Enough Dope

Andrew Denton has made a bizarre pseudo-mercy dash to Queensland to demand that Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk introduce a bill to legalise euthanasia before the October 2020 state election. Denton says if the LNP wins office next year, such a law won’t be passed. “That means at a minimum another four more years of bad deaths, all the trauma that brings, and suicides of terminally ill,” he told reporters at Parliament House. The latter was a strange lament. Is he a suicide supporter or not? Denton was described in one report yesterday as “the most high profile advocate of voluntary assisted dying.” While he may or may not regard that as flattering, if true it doesn’t say much for the intellectual firepower of the cause. For money and media coverage, however, the pro-euthanasia lobby is not wanting. In Queensland, the cashed-up Clem Jones Trust play-acts the role of tribune of the little people on the subject. When its exalted boss speaks, reporters listen. Asked yesterday about Denton’s intervention, his response was predictably sectarian and obnoxious:

David Muir, chair of the Clem Jones Trust, says a minority of those who favour life over choice are taking up too much space on the issue.

“That minority is represented by some church leaders here in Queensland who are opposing it … they are opposing something that the congregations want,” he told reporters. [Without any evidence – C.L.].

“The travesty is that we have a small group of people in Queensland who are campaigning to try to stop it, and we need to listen to the majority.”

Muir is also chairman of The Real Republic – another outfit bankrolled by the estate of Clem Jones, the late long-serving Labor mayor of Brisbane. He admires Paul Keating for his willingness to verbally “attack” his foes. You could never guess. (To his credit, in fact, Keating is one of the country’s most eloquent opponents of euthanasia). As for Muir being a spokesman for the average man, nothing says ‘common touch’ like a republican insurance lawyer who boasts of being a Knight of Honour of the Order of St John of Jerusalem. In most Queensland pubs, that wouldn’t be regarded as a rank. Close enough, though. It seems knights, even ones invested in a knock-off order of recent invention, aren’t what they used to be. Attacking divines and minorities on behalf of the mob – to make it permissible to kill the weak – doesn’t exactly reek of chivalry.

Unlike Denton, Campbell Newman is at least a son of the Sunshine State and was its leader from 2012 to 2015. Earlier this year he testified to the parliamentary committee on end-of-life and palliative care. Forgetting he was a mere premier and not a king, Newman told the committee he should have legalised voluntary assisted dying when he was in office. That’s because his mother – former senator Jocelyn Newman – had Alzheimer’s and her suffering at the end was not “dignified.” She died in April, 2018.

In March, Newman wrote an article about his mother’s decline which appeared in several newspapers. “We saw a charismatic and commanding woman change,” he recalled. “The whip smart mind was lost, she became argumentative and aggressive. This then morphed into a state of bewilderment and her body wasted away like her mind.” The first thing I thought on reading this remembrance was, she never ceased being your mother, “morphed” and “wasted” or not. The second: a man who looks back on the premiership with which he was entrusted only to lament that he didn’t make it easier for certain people to die – rather than to regret not having done more to help them live well – is a man who didn’t deserve high office in the first place.

“Voluntary assisted dying” (VAD) is a deliberately contrived euphemism for the illegal aiding of a suicide. In essence, Denton and Newman want parliament to remove that stumbling block (“illegal”) from the Queensland criminal code in relation to one special class of abettor: doctors. Perversely, this would licence as Ian Fleming double 0s the very people entrusted to defend life. It would obliterate the Hippocratic Oath and endorse a fiction rejected at Nuremberg; namely, that killing certain people is morally permissible if a legislature allows it and you were following orders. Nor is it a conflation of categories to speak of assisted suicide as an indictable offence in the hierarchy of homicidal crimes. If a friend in crisis asks you for a Walther and you hand one over, then brother, you’re going to trial – and not just for the gun.

VAD propagandists have released several catchphrase bacilli into the airwaves we breathe. These include “dying with dignity” and the creepy Philip Nitschke’s “peaceful pill.” The same activists have a cynical habit of publicising sad stories told by hand-picked celebrities – even B-list Hasselhoffers who won’t go away. Denton, like Newman, has declared that a parent’s difficult death brought him to the “assisted dying” movement. Conventionally enough in a broader lobby clearly in thrall to Orwell, his organisation is called “Go Gently.” I saw a few of his recent come-back interviews. That’s advice he should consider taking.

Appeals to emotion are not only fallacious logically but vainglorious when accompanied by demands for the corruption of the law to salve personal feelings. Denton must explain why we should now empower medical personnel to kill, against all the evidence of the twentieth century which proves that hard cases make good slogans but bad, murderous law. He must justify the incitement this would constitute for the vulnerable, who will know the state regards their lives as “undignified.” He has to prove – not beyond a reasonable doubt but beyond all conceivable doubt – that the law will never be altered to sanction the killing of not just the terminally ill, but of the depressed and the hopeless as well. (As it has been elsewhere in the world). But you will never hear him or any of his confrères make such a case. Those arguments have been lost at the bar of history. So they hide behind the brown-shirted nastiness of “the majority,” beat up on priests and try to frighten the elderly. All because they saw death once and didn’t like it.

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68 Responses to Enough Dope

  1. Woolfe

    Les Deplorables

    @woolfe
    ·

    Maybe you can try it and get back to us?

    Derryn Hinch

    @HumanHeadline
    · 20m
    Whose life is it anyway? Tonight, we look at dying with dignity, voluntary euthanasia. It’s now legal in Victoria. SA and WA getting close. How is it working? What can get better? HINCH 8 o’clock. SKY News and WIN.

  2. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Perhaps andrew d can lead by example?

  3. yarpos

    “The latter was a strange lament. Is he a suicide supporter or not? ”

    because people who are driven to it in desperation can chose desperate means, which may or may not be effective , and can traumatise family and emergency services left with the aftermath. Its convenient to try and make it a black and white argument, but sadly the world isnt that convenient. Dont really understand why people get so wound up about other peoples end of life choices, quite literally none of your business unless someone makes it mandatory to follow their rules, rather than them following your rules.

  4. stackja

    If someone wants to commit suicide aren’t we supposed to call lifeline?

  5. yarpos

    “Perhaps andrew d can lead by example?”

    how very libertarian, tolerant and inclusive of you

  6. candy

    I wonder if some of those pushing for euthanasia want someone to be deceased because it is too difficult to be there for them emotionally and physically, despite the palliative care being appropriate and the person’s death only months away, if that.

    Maybe there is some guilt attached to this whole push.

  7. Mother Lode

    how very libertarian, tolerant and inclusive of you

    Did Zippy try to force Hinch to do something? Or wryly make a point as to why he disagrees?

    Tolerance does not mean lying and pretending to be in agreement. It means not shutting someone up.

    I will assume you don’t mean ‘inclusive’ in the progressive sense of ‘100% quotas, 0% merit’. Otherwise what sphere does inclusive refer to? Do we have to be inclusive in our friendships even with people with whom we have nothing in common with? I don’t think Zippy’s and Hinch’s circles overlap much – socially, professionally, liver mileage etc.

  8. Bruce of Newcastle

    These people aren’t leading by example since they’re still breathing.

    The hypocrisy is endless, since the elites ban things like repeat scripts for codeine, and require difficult efforts by pain-inflicted pensioners to get adequate relief. There’re even pushes for paracetamol and ibuprofen to be made prescription only because of people topping themselves. Yet they now want to encourage people top themselves. Sheesh.

  9. Frank

    Maybe there is some guilt attached to this whole push.

    The inheritance being consumed by nursing fees when the oldsters choose to linger.

  10. Death with the dignity of seeing it right through to the end, no matter what.

  11. lotocoti

    Sit with a loved one through the final weeks of Motor Neuron Disease.
    Then get back to me.

  12. Mother Lode

    Sit with a loved one through the final weeks of Motor Neuron Disease.
    Then get back to me.

    I think we need to distinguish between people authorising their own suicides, and other people deciding to let them die.

    In the former it really is a suicide in as much it is killing yourself using a doctor as an instrument.

    In the latter there is the concern that whomsoever makes the decision they might be motivated by their own wishes, which becomes the more disturbing when ignoring a possibility of amelioration in the illness.

    Then there is the case of mental disease where the very condition reduces or removes the ability to make the decision. Perhaps a decision of one instant would be regretted in a future life which is lost by suicide.

  13. feelthebern

    For some reason, Andrew Denton demanded (unsuccessfully) for the state to end his fathers life.
    I don’t understand his lack/his fathers lack of balls to take care of the business.
    If my own personal outlook was to become some dribbling mess, I would take care of the business myself.
    Why would I look to the state to make the decision or carry out the act?
    But then again, I’m not some bend-the-knee statist.

  14. feelthebern

    For some reason, Andrew Denton demanded (unsuccessfully) for the state to end his fathers life.
    I don’t understand his lack/his fathers lack of b*lls to take care of the business.
    If my own personal outlook was to become some dribbling mess, I would take care of the business myself.
    Why would I look to the state to make the decision or carry out the act?
    But then again, I’m not some bend-the-knee statist.

  15. Winston

    I have a lot of sympathy for the very good arguments against euthanasia. However, one of my grandmothers checked out with full blown Parkinsons and Dementia. She lay in a nursing home bed with only the cognitive ability to hold a 1000 mile stare at the ceiling, unresponsive to anything, quivering with the Parkinsons, kept alive only by literally pumping food paste into her stomach and relying on someone else to clean up the other end. Don’t ask me how long it was like this, I was only a early teen at the time, but it was over a year. I remember being surprised how hard it was for the body to stop working for so long after the higher brain functions had ceased.

    If I kept a dog alive like that at home I’d be called a sicko who needs to learn to let go.

    In a case such as that, the withdrawal of food and water would be a hideous death. Why not a hot shot of opiates to go out with, I could only hope, as much peace as possible? I don’t have the answers to address all the arguments against it, but in a case like this, where the subject’s mind is long gone and the situation is truly hopeless, I think there should be a way to peacefully pass.

  16. feelthebern

    Why not a hot shot of opiates to go out with, I could only hope, as much peace as possible?

    Great way to go.
    You parents should have taken control of the situation.

  17. Gab

    If I kept a dog alive like that

    But your grandmother was not a dog. She was human and human life is precious, yes, more precious that a dog’s.

  18. lotocoti

    I think there should be a way to peacefully pass.

    Under no circumstances, according to the psychopaths who preference doctrinal purity above all other considerations.

  19. dover_beach

    It tell us a lot about contemporary society that the acute vulnerability of the terminally ill is considered ‘undignified’ and worthy of death.

  20. Rex Mango

    Very well written piece. Amazing aspect of this whole debate is no-one has ever been prosecuted for suicide. Euthanasia another euphemism for government taking over responsibility for people’s lives. Logically if you are for euthanasia, you should also have no problem with the death penalty.

  21. C.L.

    I think there should be a way to peacefully pass.

    Sure. Just ask about a half-dozen medical staff to kill you.
    Sounds peaceful, right?

    Denton and Newman are just narcissists.
    They’re not hurt; they’re affronted by human frailty. Not the same thing at all.

  22. lotocoti

    Tell me about the dignity of the loss of peristalsis, of not being able to even blink.
    Of “in distress” that anodyne phrase signifying that the current opiate dosage isn’t enough to maintain unconsciousness.
    Tell me about the dignity of waiting for dehydration and morphine toxicity to finally deliver peace.

  23. C.L.

    Sorry, Winston. That sounded rude.
    Palliative care is the best strategy for all – and it really does have to be about everyone.
    Strange as it may sound, it’s not all about the patient.
    As Keating says in the linked article, this is a threshold. We can’t cross it, we can’t give ourselves this right, under a compassionate pretext. We’ve seen before where that leads.

  24. feelthebern

    I’m going out like a rockstar.
    A massive hit of horse to send me to Valhalla.

  25. feelthebern

    We’ve seen before where that leads.

    This is the key.

  26. C.L.

    Tell me about the dignity of waiting for dehydration and morphine toxicity to finally deliver peace.

    Instead, why don’t you tell us what was undignified about it.

    (And please stop assuming you’re the only one who’s been through this).

  27. dover_beach

    Tell me about the dignity…

    There is no indignity in it.

  28. lotocoti

    Keep buffing that halo.

  29. JC

    Euthanasia is alive and well in public hospitals. I had to tell a doctor and his team that if he tried one more time to try and talk me into “letting my mother die of thirst and hunger” I’d report him to the police (not that it would do any good). I demanded to see his boss and retold the pressure he was trying to put me through. Imagine this dickhead with the power the law allows. This was in Feb 2013. She’s still alive. Not well. but certainly still alive.
    I wasn’t just thinking for myself, but I was acting on what I believed her wishes to be in respect to her religious and ethnic convictions..

  30. Gab

    And to be clear, “brain dead” is not dead dead.

  31. JC

    feelthebern
    #3247183, posted on November 28, 2019 at 5:41 pm

    We’ve seen before where that leads.

    This is the key.

    No way for me. Dying is for losers as I keep saying. I will be kept alive even with that tiny minute fraction of .00000000000000000001% I could come back healthy. The other side is 100% I never will.

  32. JC

    Gab
    #3247201, posted on November 28, 2019 at 5:57 pm

    And to be clear, “brain dead” is not dead dead.

    A while ago, I was reading that even dead dead may not be either. FMD.

    Here’s the test. Let’s see Denton try it out first before I lift an eyelid. I want to see one of these advocates go as a demonstration that it’s okay to croak it.

  33. Gab

    JC, it’s a Catholic thing.

  34. C.L.

    Euthanasia is alive and well in public hospitals. I had to tell a doctor and his team that if he tried one more time to try and talk me into “letting my mother die of thirst and hunger” I’d report him to the police …

    Wow. That’s blatant malpractice.

  35. Dr Fred Lenin

    Bruce the painkiller ban is to stop people from illegally topping themselves that’s private enterprise and bad.
    Government sanctioned suicide is legal So therefore good , you can’t go taking your life without government sanction not in the people’s Decromatic globalist state , The UNiparty wont allow it .

  36. Whalehunt Fun

    Brain dead is not dead dead. Brain dead is ABC employed.

  37. Dr Fred Lenin

    JC. What are you doing throwing global warming numbers around the science is settled .
    Read about these concerned climateers vowing never to fly again to save the planet .
    How are the others going to get to those 20,000 strong climate conferences in luxury resorts ?
    How are they going to work out how to stop the climate catastrophe ,?
    some people just don’t think do they ?

  38. Roger

    It tell us a lot about contemporary society that the acute vulnerability of the terminally ill is considered ‘undignified’ and worthy of death.

    +1000, dover.

  39. Tel

    … letting my mother die of thirst and hunger …

    This was the link I put on the open thread.

    https://fullfact.org/health/how-many-patients-die-thirst-or-starvation/

    Something to think about.

  40. If Christians and those of other proscriptive faiths hold that it is wrong to terminate one’s own life (in certain given circumstances) then fair enough – for them.

    They can choose to go their god in a condition they assume their deity will find acceptable.

    The rest of us should be free of the pain of their superstitious medievalism.

  41. Gab

    … letting my mother die of thirst and hunger …

    And they do the same for babies that survive abortion. Just leave then to die alone without any care.

  42. Bruce

    Arnold Christopher “Kit” Denton, originally Arnold Ditkofsky, 1928-1997,was a writer and broadcaster prominent in Australia. Denton was born in England and was of Polish Jewish descent. He was the father of comedian and television presenter Andrew Denton.

    Father and son: chalk and cheese, it seems.

  43. Gab

    Well you are free to do as you please, Richard, no one is stopping you. But that still doesn’t make it right morally or ethically. And there are plenty of non-Christians who think the same.

    In the end, we will all face God, atheists as well. If I’m wrong, laugh your head off, but if I’m right …

  44. J.H.

    yarpos
    #3247074, posted on November 28, 2019 at 2:47 pm
    “The latter was a strange lament. Is he a suicide supporter or not? ”

    because people who are driven to it in desperation can chose desperate means, which may or may not be effective , and can traumatise family and emergency services left with the aftermath. Its convenient to try and make it a black and white argument, but sadly the world isnt that convenient. Dont really understand why people get so wound up about other peoples end of life choices, quite literally none of your business unless someone makes it mandatory to follow their rules, rather than them following your rules.

    You completely miss the point… Assisted dying is Doctors killing patients. It is morally bankrupt to allow the state to proceed down this path.

    If people want to kill themselves, they can.That is not the issue. The controversy is in allowing doctors to commit homicide.

  45. Roger

    The rest of us should be free of the pain of their superstitious medievalism.

    Chronological fallacy.

  46. C.L.

    If people want to kill themselves, they can. That is not the issue. The controversy is in allowing doctors to commit homicide.

    Yes.

    It’s an interesting question from a libertarian point of view.
    Libertarians might say, ‘how dare the state stop me from dying as and when I wish?’
    But nobody is stopping you.

    The Christian says, ‘how dare you licence doctors to kill people? That affects me and the people I love – and destroys a noble profession.’

    The dead hand of statism is obvious in the latter, not the former.

  47. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    I’m going out like a rockstar.

    I’m going out in blaze of drugs, hookers, brand new sports car (bought on borrowed money) being chased by cops across a tri-state area before driving over a cliff (or running into brick wall, whichever is more convenient).

    This will take place after euthanasing every collectivist imbecile I can get my hands on.

  48. The rest of us should be free of the pain of their superstitious medievalism

    Righteous 3500 year old Mosaic law.

  49. The state taking part of the decision making process is wrong.

    I’m for euthanasia, I’m even willing to make an argument that Jesus Christ was mercifully finished off…

    The state must not get involved. Those two brothers killing themselves in Belgium, kids, etc, just wrong.

  50. Hugh

    A few years back, a Catholic priest (P) was on air with Phillip Adams (PA).

    It went something like this:

    (P) “Phil, you’re against the death penalty?’

    (PA) “Absolutely.”

    (P) “And that’s because, no matter how good the justice system is, some people will inevitably be mistakenly classified as persons who can be justifiably killed?”

    (PA) “Yes.”

    (P) “Well, why aren’t you, on the same grounds, opposed to legalized euthanasia?”

    (PA) … (huff’n’puff) …

  51. Bruce of Newcastle

    I’ll make mention of the following story from last year:

    NETHERLANDS: Elderly Woman Forcibly Euthanized (3 Aug)

    When the doctor came in to euthanize her, the patient was not informed of what was going to happen to her, to ‘avoid unnecessary distress.’ She was given coffee with a sedative in it, but she refused to drink it — and then struggled as the doctor tried to kill her. She fought so fiercely that the doctor ordered her own family to physically hold her down, and she was forcibly euthanized.

    The issue is exactly this. As soon as you allow it it will be used for convenience. The innocent will be the victims, just like abortion.

  52. pbw

    Winston,

    I have a lot of sympathy for the very good arguments against euthanasia. However, one of my grandmothers checked out with full blown Parkinsons and Dementia. She lay in a nursing home bed with only the cognitive ability to hold a 1000 mile stare at the ceiling, unresponsive to anything, quivering with the Parkinsons, kept alive only by literally pumping food paste into her stomach and relying on someone else to clean up the other end. Don’t ask me how long it was like this, I was only a early teen at the time, but it was over a year. I remember being surprised how hard it was for the body to stop working for so long after the higher brain functions had ceased.

    So, Winston, how did she feel about it? From the sound of it, she couldn’t have cared less. In that case, the argument for euthanasia is from the people who find the slow process of dying terribly distasteful.

    My mum died slowly in hospital – so slowly that we kids didn’t realise that she was dying – but she was always aware, and she clung to life tenaciously.

  53. Juan

    In the end, we will all face God, atheists as well. If I’m wrong, laugh your head off, but if I’m right …

    I don’t think that’s a particularly helpful comment. Just imagine a Muslim saying:

    ‘Gab, in the end, we will all face Allah, you Christians as well. If I’m wrong, laugh your head off, but if I’m right … ‘

  54. Juan

    In the end, we will all face God, atheists as well. If I’m wrong, laugh your head off, but if I’m right …

    I don’t think that’s a particularly helpful comment. Just imagine someone of a different faith saying:

    ‘Gab, in the end, we will all face Allah, you Christians as well. If I’m wrong, laugh your head off, but if I’m right … ‘

  55. Tel

    No. When we die we will all face the Spaghetti Monster, and you better be wearing your metal colander that day my friends.

  56. Winston

    PBW – that’s a large part of my point. By that stage I completely don’t believe she felt anything at all. Her mind was well and truly gone. The last time I recall her out of nursing care, my parents brought her home for Christmas lunch. She clearly didn’t know who anyone was or where she was or what was going on. She had the look of desperate fear in her eyes, as if being led to the gallows. She either wouldn’t or couldn’t speak by that point, and ended up vomiting all over the lunch table before we served up, due to her being in a complete panic attack. So the whole day of good intentions didn’t really work out as planned on any level.

    It was a while, many months, after that I last saw her a few times completely unresponsive and cognitively checked out from this world. Only the shell of her body persisted. I think that is a significantly different circumstance to the one you had to endure (funnily enough, my other grandmother’s situation was similar to yours). And yes – I would basically go along with my case of being the argument for euthanasia is for the people left behind. But to think there isn’t a cost for family and carers dealing with that husk of a body, painfully slowly wasting away when the mind has checked out long ago, would be foolish. I cannot to this day understand that point of forcing a body to live under such circumstances. I was never equating my grandmother to a dog, it really doesn’t help implying that from other comments, the point is that in the real world, there actually is a time to let go.

    Sadly, where euthanasia has been allowed, I can very well see the abuses of it. So yes, maybe as a society we just don’t deserve it as an option. The thing is, it’s apparently ethical to stop artificial feeding and hydration as part of end of life ‘treatment’. That just strikes me as a far crueler way to go versus an opiate assisted death. If it’s ok to commit to the withdrawal of feeding/hydration, I’m lost as to why it’s not better to cut to the chase with the latter.

  57. John A

    In most Queensland pubs, that wouldn’t be regarded as a rank.

    But it may be regarded as rank, however! 🙂

  58. dover_beach

    The rest of us should be free of the pain of their superstitious medievalism.

    Notice how the proponents prefer to engage in theatrics and calumnies rather than attend to the arguments.

  59. The BigBlueCat

    The rest of us should be free of the pain of their superstitious medievalism.

    You can be as free as you like … you have the free will to believe or disbelieve. But we ought to be very concerned about government willingness to participate in the end-of-life events of people who can make the same choices regardless of whether or not the state sanctions (or even is an active participant) in “voluntary assisted suicide”.

    On one hand, we have government decrying youth suicide, and on the other hand, promoting suicide based on “dignity”. Surely the youth have a perceived “dignity” issue too … why stop their death? But my point is why promote self-selected death for one group, and not for the other? Surely (if life is so sacred), the government should be affirming live rather than sanctioning taking it away. If the latter, then bring back the death penalty for murder!

  60. A reader

    Also notice how many of the proponents of euthenasia are also on beaches trying to stop suicidal whales from killing themselves.

  61. Gowest

    1. These loud noise makers always come down to money. It would be interesting to post the Salary and net worth of Clem Jones vs the people he thinks are making too much noise.
    The guy sounds like a bank CEO on a performance bonus.
    2. Is it just me or is there a concerted effort to bleed and get rid of the aged. – States ramming thru assisted dying in a bloody hurry. The economic growth too slow for govt taxation — sorry revenue!. Not enough inflation to destroy elderly savings. Lower interest designed to destroy elderly savings. A royal commission – with only one possible outcome – higher elderly care costs. High energy costs. Packed roads full of hyper aggressive drivers. Prowling miscreants trying invade your home – with nil police protection. High super fund costs – the list goes on.

  62. dover_beach

    It is indeed obscene to be campaigning for the right to kill the sick and aged in the midst of an aged care crisis.

  63. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    It is indeed obscene to be campaigning for the right to kill the sick and aged in the midst of an aged care crisis.

    If you’re a collectivist, it’s a logical solution to an intractable problem and involves their favourite activity, which is killing lots of people. Oldies are “useless eaters” and low hanging fruit (as are little brown people in far off lands).

  64. Twostix

    Sit with a loved one through the final weeks of Motor Neuron Disease.
    Then get back to me

    Sit near a family whose children and already talking about getting a valuation on the house.

    Yes we who have spent time in getiatric wards know what lies deep in the hearts of many euthanasia proponents.

  65. Twostix

    It will be sad that the generation who delivered us mass abortion will now finish with state approved “suicide” hanging over them as they lay frail in beds completelt reliant on the christian charity of their children and (african) strangers.

    You only had to listen to your elders, they told you this would happen.

  66. Kneel

    “On one hand, we have government decrying youth suicide, and on the other hand, promoting suicide based on “dignity”.”

    This is the same mob that told young women to only buy pre-mixed drinks to avoid date rape drugs and then put up the price of pre-mixed because more people were drinking them.

    They also increased the price of fossil fueled electricity until they could say “renewables are cheaper”.

    They also say speeding is THE major contributor to road deaths, but neglect to mention that “speeding” includes excess speed for the conditions but less than the speed limit – which is 7 times more prevalent in deaths than exceeding the limit. But the only “speeding” they prosecute is the 1/7th.

  67. Old Lefty

    It’s not as simple, Richard Laidlaw, as people having the right to end their own lives. What the euthanasia lobby wants is the right for them to force medical staff to kill them.

    And it’s not about putting granny out of her misery, but out of our misery.

    Campbell Newman, let is not forget, was such a boofhead that he wasted one of the biggest majorities in history in a single term.

  68. Tel

    Euthanasia is not really about suicide … it is about assisted suicide, and if you don’t believe the distinction is significant, you can ask Jeffrey Epstein to explain it to you.

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