Open Forum: October 12, 2019

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2,125 Responses to Open Forum: October 12, 2019

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  1. mh

    Trump has gone too far this time

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    ·
    1h
    Vote for good guy
    @seanspicer
    tonight on Dancing With The Stars. He has always been there for us!

  2. johanna

    🙂 mh. The man has a great sense of humour, something which pompous asses always find to be inappropriate in senior politicians.

    I saw a picture of Spicer where he was wearing a lime green frilly shirt such as I have not seen since the 1970s for one of his dances. He obviously has a sense of humour too.

    I think that ordinary Americans are relieved and pleased to know that their President is not obsessed 24/7 with the woes of his office, and likes to keep up with the current events that they follow, like DWTS.

  3. Hazmatic

    I’m interested in your post of a few days ago, where you commented that the Regimental Sergeant Major of 7RAR was one Reg Bandy ( I have heard of him). All any National Serviceman, who did not want to go to the “fun factory” had to do was have the bottle to get himself paraded, and put his case?

    Most likely.

    Like a digger will come up, one digger came to me one day and he rushed in and knocked on the door and he said, “Can I….” because the CO said, “If any digger’s in trouble see the RSM.” and he knocked on my door and he said, “Can I see you Sir?” and I said, “Yeah what’s the trouble?” and he walked in and he said, “I’ll be frank Sir. My girlfriend’s pregnant.” and I said, “Well what the hell do you want me to do about it?” and he said, “I don’t know. I want some advice.” and I said, “What’s your girlfriend think of it?” “She wants to get married.” and I said, “Well give us her phone number, there you are – dial her number.” So he dialled this girlfriend and he said, “The RSM wants to talk to you.” and I said, “Yeah listen, I’m such and such and I’ve got your boyfriend here. He’s told me the story, you want to get married?” “Sure yeah.” I said, “What’s your mother think about it?” and she said, “I’ll put her on.” so I said to her, “What do you think about it mum – is your daughter getting married?” she said, “They can’t get married, they’ve got no money.” I said, “Don’t worry about it, I’ll get the padre to marry them,” – the army padre marries them in the church for nothing – and I said, “We’ll put on a” – we have regimental funds in the battalion, we had nearly 28,000 I think in the funds and that’s for different things, to help diggers and their families – so I said, “Right, we’ll put on a breakfast for twenty people so don’t invite any more.” So, “That’ll be fine.” she said so boom! In a week he’s married. So mum and dad were extremely happy because you know, and so was she because no-one knew at that stage, only the two of them, and things like that and of course Mum said, “Well, I don’t know where they’re going to live.” so I knew an estate agent in Liverpool and I rang him up and I said, “I want a one bedroom unit in pretty good order.” and he said, “I’ll see what I can do.” and he rang me back about three days later and said, “I’ve got a good one.” So I paid a month’s rent from the regimental funds and said to the digger, “Now, you’ve paid a month’s rent, you get your arse into gear and get it fixed up.” and as far as I know they’re still married. So you know, you’ve got to help diggers. And that’s what they don’t understand now. And as RSM you’ve got direct contact with the CO, you can do anything you know. And I’d write a leave pass and sign it for him, the CO had to sign leave passes to go out of New South Wales but I could sign them for him and he knew.

  4. classical_hero

    Look at all the drunkards populating this thread, Arky should have a word with you lot.

  5. classical_hero

    I like how the article on the mangroves mentioned that sea levels dropped as a result of the wind direction. But blame climate change.

  6. classical_hero

    BoN, perhaps the temperature record is complete bullshit? They are just making it up for the data to fit the theory.

  7. classical_hero

    Where’s everybody? Do I smell?

  8. classical_hero

    It’s not that late out west.

  9. classical_hero

    Can’t wait for #cnnleaks.

  10. Steve trickler

    This is part 4. Easy to find 1, 2 and 3.

    Catching up now on this blokes series.



  11. johanna

    I’m here, hero. Just doing stuff on other tabs.

    Still trying to work out if JC’s revelations about various spooks visiting Australia are true. Did they go to Adelaide?

    It does seem more and more likely that sections of the international Spookocracy sought to intervene in the 2016 election and subsequently. Note that AG Barr, a tough cookie, has been globetrotting recently trying to get to the bottom of it. Of course, nobody is going to fess up, but there are many ways of putting pressure on, like being less responsive to requests for assistance, as an example.

    Trump is tweeting about Dancing With The Stars, but his enemies would be very mistaken to regard that as a sign that he has taken his eye off the ball.

  12. Snoopy

    #3184530, posted on October 15, 2019 at 1:20 am
    WTF?

    James Comey and Mifsud were in Australia the second week in March 2016 only a few days before your arranged meeting with Misfud in Rome! Clapper was in Australia 2 weeks later.

    Mifsud was not just in Australia, he was in Adelaide. Dolly Downer’s home town.

    No wonder Trump’s election caught Turnbull and Bishop wrongfooted. They had been assured by Obama’s top intelligence men it was never going to happen.

  13. Snoopy

    More than assured, it seems likely Turnbull and Bishop were invited to ASSIST in ensuring Trump wouldn’t be elected. How could those two narcissistic scumbags pass that up?

  14. johanna

    Snoopy, how do you know he was in Adelaide?

    As for using clods like Downer, it reminds me of Karla using Kirov. A dope. Someone who wouldn’t have passed Sarrat. But, Karla was desperate, and couldn’t use the usual channels.

    Institutions and their names change, but human nature doesn’t. Not that I think there is a Karla at work here, necessarily. Quite likely it is a loose coalition of people who wanted Hillary, who was bought and paid for. Or who feared that Trump would find out what they were up to. There are many possible permutations.

    I don’t suppose that we will ever hear about the details, but it is clear that the political class in Australia were opposed to Trump from Day 1. They may well have sicced our intelligence agencies on to him. Liberals like Downer and Bishop loathe him.

    There is a faint ray of hope in that Morrison has no such reservations, but we do have our own Deep State.

  15. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    There is a faint ray of hope in that Morrison has no such reservations

    Haha hehe hoho, chortle, snicker.

  16. Tom

    A.F. Branco on the impeachment kangaroo court.

  17. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Thanks Rom.
    Yet again, one of the highlights of my day.

  18. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Tom

  19. classical_hero

    The NBA is giving cartoonists plenty of work.

  20. classical_hero

    ABC in America got caught airing fake footage from Syria. Oh dear me.

  21. areff

    Elsie, scourge of rodents, brought me a rat this morning. Unfortunately it was still alive when she began dancing on the bed’s end to wake me up and demonstrate what a smart cat she is. Unfortunately the rat then got loose and chaos ensued until she caught it again by the closet. It has now gone to Rat Heaven via a single-use plastic bag in the rubbish bin. Elsie is sleeping and I’m wide awake far too early.

    Now looking at Elsie snoring by the keyboard and thinking ‘Hmmm, the makings there of white-fur collar and cuffs’

  22. bespoke

    Don’t be silly Lizzie owe disagreements are seen by me are short term and without malice . Connecting them with your symbiotic relationship with johanna only hillites the over egging you do sometimes makes things worse.

    Newbe

    No, but irrelevant if it were.

  23. areff

    For what it’s worth, Clapper addressed the National Press Club on June 8, 2017, when he had a nice little earner going as a visiting fellow at ANU.

    After the Mueller non-scandal report, the way Clapper gingered up the local hacks about Wussia! Wussia! Wussia! makes interesting reading:

    https://www.anu.edu.au/news/all-news/speech-professor-james-clapper-ao-address-to-the-national-press-club

    Then President-elect Trump disparaged the Intelligence Community’s high-confidence assessment of the magnitude and diversity of the Russian interference by characterizing us as “Nazis”. This was prompted by his and his team’s extreme paranoia about, and resentment of, any doubt cast on the legitimacy of his election. When he made this absurd allegation, I felt an obligation to defend the men and women of the United States intelligence community, so I called him on 11 January. Surprisingly, he took my call. I tried, naively it turned out, to appeal to his “higher instincts” – by pointing out that the intelligence community he was about to inherit is a national treasure, and that the people in it were committed to supporting him and making him successful. Ever transactional, he simply asked me to publicly refute the infamous “dossier”, which I could not and would not do.

    That wasn’t his only bid to pump the Wussia wagon.

  24. Mater

    Just reading last nights conversation about the B52s.

    I had a B52 turn up to support me for a particular operation in Afghanistan. Obviously it depends on the anti-aircraft situation, but at that point in time, they tended to do overwatch. That is, they just hung around doing wagon wheels in the upper atmosphere for the duration of the operation, and dropped only as requested or necessary.
    I’d just jump on the radio, give them a ten figure grid reference, they’d feed it into a JDAM, and then release a single bomb. Problem solved.
    Very precise (with the exception of the odd rogue bomb) and they only dropped what was required to deal with the particular issue.
    A far cry from the days of carpet bombing and a great support for ground troops when the air threat is limited/non existent.

  25. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Ever transactional, he simply asked me to publicly refute the infamous “dossier”, which I could not and would not do.

    that would be like disowning your own child

  26. Delcon

    Operation “Trumps Bends Over and Erdogan Does the Rest” update:
    1.

    At least 60 civilians have been killed in the first five days of the Turkish onslaught on north­eastern Syria.

    2.

    Foreign journalists were among dozens killed and injured in a Turkish airstrike on a convoy near Ras al-Ain in northern Syria on Sunday, while a prominent Kurd politician was pulled out of her car and executed on Saturday.

    3.

    US Secretary of Defence Mark Esper described the brutal and increasingly chaotic situation on the ground as “very untenable’’ as he announced the US would withdraw its 1000 troops from northern Syria. The move means US military was unable to transfer 60 “high value” ISIS terrorists out of Kurdish run prisons, according to the New York Times.

    4.

    Nearly 800 ISIS supporters and families escaped on Sunday from the Kurdish-protected Ain Issa camp after shelling by the Turkish army triggered an uprising in which they attacked their guards and stormed the gates.

    5.

    In a televised address, Mr Erdogan rebuffed their [Western leaders’] pleas, dismissing the threat of sanctions and embargoes on weapons sales. “Those who think they can make Turkey turn back with these threats are gravely mistaken,’’ he said.

    Yep, sounds like Trump knew what he was doing.

  27. P

    Snowy Hydro 2.0 a costly white elephant that won’t deliver, says energy expert

    The promised Snowy Hydro 2.0 project will be an expensive white elephant according to a leading energy expert.

    “Here is a project that is likely to cost five times more than the then prime minister [Malcolm Turnbull] said it would, and whose capability is nowhere near what has been claimed of it,” the director of the Victorian Energy Policy Centre, Bruce Mountain, told 7.30.

    “This is a project that we can confidently forecast will be a drain on the public purse and whose service in the transition to a cleaner energy future can be met far more cheaply from other sources.

  28. Notafan

    Mater

    Must have been a great comfort to be able to do that.

    Sort of thing Waleed would gnash his teeth about and cry unfair.

  29. MatrixTransform

    Yep, sounds like Trump knew what he was doing.

    ad hoc propter hoc

  30. Mater

    It was in that particular instance, Nota.

  31. MatrixTransform

    had another coffee this morning and it turns out that now I have to go to work.

    using the Delcon approach I have finally figured out that coffee causes work.

    damn, who knew

  32. Notafan

    50 troops tis a very thin red line.

    First of all there is and always has been a lot of false reporting coming out of Syria.

    As for breathlessly reporting ‘civilian ‘ deaths. Most of the time these are reclassified combatant casualties.

    Trump Trump something Trump.

  33. calli

    In the wake of Tom’s toons.

    An interesting take on comedy by an Irishman.

    Yes, people are sick of it, but not for the reason he claims. Naturally, our home-grown FunDauber doesn’t get it.

  34. Bruce of Newcastle

    Apparently the network that had Avenatti on 121 times is biased against Trump.

    Project Veritas’ alleged CNN whistleblower claims network is ‘pumping out propaganda’

    Undercover recordings made by an alleged ‘whistleblower’ capture CNN employees casually confirming the network’s anti-Trump bias and show company president Jeff Zucker telling top news executives to focus solely on impeachment even at the expense of other important news, according to the conservative activist group that posted the bombshell footage online.

    Ok, it’s nice to have verbal confirmation from Zuckerberg himself. Yes. I wonder if airports will now be allowed to turn this drivel off?

  35. Notafan

    Some people in northern Syria are pleased to see assad troops.

    Crocodile tears from aussie jihadi wives.

    I’m not surprised that assad has executed war criminals

    Anyhow assad bad.

    waah wash sisters

  36. Bruce of Newcastle

    Oops that should’ve been Zucker not Zuckerberg. Facechook is better than CNN it must be said, like herpes is better than syphilis.

  37. Notafan

    Dylan Moran worked with Gary Linehan who is in trouble with the pc crowd over the tranny episodes in it crowd.

    Pleasing PCWorld is a minefield.

    Dylan wants the publicity, at least at the end he indicated a don’t give a attitude.

    Bottom line

    It’s boring

  38. Notafan

    ABC happily sharing jiadi bride propaganda from Northern Syria
    Some people pleased assad troops arrived.

    Kurd rule has no legitimacy, something missed by some people

    waah waah sisters

  39. Notafan

    Oh and if sister Abbas has visited camps several times already why hasn’t she taken baby nieces and nephews out?

  40. calli

    I have close to zero sympathy for these jihadi “brides”.

    They were quite happy to zip over to the ME to provide sexual services to evil mongrels who were r aping and killing other women and their children and taking over their homes. No problems with death and evil when it’s happening to someone else and you can personally reap the profits. They thought they’d backed the “strong horse” after all.

    Now the tables are turned. Apparently they were tricked or summink. Yeah, right.

    As my dear old mum taught me – you make your bed, you lie in it.

  41. calli

    That’s odd. I’m in moderation. There must be a new BirdWord in the lexicon.

  42. Geriatric Mayfly

    “Until now Australia hasn’t done anything for us,” sobs one young mother of two children. She’s among more than 60 Australian women and children living in the vast al-Hawl camp for relatives of Islamic State members.

    One may well ask what have you ever done for Australia?

  43. calli

    Ahhhh. It’s a GoodesWord.

    Try again. Apologies for the repeat.

    …..

    I have close to zero sympathy for these jihadi “brides”.

    They were quite happy to zip over to the ME to provide sexual services to evil mongrels who were ra ping and killing other women and their children and taking over their homes. No problems with death and evil when it’s happening to someone else and you can personally reap the profits. They thought they’d backed the “strong horse” after all.

    Now the tables are turned. Apparently they were tricked or summink. Yeah, right.

    As my dear old mum taught me – you make your bed, you lie in it.

  44. Top Ender

    Mater, your post reminds me we had two F-16s on call over Baghdad when I was there in ’06.

    They used to sit up around 30,000 feet and orbit – just do big racetracks in the sky. USAF kept two flying 24 hours a day.

    If someone got in a jam they could be whistled up to do ground strikes. Saw them in operation a few times, and glad not to be on the receiving end. From memory they had Hellfires and a few other bits of ordnance, plus their own guns.

  45. calli

    That’s it. I give up. Time to get on with something productive.

  46. Tel

    The move means US military was unable to transfer 60 “high value” ISIS terrorists out of Kurdish run prisons, according to the New York Times.

    Those useless buggers have been told about this since 2016, and told in much clearer terms since 2018. If they haven’t made such simple preparations by now it can only be because they figured they would get away with deliberately disobeying their commander in chief.

  47. Geriatric Mayfly

    “Until now Australia hasn’t done anything for us,” sobs one young mother of two children. She’s among more than 60 Australian women and children living in the vast al-Hawl camp for relatives of Is#l#mic State members.

    One may well ask what have you ever done for Australia?

  48. Top Ender

    David Eastman case: bumbling and biased experts put an innocent man in prison
    CHRIS MERRITT

    David Eastman’s $7m compensation payout for wrongful ­imprisonment, awarded on Monday, is the direct result of bumbling and misconduct ­inside the ACT criminal justice system that left an innocent man in prison for 19 years.

    This affair started when an unknown person shot and killed Colin Winchester, assistant commissioner of the Australian Federal Police, on January 10, 1989. He died outside his home after suffering two gunshot wounds to the head while getting out of his car.

    Winchester had refused to ­intervene to have assault charges against Eastman withdrawn so he could rejoin the public service. Suspicions have emerged that Winchester might have been the victim of a mafia hit.

    Eastman was convicted and sentenced to life in prison after many key people in the affair — including Eastman — conducted themselves in a manner that, in retrospect, made a miscarriage of justice almost ­inevitable.

    At the time of his trial, Eastman was suffering from a paranoid personality disorder that manifested itself in abuse of the judge, the repeated dismissal and rehiring of his legal team and a refusal to cross-examine one of the key prosecution witnesses. “You would not know the law from a bull’s foot. You are a silly old man, and a rather nasty old man as well,” Eastman told the trial judge before adding that he was also “a corrupt shit”.

    Eastman, a former Treasury official, did himself no favours, but the reason the ACT government is now required to give him $7m is because crucial parts of the territory’s criminal justice system ­botched this prosecution.

    Eastman, now 74, will receive $368,421 for each year he spent behind bars — a period that amounts to a quarter of his lifetime.

    This might even understate the financial pain this affair has caused for the ACT government. When all costs associated with this case are included, the territory’s total bill could be closer to $20m.

    Legal academic David Hamer of Sydney University has studied what went wrong with this case and he wrote four years ago in the Flinders Law Journal that the total cost of the case at that point had been reported to be about $12m.

    Hamer wrote that the Eastman conviction highlighted the familiar weaknesses in investigation and prosecution that can bring about miscarriages of justice: “police misconduct, biased experts, prosecution non-disclosure, weak eyewitnesses”.

    After examining records of this case, and the findings from the second judicial inquiry, Hamer identified a series of failings in the criminal justice system.

    These are outlined in the report of the second inquiry into this ­affair, which was conducted by Brian Martin, a former chief justice of the Northern Territory. They include:

    • The police harassed Eastman for years in an attempt to provoke a man they knew had a long-term paranoid personality disorder. The Martin inquiry found police had engaged in unlawful conduct.

    • Police and prosecutors had relied on a forensic expert, Robert Barnes, whose evidence, according to Hamer, “unravelled” at the Martin inquiry. Serious problems were revealed with his methodology. He lacked objectivity and independence. Monday’s ruling says Martin’s findings “plainly showed that the evidence of Mr Barnes had so undermined the trial ‘that no conviction could possibly be based upon it’.”

    • The inquiry found the police and prosecutors had seen warning signs that there were problems with Barnes’s forensic evidence yet they failed to disclose those doubts. This, according to Martin, had a serious impact.

    When an inquiry was finally held, Hamer writes that the Director of Public Prosecutions of the ACT tried to ensure the problems with the forensic evidence would never be examined.

    His assessment on this point is in line with that of veteran journalist Jack Waterford.

    In 2014, Waterford wrote in The Canberra Times that the second inquiry had proceeded “with minimal help from police or the prosecution system, which spent millions attempting to prevent it happening or to rein it in”.

    Martin’s report, which covers 452 pages, says Eastman did not receive a fair trial, was denied a fair chance of acquittal and was the victim of a substantial miscarriage of justice. “The issue of guilt was determined on the basis of deeply flawed forensic evidence in circumstances where the applicant was denied procedural fairness in respect of a fundamental feature of the trial process concerned with disclosure by the prosecution of all relevant material,” he wrote.

    While Martin was convinced the criminal justice system had misfired, he was not convinced Eastman was innocent. He wrote: “I am fairly certain that the applicant is guilty of the murder of the deceased, but a nagging doubt ­remains.

    “Regardless of my opinion as to the applicant’s guilt, in my view the substantial miscarriage of justice suffered by the applicant should not be allowed to stand ­uncorrected.”

    Martin had wanted Eastman pardoned. Instead, he was acquitted unanimously on retrial.

    CHRIS MERRITT
    LEGAL AFFAIRS EDITOR
    .
    Oz today – complete article no comments allowed

  49. Knuckle Dragger

    I see Montydelgrig’s been up all night burning pixels by writing complaint letters to the relevant authority, ie the UN.

    So who executed the ladeee Kurd politician? Turkish special forces who HALO’d in the night before, no doubt. Just like at the films.

    Any ‘high value’ (according to the NYT, big AOC fans and laughing stock of the world press) prisoner wouldn’t be just across the border from Turkey for a start. Plus, the NYT definition of a ‘high value’ prisoner is one who has all ten fingers.

    And DJT’s announced an economic sanction regime against Erdogan. The initial startup of which will cost Johnny Turk $100 billion.

    The Imagined Conversations 2019 file’s going to run out of terabytes.

  50. Notafan

    No such thing as a high value is terrorist anyhow

  51. Its Remarkable

    Just listened (painfully) to Alan Jones haranguing the PM about support for farmers in drought. Painful in the extent of lack of knowledge (Jones, not Morrison), agrarian socialism-driven calls for ‘give them cash, get in the army’, etc.
    So, what we are hearing here are calls for:
    1. Direct cash handouts to all farmers, no matter who, where, in what circumstances, regardless of their financial situation, size, enterprise mix, actual impact of the drought on them, whether corporate or family farms, cropping or livestock producers (dairy seems particularly important, so they are at the front of the queue).
    2. Direct support for rural communities as well – much the same: just give them money.

    This is socialism, effectively nationalisation of agriculture, but only while a drought is on. Once it rains again, then all returns will be retained by the farmers, we will have all forgotten the taxpayer largesse, the need for putting fodder and cash away for dry times, careful farm and cash management, etc.

    Then we have a stream of ‘farmers’ phoning in crying about how terrible this all is, having to sell stock, etc

    Since when did ‘farmers’ become such a protected species, almost royalty here that must be supported by the rest at all costs, since they are ‘farmers’.

    And Jones is meant to be a ‘conservative’. The delusion is breathtaking.

  52. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘What have the Australians ever done for us?,’ said the IZIS brides.

    Well, the roads. Aqueducts.
    Comparatively few honour killings.
    The orchards. The ability to drive in the country, even with a bag on your bonce to hide your monobrows.
    And the welfare. Alllll that welfare.
    Plus, bonus chances to defraud the NDIS and childcare schemes.

    Absolutely nothing!

  53. Tel

    The police harassed Eastman for years in an attempt to provoke a man they knew had a long-term paranoid personality disorder. The Martin inquiry found police had engaged in unlawful conduct.

    If he was harassed for years, by people who are in positions of power and responsibility, and then he got angry about it, that’s not paranoia … nor is it any kind of disorder.

    At the time of his trial, Eastman was suffering from a paranoid personality disorder that manifested itself in abuse of the judge, the repeated dismissal and rehiring of his legal team and a refusal to cross-examine one of the key prosecution witnesses. “You would not know the law from a bull’s foot. You are a silly old man, and a rather nasty old man as well,” Eastman told the trial judge before adding that he was also “a corrupt shit”.

    That’s not paranoid either, that’s called “blurting out truth when it might be a good time to shut up personality disorder” which is quite unrelated.

  54. mc

    ‘What have the Australians ever done for us?,’ said the IZIS brides.

    Well, the roads. Aqueducts.
    Comparatively few honour killings.
    The orchards. The ability to drive in the country, even with a bag on your bonce to hide your monobrows.
    And the welfare. Alllll that welfare.
    Plus, bonus chances to defraud the NDIS and childcare schemes.

    Absolutely nothing!

    Nice one Centurion

  55. Bruce of Newcastle

    We are not amused.

    Queen looked ‘bloody furious’ during her speech to Parliament – ‘The Queen is raging!’

    QUEEN ELIZABETH II looked “bloody furious” while delivering her 65th Queen’s speech, Twitter users have claimed.

    The speech, which sets out the Government’s agenda for the next months, took place in Parliament this morning. Newsnight presenter Emily Maitlis sparked a heated conversation on Twitter when she said the Queen looked “furious”. She said: “Im sure she’s not. But she looks furious. #QueensSpeech”

    She sure looks annoyed. Which is quite reasonable given her life of service to these feckless pollies.

  56. Mother Lode

    Surprisingly, he took my call. I tried, naively it turned out, to appeal to his “higher instincts” – by pointing out that the intelligence community he was about to inherit is a national treasure, and that the people in it were committed to supporting him and making him successful.

    I personally have here repeatedly pointed out that pineapple on pizza is horrible.

    It seems the idiot doesn’t realise that ‘pointing out’ is what you do with established and incontrovertible facts.

  57. Mother Lode

    Delcon
    #3184582, posted on October 15, 2019 at 7:12 am
    Operation “Trumps Bends Over and Erdogan Does the Rest” update

    Why don’t you bring up a picture of a doll and show us where the Orange Man hurt you.

  58. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Since when did ‘farmers’ become such a protected species, almost royalty here that must be supported by the rest at all costs, since they are ‘farmers’.’

    Clueless. Utterly clueless.

    Love the way, in particular, farmers are described by Its Retarded as ‘farmers’, as though they’re not real farmers. They’re just guys who live in the scrub, and just want the Axminster replaced for free.

    You might change your tune at bit when your special organic eight seed loaf of bread starts slugging you $25 a loaf. But that would be Coles’ fault, because clearly you hold the view that food comes from the shop.

    The difference between more recent droughts and the older, longer ones is not climate change. It is the ability of the people in this country to temporarily assist primary producers so that food prices in general* are among the lowest in the Western world. In previous years the farmers just died on their farms. They couldn’t make the requests they’re making now, and no-one in the city streets had vision of the conditions in different postcodes.

    Get some red dirt on your pointy leather shoes IR. Know of what you speak before you speak it.

  59. bespoke

    I personally have here repeatedly pointed out that pineapple on pizza is horrible.

    Wrong so very wrong but no one is perfect.

  60. Knuckle Dragger

    *Except lamb. Overpriced. Love the cutlets, though.

  61. Tel

    1. Direct cash handouts to all farmers, no matter who, where, in what circumstances, regardless of their financial situation, size, enterprise mix, actual impact of the drought on them, whether corporate or family farms, cropping or livestock producers (dairy seems particularly important, so they are at the front of the queue).

    I’m calling for direct land handouts to all computer dudes, no matter who, where, in what circumstances, regardless of their financial situation, size, enterprise mix, actual impact of the drought on them. Clearly the farmers have way more land than they know what to do with, just the same way I have cash that they feel the need to get hold of.

  62. Tel

    Get some red dirt on your pointy leather shoes IR. Know of what you speak before you speak it.

    Great idea! I don’t want to have to pay for that dirt though, it should rightly be given to me by farmers who can’t farm.

  63. Percy Popinjay

    Snowy Hydro 2.0 a costly white elephant that won’t deliver.
    … found Michael Jackson to be “genuinely mentally ill” and “a disturbing person to be around”

    Cap’n Obvious has started his rounds early today.

  64. struth

    Good Moaning.

    I am very shitty this morning.

    A screaming gaggle of crows woke me up early and bloody Trump doesn’t intend to do anything about it.

    I suppose I’ll have to wipe my own arse again this morning , now the coffee’s done it’s trick.
    Bloody Trump.

  65. lotocoti

    It’s become a thing to claim Churchill was a genocidal racist for doing too little, too late, during the Bengal famine of 1943.
    You’re not supposed to ask who had surplus food stocks, rice in particular, ready to go.
    Nor, more importantly, the spare hulls available to ship the stuff.
    Which all came to mind this morning, as AJ whipped his listeners into a hysterical frenzy because ScoMo hadn’t flooded the nation’s highways with silage loaded Army trucks.

  66. Knuckle Dragger

    Actually, on food-related matters:

    I have noticed in the past several weeks, when opening my customary couple of tubs of yoghurt (I must reiterate at this point that I am robustly heterosexual) that the level of said yoghurt in the tub is a good 10mm lower than it was previously.

    Clearly, this is a scam akin to the great Smiths Chips travesty of 1995.

    Something must be done. By someone. Preferably someone else.

  67. bespoke

    You want to help farmers send your own cash or spend time in the local economy. If not fight against the administrate state that is the real culprit at least.

  68. mh

    Syria update:

    No Americans killed.

  69. Knuckle Dragger

    Churchill. The selfish bastard.

    It’s not as though he had anything else to do in 1943, except swan about in London. ‘Ooooh, look at me, I’m a descendant of the Duke of Marlborough and Cromwell.’

    He could have done something. For the children.

    I know for a fact* that Gandhi rang him up and said to get his troops out of Burma and over to Bengal with trucks full of pomegranates. Churchill told him to piss off, and said the trucks were busy on the Beluga route from Goa to Buckingham Palace.

    *Individual interpretations may vary.

  70. Mother Lode

    Syria update:

    No Americans killed.

    What the hell does Trump think he is doing!

  71. bespoke

    No Americans killed.

    How dare you!!!!!!!!!!!!

  72. stackja

    Why are there so many ‘public servants’ in the agricultural industries?
    The 1900 drought probably had few ‘public servants’ in the agricultural industries. No Canberra!
    Why in 2019 are urban ‘public servants’ ruling water and soil policies?
    And of course, Tim Flannery!

  73. Its Remarkable

    And have we not been told for some years now that ‘farming is a business, they are all professionals, skilled managers of the business and their assets’

  74. mh

    What the hell does Trump think he is doing!

    I know, it’s shocking.

    A geopolitical tussle between Russian and Turkey in Syria requires American blood to be spilt.

  75. Knuckle Dragger

    The return on investment, bespoke, is that you’ll be able to go to the supermarket and buy stuff to eat instead of winning the battle with several camp dogs over dug-up human leg bones, as they do in Ali Curung.

  76. stackja

    Lengthy blackouts could cause NT deaths, health experts warn

    THE lives of vulnerable Territorians could be at risk if lengthy blackouts persist this summer, a leading health expert has warned
    NATASHA EMECK, NT News
    Subscriber only

    October 15, 2019 12:00am

    THE lives of vulnerable Territorians could be at risk if lengthy blackouts persist in Alice Springs this summer, a leading health expert has warned.

    Alice Springs and surrounding regions were thrown into chaos on Sunday with power going out for up to nine hours in town, leaving residents in the dark from 2.26pm until 10.47pm while temperatures hit up to 39 degrees.

    The outage knocked out traffic lights and forced businesses to close and throw out shelves of spoiled refrigerated food.

    Australian Medical Association NT president Dr Rob Parker said the blackout could have put lives at risk.

    Renewables, Energy and Essential Services Minister Dale Wakefield said an investigation into the cause of the network outage was underway.

    In a statement Power and Water said the blackout was a result of a “generation issue”.

  77. Tel

    You want to help farmers send your own cash or spend time in the local economy. If not fight against the administrate state that is the real culprit at least.

    I’m happy to support the rights of farmers to build dams on their land, with their own money, or to get together and chip on jointly for whatever water storage projects they think will be useful. Government should only help out by doing a bit of the survey work, to establish what is being built, and then issuing a permit to say, “Yes you can build it”.

    I’m also in support of farmers who complain there’s too much red and green tape, but they need to support the same for other people as well because this crap has gotten into everything, not just farming.

  78. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘And have we not been told for some years now that ‘farming is a business, they are all professionals, skilled managers of the business and their assets’’

    I’m not sure who told you that, Its Retarded, but it’s true. Farming is a business. And during better years they do sock any profit they make away to guard against poor years. The problem is, as any business bloke/chicky will tell you, that if you have poor years for seven to ten years in a row, the excess fat dries off after two – and any other business other than farming would just close because there’s plenty of other people who can do the same job for less.

    All farmers are in hock up to their eyeballs, unless your name’s Sidney Kidman. Machinery is hideously expensive – up to half a mill for basic harvesting equipment, aside from alllll the other shit you need. Not want, need.

    I will say though, that if the gummint’s going to give the cockies a chop out it shouldn’t be additional funding. It should be cut immediately from foreign aid and the entire arts and associated grants budget.

    In the interests of priorities.

  79. Top Ender

    Cheap shot! Like to see him/her/it give it a go in the mendicant state’s less salubrious areas:

    An anti-smoking officer will be employed by Hobart City Council to stop people smoking in designated smoke-free areas throughout the city.

    The Hobart CBD is on-track to become fully smoke-free by April 2020, with three new parks added to the list of banned areas today.

    The new areas are at Franklin Square, the University Rose Gardens and Legacy Park near the athletic centre.

    The anti-smoking officer will enforce the rules in smoke-free areas, and will have the power to issue fines.

    Public places including playgrounds, outdoor dining areas and car parks are already smoke free.

    Tasmania has the second-highest smoking rates in Australia behind the Northern Territory.

    You can imagine the scenario:

    “I’m from the Council. Call me Wendy and her.”

    “But you’re six feet tall with a beard and a dress!”

    “Don’t you oppress me, or I’ll report you as well as fine you for smoking.” (Pulls out notebook with a triumphant flourish.) “Now what’s your name?”

    “Bum off McBumFace.”

    “Don’t be ridiculous, you nasty man. I told you once already – what’s your name?”

    “It’s Bum. Bum off McBumFace. And don’t call me a man.”

    “What? Why not. Because I identify as a man only on Mondays. Today’s Tuesday. Now what’s YOUR name? – so I can complain.”

  80. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘And have we not been told for some years now that ‘farming is a business, they are all professionals, skilled managers of the business and their assets’’

    I’m not sure who told you that, Its Retarded, but it’s true. Farming is a business. And during better years they do sock any profit they make away to guard against poor years. The problem is, as any business bloke/chicky will tell you, that if you have poor years for seven to ten years in a row, the excess fat dries off after two – and any other business other than farming would just close because there’s plenty of other people who can do the same job for less.

    All farmers are in hock up to their eyeb#lls, unless your name’s Sidney Kidman. Machinery is hideously expensive – up to half a mill for basic harvesting equipment, aside from alllll the other shit you need. Not want, need.

    I will say though, that if the gummint’s going to give the cockies a chop out it shouldn’t be additional funding. It should be cut immediately from foreign aid and the entire arts and associated grants budget.

    In the interests of priorities.

  81. Knuckle Dragger

    Spaminator playing random whack-a-word again.

  82. mh

    ABC (America) apologizes for mistaking Kentucky gun range video for Turkish bombing of Syria

    World News Tonight

    @ABCWorldNews
    CORRECTION: We’ve taken down video that aired on “World News Tonight” Sunday and “Good Morning America” this morning that appeared to be from the Syrian border immediately after questions were raised about its accuracy. ABC News regrets the error.

    1:54 AM – Oct 15, 2019

  83. Knuckle Dragger

    Right.

    Off to tap class. It does keep me young at heart. I have a luncheon later with several movers and shakers in social circles. I believe I’ll go with the Savile Row today, as it tends to accentuate the silhouette of my shoulders.

    Toodle-pip.

  84. struth

    Regards the drought.

    I am old enough to have seen much in the way of country taken up for farming.

    Many of you can remember there being no intensive farming out on the Hay Plains or North and west of Cobar and Bourke, etc around that area.

    Firstly the Drought is not over the entire country.
    It’s in marginal country that really needs water infrastructure before great areas of cotton etc can be taken up.
    Maybe we need Goyder to come back to life and do a survey up into NSW and Southern QLD.

    There are of course farmers who are struggling, in certain areas, but not all, as the roadtrains in their thousands carting hay up to these areas prove.

    Some farmers and the National party, have happily jumped on the Global warming train as it suits them greatly, looking for handouts from dumb city folk ,who actually love the narrative of drought as it plays into their climate change hysteria.

    A lot of broad acre areas in Australia are doing pretty good this season, but apparently those farming around Dubbo, make up the whole of the Australian farming community.

    Maybe it’s a bit like car manufacturing in this country.
    If you didn’t tax it to death in the first place, it could have handled the odd down turn without government handouts in the first place.
    A farm is just a cash cow for government, like a truck, and plenty of farms have trucks.

    Like all private sector Australians, I reckon Farmers would be much more resilient without the government doing it’s worst, like clearing regs , price and availability of water, fuel and reg etc,

  85. Geriatric Mayfly

    A screaming gaggle of crows woke me up early and bloody Trump doesn’t intend to do anything about it.

    A murder of crows sounds more fitting.

  86. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    I’m also in support of farmers who complain there’s too much red and green tape, but they need to support the same for other people as well because this crap has gotten into everything, not just farming.

    Divide and conquer. A favourite tool of our ruling elite for over half a century.
    And it seems to be getting even more effective the longer it is used.

  87. Bruce of Newcastle

    You can imagine the scenario:
    “I’m from the Council. Call me Wendy and her.”
    “But you’re six feet tall with a beard and a dress!”

    She’s clearly a woman, Chelsea Clinton tells me so.

    Awkward! Chelsea Clinton emphatically states a person with a beard and a penis can ‘absolutely’ identify as a woman, while mom Hillary shuffles and looks conflicted as she blames ‘generational’ differences for not being as open to trans rights (14 Oct, via Lucianne)

  88. stackja

    Knuckle Dragger
    #3184652, posted on October 15, 2019 at 9:06 am Sidney Kidman

    Sidney Kidman prepared for drought with a ‘chain’ of stations. The drought nearly finished him. And I believe the strain sent him to an early grave. Get urban managers out of agriculture. MDB is a urban invention.

  89. Mother Lode

    ABC News regrets the error.

    I am sure they regret them all when people point out they have done a ‘Monty’.

    They just don’t do anything to avoid posting falsehoods anyway.

    But I am with Delcon on this much: I don’t think Trump should withdraw American troops from Kentucky, no matter what Erdogan says.

  90. mh

    Ok, Bulgarian soccer fans are racist. But the question remains who is to blame – Trump or BoJo?

    A FA Spokesperson said: “The FA can confirm that England players were subjected to abhorrent racist chanting while playing in the EURO 2020 qualifier against Bulgaria. This is unacceptable at any level of the game and our immediate focus is supporting the players and staff involved. As we are sadly aware, this is not the first time our players have been subjected to this level of abuse and there is no place for this kind of behaviour in society, let alone in football. We will be asking UEFA to investigate as a matter of urgency.”​

  91. Entropy

    Ahh the Good old Ray Martin effect, when the media suddenly remember there is a drought on and go out and find dying lambs to photograph. Nobody asks the “farmer” why if it has been dry as a chip for 12 months and no feed about he still fully joined his ewe flock. Nobody asks what his drought management strategy is beyond “hope it will rain”.
    Meanwhile, those that do manage according to their climate keep their heads down. They live in those communities.

    Love the way, in particular, farmers are described by Its Retarded as ‘farmers’, as though they’re not real farmers. They’re just guys who live in the scrub, and just want the Axminster replaced for free.

    You might change your tune at bit when your special organic eight seed loaf of bread starts slugging you $25 a loaf. But that would be Coles’ fault, because clearly you hold the view that food comes from the shop.

    Actually far too many that do live in the scrub, well, that is what they are really doing. And it isn’t either or, KD. There are plenty of farmers that are doing OK, still managing their resources including the seasons effectively. It is just the media can’t make a heart rending story out of them, unless they can twist it into a battle of defeating adversity instead of living with the normal Australian climate cycle of a run of dry years followed by a run of wetter years, rinse and repeat. media are scum, and Alan Jones is one of the biggest.

  92. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Ahh the Good old Ray Martin effect

    Love it.
    Stealing it.
    Using it.

    If there is any justice that prick will one day hang for treason.

  93. Geriatric Mayfly

    This one shares the Booker prize with Atwood’s continuing yawn about Handmaidens. More bedtime reading plus the excitement of chaotic punctuation. Not!

    Girl, Woman, Other is 60-year-old Evaristo’s eighth novel. It gives a chapter each to the lives of 12 intertwining characters, who are mostly black British women.
    “We black British women know that if we don’t write ourselves into literature no-one else will,” she has said.
    The book spans more than 100 years and the characters include lesbian theatre director Amma, non-binary Morgan (formerly Megan), Barbadian bride Winsome and Northumbrian farmer Hattie.
    There’s “something utterly magical” about the book’s cast, Florence said.

    She calls Girl, Woman, Other “a readable experimental novel”. The experimental element mainly comes from the unorthodox punctuation, often dispensing with quotation marks and capital letters.

  94. John Constantine

    Snowy two point oh.

    Their The Ton fully intend this project to enable the dumping of the water of the snowy unused out into the Pacific.

    If continuous flow of water through the turbines is not allowed to keep flowing down to the Murray darling basin, but is kept churning back uphill, then they can rewild the irrigation districts even faster.

  95. John Constantine

    First person deported from Australia for trying to smuggle pork in.

    Speculation that seventy percent of chicom pigs will be dead of plague by Chinese new year.

    It was meant to be burnt put by now, but is only gaining critical mass.

  96. stackja

    Entropy
    #3184664, posted on October 15, 2019 at 9:20 am

    AJ spoke of Beale plan for rivers to go inland stopped by Hawke. Urban voters appeased again?

  97. Entropy

    The classic Ray Martin effect is when a media personality finds a three year old girl who has never seen rain, and get her to pay in the dust in the bottom of a dam, and then gets her to cry so the tears run down her dusty cheeks.

  98. Black Ball

    Good morning all.
    Mitch Marsh is a clown who isn’t very good. From today’s Hun:

    ‘Mitchell Marsh has come under attack for a “moment of madness” that broke his hand – and likely cost the all-rounder his Test place.
    Marsh could be out of action for a month after scans confirmed a broken hand sustained when he punched a wall at the WACA ground on Sunday.’

    I won’t type the full story but the very fact he is still in Test contention is alarming.

  99. Entropy

    The amount of African Swine Fever detected meat products coming into this country is scary. It is a question of when it arrives. My guess is it will some backyard pig owned by a Chinese family feeding swill to their pig in Sydney, Melbourne or brisbane, or alternatively a East Timorese family in Darwin or a TI family on the cape feeding swill to their caged feral piglet.

    Don’t feed swill. Even if you think there is no meat in it. It might have touched meat. And ASF is a tough little beast, able to survive heat and can live for years in the freezer.

  100. Not Uh oh

    New thread now available.

  101. stackja

    struth
    #3184656, posted on October 15, 2019 at 9:13 am

    Urban voters don’t know. Goyder would have been good in Sydney before all the farm land turned into suburbs.
    Mention Ha reminds of nearby:

    In 1860 McCaughey’s relations backed his purchase of a third share of Coonong, 42,000 acres (16,997 ha) near Urana in the Riverina, in partnership with David Wilson and John Cochrane. Although they suffered such initial setbacks as the lack of water, McCaughey remained optimistic and in 1864 became sole owner. He brought water to Coonong by deepening Yanco Creek and building dams. In the 1860s he acquired Singorimba and Goolgumbla and by 1872 held 137,000 acres (55,443 ha). In 1871 he visited his widowed mother in Ireland and in 1874 brought out his brother David (1848-1899) to help in managing his properties.

    Sydney political managers would not allow any of this today.

  102. 1735099

    Just reading last nights conversation about the B52s.

    And

    Very precise (with the exception of the odd rogue bomb) and they only dropped what was required to deal with the particular issue.
    A far cry from the days of carpet bombing and a great support for ground troops when the air threat is limited/non existent.

    The Septics must have improved.
    They were “a great support for ground troops” providing said ground troops were prepared to take the risk.
    In Vietnam they were sometimes simply dangerous.
    From Bruce Ravenscroft’s Contact Wait Out

    The Yank F-100 bastards missed the entire system, but made one holy mess of the other side of the river, where they did hit, as we walked right through it, and there was not a living thing to be seen for hundreds of metres all around us, or tree that was not burnt to a crisp, the whole area for approx 500 metres by 100 metres was as black as the ace of spades, with trees and logs still smouldering. This napalm sure does a bloody good job, when and if it’s placed in the right spot.
    The next time we will ask for the good old reliable Canberras. Stuff the Yanks and their modern technology with their latest F-100 aircraft, to which everyone agrees as the word spreads around.

    (pp 103 – 104)
    That accords very much with my clear memory of that incident.
    I also remember that when we arrived in country we were given a firepower demonstration which included artillery, mortars, Canberras and F-100s.
    All was accurate except the Yanks.
    The ground-air link was patched into loudspeakers, and we could clearly hear the American pilot, when he realised he’d put his ordinance 500 metres past the drop zone, asking anxiously whether there were any friendlies in the area.
    When the opportunity to call them in in support was available, it was not always taken because of the risks to friendlies involved.
    Similar stuff happened during the invasion of Iraq with horrendous results for the Blues and Royals.

  103. Mater

    The Septics must have improved.

    You think, Bob?
    Thirty odd years of technology can do that.
    Now fuck off!

  104. Arky

    The difference between more recent droughts and the older, longer ones is not climate change. It is the ability of the people in this country to temporarily assist primary producers

    ..
    Fuck the farmers.
    If they can’t compete, then there are overseas producers who can.
    These arseholes were happy (happy? laughing themselves stupid!) at dismantling subsidies and tariffs on every other industry.
    Temporary assist? Competitive advantage old man! Go find the thing that Australia has a competitive advantage in, and go do that.
    (Shame that the exact same things that meant we have no advantage in manufacturing means we have no real advantage in anything).

  105. Arky

    And if it really is a “temporary assist” that is what insurance is for.

  106. Indolent

    The American ABC network did a story entitled Slaughter in Syria purporting to show civilians being attached by Turkish forces using video from a gun range exercise in Kentucky in 2017. They have now withdrawn the video and apologised for the “mistake” which was no mistake since they edited the video to remove all reference to the original source.

    Liars.

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