Inferno

Bush fire season is upon us and the blame game is in full swing.

Before the area became ­national park, Mr Layer said, he would get permits to collect firewood from the state forests. Since the national park was declared there had been no permits issued.

“It has just been building up,” he said.

A generation of locals, raised on forest protest, are being forced to confront some tough truths about forest fuel loads and management. Communities that have been on the frontline to stop logging and expand national parks are seeking refuge as fire threatens to consume their homes.

Protesters Falls near Terania Creek, the site of Australia’s first environmental blockade in ­August 1979, is surrounded by an out-of-control blaze in the Nightcap National Park. Tuntable Creek community, a free-spirited community that grew from Nimbin’s counter-culture movement of the 1970s, was one of the first settlements to be evacuated.

Some of the best analysis I’ve seen on bush fires and the poor policy choices that lead to higher intensity fires has been done by our very own areff.

Here he is in 2013.

Excessive fuel loads feed massive fires? Don’t be silly, say those who count themselves in Nature’s corner! The past week’s infernos, as symptoms of global warming, are punishment for mankind’s sins, and the only cure is taxes, inflated electricity bills, restricted air travel and an international trade in certificates signifying ownership of nothing more tangible than tranches of thin air. In distant Britain, The Guardian’s reliably bizarre George Monbiot  even managed to paint volunteer fireman Tony Abbott as an eco-arsonist.

As for reducing fuel levels with controlled, “cool” burns during spring and autumn, the cultists will always fight that tooth and nail, as they did for years in and around Nillumbik. A procession of fire experts visited the district and saw nothing but disaster in the making, but their reports and warnings were rejected by a council whose officers were busy ticketing residents for collecting fallen wood from the verges in front of their properties, amongst other offences against green goodness. 

Then on Sunday this week:

When Victoria was ravaged by the Black Saturday bushfires in 2009 a royal commission set out to determine what led to 173 deaths and billions of dollars in property damage. Today more fires are raging, this time in NSW, and at least three people are known to have lost their lives, but there will be no need for an inquiry because the cause has already been established to the satisfaction of the media, various lawmakers and those public officials whose job it is to manage Australia’s pyrophytic flora.

Yes, you guessed it: there is no blame to share because the lost lives and destroyed property are a direct consequence of climatechange.  You can read all about this latest symptom of an overheated planet in just about any paper or news site, especially at the ABC.

Then Monday:

As NSW burns, an examination of those factors — the obstacles to staging prophylactic burns, the green romanticism that sees homes built amid pyres awaiting only a spark, the stripping of residents’ right to make their homes safe — would seem worth reprising.

If you want a better understanding of the policy failures that result in these horrific fires read Inferno: the Day Victoria Burned.

In the words of Roger Franklin, fire can be “a curious, wonderful thing”. On February 7, 2009, however, there was nothing wonderful about the flames that engulfed Victoria, killing 173 people and reducing several towns to dust. Franklin’s book, Inferno: the Day Victoria Burned, is the first to explore the horrors of the day that will forever be known as Black Saturday. Not only does the author explain what happened that day – individual heroism, unimaginable tragedy, tales of towns all but wiped off the map – but also why it happened.

The author examines the roles of the Victorian government, the CFA and the local councils that were so determined to protect roadside vegetation. He analyses the pros and cons of preventive burning, questions the merits of the state’s controversial stay-or-go policy, and delves into the mind of an arsonist. Through it all, there is a clear message: failure was everywhere on Black Saturday. And with bushfires a constant threat in Australian life, Franklin cites many important lessons that need to be learned if such a disaster is to be avoided in the future.

This entry was posted in Australian Story, Hypocrisy of progressives, Oppressive government. Bookmark the permalink.

79 Responses to Inferno

  1. feelthebern

    Right now, anyone should be able to type in a postcode & get the:
    * hazard reduction history;
    * who’s responsibility (Federal, State, Local) it was.

  2. C.L.

    Every. Single. Time.
    Thanks for this, Sinclair (and areff).

    At least this time, somebody has had a red hot go against Bandt – who seems to get some sort of sick thrill out of “linking” these tragedies to a) klimate; and b) the government.

    The same old question emerges: will we learn this time, re burn-offs, national park bombs bigger than European countries, fire protection property rights etc?

    I doubt it.

    That would take national leadership, dumping Green dogma and standing up to urban bugmen.
    Does that sound like anyone in the federal government?

  3. Dave Carter

    Am I right in recalling that Black Sat ’09 was actually Black Saturday III?
    Following two others, one of which in the ’70s burned 1.5 million hectares, ie four times ’09?
    Having a quick scrounge on Google and DuckDuckGo, but the memory hole has swallowed it up.

  4. NuThink

    From the ABC link saying that the NSW fires caused by Monsoons in India.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-11-09/fires-in-nsw-affected-by-india-monsoon-season/11689416

    Although emergency services were bracing for an intense fire season — which started earlier than predicted — a bushfire expert said climate change had created the “fairly extraordinary circumstances” seen this week.

    So their predictions are not so great then. Earlier than predicted.
    What are fairly extraordinary circumstances as opposed to just extraordinary circumstances? Is that how scientists talk nowadays.

    Remember the goon show – when it was announced that the monsoon had arrived, and the comment made was (paraphrased). It is a pity it is here during the rainy season.

  5. Mark M

    Does [global warming] play a part?
    Yes, there is a link between [global warming] and the prevalence and severity of fires.
    In fact, the research identifying a link between fires and [global warming] is “old hat”, says Professor Bradstock.
    “The research has all been done. We don’t need to keep doing it.”
    https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/old-hat-is-there-a-link-between-climate-change-and-bushfires-20191111-p539d2.html

    Dear Professor, is the link the same one that causes floods, or is that a different link?

    Coal miners to blame for Queensland floods, says Australian Greens leader Bob Brown
    https://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/coal-miners-to-blame-for-queensland-floods-says-australian-greens-leader-bob-brown/news-story/cbfe12042fa9c4149ea3c10524f57344

  6. Robbo

    Of course the morons at the ABC and other monumentally stupid media will lay the blame for big bushfires squarely on climate change. Why wouldn’t they do that? It fits their preconceived agenda and diverts attention away from the criminal ignorance of failing to do anything at all about ground fuel build up. This attempt to manipulate the facts also refuses to accept that most of the current fires have been deliberately lit by insane or mischievous individuals, many of them children or teenagers. A number have already been caught and charged so we can all stand by and watch their lawyers take advantage of the weak bastards in charge of our courts as they swallow the bullshit lines of “he’s really a nice person who will suffer badly if he is sent to jail”. There will be no recognition of those who have genuinely suffered from the fires, no attention paid to those who have died in the fires and at the end of it all no action taken to ensure that in the future the damage from bushfires is at least minimised by an ongoing and comprehensive fuel reduction programme. There is nothing new about all of this because governments of all political persuasions over many decades have been too stupid, too thoughtless, too uncaring and too incompetent. I gave over 20 years of my time to serve as a volunteer firefighter with the CFA in Victoria and I lost count of the number of times that I and my fellow volunteers put our lives on the line to fight fires that should never have reached the power they had. Two things that my CFA service taught me were that the three main causes of fire were men, women and children, certainly not climate change, and never trust a government to do anything about fire prevention unless they are forced into a corner, and even then they will do what they can to wriggle out of their responsibility.

  7. 132andBush

    Show me anything to do with the greens, in a policy sense, that is pro humanity.

  8. feelthebern

    You can spend hours trying to get an accurate picture of hazard reduction in NSW & get zero meaningful data.
    Why are the powers that be afraid of data?

  9. Forest Stylist

    As a forester working in the Nimbin area in the early 1990’s it was clear that the forest dream would one day be a nightmare.
    That day may be upon us.
    Unfortunately a disaster may be the only way attitudes to fuel reduction burning, logging and roading will change.

  10. Alex Davidson

    One of the strongest drivers of bushfire hysteria in Sydney is the never-ending crusade by the political class against what they call ‘urban sprawl’ – their ceaseless attempts to create an artificial shortage of land in the midst of plenty. By frightening people away from bushland areas and all but prohibiting clearing, they leave people with little choice but to live in the high density dwellings their mates and benefactors are busy building.

    To end this racket the government must restore respect for property rights. Among many other things, that means not interfering in any way with the right of landowners to clear vegetation on their own land.

  11. Karabar

    There is a senator I never heard of (Jordan Steele-John) who gave the most idiotic rant in the senate today that is imaginable. Even worse than Bandit, Di Nutter, and Chitine Milne combined.
    Just read it in Hansard (it was just after noon).
    It is absolutely disgusting that such total nonsense is allowed in Parliament, free speech or not.

  12. calli

    Blushing

    Dreadful Heat ™

    Thanks areff. Encapsulates everything I learned about bushfire and hazard reduction before TAFE became a zombie wasteland.

    Tuntable Falls was the first place I ever saw ecoloons. It was 1976. And they were horseriding. Stark naked. 🤣

  13. feelthebern

    And they were horseriding. Stark naked.

    Burn those saddles.

  14. Rob MW

    Eucalyptus Fire Hazards: Are Eucalyptus Trees Flammable

    God bless the romantics at the ABC…until you get to this bit:
    Eucalypts: 10 things you may not know about an iconic Australian

    Features such as oil-filled leaves and bark that can easily shed make eucalypts highly flammable.

    This ability to stoke a fire is part of their survival strategy, said Professor Ladiges.

    “If a fire is hot but goes through fast it will do less damage than a really slow burning fire.”

    “The fact that that helps fire go through fast was clearly a selective advantage to the species because then their seeds wouldn’t have been cooked.”

    Even if the tops of the trees are destroyed by fire, many species can re-sprout from buds under their bark or from a lignotuber at the base of the tree. But not all species can re-sprout.

    The remedy.

  15. feelthebern

    Try to get comprehensive historical data on hazard reduction ?

  16. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    There is a senator I never heard of (Jordan Steele-John) who gave the most idiotic rant in the senate today that is imaginable

    I blush to reveal this, but he’s from Western Australia. He was handed the Greens Shadow Ministry for Defence, and immediately announced he would be known as “Minister for Peace and Disarmament.”

  17. calli

    Even if the tops of the trees are destroyed by fire, many species can re-sprout from buds under their bark or from a lignotuber at the base of the tree. But not all species can re-sprout.

    Yes, the re-sprouting looks nice.

    It’s epicormic, from meristomatic tissue just under the bark. Only problem – it’s highly unstable and sheers off under its own weight. Another type of “widow maker”. Original branches are linked structurally to the trunk of the tree because they’ve been there since it was a sapling. These new ones are an adaptation to allow flowering, fruiting and reproduction before another conflagration or disease takes the tree permanently.

    The lignotuber is a bit different, usually producing a coppice. Which, in turn, increases low level fuel loads.

    Neither is a good result.

    This is basic stuff.

  18. Ubique

    “Top fire expert David Packham says forget global warming. It’s the reckless failure to burn-off fuel loads that have turned parts of Australia into death traps. Near Melbourne “we’re looking down the barrel in these areas at 1000 deaths”.

  19. Bosnich

    I note that Branson is in Australia at the moment and has taken the opportunity to tell us that Australia should not be selling coal to China.He is also in Australia to tell us all about his plans for a fleet of cruise liners and his plans for his rocket. At present he has not revealed his new eco friendly engines for either of these projects.

  20. Ubique

    The remedy, as proposed above, is to clear eucalypts from the surrounds of all settlements, town and cities. Replant with fire-retardant species. Rinse and repeat.

  21. Rob MW

    Neither is a good result.

    When the sun (heat of the day) busts the oil sacks the flash point then becomes the big danger.

    The boiling point is 176°C and the flash point is 49°…….

    This is basic stuff.

    To whom ? Surely not those ignorant tree change homeowners who build their houses surrounded by petrol bombs waiting for a hot day.

  22. Val Majkus

    this is currently doing the rounds on f/b

    BLACK THURSDAY BUSHFIRES – 6th Feb 1851

    In preparing for tomorrow’s extreme conditions, it’s important to look at history to understand how bad things can get.

    Australia’s most extensive Bushfires were known as the ‘Black Thursday’ Bushfires, where on the 6th Feb 1851 (Co2 levels 285ppm) when the temperature hit an incredible 117°F (47.2°C) at 11am in Melbourne, and quarter of Victoria, 5 million hectares in total were burnt out (10 times more than from the current Bushfires in NSW). 12 lives were lost and one million sheep and thousands of cattle where lost.

    Thomas McCombie recorded the scene in Melbourne on that day:

    “For two months preceding, the country had been under the desiccating winds, which appeared to be highly charged with electricity. The herbage was parched up, and everything that the eye could rest upon was dry, dusty, and disagreeable. The 6th of February dawned much as very hot days generally do; the roseate tints of the horizon were rather brighter and more lurid than usual – the glassed glare over the sky more vividly perceptible. The north wind set strongly in early in the morning, and by eleven o’clock in the fore-noon it had increased to almost a hurricane.

    ‘’In the streets of Melbourne the heat was intense, and the atmosphere densely oppressive. Clouds of smoke and dust hung over the city. The fires which blazed in the surrounding country no doubt increased the suffocating sensation which was generally experienced. It was hardly possible to go abroad; the streets were nearly deserted; and a few of the persons who were compelled to make the effort to traverse them stalked along with their faces closely enveloped in cloth; no man, however bold, appeared able to face the furiously-suffocating blast, which seemed to wither up their physical energies. By noon, the inhabitants, generally, had shut themselves up in their various dwellings, too happy to have got out of the reach of the overpowering blast. They continued to sit until night listening in terror to the howl of this real sirocco. Had any portion of Melbourne ignited the whole of the city must have been reduced to ashes, as no effort of the inhabitants could have prevented the conflagration from extending and becoming general. The citizens were providentially preserved from so terrible a disaster.”

    Catastrophic Bushfires hit Victoria again in 1898 (Co2 levels 295ppm) know as ‘ Red Tuesday’ when fires burned 260,000 hectares in South Gippsland. Twelve lives and more than 2,000 buildings were destroyed.

    In 1939 (Co2 levels 311ppm) the 13th Jan became known as ‘Black Friday’, the fires in Victoria burned 1.5 to 2 million hectares, they killed 71 people and destroyed more than 650 buildings.

    In 1944 (Co2 310ppm) levels fires in the Western Districts of Victoria destroyed more than 500 houses and caused huge losses in the pastoral industry. Four or more grass fires near Hamilton, Dunkeld, Skipton and Lake Bolac burned about 440,000 hectares in eight hours. Between 15 and 20 people died. The total area covered by grass fires that season was about one million hectares.

    In 1962, (318ppm) Fires in the Dandenong Ranges and on the outskirts of Melbourne killed 32 and destroyed more than 450 houses.

    In 1965, (320ppm) fires the in Gippsland burned for 17 days, covering 300,000 hectares of forest and 15,000 hectares of grassland. More than 60 buildings and 4,000 stock were destroyed.

    In 1969, (324ppm) Two hundred and eighty fires broke out on the 8th Jan, Twelve reached major proportions and burned 250,000 hectares. Twenty-three people died, including 17 motorists at Lara, trapped on the then highway between Geelong and Melbourne. The fires also destroyed 230 houses, 21 other buildings and more than 12,000 stock.

    In 1977, (333ppm) widespread fires occurred across the Western District of Victoria. The fires killed four people and burned about 103,000 hectares. More than 198,500 stock, 116 houses and 340 other buildings were also lost.

    In 1983, (342ppm) the 16th Feb became known as ‘Ash Wednesday’ more than 100 fires burned 210,000 hectares and killed 47 people. More than 27,000 stock and 2,000 houses were lost.

    That’s just Victoria.

    And to think, that the Greens have the anti-sciencific superstitious belief that we can stop Bushfires by importing more solar panels from China. These people are not only demented, they have a complete ignorance of Australia’s history. But then again they are perhaps just the worst of dishonest liars, exploiting tragedy and spreading untruths for their own political gain.

  23. feelthebern

    It snowed at Henry the fifths coronation.
    9 April 1413.

    Please explain.

  24. Val Majkus

    Roger Underwood is an expert advocating Forest Management … this article is from 2013 but very applicable today … the last couple of paras

    …n conclusion, Australia does not need more helitaks, more water bombers, more infra-red gizmos or more overseas firefighters. What is needed is a fundamental change in bushfire philosophy and governance. Forest managing agencies and fire services must shift their focus from suppressing running fires to the critical long-term work of pre-emptive and responsible land management. Their job is to make the task of the firefighter easier and safer, not harder and more dangerous. Arson, Acts of God and possible Global Warming can all be anticipated and steps can be taken to minimise their impact. We know what to do and how to do it.

    Finally, I would like to return to my theme about the lessons from history. At a conference of forestry officers in Perth in 1923, the Conservator Stephen Kessell was laying down his philosophy to departmental staff. Preventing large high intensity forest fires, he said, is the most fundamental requirement for forest conservation in Australia. Kessell recognised that without effective bushfire management, no other management outcomes can be achieved.

    It’s that simple. Sadly, 80 years later, many of the people who today are responsible for conserving Australia’s forests have not yet grasped this fact. They fiddle, while Australia burns.”

  25. Val Majkus

    link to some of Underwood’s writing in Quadrant Online

  26. Truth n Justice

    NSW burns while worthless, pointless, venomous idiots like Bandt spew green garbage and worship the utterances of a retarded child. If Morrison can’t see through this crap he can forget the vote of the “quiet” Australian he tried so hard to successfully achieve. Forget trying to appease these green grubs Scotty, they are simply parasites and would never vote for you regardless of whatever you do to destroy Australia in
    pursuit of their vote.

  27. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    No better than arsonists’

    Greens senator Jordon Steele-John has blasted the government over their management of the climate, telling parliament on Tuesday afternoon they’re “no better than a bunch of arsonists, borderline arsonists” who should be “ashamed”.

    It comes as the fifth emergency warning is issued for bushfires in NSW, with residents west of Kempsey on the mid-north coast being warned it’s too late to leave.

    The Carrai Creek fire, which has already burned through 76000ha, has breached containment lines and is spreading quickly.

    “If you are in the area west of Kempsey you are at risk,” the NSW RFS said in a tweet.

    “It is too late to leave. Seek shelter as the fire approaches.”

    From the Oz. Another meaningful contribution from the Greens. FMS.

  28. Biota

    Takes about 2 seconds of thought to realise that in pre-European times any fire that started by lightning or by the locals simply had to burn out. No RFS, SES, water bombers etc. So it is pretty obvious that burning was going to be extensive and frequent. Consequently the bush would not have been as dense as it is today so most fires would have been more like grass fires than violent crown fires. I know of areas in the NSW Central Coast that according to long gone old-timers were open grassland with scattered enormous eucalypts. Today these areas are dense scrub from the ground up.

    A while back I came upon a quote from Captain Cook’s diary to the effect that the entire east coast of Australia was on fire as he sailed north from Sydney.

  29. cohenite

    One of the best articles on bushfires, green complicity and regulations preventing hazard reduction in the context of the Black Saturday 2009 fires:

    https://mises.org/library/victorian-bushfires

  30. cohenite

    The greens policy on hazard reduction:

    https://nsw.greens.org.au/sites/greens.org.au/files/policydownloads/Bush%20Fire%20Risk%20Management.pdf

    Any one arguing the greens are for hazard reduction should be barbecued.

  31. Val Majkus

    thanks for that link cohenite; there’s a post now on the current bushfire situation … would be worth linking there

  32. cohenite

    I’m trying to link to the green’s policies on hazard reduction and it won’t let me link so here they are:

    Principles
    1. Assumptions about traditional European bush fire prevention,
    mitigation, control and management need review in the light of the
    need for ecologically sustainable management.
    2. There is an urgent need to correct the common misconception that
    responsible fire management always involves burning or clearing to
    reduce moderate and high fuel loads generally throughout the
    landscape, irrespective of where they occur. Rather, such activities
    should be strategically planned, to protect the community and
    vulnerable assets whilst minimising the adverse impacts of these
    activities on the environment.
    3. Stricter controls are required to drastically reduce the amount of rural
    burning not required for essential asset protection.
    4. Prescribed burning is only one method of fuel management and should
    be considered in the context of other available options and the
    management objectives of the land in question.
    5. Many vegetation communities and plants cannot survive frequent fire;
    for this reason frequent fire has been listed as a key threatening
    process by the NSW Scientific Committee under the Threatened
    Species Conservation Act.
    6. Further, many vegetation communities can undergo severe decline in
    biodiversity with long term fire exclusion. Ecologically appropriate fire
    regimes are required to maintain biodiversity and functioning
    ecosystems.
    7. Firefighting services in NSW need support, supplementation and
    additional resources. In particular, local government needs to be
    provided with additional resources and finances to enable the proper
    implementation of its responsibilities with regard to the assessment and
    implementation of hazard reduction strategies.
    8. Education of councils, land managers, land-holders, the general public,
    fire management planners and fire fighters is needed and should be
    publicly funded. Such education should target specific audiences and
    address a broad range of ‘bush fire’ and environmental issues.
    9. Education and community awareness material needs to focus
    especially on the threat to the environment and property of
    inappropriate use of fire, particularly burning which is too frequent,
    extensive in area, of excessive intensity, badly timed or carelessly
    implemented.

  33. Val Majkus

    Huh … what does ecologically sustainable management mean to a green; don’t touch …

  34. Val Majkus

    sorry cohenite, my bad, you’re on the right post

  35. Why are the powers that be afraid of data?

    They lose their fear after it has been adjusted, homogenized and tortured.

  36. I_am_not_a_robot

    This is not normal: What’s different about the NSW mega fires …. SMH Monday, 11 November 2019

    A search of the BoM pages Climate > Climate Data Online > Monthly Statistics for stations in N E NSW raises the following statistics for the earliest and latest years available in each case:

    ========================================================================
    Annual Mean maximum temperature (°C):

    Lismore (Centre Street) 1891-1920 … 25.5. 1981-2010 … 25.4.

    Grafton City Council 1891-1920 … 26.7. 1951-1980 … 25.3.

    Armidale (Radio Station 2AD) 1861-1890 … 20.3. 1981-2010 … 20.4
    (As described)

    Glen Innes Post Office. 1891-1920 … 20.2. 1981-2010 … 20.4

    =========================================================================
    Annual Decile 5 (median) rainfall (mm):

    Lismore (Centre Street) 1891-1920 … 1192.2. 1981-2010 … 1274.8

    Grafton City Council 1871-1900 …. 911.8. 1951-1980 … 1029.5

    Armidale (Radio Station 2AD) 1861-1890 …..833.4. 1981-2010 …. 742.6

    Glen Innes Post Office. 1891-1920 …. 767.6 1981-2010 …. 916.3

    ===========================================================================

    If anything can be inferred from the statistics, the maximum temperature for the general area is slightly lower and the annual rainfall is slightly greater than a century ago.

  37. Fair shake of the Sauce bottle

    The Royal Commission reports on Ash Wednesday were pretty clear. However seeing people continue to build in and around forested areas , watching fuel load build up in National Parks in Victoria I could only assume same outcomes around the country. We really are too stupid to live in this great land.

  38. Val Majkus

    a Qld rural firefighter asks how many more homes, how many more lives … The “authority figures that have stood for environmental protection” over the past five years are “directly responsible for this devastation”, Smith wrote. “The fuel loading we are seeing out on the ground is ridiculous. We are looking at 5-10 years of growth, this fuel source is making these fires untouchable, we can’t even get near them to fight them.”

  39. Boambee John

    Biota

    I know of areas in the NSW Central Coast that according to long gone old-timers were open grassland with scattered enormous eucalypts. Today these areas are dense scrub from the ground up.

    In the long lost days of my youth I used occasionally to go spearfishing at Broken Head, up near Byron Bay.

    In those days the headland was open grassland less than knee high.

    Went back there in the 1990s. The entire headland was covered in banksia scrub several metres high.

  40. stackja

    Watching old Hollywood movies, the forests, are Eucalyptus!

  41. A Lurker

    The Greens coyly state that given that they are not in power they shouldn’t be held responsible for the fires. Yet all I know is that ever since the Greens entered politics there has been an increasing reluctance by Government at all levels to stand up to the demented demands of the Greens.

    The Greens may not be the people actually signing off on the environmental legislation that enabled the buildup of fuel on the ground, but they are certainly the ones who have protested and agitated such legislation into being.

  42. feelthebern

    A while back I came upon a quote from Captain Cook’s diary to the effect that the entire east coast of Australia was on fire as he sailed north from Sydney.

    Correct.
    It worked for eleventy billion years.
    Why would we stop it ?

  43. I_am_not_a_robot

    Watching old Hollywood movies, the forests, are Eucalyptus!

    There is a scene in Vertigo that seems to be filmed in Australia because the road is edged with gum trees and the car is driving on the left, however the road to San Juan Bautista in part is divided and goes through a eucalyptus forest (first 30 secs):

  44. Yes Lurker, but the other parasites are passing legislation and regulations.

    Look up “Agenda 21 Tom DeWeese” for the reasons why.

  45. Spent some spare time baiting greens on twatter by writing “Ok Doomer”.

    No point trying to reason with doomsayers.

  46. Biota

    Back in the early 1980’s I went for a walk in Sherbrook Forest, Victoria. That council was one of the early green councils and wouldn’t let a splinter be touched. The ground fuel load was knee deep with a dense mid-storey and eucalypt canopy. It was clear then that it was a disaster waiting to happen.

  47. I_am_not_a_robot

    The extent of the fires can be seen very clearly on the BoM satellite images.

  48. jupes

    You can read all about this latest symptom of an overheated planet in just about any paper or news site, especially at the ABC.

    Well the ABC would say that wouldn’t they.

    The fact is that the likelihood of their own culpability for the fires is exponentially higher than any Australian produced CO2 molecules. After all, they actually incited arson last Monday on Q and A.

  49. NuThink

    In the 1850s, Eucalyptus trees were introduced to California by Australians during the California Gold Rush. Much of California is similar in climate to parts of Australia. By the early 1900s, thousands of acres of eucalypts were planted with the encouragement of the state government.

    Robot – the filming of the linked scenes appears to be done in a studio with rear projection. Possibly they did not use a projector that had lateral inversion as not too many people would have noticed. Or it could have been a blooper.
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0052357/trivia
    This was not specific to the scenes that you link but Hitchcock was making extensive use of rear projection. With reference to another scene.

    The shot was achieved with rear projection of the background plates.

  50. Roger

    The Greens may not be the people actually signing off on the environmental legislation that enabled the buildup of fuel on the ground, but they are certainly the ones who have protested and agitated such legislation into being.

    I’m afraid local councils are often infested with Greens, Lurker.

    Little misanthropic Hitlers.

  51. Mother Lode

    Of course the morons at the ABC and other monumentally stupid media will lay the blame for big bushfires squarely on climate change.

    Climate Change is the area where they are confident they can claim more expertise than physicists, chemists, and even economists. This is where they must drag all discussion, make it the dominant perspective.

    Anyone who is a professional in their field is compromised by a conflict of interest – their career is at stake. Their career prospects in the AGW is differnt because they present themselves as caring about humanity. All the academics on the gravy train (there is no justification for them in the private independent sector). The lure of prestige, power, government patronage, ego, and the fear of admitting you were wrong – these are unworthy.

    Take a chemist who works in the oil industry. They stay with the job because they have determined with their background it is not credible. Warmies will not entertain the possibility the engineer accepts their income as consistent with their beliefs. They will insist the engineer’s beliefs are compromised by mercenary greed.

    What an abominable presumption.

    But Bob Brown’s and Richard Di Natali’s political ambitions, Ross Guano’s book sales and association with AGW, and Tim Flummery’s guru status on AGW which far exceeds his as palaeomammalogist are all the result of purity.

    Yet unlike the engineer, none of them have any training or record of achievement in the field.

    Shit, no one has a history of achievement in AGW. They have not got a prediction right yet.

  52. Val Majkus

    I’m afraid local councils are often infested with Greens, Lurker

    yes, just look at all the climate emergencies being declared

  53. Mother Lode

    Their A warmist’s career prospects in AGW is differnt because they present themselves as caring about humanity.

  54. herodotus

    “I blush to reveal this, but he’s from Western Australia. He was handed the Greens Shadow Ministry for Defence, and immediately announced he would be known as “Minister for Peace and Disarmament.”

    I thought he was an invited schoolie or something from an ABC drama. A complete dufus.

  55. Mother Lode

    Take a chemist who works in the oil industry. They stay with the job because they have determined with their background it (the warmly myth) is not credible.

  56. Roger

    Tim Flummery’s guru status on AGW

    Or, as I prefer to call him, Dr. Flim Flammery

  57. Roger

    He was handed the Greens Shadow Ministry for Defence, and immediately announced he would be known as “Minister for Peace and Disarmament.

    The Greens in a nutshell right there.

    Subversives masquerading as idealists.

  58. Colonel Crispin Berka

    None of you have mentioned “tipping points” yet.
    How dare you.
    You are all required to mention “tipping points” in all global warming climate change global weirding global heating discussions.
    This is easy enough to do as you don’t need any evidence, you just need the feels.

    Yep These fires certainly have a tipping point feel to them

    The Twatter is filling up so fast with tipping point feelings it’s bound to reach 97% consensus soon.

  59. nb

    How is it the greens support the wrong option for every issue?
    Is there a term for this alternate, negative, universe they inhabit, where everything good is bad and everything bad is good?
    ‘Hell’ comes to mind.

  60. Gab

    Very good point. They blame “climatechange” so it absolves them from looking at the real cause and mitigation.

  61. Squirrel

    The federal government response should be focused on mitigation and resources to back-up state efforts for disaster management. A disaster-management focused National Guard could be worth pursuing.

    There also needs to be a forceful push back against demands to shut down coal exports – and doubtless, following that, gas exports – by explaining to the public what that would do to government budgets and to our ability to pay for all the things we need/want to import.

    Cats who’ve commented on eucalypts in California might be interested to know that eucalypts were introduced to that state in 1856. They were also introduced to Italy in the 19th century, and were seen by some as a solution to the malarious marshes around Rome (not sure if they worked there, but they clearly haven’t dealt with our Swamp).

  62. Roger

    A disaster-management focused National Guard could be worth pursuing.

    Army – full time and reservists – plus civil emergency services have that covered. Not sure we need another agency plus the bureaucracy that inevitably goes with it.

    The powers of state governments & local councils re land (mis)management need to be addressed by the Commonwealth. A summit – with national shaming of offending authorities – might be beneficial.

  63. Des Deskperson

    heres an ABC Op/ed by one ‘Janet’ who ‘ lost my home to bushfire’.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-11-12/nsw-bushfires-scott-morrison-thoughts-and-prayers/11697378?section=analysis

    Janet is highly critical of the Morrison government for failing to ‘make meaningful inroads into emissions reduction.’

    Your average reader coming across this would be entitled to assume that Janet is a simple, average Australian who has just lost everything, has suffered devastating trauma and therefore someone to whom attention must be paid. However:

    ‘Janet” actually lost her home in the 1983 fires, some four decades ago

    ‘Janet’ is not your ordinary punter. She is, rather, associate professor and principal research fellow at the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute at the University of Melbourne with a very large stake in a certain point of view.

    Somewhat mendacious, I think. BTW, if Janet, despite her ‘associate’ chair – does she get her own desk? – was more astute, it might have occurred to her that referring to a – so far – much worse fire event 36 years ago that claimed 80 lives doesn’t help her case.

  64. NuThink

    In the late eighties I bought 20 acres of “forest” near Adelaide. I tried to get permission to build but native vegetation sent out an inspector who looked at a few tiny plants and then wrote a report recommending refusal to clear for a house. I responded with my side to the saga and pointed out the surprising lack of attention to detail by the inspector, who did not mention in his report that there was a already a cleared and leveled section upon which stood the remains of a stone cottage from many moons before, and that was where I intended to build, and why was I being singled out when every other 20 acre blocks in the vicinity also had houses. I was very aware of the fire danger and an architect had designed a house for me with a sod roof to meet the 4 hour fire rating.
    The review panel sided with me.
    The photo from above of the area also clearly showed the cleared area. The inspector out in the field was the first time I had personal contact with such blatant bias of an inspector who omitted basic facts in his report. Up until that time I was trusting of the impartiality of public servants.

    The guy who had the property across the road from the entrance of the access track to my old stone cottage clearing approached me one day as I arrived, and berated me and told me off about wanting to build. He said it would spoil the area. He was standing in front of his shiny galvanised iron shed, so I asked him how come he did not build a green colourbond shed that would not stick out like a dog’s proverbials. That floored him and he had a lame excuse like they did not have any at the time he put up his shed. I told him he could paint it with camourflage or plain old khaki. He did not bother me again.
    I sold before I could build because of the high interest rates that ensued under Keating.

  65. Boambee John

    I thought he was an invited schoolie or something from an ABC drama. A complete dufus.

    Also a pinhead. His head looks small in proportion to his body.

  66. iamok

    Sorry folks I have not read any of this but I can confirm that Adam Bandt is getting smashed on social media for his politicising hypocrisy. And it is about fucking time, he is an A grade turd.

  67. calli

    I wondered about the avalanche of dumbtrolling here. Answered.

    Thanks iamok.

  68. JohnL

    The same old question emerges: will we learn this time, re burn-offs, national park bombs bigger than European countries, fire protection property rights etc?

    No, we will never learn!

  69. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Cohenite that mises site link is jam-packed. I found this bit amazing:

    Despite having the legal power to undertake controlled burning on its land, the Yarra Ranges Shire in Victoria refused to do this for years before it was hit by the bushfires, instead calling for “rigorous” environmental assessments to determine the breeding seasons of local flora and fauna and the effect on endangered Leadbeater’s possums.

    How many 10s of thousands of years has the Leadbeater’s possum been here? As though it’s just going to sit there and get burned! Pretty sure that possum knows to run away from fire. FFS, I think the Leadbeater’s possum might be more intelligent than the Greens party.

  70. Boambee John

    . FFS, I think the Leadbeater’s possum might be more intelligent than the Greens party.

    Definitely!

  71. egg_

    I can confirm that Adam Bandt is getting smashed on social media for his politicising hypocrisy.

    Bandit’s partying on down to a disco inferno?

  72. Tel

    If anything can be inferred from the statistics, the maximum temperature for the general area is slightly lower and the annual rainfall is slightly greater than a century ago.

    Those years around 1890 include the Federation Drought so that’s a reference point that leans towards unusually hot and dry.

    Mind you, all these climate statistics are very sensitive to where you start the trend, since they tend to be quasi-cyclic. Many of the BOM trends carefully start just a bit AFTER the Federation Drought and they can achieve the opposite trend as yours.

    I’m searching for how many fires were around during the Federation Drought and there doesn’t seem to be a lot of information out there. Joanne Nova has this graph which only goes back as far as 1950 …

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/jo.nova/graph/land/fires/fire-sw-wa-17.gif

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