The ongoing suffering of contemporary Western women

Dear ABC: If you’re going to push ‘social change’ 24/7 – about Women still battling sexism in the workplace, for example – at least require your ism roundsmen to come up with better sob stories than this one:

Simone Loone was Tasmania’s first female electrical contractor
and used to receive phone calls asking for “Simon.”


“Destitute pea pickers in California. Mother of seven children. Age 32. Nipomo, Calif, 1936.”
(Library of Congress)


The lady in this famous image – ‘migrant’ to California Florence Thompson – didn’t own a phone. On the day the picture was taken, she couldn’t feed her hungry children. The peas she and her husband travelled to pick had frozen in the ground overnight and were ruined. Consequently, there was no work available and no money to be made. The photographer was celebrated Great Depression photo-journalist, Dorothea Lange. Owens told Lange “they had been living on frozen vegetables from the surrounding fields and birds that the children killed.” Mrs Thompson had three more children (that’s 10). They all survived these grim years. Eventually, her children bought her a home in Modesto, CAL. She died, aged 80, in 1983. A daughter, Katherine, told CNN in 2008: “She didn’t eat sometimes, but she made sure us children ate.” Her gravestone reads: “FLORENCE LEONA THOMPSON Migrant Mother – A Legend of the Strength of American Motherhood.”

This entry was posted in History, Media. Bookmark the permalink.

40 Responses to The ongoing suffering of contemporary Western women

  1. Geriatric Mayfly

    Calling her Simon would almost be indictable these days, if the ABC, had its way under: Using A Carriage Service To Menace, Harass or Cause Offence. .

  2. Candy

    What suffering and hardship.
    I can’t help but wonder why her husband could not refrain sexually and just leave her alone. How much she and the children starved and suffered.

  3. Infidel Tiger

    It’s incredible. We no longer know real hardship so we invent it. We are pissants.

    P.s Florence was a babe.

  4. Scott Osmond

    Modern western women are the most pampered examples of femininity in human history. But they are still carrying on as if they are being oppressed. It gets tiresome.

  5. mh

    Chilling

    Simone Loone was Tasmania’s first female electrical contractor and used to receive phone calls asking for “Simon.”

    There is no God.

  6. Oh come on

    You’re a fine blogger, CL. I’d forgotten your mastery of the medium.
    It’s good to have you back.

  7. Zatara

    I can’t help but wonder why her husband could not refrain sexually and just leave her alone.

    Or, why she could not refrain sexually and leave her husband alone.

    That aside, when you are that poor your only distraction from that tough life might be each other. And when you were trying to establish a family farm having a bunch of kids to help isn’t a bad thing.

  8. Tom

    It’s incredible. We no longer know real hardship so we invent it.

    Correct.

    And blasted at us 24/7 by an unaccountable billion-dollar government propaganda megaphone controlled by political revolutionaries.

  9. areff

    The interesting thing about that ABC report is that it’s mostly good news:

    “The industry has changed a lot over the past 25 years, which makes me feel really good.”

    Hubby “knows about some of the situations women face in the male-dominated industries and was obviously worried I’d be upset by those situations, but I haven’t found that’s been an issue for me at all, ”

    As for Ms Boland, she started work “nd had to prove herself to the boss”.

    Men, of course, never have to demonstrate to the boss’s satisfaction that they can do the job.

    But the best victimhood-brings-rewards line is this:

    Higher pay rates for women would help get more involved in the industry, she said.

    Let’s achieve equality by paying women because uterus!

  10. Dianeh

    Higher pay rates for women would help get more involved in the industry, she said

    When in reality it would ensure no woman would ever be hired in the industry because they cost more than the men doing the same job.

  11. Tintarella di Luna

    Thank you C.L. great post. I remember when Gillard and the handbag hit squad were elected in 1998, Pilberserk, Anna Blight, Nicola Rockson etc… I read all their first speeches — talk about a privileged bunch of leg-upped whiners. To find some hardship they had to go back a few generations to Great Aunt Maud who lived through the 1890s — some whined at having worked as a checkout chick, but almost every real example of hardship had been endured by someone else, the hardship was no one personally experienced.

    I compared those speeches to the first speeches of Dorothy Tagney and Enid Lyons, the real trailblazers elected in 1943; both were modest, and did not dwell on the fact that they were women, they said they were there to represent all Australians.

    I am so heartily sick of whining privileged shielas with too much of so many advantages they can’t look beyond themselves to see that advantage is not a universal experience.

  12. struth

    Witten on the tear soaked paper and signed by 11 ooo scientists.

  13. Entropy

    That aside, when you are that poor your only distraction from that tough life might be each other. And when you were trying to establish a family farm having a bunch of kids to help isn’t a bad thing

    They were itinerant pickers, Grapes of Wrath style.

  14. Des Deskperson

    ‘Higher pay rates for women would help get more involved in the industry, she said’

    Surely unlawful under current industrial and human rights legislation.

  15. Mother Lode

    Did the story mention that anyone had suddenly lost interest when they found out it was a woman?

    I suspect there were some women who called and maybe called her Simon – but accept that such is the perniciousness of Dah Patriarchy, that women have been conditioned to see things from a male perspective and deny their authentic female self.

  16. struth

    Strangely enough with this pay situation for women….I just don’t believe they want money at all.
    I am a professional singer and muso and what I get paid to do, women will come up on stage and do for nothing.
    And beg to do it.
    They’ll even buy me drinks to do it.
    They don’t want money.
    They just don’t want to be electricians.
    They want to be in front of the spotlight, not fixing it.

  17. Rex Mango

    ABC RN yesterday had this show about ‘missionary feminsim’. The show argued that western women had no right to preach to other women, because there was no universality to feminism, or some such nonsense. It was essentialy an anti western tirade.:

    https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/philosopherszone/missionary-feminism/11708672

  18. Tel

    It’s incredible. We no longer know real hardship so we invent it.

    Told you we are the victims of our own success.

  19. Tim Neilson

    When in reality it would ensure no woman would ever be hired in the industry because they cost more than the men doing the same job.

    True, Dianeh.

    But there’d soon be a multi-hundred million dollar a year bureaucracy with coercive powers to force employers to hire them.

    Surely unlawful under current industrial and human rights legislation.

    Key word there is “current”, Des.

  20. Dr Fred Lenin

    These poor women should convert to islamofascism the religion that really knows how to reat women . They adore womens beauty so much they cover them in bags ,they ensure women never get cold keeping them wrapped up in all weathers . The men respect womens sexuality so much the use goats for pleasure .
    So get that hijab on girls you will have an interesting experience .
    Its like the guy complaing he has no shoes seeing a guy with no feet .

  21. Tom

    Mrs Thompson had three more children (that’s 10). They all survived these grim years. Eventually, her children bought her a home in Modesto, CAL. She died, aged 80, in 1983.

    Likewise in the land of plenty Down Under — south-west Victoria to be exact — I’m sure most of the Italian and Greek laborers who picked peas for contractors on our farm in the 1960s went on to become wealthy landowners, courtesy of the Australian property ponzi.

    But the current generation of millenials have been so thoroughly dumbed down by the Marxist education system and the ABC they know little about this country’s history.

  22. Rusty of Qld

    My old mother told us kids of a time during the depression when things got that bad that at one stage they (mum dad and six kids)only had a bag of pears to eat for a fortnight. Boiled pears, stewed pears, syrupy pears, raw pears, baked pears and pears in alsorts of concoctions. We now see how this current drought is killing off the countryside and I wonder how many poor bloody farming families are being reduced into conditions like those of the depression times.

  23. Huck

    Likewise in the land of plenty Down Under — south-west Victoria to be exact — I’m sure most of the Italian and Greek laborers who picked peas for contractors on our farm in the 1960s went on to become wealthy landowners, courtesy of the Australian property ponzi.

    That’s an interesting story Tom.
    My Father & Grandfather used to run teams of pea pickers around the Colac area back in the 60’s & 70’s.
    It’d be a nice small world if they did that at your place!

  24. What suffering and hardship.
    I can’t help but wonder why her husband could not refrain sexually and just leave her alone. How much she and the children starved and suffered.

    “Man is the lowest-cost, 150-pound, nonlinear, all-purpose computer system which can be mass-produced by unskilled labor.” – NASA: Gordon Silverman

    It’s 2019 and we still haven’t invented a robot that can pick peas in a paddock.

    And buy you a house when you turn 80.

  25. notafan

    and maybe Mrs Thompson didn’t mind either

    as for’ starved and suffered’

    the children said she made sure they always got fed and clearly no-one in the family thought the three youngest had no right to even exist

    nor was the depression the fault of Mr Thompson

  26. candy

    Bearing 10 children half starved and working in a cold field. I would wonder if she wanted the attentions of her husband. Keeping alive was probably the goal and not leaving orphans.

  27. pete m

    Stop concern trolling candy.

    You were not there.

    Most of the kids were born outside the worst if the depression years.

  28. notafan

    Bearing 10 children half starved and working in a cold field. I would wonder if she wanted the attentions of her husband. Keeping alive was probably the goal and not leaving orphans.

    keep blethering

    She didn’t ‘bear 10 children half starved and working in a corn field’

    you just made that up

    Seventeen-year-old Florence married Cleo Owens, a 23-year-old farmer’s son from Stone County, Missouri, on February 14, 1921. They soon had their first daughter, Violet, followed by a second daughter, Viola, and a son, Leroy (Troy).[2] The family migrated west with other Owens relatives to Oroville, California, where they worked in the saw mills and on the farms of the Sacramento Valley. By 1931, Florence was pregnant with her sixth child when her husband Cleo died of tuberculosis. Florence then worked in the fields and in restaurants to support her six children.[2] In 1933 Florence had another child, returned to Oklahoma for a time, and then was joined by her parents as they migrated to Shafter, California, north of Bakersfield. There Florence met Jim Hill, with whom she had three more children. During the 1930s the family worked as migrant farm workers following the crops in California and at times into Arizona. Florence later recalled periods when she picked 400–500 pounds (180–230 kg) of cotton from first daylight until after it was too dark to work. She said: “I worked in hospitals. I tended bar. I cooked. I worked in the fields. I done a little bit of everything to make a living for my kids.”[3]

    It was the depression and the situation was temporary
    and as you can see her husband died in 1931 and ‘left her alone”

  29. notafan

    pete m

    candy is a sock of a well known troll here

    gave it away here one Friday night a long time ago after two many Aldi white wines

  30. cohenite

    I thought women were made to suffer. That’s always been my approach: treat them mean and keep them keen. It’s worked a treat so it must be true.

  31. Kurt

    All this white privilege. Makes me sick. We should give our wealth to the third world. It is so unearned.

  32. Squirrel

    This is probably the sort of gritty realism we can expect from Aunty after Ita and the gang slummed it in Bankstown – at least they’ve got a story about someone doing a real job, rather than the usual demands for even more privilege for highly privileged women employed in overpaid b/s desk jobs.

  33. Their ABC doesn’t know about women and certainly doesn’t talk on behalf of women. My wife became a Victorian Ambulance service volunteer (a rural Victorian thing) post 50 years of age a few years ago, where the job involves driving an ambulance and responding to calls with or without a paramedic and attending to patients. She loves the job, is highly respected and has no issues with sexism. My niece is also a paramedic.

    There are many other women doing the same thing and they don’t have any issues with ‘workplace sexism’. Their ABC should, from time to time, get out of their Left wing cafes and visit the real world for a bit of enlightenment. But I suppose that venturing beyond the metropolitan boundary is a very scary thing for Their ABC ‘journalists’ and I use the term journalist very reservedly.

  34. Tel

    “Man is the lowest-cost, 150-pound, nonlinear, all-purpose computer system which can be mass-produced by unskilled labor.” – NASA: Gordon Silverman

    Sexist bastard!!

    But with the advent of minimum wage … robots look a lot more attractive … even if they can’t pick peas.

  35. mh

    Caption competition

    ‘At least we’re still have our white privelege’

  36. mh

    Bugger

    ‘At least we still have our white privelege’

  37. Mundi

    It was a union meeting to discuss plans to push the next labour government for sex based compensation, basically forcing companies to pay women extra who work in male dominated industries in the interests of equality etc.

  38. Nob

    Huck
    #3214927, posted on November 18, 2019 at 2:16 pm
    Likewise in the land of plenty Down Under — south-west Victoria to be exact — I’m sure most of the Italian and Greek laborers who picked peas for contractors on our farm in the 1960s went on to become wealthy landowners, courtesy of the Australian property ponzi.

    That’s an interesting story Tom.
    My Father & Grandfather used to run teams of pea pickers around the Colac area back in the 60’s & 70’s.
    It’d be a nice small world if they did that at your place!

    The peapickers we had used to come down on a contractors bus from Geelong.

    Mostly women wearing headscarves that we just called “Yugoslavs” but possibly Bosnian Muslims. I dunno. All sorts wore headscarves in those days.

    As a kid I worked alongside them a bit but no way could I keep up with them filling or stitching the bags so mostly was on the scales.

  39. Nob

    Huck
    #3214927, posted on November 18, 2019 at 2:16 pm
    Likewise in the land of plenty Down Under — south-west Victoria to be exact — I’m sure most of the Italian and Greek laborers who picked peas for contractors on our farm in the 1960s went on to become wealthy landowners, courtesy of the Australian property ponzi.

    That’s an interesting story Tom.
    My Father & Grandfather used to run teams of pea pickers around the Colac area back in the 60’s & 70’s.
    It’d be a nice small world if they did that at your place!

    The peapickers we had used to come down on a contractors bus from Geelong.

    Mostly women wearing headscarves that we just called “Yugoslavs” but possibly Bosniaks. I dunno. All sorts wore headscarves in those days.

    As a kid I worked alongside them a bit but no way could I keep up with them filling or stitching the bags so mostly was on the scales.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.