It’s understandable a Eurosceptic should be sceptical

I’d vote for Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal in a heartbeat says “the only person ever to have been elected for Ukip in a General Election”. And why is that?

Firstly, UK law will become supreme in the UK. No longer will we be under the jurisdiction of the EU courts. Nor will we be bound by EU regulation…..

We will get to control our own borders once again. We will escape the EU’s unreformable Common Agricultural and Fisheries Policy. British farming and fishing policy will be made to benefit British farmers and fishermen….

After only 90 days in office, the Prime Minister has put in front of MPs everything we Leavers were asking for; from now on we are a self-governing country, living under our own Parliament and making our own laws.

The extent to which we co-operate with the neighbours or decide to do things differently is up to us. Crucially, if we don’t like public policy in Britain, from now on we will only have Brits, not Brussels, to blame….

Boris’s deal won’t just get us out of the EU. It will do so sensibly and successfully, exposing starkly the mediocrity and folly of our commentariat class.

Is it really as straightforward as that? Who any longer can you trust?

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30 Responses to It’s understandable a Eurosceptic should be sceptical

  1. Jannie

    Its not clear yet. The deal may be rejected by parliament and there may be an extension. At least a second referendum seems to be off the table for the moment. UK fishermen are not happy. Perhaps it will enable some form of transition to an election and a functioning parliament which will be able to finalise the separation law. Can Boris be trusted, its too early to tell.

  2. struth

    Bullshit.
    Anything but a complete withdrawal from a corrupt , antidemocratic organisation which seeks one Europe government, full of socialists and all the old eastern block old commos, is nothing more than a time waster.
    They’ll be back to the same level of control over Britain they have now in under ten years.
    Actually, with the enthusiastic help of the traitor elites in the British parliament, I’d say five.

  3. RobK

    I’d say five.
    Less than 2.

  4. The UK is a key funder of the EU and gets EU subsidies.

    It’s like the EU wants to drag them back to the pre “Winter of Discontent” era.

    It is just a bizarre make work scheme for people without any real world outputs.

    What the UK ought to have after they pull out of the EU (the idea they can’t besides the Irish border issue is a farce) is a balanced budget amendment and greater devolution to the UK “States”, maybe even an English one, or northern and southern English States.

    Repealing a host of illiberal laws like those that make criticism of certain religions, mean tweets or “Nazi” dogs is a given for civility and liberty; but even better would be sunset clauses on ALL legislation, even caselaw would end these anyway, as would likely citizen veto powers.

    What they really need is a proper written constitution. All States with written constitutions are doing better than them. It’s a medieval freakshow.

    They need to remember who Wat Tyler was.

  5. Up The Workers!

    But…but…but…governance is SO much easier when you can give it to somebody else to do in respect of your own country.

    You can just sit back, put the feet up, point the finger of blame permanently in the other blokes’ direction, and enjoy the bounteous fruits of a full British Parliamentary Pension, lurks, perks, schemes and scams, whilst doing bugger-all.

    Boris evidently has a large masochistic streak.

    Those Brussels Sprouts – marvellous creatures…at a distance.

  6. Tel

    The UK is a key funder of the EU and gets EU subsidies.

    You mean … the UK gets back some of their own money?

  7. Crossie

    That protest in UK for a second referendum is just silly. All they have to do is insist on a new election and there’s your referendum.

  8. Mark A

    They need to remember who Wat Tyler was.

    Didn’t do him much good in the end but.

  9. Jannie

    Wat Tyler was killed by the establishment while under a flag of truce to conduct negotiations with the Mayor of London. The people need to remember what happened to him.

  10. struth

    You can just sit back, put the feet up, point the finger of blame permanently in the other blokes’ direction, and enjoy the bounteous fruits of a full British Parliamentary Pension, lurks, perks, schemes and scams, whilst doing bugger-all.

    Sort of like the Federal/state blame game here.

  11. Chris M

    Well I liked the way the Poms dealt with the train protestors. Now no more mister nice guy for the politicians.

    At this point it is clear the majority defy the democratic choice of the people. The answer is the noose, hang them for treason.

  12. Kneel

    “… The deal may be rejected by parliament and there may be an extension…”

    It shouldn’t be too hard for BoJo to find an EU member state that is prepared to veto an extension – or he could do it himself.
    Or do his own no confidence motion and force an election so the 31st deadline passes before any more laws can be enacted.
    Either would see him win any election IMO – maybe not the sharpest tool in the shed, but if he’s prepared to do the will of the electorate when no other will, he’s a shoe-in. Much as PDT is doing. Much as we badly need here – someone to put the wind up ’em, and remind ’em: THEY work for US! WE’RE the boss, we just delegated temporarily to you, and if you snub your nose at us, you’ll pay the price of your arrogance.

  13. Iampeter

    Firstly, UK law will become supreme in the UK. No longer will we be under the jurisdiction of the EU courts. Nor will we be bound by EU regulation…..

    But what kind of law should the UK have? You’d think this would be the top question to be answered otherwise why leave the EU?
    But the people advocating for Brexit have no idea and are just doing so because they are nationalists.
    So they want to leave the EU because of it’s few good features, not for any of it’s bad ones. None of which they could articulate anyway.

    It takes ignorance to a whole new level to oppose the EU on ideas that are even worse than the EU.

  14. Dr Faustus

    Firstly, UK law will become supreme in the UK. No longer will we be under the jurisdiction of the EU courts. Nor will we be bound by EU regulation…..

    Well, you certainly can’t trust Douglas Carswell, author of this sentiment.

    The latest iteration of the Withdrawal Agreement leaves Northern Island:

    – In a customs union with the EU (and the UK);
    – Subject to hundred+ EU Standards, Acts and Regulations (specified in 7 Articles and 30+ pages);
    – With a customs point for imports from the UK mainland which could be exported to the EU; and
    – Subject to any changes or additions agreed by the EU.

    … and the UK subject to the EU legal system in the implementation and reporting of the new economic Apartheid and a new EU bureaucracy to administer EU policy as it applies to the UK – plus an unresolved immigration issue for travel between NI and mainland UK.

  15. Tel

    Having a customs point for goods going into Northern Ireland is probably OK providing the Northern Irish get to control that port. They can enforce it the way they feel necessary.

    Subject to future change imposed by the EU is of course unacceptable, but then again they can always say no when unreasonable changes come up the pipeline.

  16. Andre Lewis

    If Oliver Cromwell could raise up from his unmarked grave he would no doubt be disappointed in his legacy. After overthrowing a monarchy temporarily and beheading a despotic king he no doubt thought the primacy of parliament would take the country forward. He could hardly have countenanced that today the parliament is every bit as despotic and unanswerable to citizens as the king he took down.

  17. Dr Fred Lenin

    The so called deal sounds like another document of surreder,the eurofascists will still have controls over the UK that rduce the UK to vassal status ,it is without doubt a ocument written up by the fascists and signed by the UKs version of turnbull ,the only way out of the Fourth Reich is a total No Deal . Britain has stood against european tptalitarianism before and prevailed . The Spnish armada , the Stuart invasions in the 1700s Napoleon , the Kaiser and the socialist Hitler I am sure they will survive without the Fourth Reich . It will crumble in France Italy Holland within a few years ,even in the heart of the reich , Germany where the right wing non communists are gaining numbers,and just when Germany was nearly re admitted to the human race. It is like the soviets and communust china they crumble in the end .

  18. max

    Gary North:

    The push of Jean Monnet to create the European Union in a step-by-step series of treaties was always opposed to the interests of the nations involved. It was surely not in the interest of Germany.

    Any of those nations could have achieved all of the economic goals that Monnet promised.
    Each of them could have done this by lowering all of its tariffs to zero. At the same time, each of them could have abandoned all import quotas of any kind.
    Had any nation done this, it would have had plenty of trade with the nations in what is now the European Union. Exporters love to send their goods and services into any nation that does not tax imports.
    The only reason why the European Union came into existence was this: the organizers knew that domestic politics, especially mercantilism, would keep each of the nations from lowering its tariffs to zero. That was what the founders of the American Constitution figured out in 1787. The attempt to get tariffs reduced at the Annapolis conference of 1786 had failed. The states would not reduce their tariffs. The next Convention achieved this through the Constitution.

  19. Chris Harper

    The agreement will be governed by decisions by the European Court of Justice. The provisions on regulation and the ‘level playing field’ are so vague that the ECJ could easily rule that EU regulation and tax policy remains supreme. Given the ECJ is NOT an indipendent law court but rather has an explicit obligation to rule in favour of ‘ever closer union’ I have every expectation that this is what will happen. This does not repatriate law back to the UK.
    The agreement does not abolish the common fisheries policy, it cements it in perpetuity.
    The UK can set its own foreign policy, but only where that does not conflict with
    EU policy. The UK will have no right to independent foreign policy in any area where the EU is acting or has policy, and it has no role in setting that EU policy.
    It immunises EU officials from UK law.
    The UK loses all role and assets in EU financial institutions, however the UK retains financial liability for any potential failure. If(When) the Euro collapses the UK could be up for $500 million in liabilities.

    This is a dog of an agreement, and a WTO no deal deal would be an order of magnitude better.

  20. struth

    But what kind of law should the UK have? You’d think this would be the top question to be answered otherwise why leave the EU?
    But the people advocating for Brexit have no idea and are just doing so because they are nationalists.
    So they want to leave the EU because of it’s few good features, not for any of it’s bad ones. None of which they could articulate anyway.

    It takes ignorance to a whole new level to oppose the EU on ideas that are even worse than the EU.

    FMD…………………..put the bong down, it’s embarrassing.

  21. struth

    The people voted for Brexit.
    They did not vote for a soft brexit or a hard brexit, they voted to leave the dam thing.
    Leave means leave.
    A hard exit is the only exit, a deal wasn’t what was voted for.
    NO DEALS.

  22. Chris Harper

    Sorry, £500 billion in liabilities.

  23. max

    Chris Harper
    #3189098, posted on October 20, 2019 at 12:53 pm
    Sorry, £500 billion in liabilities.

    why?

  24. Chris Harper

    Max: When the eurozone goes south, as it will, the UK will be responsible for helping to bail out the affected countries. Ditto any other financial problems which require intergovernmental financial transfers.

  25. max

    Chris Harper
    #3189107, posted on October 20, 2019 at 1:03 pm

    thanks.

    if they are stupid they will pay it.

  26. max

    Boris Johnson has sent a request to the EU for a delay to Brexit – but without his signature. The request was accompanied by a second letter, signed by Mr Johnson, which says he believes that a delay would be a mistake.

    The PM was required by law to ask the EU for an extension to the 31 October deadline after losing a Commons vote. EU Council President Donald Tusk tweeted that he had received the extension request.

    A senior Downing Street source said that the hard copy and email copy of the letter would be conveyed by Sir Tim Barrow, the UK’s representative in Brussels.

    The second letter from Mr Johnson – signed off this time – makes clear that he personally believes that a delay would be a mistake.

    BBC Political Editor Laura Kuenssberg described the decision to send three documents as “controversial”, predicting “there will be a fight about whether Boris Johnson is trying to circumvent the court”.

    She added: “This is heading straight for the court, and it may very quickly end up in the Supreme Court.”

    Earlier, Mr Johnson rang European leaders, including Mr Tusk, to insist that the letter “is Parliament’s letter, not my letter”.

    https://moneymaven.io/mishtalk/economics/johnson-requests-delay-but-doesn-t-sign-the-letter-L-30w5OGdEmaQSwYENbohQ/

  27. nb

    ‘Veterans for Britain’ are skeptical, as are others:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNb7rvbqn3o
    Is Boris’s ‘deal’ a dud? UNN LIve #93
    Streamed live on Oct 18, 2019
    Unity News Network
    ———————————-
    More on EU army (‘Common Defence’).
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ksRBhfIaT90
    “UK defence being betrayed to EU” David Banks interview
    Jul 2, 2018
    Politics UK
    ———————————-
    Meantime, The Duran, supports the deal. The Duran has something of a Russian slant, but is useful.
    BREXIT: Good deal, bad deal, or somewhere in middle?
    Oct 18, 2019

  28. Oh come on

    Just ignore limp beater.

    If this gets through the Commons – and I suspect it will if the EU refuses to grant an extension – I suspect Farage will be largely wedged. The Brexit Party might continue to exist as a pressure group to ensure the London elites don’t gum up the process, but we’ll see.

    My issue with Farage lately is that he’s been on the attack against the new treaty, citing parts of the political declaration that, in isolation, doesn’t sound like a ‘clean break’ after all. Which sounds fine, but…in the past, the defenders of May’s treaty also cited parts of the political declaration as evidence that it was a real Brexit. At those times, Farage would say (correctly) that the political declaration was non-binding and reliant on the goodwill of the EU. The nature of the political declaration has not changed. Farage cannot really hold up the political declaration as evidence now when he has criticised others for doing the same in the past.

  29. Dr Faustus

    Be interesting to see if this gets in front of the Supreme Court – as per the BBC – and if so, what the Court does.

    The facts seem to be that Johnson complied with the Benn Act. The prescribed letter was sent to the EU Council (albeit unsigned)and Tusk has acknowledged the request for an extension.

    Essentially then, the Court would be asked to read into the Act’s quite specific requirement (presently fulfilled) further implied obligations to prevent the PM from dealing with the politics of Brexit Agreement and his Governments’ stated position.

    Looks like Remainers are not satisfied with trashing Parliament’s social compact and want to pop the separation of powers. Hopefully the SC is less keen.

  30. A reader

    I think it’s tactically brilliant by Johnson.

    Johnson put forward his own no confidence motion weeks ago but the scum refused to vote for it because that would end up in an election that will decimate Labour

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