You should do what will turn out best in the long run

I’ll start with this: Middle East wars will rage with or without America’s heavy presence. It’s from The Times via The Australian so take it for what it is.

As long as the West and its dwindling number of allies in the Middle East concentrated on the task of defeating the jihadist thugs of Islamic State, there was a kind of ramshackle consensus about the task in hand. Now that the so-called caliphate has been broken, all hell is breaking loose.

This is partly because of the ugly compromises needed to smash a nimble enemy such as ISIS. In Syria, America (under Barack Obama and Donald Trump) enlisted the Kurds as its janissaries, ready to risk their lives on the ground. The US did so in full knowledge that some were more than hardened soldiers.

One faction was also affiliated to the separatist Kurdistan Workers Party that has been a thorn in Turkey’s side for more than 40 years.

Look up Kurdistan Workers Party on Wikipedia and you find this.

The PKK was founded in 1978 in the village of Fis (near Lice) by a group of Kurdish students led by Abdullah Öcalan and 1979 it made its existence known to the public. The PKK’s ideology was originally a fusion of revolutionary socialism and Kurdish nationalism, seeking the foundation of an independent Communist state in the region….

The PKK is listed as a terrorist organization by several states and organizations, including the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, and the European Union.

To which I will append this.

 

From Trump: Europe Won’t Help, and We’re Not Going to Hold Thousands of ISIS Fighters at Guantanamo Bay. Watch the video and hear PDT say it himself.

“We’re not bringing 50, 60, 70 – or even 100,000 people to Guantanamo Bay in Cuba,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “We’re not going to be paying them for the next 50 years – or paying to take care of them for the next 50 years.”

He characterized the European response to Washington’s appeals as another example of allies taking advantage of the U.S., and treating it as a “sucker.”

Meanwhile, who has any idea of which side who is on or what they are fighting for or against. And same again here. Who should we support, do you think?

The Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) are dominated by fighters from the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG), whom Turkey views as terrorists because of links to the Kurdish Workers’ Party (PKK) – a radical group which Turkey, as well as the U.S. and European Union, has designated a terrorist organization.

Of course none of these countries want these jihadists back. To continue the story:

European governments have voiced reluctance to repatriate citizens who joined ISIS’ jihad. Reasons vary, but include concerns that difficulties in obtaining clear evidence of wrongdoing will see suspects dodge conviction and be released back into society.

In France, public opinion runs strongly against repatriating jihadists, although there is considerable support for allowing the French wives and children to return home.

My enemy’s enemy may sometimes be my friend, but it is always worth remembering that my enemy is still my enemy.

As for what to do, I have no idea, other than to do what will turn out best in the long run.

ADDING A LITTLE MORE: How Obama’s team set up Trump’s Syrian dilemma. From The New York Post.

“These are the people who for the last four years have been fighting on our behalf, with our equipment, to defeat ISIS,” Susan Rice [Obama’s former National Security Advisor] said. “And they have done it with enormous efficacy, and they have sacrificed immensely, and we basically just said to them, ‘See ya,’ and let the Turks, who are like the hungry wolf trying to kill the lamb, go for it.”

Over the last few days, a host of former Obama officials have been repeating this story, which is highly misleading, to say the least. Rice and her colleagues would have us believe that Team Obama created a highly effective plan for stabilizing the Middle East by working through groups like the YPG, and Trump, mercurial and impulsive, is throwing it all away by seeking a rapprochement with Ankara. That’s nonsense.

Read it all.

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44 Responses to You should do what will turn out best in the long run

  1. stackja

    Europeans created the ME mess. USA has tried to alleviate, with little success.
    As usual the MSM blame DT.

  2. Tim Neilson

    Europeans created the ME mess.

    Funny how:
    (a) a country with lots of different cultures because of the way da eeebil white colonialists drew the boundaries is a disaster area; but
    (b) a country with lots of different cultures because of enlightened progressive mass immigration policies is a utopia*.

    (*As we all know -especially a friend’s son who is a police officer stationed at Tarneit in CFMEUistan.)

  3. Hamish Marshall

    Geez Steve…”As for what to do, I have no idea, other than to do what will turn out best in the long run”
    I am not as passionate about the Trump Presidency (Supported Ted Cruz in the primaries), however I will put up with a lot and still support him to the hilt because I want western civilisation to survive. There is however a limit. This stupid, impulsive action is almost as degenerate and as ill informed as most of Obama’s disastrous foreign policy actions over 8 years. It will damage the interests of mankind and it will damage the interests of citizens of the United States. Every utterance DT has made in regard to this “initiative” has been childish and/or naïve in the extreme. It is never groovy to start a genocide Steve, and it is always immoral to assist totalitarian tyrants.

  4. Anthony

    Broadly speaking, in recent times the Kurds are the most pro-American people in the Middle East. In Northern Iraq they carved out a stable country in all but name.

    It’s true that Kurds have been on opposite sides of conflicts throughout the last century (fought on either side in WW1, the Soviets backed the PKK during the cold war). The PKK are pretty horrific, but they generally aren’t ISIS type 72 virgins when I blow up a bunch of Westerners, they are (were?) a bunch of commies who want independence from Turkey. In any event not all Kurds are the PKK. The Iraqi/Kurdish Communist parties can barely get a seat in parliament, so I wouldn’t be surprised if the communist angle is just lip service at this point.

    Like Israel, Western powers promised the Kurds a country post WW1, but have gone cold on the idea ever since. In any rational world we would treat the Kurds no differently than the Israelis and be booting the increasingly Islamofascistic Turkey out of NATO.

    That the Kurds have been solidly fighting America’s enemies for the last 15 years, if not longer – it’s pretty fucking sad (and honestly a bit bewildering) they are (probably) going to get the shaft again.

  5. Oh come on

    Hamish, perhaps it is you who is ill-informed. The US owes nothing to this group of Kurds.

  6. Oh come on

    The Kurdish insurgency in Turkey is Not. Our. Business. The PKK/YPG Kurds would love to make it our business (hence all the wailing about betrayal and whatnot), but it is not. Fact is that the US’s marginal position in Syria was untenable. A decision had to be made whether to shit or get off the pot – a choice between a long term and much larger military commitment in northern Syria, or complete withdrawal.

    Withdrawal is the obvious choice.

  7. The BigBlueCat

    Tim Neilson
    #3180429, posted on October 10, 2019 at 4:31 pm
    Europeans created the ME mess.

    Funny how:
    (a) a country with lots of different cultures because of the way da eeebil white colonialists drew the boundaries is a disaster area; but
    (b) a country with lots of different cultures because of enlightened progressive mass immigration policies is a utopia*.

    (*As we all know -especially a friend’s son who is a police officer stationed at Tarneit in CFMEUistan.)

    My son-in-law is in VicPol and is stationed at Tarneit (for his sins) …. small world! Tarneit is definitely not a utopia.

  8. I’m inclined to think that the West should not get involved in the Turkey/PKK fight, despite the fact that Erdogan is a brutal thug.

    Trump is, as usual, correct in refusing to continue finance the burden of imprisonment of the flotsam & jetsam of the Middle East – with the exception of the high ranking terrorists.

    I wouldn’t countenance the return of any of the willing participants of the IS terrorist state.

  9. Tim Neilson

    Tarneit is definitely not a utopia.

    Quite so.

  10. Speedbox

    Remember that the PKK have been a thorn in Turkey’s side for years. Further, PKK is a listed terrorist entity in most western countries (including the USA) yet Obama encouraged, and armed them, to fight IS. Whilst US troops have been involved, it is undoubted that PKK did a lot of the ‘heavy lifting’ in that part of the world.

    My reading of the various releases is that Erdogan made it clear to Trump that Turkey was going to invade Nthn Syria virtually ‘come what may’ as IS is defeated and this is an opportunity to severely wound the PKK in that area. It further seems that Trump tried to talk him out of it but despite pressure, Erdogan wouldn’t fold.

    So, what is Trump to do? He had only about 1,000 troops in the area (from combat soldiers to cooks) yet a substantial force of Turkish soldiers is on the way complete with tanks, APC’s, air support, artillery and a host of other stuff that will force the US soldiers to run, hide or fight back (even if in self-defence).

    Obviously, running away/hiding is not an image the US troops (or the US President) would like to have beamed around the world. As for fighting back (even in self defence), that is hugely problematic because the NATO Agreement prohibits NATO forces from engaging each other. If Trump ‘allowed’ his forces to be in harm’s way from a rampaging Turkey (NATO member), this is a monster issue in terms of legality.

    It seems to me that Erdogan effectively presented Trump with a fait accompli and whilst Trump can threaten economic sanctions against Turkey, there are some very large issues associated with actually following through on that – and Erdogan knows it.

    It appears that Trump didn’t really have a choice but to order a prompt withdrawal of US forces from the area.

  11. Tel

    Did Monty’s talking point memo include a rundown on how many Kurds are currently living in Turkey, and how long they have been living there?

    The PKK’s ideology was originally a fusion of revolutionary socialism and Kurdish nationalism, seeking the foundation of an independent Communist state in the region….

    Hmmm leftwing national socialism, that reminds me of someone.

  12. hzhousewife

    Did Monty’s talking point memo include a rundown on how many Kurds are currently living in Turkey, and how long they have been living there?

    Earlier this arvo I heard one commentator mention there were about 300,000 Kurds in Turkey and many have been there for greater than 5 years. Trump has withdrawn 1000 men ! Astonishing how effective they have been as peace keepers.

  13. candy

    I tend to think another Middle East war is not desirable and does a majority really want that? This business of trying to reshape Middle Eastern countries seems destined for failure.

    Iraq was bad enough, though I guess well intentioned. Maybe. But in the long run there seemed just death and destruction.

  14. A Lurker

    As for what to do, I have no idea, other than to do what will turn out best in the long run.

    Build a wall around the ME. Put up a sign stating “Here Be Dragons”. Let them slug it out. In a millennium or two when the (radioactive) dust finally settles, start sending in the traders and ambassadors.

  15. Dr Fred Lenin

    A lot of this is down to obama trying to destroy Assad who kept the lid on this craphole for years, he protctedChristians and Yazidis , obamas mob encouraged revolt against him ,the more pragmatic Russians helped him ,not just to protect their bases but to keep the place more stable, after the West destryed Saddam reducing Irak to a bloody shambles and encoraging the Iranians to be bolder ,you dont have to be an expert to work that out ,the mess was created by thevWests weakness and stupid actions .

  16. Bruce of Newcastle

    I’ll repeat what I wrote on the open thread.

    By the terms of the NATO alliance Trump cannot legally commit forces into conflict with allied Turkish forces. That has nothing to do with whether Turkey is right, wrong or whatever, it is US law ratified by the Senate.

    Thus any support of the Kurds must be provided by legal means via Congress, who so far have not bothered to do anything. Thus Trump has pulled US troops out of the conflict area.

    If he did cause, or fail to stem, conflict between US and Turkish forces he would be in breach of the law and could be impeached for that. I suspect Congress’s inaction is partly because they hope media and public pressure will lead him to do something like that, thereby giving them a real impeachment justification which they presently lack.

    The Kurds will have been told this at the time of the agreement. Again I suspect that is why they aren’t screeching too much, although I can’t fault them for being disgusted. Congresscrutters are the ones to blame. Turkey should’ve been booted from NATO a long time ago.

  17. Nob

    Iraqi Kurdistan or Kurdish Iraq or whatever is one of the better parts of the ME after Israel, Lebanon and Jordan.

    Erbil still has a “Christian quarter” with churches, bars etc and industry colleagues don’t mind moving their families to Erbil.

  18. Bosnich

    “Turkey should’ve been booted from NATO a long time ago”.
    But Turkey was a great place to have missiles threatening Russia whilst complaining about the Russians having missiles in Cuba threatening America.

  19. Bruce of Newcastle

    While I’m at it I’ll also say that this has only been a limitation regarding Turkey.

    As you may recall February last year Putin and Assad sent a supported battalion to cross the Euphrates and take control of a strategically important oil area held by the Kurds. The US and Kurds obliterated the battalion, including the Russians in it. That was legal because the Russian/Syrian force was in breach of a local agreement with the US and were not subject to legislation from Congress.

    The Mystery Of The Dead Russian Mercenaries In Syria Deepens (Mar 2018)

    So Trump has been quite happy to provide massive support to the Kurds when he has been able to. That supports my view that he legally can’t in this case.

  20. 2dogs

    The West currently has a difficult choice to make, either:

    (a) stand up to China, Russia and their Shia Muslim allies, and suppress their growing influence. This will mean we turn a blind eye to the misdeeds of the West’s Sunni “allies” such as Saudi Arabia.

    or

    (b) Join with China and Russia in a pact against all Islamic theocracies. This will stabilise the middle east, but China will become very powerful by then end of it.

  21. Old Lefty

    Kissinger summed it up perfectly when (reportedly) commenting on the Iran-Iraq war: ‘Pity they can’t both lose’.

  22. Delcon

    Hamish Marshall
    #3180439, posted on October 10, 2019 at 4:41 pm
    Geez Steve…”As for what to do, I have no idea, other than to do what will turn out best in the long run”
    I am not as passionate about the Trump Presidency (Supported Ted Cruz in the primaries), however I will put up with a lot and still support him to the hilt because I want western civilisation to survive. There is however a limit. This stupid, impulsive action is almost as degenerate and as ill informed as most of Obama’s disastrous foreign policy actions over 8 years. It will damage the interests of mankind and it will damage the interests of citizens of the United States. Every utterance DT has made in regard to this “initiative” has been childish and/or naïve in the extreme. It is never groovy to start a genocide Steve, and it is always immoral to assist totalitarian tyrants.

    I think I just found my Catallaxy soulmate. Love is in the air.
    But seriously now, the biggest atrocity in the 21st Century was the Yasidy genocide. A genocide is everyone’s business to start with. Also, what happens in the ME tends to end up being our business, as history seems to tell us.
    Obama was to blame for ISIS and its atrocities. I can’t see anything good coming out if Trump’s decision and the subsequent Turkish invasion.

  23. Hamish Marshall

    Sorry Oh Come On, you are buying the logic of Nazi Germany excusing itself for invading Czechoslavakia.
    The United States does owe the Kurds and Yazidis (of Syria) because they inflicted Barack Obama on Iraq and Syria. The near genocide wouldn’t have commenced if it hadn’t been for the duplicit absurdity of Obama’s retreat and facilitation of ISIS. The Kurds stood up and were instrumental in the defeat of ISIS, a creation in the first instance of US foreign policy. They showed a witless world how to stand up to fascism and tyranny, at massive human cost. All the while, Obama was turning a blind eye to Erdogan helping ISIS with safe passage into the war zone. The cost/benefit ratio of keeping Turkey (NATO member) out of Kurdish Syria was magnificent. Now there will be a genocidal shambles, ISIS will rise again and go from strength to strength,and no country on Earth can value a military alliance with the US with the same currency as 10 years ago. The only reason we are here today was because we stood up to tyranny in the past. It would have been a less bloody affair in the 20th century if our politicians had been smarter, but to have smart politicians, you have to have a smart polity!….did anybody go into the City today?

  24. Hamish Marshall

    Well said Delcon!

  25. Petros

    Oh ye of little faith. Have people not learnt that Trump is an excellent strategist? He is steps ahead of most other politicians, save Putin. The Kurds have probably learnt not to side with the Yanks but maybe there’s a deal underfoot. Let’s not forget the Gulenist Putsch. The US does not want Erdogan in power. My prediction is that Turkey is going to end up worse off after this. Curious to see.

  26. JohnJJJ

    The Kurds were not protecting the West, the USA or us. ISIS was their enemy. The Kurds used the West to help destroy THEIR enemy. We owe them nothing. They are not ‘our Allies’. The place reverts to the centuries old wars. We have nothing, absolutely nothing, in common with these people. Let them sort it out. We are ignorant fools when it comes to these massive tribal battles.

  27. Chris M

    M00slems killing each other!

    Unheard of! Now what can we do to help this situation?

    – Censorship, really??

  28. Aynsley Kellow

    I’m afraid I’m with Hamish and Delcon. The Kurds did the heavy lifting in defeating ISIS and this is an atrocious betrayal that will damage US credibility as a trustworthy ally. The Kurdish forces, the Peshmerga, are not the same as the PKK, and should be supported against the Islamist Erdogan, who has destroyed the legacy of Ataturk, a secular democratic Turkey.

    And Speedbox: ‘the NATO Agreement prohibits NATO forces from engaging each other.’ It cuts both ways. Having the token few US advisers embedded with the Kurds protected them from Turkish attack at next to no cost.

    History will judge Trump harshly for betraying the Kurds.

  29. John Stankevicius

    Dr Fred Lenin
    Who any why was after Assad. Why did they want to get rid of him.
    Also who and why did “they” get rid on Gaddafi.

  30. Iampeter

    I’ll start with this: Middle East wars will rage with or without America’s heavy presence.

    Yea it’s like the sun rising and setting. No need to go through icky things like getting to the fundamentals and integrating and resolving contradictions. That takes thinking skills. Too much work.

    ADDING A LITTLE MORE: How Obama’s team set up Trump’s Syrian dilemma

    Obama was awful, but Trump turning up the awful to 11 is not Obama’s fault. Trump is just the biggest sucker that’s ever occupied the Whitehouse.

  31. Oh come on
    #3180458, posted on October 10, 2019 at 5:00 pm

    The Kurdish insurgency in Turkey is Not. Our. Business.

    Good lord. Imagine starting a war with your own “ally” (Turkey).

    [Actually, war with the Saudis is plausible; but it would be bloody awful as well].

    This is not in our allies (America’s) interest, and no conceivable way is it in Australia’s interest to be involved in such a convoluted and silly crusade.

  32. Hamish Marshall
    #3180709, posted on October 10, 2019 at 8:02 pm

    Sorry Oh Come On, you are buying the logic of Nazi Germany excusing itself for invading Czechoslavakia.
    The United States does owe the Kurds and Yazidis (of Syria) because they inflicted Barack Obama on Iraq and Syria. The near genocide wouldn’t have commenced if it hadn’t been for the duplicit absurdity of Obama’s retreat and facilitation of ISIS. The Kurds stood up and were instrumental in the defeat of ISIS, a creation in the first instance of US foreign policy. They showed a witless world how to stand up to fascism and tyranny, at massive human cost. All the while, Obama was turning a blind eye to Erdogan helping ISIS with safe passage into the war zone. The cost/benefit ratio of keeping Turkey (NATO member) out of Kurdish Syria was magnificent. Now there will be a genocidal shambles, ISIS will rise again and go from strength to strength,and no country on Earth can value a military alliance with the US with the same currency as 10 years ago. The only reason we are here today was because we stood up to tyranny in the past. It would have been a less bloody affair in the 20th century if our politicians had been smarter, but to have smart politicians, you have to have a smart polity!….did anybody go into the City today?

    This is a reasonable argument. Where should the liability extend to though?

  33. Iampeter

    Kinda on this topic, there was this article in the Atlantic about generals all unloading on Trump.
    While they do a good job showing what a disaster Trump is as CiC, none of that was really surprising.
    IMO the story that everyone missed in that article are the bizarre priorities of these “combat experienced” generals.
    There seems to be zero concern with victory, crushing the enemy, or even identifying an enemy.
    Instead all these critics of Trump care about is perception from the “international community,” looking for “off-ramps” from inconclusive military conflicts, preemptive and inappropriate “diplomatic solutions” and what just seems like all out fear of war with any of America’s enemies.
    It seems when Trump cancelled the attack he ordered on Iran after the drone was downed, it wasn’t an example of his customary scatter-brain approach, he was actually talked out of it by the military.
    They seem to be terrified of a shooting war with Iran. They have no “off-ramp” for this scenario!

    I’m beginning to think that the only thing keeping the evil regimes in check the world over, is not the US military, they seem to be led by truly lost people, but just the inherent incompetence of evil.

  34. Tel

    Thus any support of the Kurds must be provided by legal means via Congress, who so far have not bothered to do anything. Thus Trump has pulled US troops out of the conflict area.

    I’m all for Constitutional governance … problem with Trump is that he selectively applies these rules when it suits him. For example, Both houses of Congress specifically declared NO WAR in Yemen and demanded Trump stop supporting any attacks on Houthi tribesmen. This was the backwards world where Congress declares the lack of war, then President vetoes that declaration. The USA continues to support the war in Yemen, despite it clearly being illegal to do so. As Trump has spelled out in simple language … he likes the money flowing in from Saudi military procurements.

    If Trump was a bit consistent he would at least open the blockade and pull back the US Navy to a defensive position, and stop offering direct support for the Saudis. I could understand there might be Constitutional grounds for impeachment over that … instead of the moronic stuff they are attempting to impeach him over his anti-corruption drive.

  35. Tel

    All the while, Obama was turning a blind eye to Erdogan helping ISIS with safe passage into the war zone.

    There was also that business of the oil shipments going from Northern Syria out to market via Turkey, presumably providing revenue for the Islamic State. Hey, soon Erdogan will have the same oil without needing to pay any middle-men. See? ISIS problem now solved!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_production_and_smuggling_in_ISIL

    Not only Turkey doing it … but first target of the Russian bombers was the oil conveys which very quickly put and end to ISIS money raising efforts. That was really the turning point of the Syrian war. The Americans could have easily done the same thing four years earlier if they were interested enough.

  36. Crazyoldranga

    It’s interesting that everyone seems to think that Turkey will walk all over the Kurds and destroy them. The Turks haven’t seen serious action for a LONG time, whilst the Kurds are still mopping up ISIS remnants. I expect to see the Turkish military embarrassed and take heavy losses as their invasion of a Sovereign country falls in a big heap. Yes, they are invading Syria. Where’s the outcry?

  37. Iampeter
    #3181183, posted on October 11, 2019 at 8:47 am

    Kinda on this topic, there was this article in the Atlantic about generals all unloading on Trump.
    While they do a good job showing what a disaster Trump is as CiC, none of that was really surprising.
    IMO the story that everyone missed in that article are the bizarre priorities of these “combat experienced” generals.

    I don’t buy this shit at all. Clapper is corrupt as all hell and just wants a Democrat sinecure.

    Obama could have bombed the shit out of ISIS divisions in open battlefield environments, but chose not to, but rather wanted the Kurds to fight on the ground for him.

    I bet not one USAF General or USN Admiral who served in the air wing were interviewed.

  38. Crazyoldranga
    #3181235, posted on October 11, 2019 at 9:30 am

    It’s interesting that everyone seems to think that Turkey will walk all over the Kurds and destroy them. The Turks haven’t seen serious action for a LONG time, whilst the Kurds are still mopping up ISIS remnants. I expect to see the Turkish military embarrassed and take heavy losses as their invasion of a Sovereign country falls in a big heap. Yes, they are invading Syria. Where’s the outcry?

    For a bit.

    Turkey are armed much like the US. After the initial losses, you have a large army and air force with F-16s and M60 & Leopard 2 tanks.

    Well trained infantry don’t stand a chance in the long run. FLIR and fire and forget missiles are superior technology. As are decent stand-in artillery with good fire control systems.

  39. BorisG

    And Speedbox: ‘the NATO Agreement prohibits NATO forces from engaging each other.’ It cuts both ways. Having the token few US advisers embedded with the Kurds protected them from Turkish attack at next to no cost.

    Exactly. It is not like US troops were fighting daily and sustaining losses. Erdogan won’t lift a finger as long as Americans wear there. Just remember what happened when they shot down a Russian airplane. They know what will happen if they (or their proxies) harm a single US soldier.

    Of course the Turkish forces are vastly superior to the US and Kurd combined, but no one threatened them as long Americans were there.

    And if trump was stubborn to bring last troops home, he should have at least used other means to prevent Turkish invasion. Threaten sanctions or whatever.

  40. BorisG

    And I am no fan of PKK but erdogan is now driving out Kurdish civilians to clear land to send back Syrian refugeeas (sunnies).

    Let’s not forget that erdogan helped create ISIS in the first place. Why give him crate Blanche again?

  41. Delcon

    BorisG
    #3181311, posted on October 11, 2019 at 11:06 am

    … Erdogan won’t lift a finger as long as Americans wear there. ”
    Exactly. Not everyone understand that it doesn’t matter how few American troops were there, no country (as opposed to terrorist organisations) in the world is crazy enough to attack American troops.

  42. classical_hero

    The PKK trained Antifa to fight. They are Communist scum. President Obama picked a bad side and it’s all on him.

  43. No one taught Antifa to fight…they’re useless, utterly weak and uncoordinated, limp dick cowards that beat up old ladies, using bike locks and chains.

    Okay, excuse my shock and scepticism. If that’s the case, I expect the PPK will go down like a flaming sack of shit on a LNG ship.

  44. Zatara

    Both houses of Congress specifically declared NO WAR in Yemen and demanded Trump stop supporting any attacks on Houthi tribesmen.

    No. What the Resolution said was:

    “Pursuant to section 5(c) of the War Powers Resolution (50 U.S.C. 1544(c)), Congress hereby directs the President to remove United States Armed Forces from hostilities in the Republic of Yemen, except United States Armed Forces engaged in operations directed at Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula or associated forces, by not later than the date that is 30 days after the date of the adoption of this concurrent resolution (unless the President requests and the Congress authorizes a later date), and unless and until a declaration of war or specific authorization for such use of United States Armed Forces has been enacted.”

    That’s it. Not a mention of the words ‘Houthi’ or ‘support’ anywhere in there. Just no US forces to engage in hostilities in Yemen.

    Yes, Saudi is fighting the Houthis in Yemen. Yes, Saudi continues to buy armaments from the US, as they do from the UK, Canada, France, Spain, Italy, China, and South Africa among others.

    So are all of those countries “supporting the war in Yemen”? Or is it just Trump?

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