QED

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17 Responses to QED

  1. That’s all well and good, but what about reliable access to electricity?

  2. stackja

    Trees have depowered some north Sydney suburbs.

  3. Tel

    That’s a BS map … South Australia is nowhere near 100%.

    It’s also kind of a silly premise, because many forms of electricity are intrinsically portable: genset, battery, solar cell, etc. If all you want to indicate is “access” then everyone has access. What they are really saying is connection to a fixed grid with large scale generation capability and minimal downtime … in which case SA should be derated based on excessive downtime. Possibly Victoria should too.

    Then we could talk about costs … Africa is cheaper for grid connection than Australia, and even if you don’t have a grid connection the diesel is also cheaper. Think about that for a minute. I guess if you want to compare cost of living as based on percentage of median income then Australia starts to look a bit better again.

  4. Entropy

    A screen saver on the Apple TV 4K includes a satellite view of the night side of the earth as it tracks east from Mongolia, over Northern China, North Korea, South Korea and Japan. Absolutely Amazing.

  5. NuThink

    The 15 episode serial of Darkest Africa made in 1936 is still playing out.
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0027502/

    A 15-episode serial in which Beatty goes to darkest Africa to rescue the Goddess of Joba, who is being held by the high priest.

  6. rich

    In parts of Kalimantan in Indonesian Borneo there are blackouts for 3 hours at a time.

    Even if they have access to electricity, every business either has to be able to operate without electricity. So that 100% may not be an accurate number

  7. old bloke

    A map showing the global cost of electricity would be interesting.

  8. 1735099

    I wonder how many can remember the days before we had access in Oz.
    I was 11 when we were hooked up to the grid for the first time.
    I don’t remember feeling deprived.
    You used a bowser with a handle to fuel the A40.
    We had a kero fridge and battery radio.
    My dad could have a cold beer whilst listening to the cricket.
    Good times.

  9. Helen

    That is rubbish, NT has f all, just the towns, everyone else has to amke their own

  10. Speedbox

    Parts of India have very limited (if at all) electricity but the map refers to ‘access’ not ‘continuity of supply’.

  11. Bruce of Newcastle

    Electricity consumption is linear with GDP per capita.

    Graph

    You can look at the data anyway you like. Energy consumption is linked to prosperity intimately. If you want a prosperous country you must have cheap abundant energy. No exceptions.

  12. RobK

    You don’t have to go far from regional centres in Australia to be off the grid. Subsidies and contributary schemes for household connections in the regions are long gone( certainly in WA). The fringe of the grid and beyond is ripe for islanded schemes such as the WA government is doing. I know of no islanded remote area power systems, where continuous supply is critical, that doesn’t have diesel backup. The state often does provide headworks deals for major projects….such as mines and wind farms. Islanded schemes are more expensive than grid distribution if the consumers are reasonably close together. Grid schemes work best with big generators. Even commercial wind and solar gravitate to big schemes. Domestic solar is messy and not very cost effective in comparison ( lots of fiddly maintenance and overall inefficient). That domestic solar even gets a feed-in tariff is ludicrous.
    Most people don’t realise that a city uses electricity for essential services like sewage pumping, water pumping, high rise ventilation, street lights, freezers, then there’s a mass of industrial consumption which pays the bills.
    It’s the subsidies that make this cancer spread.

  13. Speedbox

    Most people don’t realise that a city uses electricity for essential services like sewage pumping, water pumping, high rise ventilation, street lights, freezers, then there’s a mass of industrial consumption which pays the bills.

    I’ve tried to point this out to an idiot I’ve met during my current contract. He has proudly told me that he gets all his news from the ABC. He brags that it takes only 15 minutes to ride his bike into work as he lives (with his public service wife) in an inner city suburb. His children have those stupid made-up names.

    I try to tell him that without reliable (virtually) uninterruptible power delivered at consistent voltage, lots of stuff that we take for granted (and is often hidden from public view) will stop working. I point out the public safety, public health and broader societal issues. Nope. The response is invariably that wind/solar/hydro/wave power (you name it) will be enough during the day and stored energy via batteries will be the answer at night. Plus, renewable energy is getting cheaper all the time! He says that every building in the city should be required to install rooftop solar/windmills with battery banks in the basement. Same applies for supermarkets and shopping centres. The evolution to electric cars should become a revolution and ICE cars banned within a decade.

    FMD.

    One thing that is absolutely clear to me (now) is that his beliefs are identical to that of a belief in a deity and are/border on fanaticism. I had read about these people before but until you actually get up close to one, you may not realise how wedded they are to ‘the cause’. They seem to imagine that the massive structural change that envisage will have no material impact on themselves directly – that everything will carry on as normal and this is just a change in electrical source, not that electricity is being banned. As to the cost, ‘industry’ can pay for their own installations and the Government can pay for the rest by higher taxing of the rich.

    When he mentioned that little gem I reminded him that his household income was relatively significant and with only two children, he could easily be considered ‘well off’ by community standards. He was nonplussed by this but thought no, he will escape any additional tax imposition. He didn’t say how. There are a wealth of issues to drill holes in his utopia but he seems impervious. Single-minded and somehow ‘insulated’ from dissenting views.

    I have six months left on this contract and there is no likelihood of changing this fellow’s opinion. He has drunk to kool-aid and is 100% committed.

  14. Cementafriend

    India has improved ovrr the last few years from about 50% to 85-90 %. Surprised sbout difference between PNG and West Papua. Maybe they took the main Islands of Java and Sumatra and spreads to others parts

  15. 2dogs

    The 100% shown for Venezuela is out of date.

  16. cohenite

    I don’t remember feeling deprived.

    That’s because, like all lefties, you’re insane.

    Good times.

    May they happen to you and other lefties again. Especially when you, and your others, go to hospital and there’s a kerosene lamp for the surgeon to operate to.

    You gangrenous piece of shit.

  17. John A

    Speedbox #3247132, posted on November 28, 2019 at 4:12 pm

    When he mentioned that little gem I reminded him that his household income was relatively significant and with only two children, he could easily be considered ‘well off’ by community standards. He was nonplussed by this but thought no, he will escape any additional tax imposition. He didn’t say how. There are a wealth of issues to drill holes in his utopia but he seems impervious. Single-minded and somehow ‘insulated’ from dissenting views.

    Yes, I daresay he will still be mentally patting himself on the back as he rides his bike to work – until the no-longer-present traffic lights fail to restrain the cross traffic and he is run over by a silent, electric 18-wheeler.

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