A Prime Minister called Amber or Dakota can’t be far off

Paul Collits’ No Country For Old Men (new at Quadrant) is an interesting companion-piece to this site’s currently controversial David Leyonhjelm assault on elderly “parasites.”


You know you are getting old when your country’s Treasurer is called “Josh” and a senator who goes by “Cory” is retiring. 


Collits goes on to discuss the implications of unemployment and under-employment for the post-50s.

This entry was posted in Cultural Issues, Economics and economy, Federal Politics. Bookmark the permalink.

30 Responses to A Prime Minister called Amber or Dakota can’t be far off

  1. stackja

    Josh and Cory are captive to MSM ‘JFK’ ‘Kev 07’ fixation.
    Cory didn’t seemingly understand politics.
    Is Josh saying all this or is some ‘smart’ staffer?
    Josh and ScoMo need to get ‘real world’ staff.
    I believe older Australians are getting tired of Canberra and state politicians who don’t know the real world.
    I believe bush fires and the drought are political failures. No proper water conservation or bush care.

  2. No proper water conservation or bush care.

    The millennials seems to blame the boomers for everything, but us boomers can certainly blame the millennials (in large part) for the declining state of our environment and lifestyle.

    And I don’t care what the future name of our PM is, as long as they are more like Thatcher than Gillard (or Turnbull, another blouse).

  3. sfw

    If you’re a white male over 50 it’s almost impossible to get a job, unless it’s truck driving. Due to some unfortunate circumstances I found myself looking for work at 57, I applied for at least 50 jobs in areas that I had experience and qualifications in (in several different fields), could not even get a return email much less an interview. I was previously a member of vicpol, I applied for a position at Albury Airport as a security officer, didn’t even get a reply.

    So like many in my situation I started a business and now work flat out doing it. I don’t really like it but there are few options.

  4. Roger

    …and the PM is called “Scott” but often goes by “ScoMo”.

  5. herodotus

    I’d say someone who has sniffed around politics repeatedly, under various flags, should be a bit cautious about using the term parasite.

  6. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Hey, what’s good for the goose is good for the gander.
    Heavenly Hiraani Tiger Lily Hutchence for UK Prime Minister 2025.
    Bindi Irwin for Australian Prime Minister 2030.
    Superman Wheaton for New Zealand Prime Minister, 2040.

  7. Dr Fred Lenin

    How about leaders called Tarquin or Stormy we may as well go full idiot ,gone are the days of Shorty ,Pudd and the one armed Wingy,good old Aussie names .
    “Dusty” Miller ,”Knobby “Clark “Stretch “Smith ,them was the days cobbers .

  8. PB

    I have nightmare visions of Presidentess Stormy getting her leathery tits out to support regime-change in the Middle East.

  9. Entropy

    None of this will apply to them of course.

  10. Squirrel

    I am reminded that Maggie Simpson was, at one time, struggling with an addiction to the “Non-threatening boys named Corey” hotline.

    Josh, at least, has O.T. precedent, and that sort of wisdom will be required if his platitudes about the economic impacts of an ageing population are to be translated into practical and politically viable action.

  11. Chris M

    I found myself looking for work at 57, I applied for at least 50 jobs…

    That’s sad, 50+ is the sort of age group I do & would prefer to employ. Typically reliable and knowledgeable.

    I was previously a member of vicpol

    Hmm that part may not float so well for some! Quite apart from the taint of the Vicpol image employing ex public servants can work out well but one needs to be very careful. All the best sfw.

    I’m totally fine with PM Amber or Dakota as I know they could scarcely be worse than the Kev/Juliar/Tony/Slomo bunch of boomers that have been grinding this country down.

  12. RobK

    I have nightmare visions of Presidentess Stormy getting her leathery tits out to support regime-change in the Middle East.
    Might work.

  13. Wozzup

    Writing as an over 50 I recognize that we have a fundamental problem. The problem is this. On both Left and Right the attitude is: “these are old farts”. Old farts are set in their ways. No matter what we do to them or for them it is not going to change their voting habits. So screw them – we have already got their votes. or we have already lost their votes so they just do not matter! (And besides appearing “woke” is much more cool and politicians love to look cool). That is about the nub of it. No one gives a crap because we do not count electorally for the above reasons.

  14. sfw

    Chris, I’m rather selective in what goes into applications and in that particular case it was a selling point, or should have been.

  15. Beachcomber

    It’s not “Josh” Frydenberg, it’s “Fredo”.

  16. candy

    I’m not sure christian names are important at all, it may be a little judgmental?

    A chap or lady with strong values and the wherewithal to see policy through and withstand the social media abuse and desire to be “polular”, and proceed to good policy because they believe in it.

    Probably quite hard to them though.

  17. Jimf

    I’ve just cracked 50, have been contracting for a while ,but last 9 months looking to get back into salaried roles at a senior level. Long time Director level successful career in a blue chip multi nat private sector firm , loads of variety of experience , managed a $550m budget and team of 105 ppl but can’t get past the 30 something upstarts in recruitment.
    For Josh to flippantly spruik the need for older Aust’s to retrain etc shows him to be an out of touch jerk. Australia is throwing good, hard working ppl to the scrap heap . There will be a price to pay.
    If I said this on twitter I’d get “ok boomer’ed” instantly!! (Even as a Gen x).

  18. Mak Siccar

    There is no Open Thread so I’ll post it here. An excellent article in The Spectator.

    FLAT WHITE

    Why men need to start being men again
    Caleb Stephen

    Caleb Stephen
    20 November 2019

    6:03 PM

    “Australia’s ‘man drought’ is real — especially if you’re a Christian woman looking for love” was the attention-grabbing ABC headline that caught my eye a few days ago.

    The story was about 32-year-old Anna Hitchings who expected to be married with children by now but hasn’t. She attributes this in a large part to there being a lack of men who share her Christian values.

    “It seems to be quite a rare thing to meet a man on the same level who also shares our faith,” she lamented.

    Ms Hitchings who has dated both Christian and non-Christian men went on to say that she once thought “that if you find someone that you love and get along with, everything will be fine — and that’s not true.”

    “You do have to sacrifice a lot to make a relationship work.”

    It really got my brain cogs turning on this one. You see, this problem is a symptom of a far deeper issue.

    When you look at the character of today’s men, it’s really not surprising why so many marriage-ready women are still single and why the breakdown of relationships and marriages are at an all-time high.

    And while it is true, that there are fewer men than women in Australia – 98.6 males for every 100 females – the growing problem is not just the lack of men alone but a lack of men with solid values.

    Furthermore, the issue is not men being too masculine, but rather men not being masculine enough. The issue is not men but the very values that shape who today’s men are.

    When masculinity is shunned, men by default run away from responsibilities resulting in despair, destruction and depression.

    We are currently in the middle of a manhood crisis. Women of today are crying out for men who can provide in both the realms of affection and basic life necessities but who can also lead them and ride through the storms of life with them.

    Women want real men.

    Women want men they can count on.

    Women want men they can look up to.

    Women want men who are brave, intentional, strong and tender.

    Whether that is responsibility for their own actions, responsibility for provision, protection and nurturing, more and more men are doing the complete opposite by running away from it.

    And the impact is staggering. In the United States, 71 per cent of kids who dropped out of high school are fatherless. This has a direct correlation to alarming rates of teen pregnancy, homelessness and mental health issues. The cycle just repeats itself. Fathers are 100% critical to the early developmental stages of a boy and those actions have a huge bearing on that boy’s progression into manhood.

    Manhood doesn’t begin at puberty. Manhood begins the moment values that will make a positive impact on the lives of those around them are forged.

    A boy’s voice can deepen with physical maturity, but a boy does not simply transition into manhood overnight.

    Strong men are not products of mere social constructs, cultural pressures or personality clones.

    Strong men are needed for happy families, thriving relationships and healthy communities.

    And while there is the notion of “toxic masculinity” swirling about in today’s culture, the answer to the reckless and irresponsible actions of men is not less masculinity, but more.

    Radical agendas including “gender equality” pushed by various ideologues are also very unhelpful and severely detrimental to this cause. These radicals believe that feminising men will achieve the goal of eliminating sexism, abuse and violence perpetrated by men on women whether that’s in a domestic, workplace or other context.

    Masculinity isn’t toxic. It’s actually men who aren’t masculine which brings about toxicity. Feminine, passive men don’t stop evil. It’s strong, resolute men of grit who stop evil.

    Weak, little men who use and abuse women instead of protecting, loving and cherishing them is the cause.

    Strong men with Christian values will treat women with respect, provide, protect and make responsible life decisions.

    The bottom line is our society is not suffering from a lack of males, but rather a shortage of real masculinity which results in great harm to women and children and society as a whole.

  19. “Australia’s ‘man drought’ is real — especially if you’re a Christian woman looking for love” was the attention-grabbing ABC headline that caught my eye a few days ago.

    The story was about 32-year-old Anna Hitchings who expected to be married with children by now but hasn’t. She attributes this in a large part to there being a lack of men who share her Christian values.

    Sad.

    Doesn’t even know how wrong or indoctrinated she is.

  20. yarpos

    Personally I am waiting for some of the bogan name mispellings (or creative spellings if you like) to come shining through like Mishel, Jakxsen, Feebi or Harisyn. All real by the way, its a thing.

  21. You mean Mickael Jashon?

    A mate of mine taught a kid called Danail.

    Pronounced, apparently, to fuckwit bogans, as “Daniel”.

    Yep, *da nail*.

  22. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    the issue is not men being too masculine, but rather men not being masculine enough. The issue is not men but the very values that shape who today’s men are.

    There is good sense in this statement. It also ties in with the theme of this thread, that older workers who are male are finding it hard to get work. Work is often what defines a man, probably more so than it does a woman. At the heart of the definitional issue of ‘the persona’ is modern feminism, which has the aim of diminishing all traditional gendered roles, in the workplace and in family life.

    As for the 32 year old who wanted to be married but can’t find a ‘Christian’ enough man. I suspect what she means is she can’t find a manly enough man. I hope she finds someone who is a manly Christian. Perhaps to she needs to realise that ‘giving way’ on certain things, expectations perhaps, is part and parcel of the marital deal. Each couple has to work out what they want and how they will love each other.

  23. Work is often what defines a man, probably more so than it does a woman.

    Careful there, friendly chap who does some chores in exchange for food and free lodging…

  24. Chris M

    Doesn’t even know how wrong or indoctrinated she is.

    Another God hater. Australia has so many people that despise our western culture.

  25. No, that woman is a god hater, if she was a good woman in her 20s, she’d be married.

    Enough of this rejection of the logos.

    What was she doing in her 20s?

    Can’t she figure this out herself?

  26. egg_

    Masculinity isn’t toxic. It’s actually men who aren’t masculine which brings about toxicity. Feminine, passive men don’t stop evil. It’s strong, resolute men of grit who stop evil.

    Amen.
    Both Genders, actually.

    “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

  27. A “conservative” woman in her 30s who can’t find a husband, blames men.

    News at 11.

  28. Juan

    Josh, at least, has O.T. precedent

    But there is no “Josh” to be found anywhere in the Old Testament. There is a Joshua (Yehoshua) but I think the original point isn’t so much what appears on the Treasurer’s birth certificate, but rather how he is known to the populace.

    But allow me to make the case for why we — and especially if you’re Christian — should embrace these novel variations of traditional given names.

    Jesus comes to us from the Hebrew name Yeshua, an alternative spelling, diminutive, or contraction of the Old Testament’s Joshua (Yehoshua). The former wasn’t an evolution or replacement for the latter, as both were widely used in the 1st Century (in fact there were a lot of Jesuses around!)

    So mock Mishel, Jakxsen, Feebi, Harisyn, and even Danail, if you wish but bear in mind the uppity 1st Century types who did the same to any of their contemporaries named Yeshua: “What … four syllables is one too many for you?”

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