Open Forum: November 30, 2019

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4,050 Responses to Open Forum: November 30, 2019

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  1. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘at the time’

    Posting and scratching derg. One or the other in future.

  2. 1735099

    The bloke of Polish heritage was Joe Gilewicz.
    Joe was born in Germany.
    He was, for a time, in my section.
    He was a Taswegian Nasho who was shot by police in 1991.
    It took a fellow veteran of Polish heritage to go whistleblower, but the real truth has never been told.

  3. struth

    Numbers…..
    I was just walking the dog and having Dinner.

    Please don’t be so foolish as to remark on disappearing when you have no answer.
    You are the king of this practice.

    However, it does look like he lied and when there is video evidence I accept that.

    I still check out dates etc and look for editing.

    Not that I give a shit, because the good he is doing far outweighs this bullshit subject.

    Now this is how it’s done.

    Now, please admit that you don’t know what is and isn’t a socialist country and you have no set boxes to tick on the issue, just that they’re socialist until they collapse or start killing millions of people and then you reclassify them as extreme right wing.

    Does private business ownership exclude a country from being socialist?

  4. Leigh Lowe

    Given that the Sri Lankan and West Indian were named as such outright, the only conclusion left to draw is the poor bloke ‘of Polish heritage’ was actually born in Australia but had Polish ethnicity. 

    Wasn’t my old mate Spitten Polish was it?

  5. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘something/anything you can use as a smear’

    Those in the know say it’s nigh on impossible to smear diarrhoea.

  6. Leigh Lowe

    Snoopy

    #3252138, posted on December 4, 2019 at 9:16 pm

    If Trump says he doesn’t know Prince Andrew, he never dated him. That’s the issue here isn’t it?

    The odd photo in the same room doesn’t make them besties.
    Still no mention of Cigar Bill in reports about Epstein / Randy Andy but.

  7. Hazmatic

    Like to dig that a hole a little deeper?

    The claim.

    I served in 5 Pl B Coy 7RAR in SVN in 1970. On arrival in country my section consisted of a bloke from Adelaide, a bloke Sri Lankan, a West Indian, 2 Murris, a pommy, and bloke of Polish heritage. The rest of us were Australian born. None of us gave a stuff about religion or race. What mattered was how we covered each other’s backsides. That was not PC – that was the real world.

    6 Section on arrival in Country:

    Section Commander Cpl Brian De -Fretis – Trinidad
    LCpl David Goy – Campsie
    L/Cpl John Brain- Ulverstone
    Pte Kevin Morrison – Bairnsdale
    Pte Frank Rutherford – Leongatha
    Pte Trevor Rafferty – Naracoorte
    Pte Joe Gilewicz – Berlin
    Pte Bernie Cox – Gunnedah
    Pte Milton Dufty – Kempsey
    Pte Daniel Harrison – Melbourne

    and maybe, maybe not; because he can’t remember which section he was in – a pathological liar from Toowoomba…

  8. JC

    Snoopy
    #3252138, posted on December 4, 2019 at 9:16 pm

    If Trump says he doesn’t know Prince Andrew, he never dated him. That’s the issue here isn’t it?

    Until knucklehead came up with this flamboyant statement.

    cohenite
    #3252125, posted on December 4, 2019 at 9:05 pm

    Trump doesn’t lie, he couldn’t be bothered; and with the left you don’t have to lie because whatever shit things you say they’re doing they’re doing worse.

  9. Arky

    However, it does look like he lied and when there is video evidence I accept that.

    ..
    Lame.
    You accepted their framing of the thing.
    That Trump “knows” Prince Andrew.
    Everyone “knows” Prince Andrew.

  10. cohenite

    The end of the second episode of the current series of Ray Donovan is a classic.

  11. Knuckle Dragger

    Whoa there, Mr Matic.

    That sounds awfully like a contemporary account, and a self-published historian famous at the Toowoomba East Post Office said on Monday that contemporary written accounts, like his own letters, cannot be relied upon.

  12. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger

    #3252097, posted on December 4, 2019 at 8:23 pm

    Looks like crazed homosexualist rage monster Reggie Dwight was completely in the wrong with his spittle and fecal flecked spaz attack at security in Perth.

    Let’s hope they sue.

    Fark.
    I saw news footage of him getting of a plane in Adelaide.
    Jeeeee-sus.
    I reckon he will emulate one of Rock ‘n Roll’s greats.
    That is, he will be found dead in his bathroom with a half eaten cheeseburger in his hand.

  13. cohenite

    ‘sup head prefect; you off your meds.

  14. struth

    It’s still a Lie ,Arky.

    However, what I don’t mention to Numbers is that knowing Trump he is working it like misspelled tweets.

    The dumb media go insane about it, and he’s pulling a swifty somewhere else or just keeping the attention on the pedo Isle story so as to keep people finding out about Bill Clinton on the internet.
    The lie is irrelevant , but it still is one, and we can all see that.
    It’s not up there with “I did not have sexual relations with that woman”

  15. Knuckle Dragger

    I know Prince Andrew, but not in the biblical sense.

    More importantly than all this, it is prime outdoor choof growing season in the Top End.

    Exhibit A – my herbs, bought and planted – again in the old Chinee container after the bastard rock rats ate the last lot at night – on Monday night. The packets said germination in three to six weeks under full sun.

    Two days later, I have 28 shoots, up to and including 2cm in height. At this rate I’ll have baby beets the size of pumpkins.

    I’m starting to think I bought magic beans by mistake.

  16. JC

    This is absolutely hysterical. Trump pretends he’s his own spokesman calling himself John Miller. In fact we should call him John Miller from now on.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2016/05/13/transcript-the-full-text-of-john-miller-interview-about-donald-trump-with-people-reporter/

    You can die laughing with this fat fuck.

  17. 1735099

    Wasn’t my old mate Spitten Polish was it?

    His name was Joseph Gilewicz, he was in my section for a while.
    He was Polish, but born in Berlin.
    He was shot by Tasmanian police in a siege situation in 1991.
    A fellow Vietnam veteran (ex-tankie) who was a police ballistics specialist smelt a rat and went whistleblower.
    Paul Tapp wrote a book about it.
    Just another casualty of a futile and tragic conflict.
    May he rest in peace.

  18. cohenite

    And you look at some of the leftie listed lies of Trump and you realise the man is incapable of lying: he’s just like a big, tubby orange God:

    https://www.politifact.com/personalities/donald-trump/statements/byruling/false/

  19. Knuckle Dragger

    I’m hoping for a real Prince-style demise from Reggie.

    Found on his bed three days after death, metallic trackies starting to get a bit maggoty, pants round his ankles and a syringe full of palm oil hanging out of his cock.

  20. Top Ender

    Meanwhile in the Top End:

    More than 20 Katherine teachers will be packing their bags and heading interstate at the end of the 2019 school term, following a tumultuous year of funding cuts.

    The number is double that of last year, which saw eleven positions needing to be filled, and does not include two principals also departing.

    While it cannot be confirmed the exodus is a direct response to the Northern Territory Government’s contentious decision to cut $500,000 from rental subsidies, the Australian Education Union’s Northern Territory branch president Jarvis Ryan said he knows of two teachers relocating because of the cuts.

    “It is fair to say the impact (of subsidy cuts) is fairly muted to date and we might not see it until we find out principals are having difficulty recruiting next year,” Mr Ryan said.

    “We know the Department of Education had offered a compassionate transfer for those who wanted to leave as a result of the cuts, and so far we are aware of two people taking up that offer.”

    Mr Ryan said the union is concerned it will be more difficult for principals to recruit teachers moving forward, with one of the most alluring incentives now taken away.

    “We have said all along, it is only $500,000 out of many millions and the government has decided to save a little bit of money and risk all sorts of problems down the line.”

    Schools in Katherine have fallen from being one of the most heavily incentivised locations to teach in the country, despite the highly transient nature of the region.

    Katherine principals have now been left with the difficult task of hiring teachers for 2020 as fears switch to recruiting new teachers if rental subsidies are off limits.

    “The agreement from the Department of Education was to process a relocation allowance for the next three years and then reassess,” Mr Ryan said.

    “As it stands, teachers in Katherine will receive no other recognition of their isolation, no remote allowance, no study points, even though teachers just an hour away in Barunga get a whole range of entitlements.”

    Relocation allowances are set out by the Office of the Commissioner for Public Employment each year.

    The Department of Education announced in August it would double the relocation allowance for new teachers, who are set to receive up to $11,000 in the first year ($546 per fortnight for 20 weeks).

    The allowance would be reduced to just 15 weeks in 2021 and 10 weeks in 2022.

    “We have found Katherine has a fairly high number of permanent teachers and a relatively low turn over rate, with Katherine High being the exception,” Mr Ryan said.

    “Katherine High has a high proportion of contract teachers and issues with its budget make it difficult to make more teachers permanent.”

    He said the issue lies with regional schools like Katherine High offering specialist classes with a small cohort of teachers – budget challenges are inevitable.

    “The department decided to grandfather the current arrangement allowing current teachers to continue to receive the subsidy,” Mr Ryan said.

    “The question that remains with eliminating the subsidy for new teachers is will there be a sufficient incentive with only a relocation allowance of $11,000 for next year.

    “We are committed to keeping a close eye, if we feel problems emerging we will raise the alarm.”

    The Department of Education says it is aware of 14 teachers leaving from public schools, with “most” of the positions already filled.

    “The department is not aware of any teachers leaving Katherine due to the changes of the Katherine Housing Subsidy,” a government spokeswoman said.

    Five teachers are also leaving St Joseph’s Catholic College, as is the school’s principal Denis Graham.

    Katherine High School’s principal Dan Murtas also resigned after just over a year in the notoriously difficult position.

    Link

  21. JC

    And you look at some of the leftie listed lies of Trump and you realise the man is incapable of lying: he’s just like a big, tubby orange God:

    Of course. But listen to John Miller’s tape from 1991. You won’t stop laughing.

  22. struth

    Katherine is the third largest town in the NT and only 300 k’s from Darwin .

    Why the f would teachers expect rental subsidies?

  23. Infidel Tiger

    Footage of Elton John’s plane taking off:

    https://youtu.be/ZyvY2GK9B3M

  24. Leigh Lowe

    Of course. But listen to John Miller’s tape from 1991. You won’t stop laughing.

    The three funniest high profile blokes on the planet at the moment are Trump, Dave Chapelle and Ricky Gervais.
    And all they are doing is looking at the crazy shit QWERTYs do, and respond with what millions of people are saying in bars and lounge rooms everywhere.

  25. Infidel Tiger

    Best plane footage of all time.

  26. JC

    President Miller on his way to the NATO meet up right now.

    https://factba.se/topic/calendar

  27. 1735099

    Section Commander Cpl Brian De -Fretis – Trinidad

    You continue to misspell Snoopy’s name.
    Your source (Bruce Ravenscroft’s Contact – Wait Out – p196) is compromised.
    He has made a few errors, including the spelling of my name.
    Ravo’s memory (and mine) are equally unreliable.
    You need to do better than that – at least triangulate – get three corroborating independent sources.
    The nominal roll is usually OK, but they do sometimes get it wrong, as I’m discovering as I trawl through the full list of Nashos who served with 7RAR second tour. When they do, I tell them.

    It’s also telling that you never quote your sources.
    You’re not an historian’s bootlace.

  28. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger

    #3252166, posted on December 4, 2019 at 9:43 pm

    Footage of Elton John’s plane taking off:

    V1.
    Elton, could you move your seat back.
    Rotate.

  29. Infidel Tiger

    Has anyone added up how much the media have forked out in damages and defamation this year?

    Fitz skating close to the line again in his most recent dirge today.

  30. JC

    The three funniest high profile blokes on the planet at the moment are Trump, Dave Chapelle and Ricky Gervais.

    If you’re on his right side, it must be a scream working in that White House at the moment. You’d die laughing.

    He came up with Mini Mike referring to Bloomberg and when those idiots at Bloomberg media said they would only run stories on President “Miller” and not Mini Mike, nor the Dems, “Miller” took away Bloomberg’s press passes to the White House.

    He’s a laugh a minute.

  31. Hazmatic

    The claim.

    The Claim:

    When I returned from Vietnam back in December 1970, my mother packaged up all the letters I wrote, and gave them to me.
    Because I wrote at least one per week, and I wrote to all members of my close family when I could, there were plenty of letters – over 350 in fact.

    Arrived 16 February Departed 10th December. That’s 297 days.

    350 letters divided by 297 days gives 1.18 letters written per day.

    That’s quite prolific.

    Is there anything in those notes made at the time that can help jog the memory? Changing from one section to another would be newsworthy?

    It doesn’t have to be this specific.

    “Dear Mum and Dad
    I missed recorder practice today because I was so upset. I got sacked from 6 section today and now I am in 5 section. Something to do with being a passive aggressive bludger. I sure will miss that bloke from Adelaide, the Sri Lankan, the West Indian, a pommy, a bloke of Polish heritage and especially the 2 Murris who I was especially close to.

    PS. “Even though my marks at teachers college have been dreadful the Army will pay me to study fulltime when I get back. How cool is that?”

  32. MatrixTransform

    You’re not an historian’s bootlace.

    lol.

    I suppose The Cat is the general cool hangout for all historians of note is it Numptard?

    gawd yr stupid

    Oh yeah … and sue me

  33. JC

    There’s quite a few , what I call, historicians at the the Cat.

  34. Dr Faustus

    The order and structure that are created from such mathematical relationships is encapsulated in algebra. It is no surprise then that Indigenous people of Australia have language for number and have base-five number systems.

    Counting up to 10 Black Emus in base-five goes as follows:

    1, 2 , 3, 4 , 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 20

    Not exactly intuitive, or simple to put into language. The sequence of fractional relationships is even harder to follow because five is a fairly chunky prime number.

    It is no surprise then that Indigenous people of Australia have never accomplished much in anything that requires mathematics.

  35. Shy Ted

    It is no surprise then that Indigenous people of Australia have never accomplished much in anything that requires mathematics.
    What about the abocus?

  36. JC

    It is no surprise then that Indigenous people of Australia have never accomplished much in anything that requires mathematics.

    I don’t know about that. Spatial awareness is a form of mathematics. They were pretty decent at that. Also, arithmetic would have derived from the environment people lived in.

    Hunter gathering is a rich persons lifestyle as you require a ton of land to survive and they had plenty and did survive well enough. It’s not me suggesting this, Fatal Shore suggested that at the time of Cook’s arrival, the average aboriginal diet was much superior to the average Brit.

  37. Viktoristan maths.

    many
    many many
    lots
    dozens
    heaps
    shitloads
    bulk
    motza

    Masters degree exam question: “Which of these is the largest quantity?”

  38. 4,000 years decimal is 112,000 years in base 5.

    Maybe this is the source of confusion about the length of residency.

  39. zyconoclast

    Cross-curriculum priorities

    Introduction
    The Australian Curriculum is designed to meet the needs of students by delivering a relevant, contemporary and engaging curriculum that builds on the educational goals of the Melbourne Declaration. The Melbourne Declaration identified three key areas that need to be addressed for the benefit of individuals and Australia as a whole. In the Australian Curriculum, these have become priorities that give students the tools and language to engage with and better understand their world at a range of levels. The priorities provide national, regional and global dimensions which will enrich the curriculum through development of considered and focused content that fits naturally within learning areas. They enable the delivery of learning area content at the same time as developing knowledge, understanding and skills relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures, Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia and/or Sustainability. Incorporation of the priorities will encourage conversations between students, teachers and the wider community.

  40. the average aboriginal diet was much superior to the average Brit

    Let’s test that assertion against average life expectancy.

    Hmmm.

  41. zyconoclast

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures Illustrations of practice

    What do a humanoid robot and the recently awakened Narungga language have in common?

    Introduction
    Maitland Lutheran School is an independent, co-educational primary and middle school located in the farming district of Maitland, Yorke Peninsula in South Australia on the traditional lands of the Narungga People. The school has an enrolment of 237 students, of whom 16% are Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.

    This illustration of practice shows how teachers embed the local Narungga language into the Digital Technologies learning area in Years 3 and 4 (with some Year 1) through the guidance of a fluent Narungga speaker and the use of a humanoid robot.

    The school participated in the 3-year Humanoid Robot Research Project. This was a collaboration between the Association of Independent Schools, South Australia and universities from around Australia.

  42. Overburdened

    Lotocoti 5:05ish pm

    Yep.

  43. JC

    Here’s a question that may be worth pondering. At the time of Cook’s arrival who would have had a better life, aboriginals or the average brit?

  44. Zippy:

    Overburdened:
    …It’s what’s next that is important.

    a paranoid CCP trying to hang on to power at any price faced with US decoupling is going to be a dangerous beast indeed. since every US official is going to great pains to point out that regime change is not the US agenda one can only presume that it is. logic would suggest that it must be.

    “Troubled borders make for a compliant people.”
    The CCP will stir up trouble with the rest of the world.
    It’s as obvious as the warts and scars on numbers dick.

  45. Overburdened

    https://youtu.be/aTgyik8jSxI

    Art And Dottie Todd 1958 with their hit at the time made more famous by Manhattan Transfer,
    Chanson D’Amour

    This is one of my favourite strumalongs here at the camp.

    Life is good.

  46. Knuckle Dragger

    350 letters. I’d actually go with that.

    This is a bloke so prolific he paid $15,000,000 in tax.

    He’s got his faults, but you have to admit Liability Bob’s good with…………

    Numbers.

  47. JC

    It took from 1300 to 1700 for UK GDP to double:

    See figure 9. In this article.

    Life in the UK (and Europe as a whole) in those days was absolutely fucking miserable for the average person.

  48. Overburdened

    Seem to think I may have posted about Art n Dottie before.

    Anyhow

  49. Overburdened

    KD

    More strength to your arm.

    Your tenacity is only matched by your bête noir.

  50. zyconoclast

    Here’s a question that may be worth pondering. At the time of Cook’s arrival who would have had a better life, aboriginals or the average brit?

    Likely the indigenous men.
    The indigenous women, not.

  51. JC

    Around 1750, the average Brit worked ~330 days a year.

    http://www.lem.sssup.it/WPLem/files/2011-22.pdf

    Fuuuucckk

  52. JC

    In 1990 Dollars, in 1700 the average brit earned (or created farm value more like it) equal to about 1600 bucks a year.

    http://www.lem.sssup.it/WPLem/files/2011-22.pdf

    That works out to about 5 (199o) dollars a day.

  53. Overburdened

    The definition of affluence is the amount of effort for the accepted lifestyle.

    By this measure the indigs were among the most affluent people for a long time, working I think it was in some locations as little as 3 hours a day sourcing tucker.

  54. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Anger in China as US House passes Uighur crackdown bill
    Beijing ‘resolutely opposes’ resolution, which among others seeks to sanction Communist Party leader in Xinjiang.
    “We urge the US to immediately correct its mistake, to stop the above bill on Xinjiang from becoming law, to stop using Xinjiang as a way to interfere in China’s domestic affairs,” said the statement, attributed to the ministry’s spokeswoman, Hua Chunying.

  55. JC

    By this measure the indigs were among the most affluent people for a long time, working I think it was in some locations as little as 3 hours a day sourcing tucker.

    3 hours if that. Imagine the other side of the world where people had to toil sun up to sun set to avoid starvation.

    Hunter gathering was an extremely wealthy lifestyle.

  56. Entropy

    Life in the UK (and Europe as a whole) in those days was absolutely fucking miserable for the average person.

    As opposed to the noble savage hunter gatherers in Australia?
    I might believe a mob living at Noosa might have had a pretty good life, but inland, yeah, nah.
    How superior is a diet of goanna really? And that would be in the years of flooding rains.in the endless drought years, most of your children and anyone over 35 probably died.

  57. Overburdened

    Most everything else they were doing was part of the lifestyle and time was spent on preserving fire, carrying frames for constructing shelter, making and maintaining twines and weapons and accoutrements such as they were.

    I gotta stack of interesting data about this side of things.

  58. Tel

    Hunter gathering was an extremely wealthy lifestyle.

    Until someone else starts muscling in on your territory … then it becomes a very violent lifestyle.

    The European aristocracy were only too aware of this issue.

  59. Snoopy

    There aren’t many accounts of found shipwreck survivors who said, “No thanks, I’ll stay here.”

  60. Infidel Tiger

    Aboriginal life was one of constant hunger, threat and much sexual and physical abuse.

    Might have occasionally had its moments when food was bountiful.

  61. Leigh Lowe

    Aboriginal life was one of constant hunger, threat and much sexual and physical abuse.

    When was this?
    Last week?

  62. Infidel Tiger

    Weekends, leisure time and women and children not having to work are very recent things.

  63. Infidel Tiger

    When was this?
    Last week?

    Yesterday, today and tomorrow unfortunately.

  64. JC

    As opposed to the noble savage hunter gatherers in Australia?

    Leave the noble savage stuff for the left. They were hunter gatherers , which by definition means they possessed a great deal of land.

    I might believe a mob living at Noosa might have had a pretty good life, but inland, yeah, nah.

    Sure, like there is now in a modern country. The cities do well while the rural areas don’t. Not much change there 🙂

    How superior is a diet of goanna really?

    Okay, but compared to what. Also how many hours of toil did it take in comparative terms? Let’s be clear, in 1770s Europe and the UK 99% of the population was living hand to mouth and people lived in fear of being caught hungry.

    And that would be in the years of flooding rains.in the endless drought years, most of your children and anyone over 35 probably died.

    The child mortality rate was very likely the same. Dunnom about the mortality rate, but it may have been superior for the “noble savage”.

  65. JC

    Until someone else starts muscling in on your territory … then it becomes a very violent lifestyle.

  66. JC

    Aboriginal life was one of constant hunger, threat and much sexual and physical abuse.

    Leave the hunger point aside, because these days our poor are very fat, but the rest wouldn’t be that much different in the regular government projects.

    Might have occasionally had its moments when food was bountiful.

    And there were no agric problems in europe over the centuries? Food was always bountiful? The potato famine occurred in Tasmania?

  67. Fisky

    Medevac repealed. A devastating blow for open borders!

  68. calli

    Good news re Folau. Off to the boat. Will pop in on and off.

  69. Black Ball

    The strange notion that we should incorporate their concepts in our Australian education system is just more patronising racism. If I were aboriginal, I’d get angry about it. As it is, I just despise the racist creeps.

    The real racists in my mind Doctor are the department clowns in charge of the curriculum and other aspects of Aboriginal life. Policies designed to keep blacks voting Left. Like treaties here in Victoria. It is abhorrent and as struth says, criminal.

  70. Zatara

    The child mortality rate was very likely the same. Dunnom about the mortality rate, but it may have been superior for the “noble savage”.

    One plus about being a nomadic hunter gatherer is that you move away from the filth you create.

    Medieval Europeans, particularly city dwellers, lived in theirs.

    Probably a mortality factor there, as well as your basic plagues and such.

  71. Infidel Tiger

    Wonder when Fitz will start drinking again?

  72. Dr Faustus

    I don’t know about that. Spatial awareness is a form of mathematics. They were pretty decent at that. Also, arithmetic would have derived from the environment people lived in.

    No argument about the quality of Indigenous spatial awareness, but I wouldn’t want to follow that as an indicator of abstract mathematical thought. Pretty much the whole of animal life has some degree of spatial awareness – some sensationally better than humans.

    My point was that base-five notation (ie counting on your fingers) is a bit of a handicap in developing the thought processes that lead to useful mathematics – and not really the sophisticated advance that Dr Matthews suggests.

  73. Lazlo

    Then the industrial revolution happened JC.

  74. JC

    Medieval Europeans, particularly city dwellers, lived in theirs.

    Dog shit was used as a tanning agent for leather. There were fuckers who went around picking up dog shit, sticking it in a sack to sell to tanners.

    Life was good then.

  75. Knuckle Dragger

    Grain harvests in medieval Europe were always hit and miss, although the 1200s seemed to be pretty good.

    The good times also seemed to coincide with very long reigns. In England Henry III hung onto the big chair for over 50 years in the thirteenth century, unheard of until Vicky.

    If memory serves me right the Great Famine of 1315-17 actually went for quite a bit longer than that, and then the Black Death smacked everyone right on the cock.

    Any good years after that were fucked up by various punters chevaucheeing across the countryside with their armies burning the crops they couldn’t pinch, and then the Thirty Years’ War dented the Eurotrash for generations.

    The humble spud was brought to France from somewhere or other in the Middle Ages. Better suited to the climate and fed the punters much more easily.

  76. Overburdened

    I reckon a visit to the Maritime Museum in Freo is a must.

    In the west no one gives a fuck about Captain Cook.

    Australia has a mixed history, and the one thing that stays the same is that there was minimal signs of occupation by the standards of the arrivals.

    In spite of the distance for the arrivals to cover to get here in the circumstances of the time and the by today’s standards minimal/sub-par capacity to provide for them when they got here, they took over by working the land.

    The indigs never really had a show from day one and that is as it is in any hierarchy, human or otherwise.

    I reckon that their are people that are truly off the grid in Australia, and we have no idea what they do more than subsist in the wilderness, and there’s nothing wrong with that either.

  77. JC

    Then the industrial revolution happened JC.

    The western left considers that to be a bad thing at the present time. Think about that for a second. I’d love to see these fucks going around picking up dog shit to sell to tanners.

  78. JC

    Jeez, lord. What people did in the old days.

    … dog feces were used in the tanning process of leather during the Victorian era. They had to press on them with their bare feet, much like how wine is made.

  79. Zyconoclast

    From memory, Geoffrey Blainey made a comment in one of his books how surprised the aborigines, that were taken to England, would have been once they saw the miserable life and diet of the working class.

  80. Overburdened

    JC

    You’re on it.

    The issue raised of constant starvation for example is used as a indicator of inferiority of culture and doesn’t take into account that at some stage there must have been a flourishing population to leave so many scattered remnants for the Euros to find when they got here, as well as the people various coastal locations who were doing fine thanks.

  81. Lazlo

    The point is, JC and KD, that the seeds of the industrial revolution were sown long before: in urbanisation that forced stinking tanneries to the outskirts of town, in American colonisation that brought the spud and sugar to town, expanding the population due to better nutrition. Then there was scientific rationalism, driving innovation, and access to capital, etc.

    These historical confluences simply did not exist in 18th century Australia – not a value judgement, just a fact.

  82. Overburdened

    JC

    The Euros were in some cases lice ridden, disease plagued and carrying parasitical worms care of your dog story.

    If you got sick they gave you mercury.

  83. JC

    99% of the commentariat here want Tesla to fail.

    Sure, it just an opinion, but this dude thinks it has yuge upside. Also, although I’ve never owned the stock and never intend to. I’ve been the only person here cautioning on an almost unanimous view that Telsa would skid off the road.

    Tesla stock has had a wild ride in 2019, but an analyst at Piper Jaffray says stick around for huge upside.

    Why:

    The new price target comes from the analyst’s shift to a valuation model based on discounted cash flow. He argues this model better captures product lines that won’t achieve high-volume production for another several years, like Tesla’s Cybertruck, Semi, and Roadster.

    He assumes Tesla’s eventual market share in the luxury sedan segment with rise to 21.5%-plus in the U.S. and 9% in China. He also assumes its share of the luxury SUV market hits 20.5% in the U.S. and 12.5% in China.

    “These figures capture the contribution of the Model S, X, 3, and Y—but not the pickup, which we assume will be sold at a rate of 200k-225k units/year,” he added. “We also assume that operating margin will reach 13% by the mid-2020s.”

    Telsa stock rose 0.4% to $336.20 on Tuesday, while the broader S&P 500 index fell 0.7%.

    Looking ahead. Potter now has an Overweight rating with a $423 price target. He said the new look at Tesla is part of his firm’s broader effort to focus more directly on disrupters in transportation. “In this industry (or in any industry for that matter), it’s hard to find a more impactful disrupter than Tesla,” he wrote.

    “The company has always had a poignant mission statement, a loyal customer base, and bold product designs—but lately Tesla has demonstrated some new skills,” he added.

    Those skills he cited included high-volume manufacturing, operating expense control, and frugal capital spending, according to Potter. “For all its controversy and volatility, we think TSLA is a must-own stock in this sector,” he added.

  84. Overburdened

    ….if you could afford it, otherwise you died either before or after the Mercury would have killed you.

  85. Infidel Tiger

    Sure, it just an opinion, but this dude thinks it has yuge upside. Also, although I’ve never owned the stock and never intend to. I’ve been the only person here cautioning on an almost unanimous view that Telsa would skid off the road.

    Tesla is a massive ponzi.

    When EV’s take off it will be because one of the big manufacturers succeeds with them.

  86. JC

    Lazlo

    I’m just having a little fun comparing the time Cook landed here. That’s all.

    The fight is with those who think those pre-industrial times were great and we should head back before we die from gerbil warming.

    I’d love to see the entire Canberra APS going off picking up dog shit to sell to tanners as their day job.

  87. Knuckle Dragger

    Oh.

    Up till now I had the view the IR was brought about by things like steam power, railways, electrickery in its infancy and the ability to produce machinery with sufficient tolerance for production on an…. industrial scale.

    Anyway.

  88. Leigh Lowe

    Fisky

    #3252220, posted on December 4, 2019 at 10:55 pm

    Medevac repealed. A devastating blow for open borders!

    It is quite interesting to watch the response.
    Lefties like to file their victories away and move on the next target.
    They love consolidating the new “status quo” and are horrified at any “regressive” roll-back of their relentless campaigns.
    Witness the response to the mildest push-back on abortion law in the US.

  89. JC

    When EV’s take off it will be because one of the big manufacturers succeeds with them.

    Dude, short the sector because with the EV there is no upside for the rest of the legacy firms. They’re fucked. That sector is completely rooted. It will be an Apple like situation. Apple produces 10% of the smart phones and captures 90% of the profits.

  90. vr

    JC, Barry ritholz had interesting interview with James Chanos. Not, surprisingly he is bearish on them. So, is David Einhorn at the moment.

  91. Lazlo

    Get it JC, and let’s not forget those housemaids treading in urine to clean m’lady’s sheets. Girls today should dream of such a sustainable occupation, all based on renewable outputs.

  92. Geriatric Mayfly

    Trump on Tour
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/10474886/boris-johnson-queen-buckingham-palace-nato-trump/

    I swear I saw Frau Merkel throw a towel on the best Chippendale chair in the room.

  93. Infidel Tiger

    Musk is going to end up in jail.

    Dude is completely cooking the books at Tesla.

  94. JC

    and let’s not forget those housemaids treading in urine to clean m’lady’s sheets.

    Explain the urine bit.

  95. Lazlo

    They were a consequence of the IR, KD, not a cause.

  96. Knuckle Dragger

    Currently watching a contest that should be required viewing for any young punter, and I mean any, who think they can hold their hands up.

    Anthony Joshua is a 6 foot 5 at least heavyweight boxer. Looks like he’s been carved out of dark marble. Ripped to shit, supremely muscular. Towers over his opponent Andy Ruiz, who’s maybe five-eleven and tubby with a gut hanging over his belt. Love handles, the lot.

    Gave away six inches in reach, and God knows how much speed. Over three rounds Ruiz got a thorough and aesthetically pleasing hiding from Joshua. Took all the punches without blinking, and over the next two rounds sat Joshua on his arse three times before the ref stopped it. Joshua was fucked.

    Moral: Be careful who you pick on, roid boys. Books and covers and all that.

  97. Lazlo

    Urine contains ammonia, a known (to the Romans, also) cleansing agent.

  98. JC

    JC, Barry ritholz had interesting interview with James Chanos. Not, surprisingly he is bearish on them. So, is David Einhorn at the moment.

    Okay. Einhorn was bearish going into the GFC and lost money. Figure that one. These dudes don’t always make mullah on every position.

  99. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger

    #3252252, posted on December 4, 2019 at 11:29 pm

    Musk is going to end up in jail.

    Dude is completely cooking the books at Tesla

    He is also up for a bit of a payout for calling one of the guys who rescued the Thai kids from the cave a “p3do”.
    Claims it wasn’t meant to be taken seriously.

  100. Juan

    When EV’s take off it will be because one of the big manufacturers succeeds with them.

    I can just imagine someone in 1889 would have said: ‘That Karl Benz, he has no hope. When ‘motors’ take off it will be because one of the big carriage-builders succeeds with them.’ 😜

  101. JC

    Lazlo
    #3252256, posted on December 4, 2019 at 11:32 pm

    Urine contains ammonia, a known (to the Romans, also) cleansing agent.

    Are you fucking serious. They’d wash the sheets in piss. FMD.

    Hey Snoopy, if we’re ever shipwrecked, I’ll stay right here thank you. I’ll allow you to go home.

  102. MatrixTransform

    potatoes and sugar == better nutrition?
    Because … progress?

    KFC chips and Pepsi got where we are today

    ffs

  103. Lazlo

    Umm they would rinse them also.

  104. JC

    Infidel Tiger
    #3252252, posted on December 4, 2019 at 11:29 pm

    Musk is going to end up in jail.

    Dude is completely cooking the books at Tesla.

    Okay, let’s take a bet. If tesla stock is higher or lower on Dec 31 2020. It closed at $332.20.

    The loser buys dinner in the winner’s city. I say it will be higher.

  105. JC

    Lazlo
    #3252263, posted on December 4, 2019 at 11:36 pm

    Umm they would rinse them also.

    What a relief.

  106. Knuckle Dragger

    Well, no-one in 1889 said ‘Let’s give Karl Benz untold billions of other people’s Deutschmarks until he gets it right, and in the meantime we’ll make it systematically harder for people to buy horses.’

  107. Cold-Hands

    Speaking of urine, the Romans used it to make toothpaste...

  108. Juan

    They’d wash the sheets in piss. FMD.

    Confirmed:

    The cleansing power of pee: If you’ve investigated the ingredients in your household cleaners, you may have noticed a prevalent ingredient: ammonia. As a base, ammonia is a useful cleanser because dirt and grease–which are slightly acidic–get neutralized by the ammonia. Even though early Europeans knew about soap, many launderers preferred to use urine for its ammonia to get tough stains out of cloth. In fact, in ancient Rome, vessels for collecting urine were commonplace on streets–passers-by would relieve themselves into them and when the vats were full their contents were taken to a fullonica (a laundry), diluted with water and poured over dirty clothes. A worker would stand in the tub of urine and stomp on the clothes, similar to modern washing machine’s agitator.

    Source: ‘From Gunpowder to Teeth Whitener: The Science Behind Historic Uses of Urine

  109. Cold-Hands

    Speaking of piss, the Romans used to clean their teeth with it.

  110. MatrixTransform

    urine contains urea … not ammonia … unless your’e crook

  111. Cold-Hands

    Apologies for a triplicate post swallowed by the spaminator.

  112. Infidel Tiger

    Okay, let’s take a bet. If tesla stock is higher or lower on Dec 31 2020. It closed at $332.20.

    The loser buys dinner in the winner’s city. I say it will be higher.

    Done. Monty can’t come unless he pays.

  113. Juan

    Well, no-one in 1889 said ‘Let’s give Karl Benz untold billions of other people’s Deutschmarks until he gets it right

    Both Benz and Daimler had financial backers who would have invested with boom-or-bust expectations, particularly with how novel the technology was; more so than EV technology in 2019.

    Their financial backers were also instrumental in the eventual merger of the erstwhile competitors to create Daimler-Benz AG.

    Who knows, maybe one day we’ll see FaradayTeslas on our roads!

  114. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Well, no-one in 1889 said ‘Let’s give Karl Benz untold billions of other people’s Deutschmarks

    Evening Knuckes.
    The other minor point of course, is that EV’s need electrickery. The US and China are the only places with enough capacity to even contemplate electric vehicles in any sort of numbers. Here in Oz we’re rapidly reaching the point where just keeping the lights on is in doubt.

  115. JC

    Agreed

    And Monster will not attend.

  116. Infidel Tiger

    Is Monster ok?

    A diet of rakes is never healthy.

  117. Oh come on

    The loser buys dinner in the winner’s city. I say it will be higher.

    Does that mean the loser needs to fly to the winner’s city specifically for the dinner, or does the winner have to wait around for the loser to schlep across the Nullarbor due to a funeral or a connecting flight or whatever?

  118. JC

    He looks healthy, very healthy if you click on my name tag (JC). Very, very healthy. But that was then.

  119. Knuckle Dragger

    Naturally, Peter.

    In a country where the lights go off in your house as soon as it hits 25 degrees, or a cloud briefly covers the Sun and blacks out the entire town (and district) for nine hours, a la Alice Springs a couple of weeks ago, some punters appear to be getting a bit ahead of themselves expecting to be able to use that shit for transport.

  120. Infidel Tiger

    Shit. JC might be living in NY by then.

    Expensive dinner if I’m wrong.

  121. Arky

    I can just imagine someone in 1889 would have said: ‘That Karl Benz, he has no hope. When ‘motors’ take off it will be because one of the big carriage-builders succeeds with them.’ 😜

    ..
    You mean like Studebaker or Holden?

  122. MatrixTransform

    TSLA presents the new improved Electric Unicorn.

    coming to an economy near you somewhere between 2021 and 2030

    or before the end of the world,

    which ever come first

  123. JC

    Seriously, this shit better stop and stop now. If we all refused to deal with people we disagree with the economy would be destroyed.

    Conservative activists are calling out America’s largest financial institution, charging they are being targeted.

    JPMorgan Chase is under fire for closing the bank accounts of several customers in the conservative movement as other right-wingers are threatening to close their accounts unless the bank plays nice.

    “If Jamie Dimon can’t absolutely guarantee that Chase Bank won’t ever discriminate against conservatives, conservatives should consider banking elsewhere,” warned David Almasi, vice president of the conservative-leaning National Center for Public Policy Research, referring to JPMorgan’s chairman and CEO.

    JPMorgan first landed in hot water soon after conservative activists Enrique Tarrio, Joe Biggs, Laura Loomer and Martina Markota discovered their accounts at Chase were closed within weeks of each other earlier this year — and without satisfactory explanations, they claim.

    Tarrio is a President Trump supporter and head of the Proud Boys organization. Several Chase managers could not give him a satisfactory reason for the account’s closure. One even called the closing “mind-boggling.”

    https://stockdailydish.com/jpmorgan-chase-accused-of-purging-accounts-of-conservative-activists/

  124. Knuckle Dragger

    Of course Benz had financial backers. Not the gummint throwing coin at him no questions asked, though. That’s the point.

    Where’s the ROI for the mountains of cash going into this white elephant of an industry?

    I can’t see it, and somehow I’m going to pay for it.

  125. Arky

    Mitsubishi started as a shipbuiding firm in 1870.

  126. JC

    Infidel Tiger
    #3252282, posted on December 4, 2019 at 11:58 pm

    Shit. JC might be living in NY by then.

    Expensive dinner if I’m wrong.

    No no, it’s a melbourne/Perth wager.

    NY / Perth would have to be the longest flight combo in the world. This bet simply wouldn’t be worth the horrendous travel time.

  127. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Ben Roberts-Smith seeks documents that may disclose journalists’ sources
    Jennifer Duke
    By Jennifer Duke
    December 4, 2019 — 8.02pm

    Australia’s most decorated soldier and general manager of Seven West Media Queensland, Ben Roberts-Smith, is seeking access to documents that could disclose confidential sources of journalists Nick McKenzie and Chris Masters as part of defamation action against The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. McKenzie and Masters are senior investigative reporters who have won multiple Walkley awards.

    Mr Roberts-Smith, a Victoria Cross recipient, is suing The Age, the Herald and The Canberra Times in the Federal Court after a series of articles in 2018 accused him of war crimes while serving with the Army overseas. He said they are defamatory because he is portrayed as a person who “broke the moral and legal rules of military engagement” and committed murder.

    The Herald and Age’s defence argues that the articles do not defame Mr Roberts-Smith and allege he was involved in six unlawful killings in Afghanistan.

    The case will go to trial in June. However, the Herald and The Age – which are owned by Nine Entertainment Co – are fighting requests from Mr Roberts-Smith for some documents, interviews and materials generated during the investigations. Nine says disclosing these documents would expose confidential sources and breach ethical responsibilities.

    However, Mr Roberts-Smith’s legal team have argued that the documents should be disclosed to the court for the judge to decide whether the information is privileged. Seven chairman Kerry Stokes has thrown his support behind Mr Roberts-Smith.

    McKenzie and Masters said they would adhere to their ethical obligations in all circumstances. “There is nothing more important for a journalist than protecting sources, press freedom and working in the public interest,” said McKenzie.

    The push for greater disclosure of these sources comes as Seven joins several major news organisations, including Nine Entertainment Co and News Corp, in backing the press freedom push Your Right To Know.

    A Seven spokesman declined to answer questions.

    Sydney Morning Herald. I hope Roberts Smith sues the whole corrupt pack of douche nozzles back to their birth certificates – if they have any, which I doubt.

  128. Knuckle Dragger

    Husqvarna started as a munitions company before diversifying into chainsaws, motorbikes and sewing machines.

    If the EV industry in Australia stopped tomorrow and started making lava lamps we’d all be better off.

  129. JC

    Where’s the ROI for the mountains of cash going into this white elephant of an industry?

    At the moment, carmakers can differentiate on the engine. They really can’t with an EV as it has around 26 parts to it vs 2600 for a regular engine. The coach building side? Nearly all cars look the same. Electronics? Brand name gadgets are now taking over most of the e function. BMW want 300 bucks to update navigation. Google give nav away for free.

  130. MatrixTransform

    Mitsubishi started as a shipbuiding firm in 1870.

    Yeah and Mitsubishi actually made actual things as opposed to minting weekly marketing brochures and lawsuits

  131. Arky

    Toyota started in 1924 making looms.

  132. Oh come on

    m0nty is, I suspect, psychologically troubled. He may have come to the (not unreasonable) conclusion that, as his record of wrongology here is so improbably consistent, it is his contributions here that are determining the course of history.

    That’s a heavy burden.

  133. JC

    OCO

    There’s been a few updates at the blog.

  134. Infidel Tiger

    Companies that used to make things?

    Crazy old world.

  135. Arky

    The Peugeot family of Valentigney, Montbéliard, Franche-Comté, France, began in the manufacturing business in the 19th century. In 1842, they added production of coffee, pepper, and salt grinders.[15] The company’s entry into the vehicle market was by means of crinoline dresses, which used steel rods, leading to umbrella frames, saw blades, chisels, wire wheels, and bicycles.[16] Armand Peugeot introduced his “Le Grand Bi” penny-farthing in 1882…

  136. Fisky

    m0nty is, I suspect, psychologically troubled. He may have come to the (not unreasonable) conclusion that, as his record of wrongology here is so improbably consistent, it is his contributions here that are determining the course of history.

    m0nty is hurting, but he shouldn’t be. He is actually one of the greatest seers I’ve ever encountered, albeit in reverse. Someone once commented that his wrongology is so brilliant that it meets the level of causality. He is so Wrong, that the mere act of his making a prediction is able to bend the forces of history in the opposite direction. If only he could somehow monetise this astonishing talent, he wouldn’t need to waste time on that stupid fantasy football site.

  137. Juan

    The other minor point of course, is that EV’s need electrickery. The US and China are the only places with enough capacity to even contemplate electric vehicles in any sort of numbers. Here in Oz we’re rapidly reaching the point where just keeping the lights on is in doubt.

    EVs are one of the best arguments for coal-fired power, particularly for building new plants.

    If I was Matt Canavan, instead of trying to poke holes in Labor’s 50% target for electric new car sales by 2030 — which is actually not a particularly ambitious target — I would have one-upped them with a a target of 75% or 80% (most city vehicles, leaving the remainder for diesel sales in the regions) and I would have said these cars would be charged overnight on the hitherto excess off-peak power produced by fixed-load coal-fired plants; with a couple of new ones ‘to be built to power our EV future!’

  138. MatrixTransform

    Crazy old world.

    Things are overrated.
    Ideas is where its at.
    who needs utility?

  139. Oh come on

    If the EV industry in Australia stopped tomorrow and started making lava lamps we’d all be better off.

    Ftfy

  140. JC

    I can’t recall if it was Peugeot or Citroen. I forgot. I worked with the dude who was a descendant . He was a very smart dude, but the family didn’t have a lot of money though.

  141. MatrixTransform

    Peugeot

    business partner bought one.
    top of the line too
    7 years … couldn’t sell it

  142. Oh come on

    m0nty is the greatest counter-indicator ever.

  143. Juan

    The Peugeot family of Valentigney, Montbéliard, Franche-Comté, France

    That explains why they have manufacturing plants at Sochaux, Vesoul, and Mulhouse!

  144. Infidel Tiger

    Monty and Fitz should form an advisory firm.

  145. Overburdened

    If you don’t have an inclination to watch the whole thing, from to 5:45 for a comparison of the concerns of William Blair and Aldous Huxley regarding the state of society in the present time.

    https://youtu.be/37N0aFmO19o

  146. JC

    In can’t understand why Cadi and Lincoln aren’t imported here. They do make right hand drive I think.

  147. Oh come on

    Actually, if EV development continues without govt support, it’s a good thing.

  148. MatrixTransform

    I would have said these cars would be charged overnight on the hitherto excess off-peak power produced by fixed-load coal-fired plants

    dude, your wrongology is beginning to rival Numpty’s

    you reckon coal powered generators are spinning with excess that’s un-used ?

  149. Arky

    I rebuilt an old Peugeot for a friend.
    Great car.
    Engine blocks are sleeved, so whack in new sleeves and pistons and you basically have a new engine.
    All cars should be engineered like that.

  150. MatrixTransform

    snazzy

    looks like a pen/pencil eraser from the 1984 school stationery list

  151. Juan

    In can’t understand why Cadi and Lincoln aren’t imported here. They do make right hand drive I think.

    When GM-H had the Statesman and Caprice they didn’t do it because Cadillacs would just have cannibalised their own domination of the pseudo-limo market. Now, it’s probably too late. The market’s changed.

    And if you brought Lincolns to Australia, most people wouldn’t have a clue what they were.

  152. JC

    It’s fine for a city car. I actually use a mini for inner city driving and it’s fun because can find parks.

  153. Fisky

    Why do we spend millions a year on the ABC Insiders program, when m0nty provides the same service for free? Worth asking…

  154. Oh come on

    JC, I think Holden will start rebadging Caddies for its premium models pretty soon. GM’s global stable that it has to draw on to field a Holden line up is much smaller now that it’s offloaded Opel to PSA.

    In the medium term, I think the Holden brand is dead. It has no value anymore, so why keep it? We’ll have Chevrolets or Buicks and Cadillacs instead.

  155. Juan

    I rebuilt an old Peugeot for a friend.
    Great car.
    Engine blocks are sleeved, so whack in new sleeves and pistons and you basically have a new engine.
    All cars should be engineered like that.

    Which model, if you don’t mind me asking?

    I remember a mechanic once telling me to get an old 504; he said it was one of the most solidly built cars he’d ever worked on. This was a few decades ago, admittedly.

  156. MatrixTransform

    That Continental is sexy…I want one

  157. Arky

    Cars did not replace coach building.
    Early car companies did not have the capability to build the coachwork for their automobiles and usually farmed out that work.
    My 1929 Ford has a body that was built by Briggs, a coach building firm.

  158. Oh come on

    JC: The Blog.

    ‘odious burden of chastity’ plus ‘old enough to know better’ are recurring themes.

    It’s as though some people tell the same awkward stories to everyone they meet.

  159. Juan

    In the medium term, I think the Holden brand is dead.

    Agreed. If it survives it would be as niche marque, probably only on GM … Peugeot … I mean Inchcape’s mid-sized ute, the Thai-manufactured Holden Colorado.

    What used to be Holden dealers – I mean the ones which haven’t defected to Hyundai – will likely be known as Holden-Opel-Cadillac-Chevrolet dealers.

  160. Black Ball

    Nigella Lawson is just so very sexy

  161. Juan

    Cars did not replace coach building.
    Early car companies did not have the capability to build the coachwork for their automobiles and usually farmed out that work.

    But did you notice how the carmakers eventually bought out all of the coachbuilders? 😊 The real money was in the motors, not the coaches. Otherwise the coach-makers would have bought out the carmakers and underpinned their coaches with the newfangled technology.

  162. Oh come on

    Doesn’t USD80k buy you an entry level Merc S-class in the States?

  163. JC

    Yea, it would, OCO. The Lincoln has everything though.

  164. MatrixTransform

    Nigella Lawson is just so very sexy

    there’s a few dishes I can think of that I’d cook for her

  165. Infidel Tiger

    dAsante Retweeted

    Mark Knoller
    @markknoller

    “Well, he’s two-faced,” says Pres Trump about criticism from
    @JustinTrudeau
    , but at the same time says, “I find him to be a very nice guy.”
    @POTUS
    says he called him out on not reaching 2% GDP on defense spending., “I can imagine he’s not that happy – but that’s the way it is.”

  166. Colonel Crispin Berka

    ABC now admonishing people for the hurtful act of saving their own money.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaE41vhBuaw

    You must spend your money for the good of the nation, citizen.

  167. Infidel Tiger

    He sure is two faced.

    Black and white.

  168. Musk is going to end up in jail.

    Yep.
    Just like Elizabeth of Theranos.
    Just like Adam of Wework.
    Just like the GFC bankers.
    Just like Gillard of the Clinton Foundation.
    Just like the Clintons of the Clinton Foundation.
    Just like Rudd of wherever he got his money from.
    Just like the renewable energy fraudsters.
    Just like Biden and the Ukrainians.
    Just like Hillary and Uranium One…

    At least Musk launched a car into space and landed a reusable rocket.

  169. Fisky

    “Well, he’s two-faced,” says Pres Trump

    That was intentional wasn’t it. Totally neutralises any payback from Trudeau. The man is the master of the multi-barbed insult.

  170. Black Ball

    And now Total Divas. I am vacuous at times. 😂

  171. Harlequin Decline

    Shy Ted
    #3252004, posted on December 4, 2019 at 6:41 pm
    I’ve managed to get a sneak peek at Pirate Pete’ new book – “Raelene Castle, A Woman Wronged”.

    Well done and very funny Shy Ted.

  172. Oh come on

    The depreciation curve on those full size luxobarges is practically vertical, JC. You really should be rich to blow that kind of money on such vehicles.

  173. Top Ender

    Moto-Guzzi had a rather weird V-twin motorcycle out for a long time – the Le Man 850.

    V-twin was mounted sideways. Shaft drive. Rode one a few times, swapping my superbike for it, and remember giving it back with some relief. The bike seemed to want to go sideways under hard throttle.

    The rumour was the V-twin was out of some agricultural machine. Don’t know if true or not.

  174. Top Ender

    Raelene Castle should resign over diabolical Israel Folau disaster
    JANET ALBRECHTSEN

    A team of the sassiest spin doctors can’t help Rugby Australia. They lost on Wednesday. Big time. It was an old-fashioned shellacking not seen since the Wallabies lost to England in the World Cup quarterfinal this year. Given that Westpac boss Brian Hartzer fell on his sword for a disaster he didn’t know about, surely RA boss Raelene Castle should resign for a disaster she personally orchestrated.

    Put it this way. Earlier this year, Israel Folau, who was sacked by RA for posting on social media his religious beliefs, said: “First and foremost I am hoping for an apology from RA and an acknowledgment that even if they disagree with my views, I should be free to peacefully express my religious beliefs without fear of retribution or exclusion.”

    Folau’s solicitor, George Haros, said an apology would “come a long way to resolving the dispute”.

    That was in August. Castle responded by saying RA would not apologise to Folau.

    On Wednesday afternoon, following marathon mediation negotiations, RA wholeheartedly apologised to Folau. In fact, the humiliating settlement overseen by Castle saw RA “acknowledge and apologise for any hurt or harm caused” to both Israel and his wife, Maria. It reads like a mea culpa from RA for being part of the pile-on that Maria endured when she publicly supported her husband during this battle.

    Folau received money from RA, too. That’s in addition to the $2.1m fighting fund to cover his legal expenses from Australians who support Folau’s right to express his religious views, even if many — like me — disagree vehemently with his views. That, after all, is the real test of our commitment to freedom of expression, and religious freedom, in a liberal democracy. The money left over after legal costs will now be refunded.

    It’s a safe bet that Folau received a decent sum, too. A source close to the litigation confirmed to The Australian it was a multimillion-dollar settlement. Why else would Folau settle, given what lay ahead?

    Folau’s legal team, led by Stuart Wood QC, intended to call Pacific Islander members of the Wallabies to give evidence that they told Castle that RA’s treatment of Folau was causing them great distress. In other words, entirely contradicting Castle’s claims that Folau’s actions were the cause of sinking team morale.

    Folau’s team could have called Qantas boss Alan Joyce too, to determine who was calling the shots, potentially encouraging RA to breach section 772 of the Fair Work Act, which prohibits an employer from sacking an employee for unlawful reasons, including a person’s religion.

    Just as it is clear that Folau settled because he has walked away with a stonking big win — an apology and a healthy sum of money — it is equally clear that RA rolled over because it couldn’t bear a court case. And another year of being reminded of its hopeless mishandling of this matter.

    And imagine the relief on Kate Eastman’s face on Wednesday afternoon. Folau’s team was set to argue that the Sydney barrister’s role in the original tribunal hearing that led to Folau’s sacking raised questions of bias, or perceptions of bias. Eastman, a human rights lawyer, has a long history of supporting LGBTI causes. Good on her, that is her business. But her inclusion on the tribunal to sit in judgment on a devout Christian was a silly stunt that backfired badly.

    Speaking of human rights, it’s high time that freedom of expression was reinstated as one of our most fundamental human rights. But that will have to wait.

    Though Wednesday’s confidential settlement is a terrific win for Folau, some bigger questions remain unanswered in strict legal terms. A legal determination is still needed so that workers in this country know if they can be terminated, more or less at will, for expressing their religious beliefs under vaguely drafted, and subjectively interpreted, codes of conduct.

    Oz complete article – probably paywalled

  175. Tom

    David Rowe has worked out how to inject TDS into his Coalition hatred. FMD.

  176. Rockdoctor

    LOL, just glanced at a few day old Age where I am staying. Letters page red hot about political donations… Wonder after a yesterdays relevations in the News Ltd papers on Dan, if they are regretting running that line

  177. Porter

    Not a word I would usually use for Andrew Bolt: powerful.

    https://www.skynews.com.au/details/_6112634403001

  178. Herodotus

    Side-mounted motorcycle engines, be they the v or the flat variety (as per BMW) will have a torque reaction to one side as the revs go up.
    What was even worse back in WW1 days were the airplane engines that rotated!

  179. Bruce of Newcastle

    What a fine swag of cartoons! Thanks Tom!
    Varvel #2 is very sharp but I’ll go with Knight’s one of Coldplay and Greta. And Leak’s. Ripper.

  180. Rafe Champion

    Liberty Quote
    History is littered with examples of politicians withdrawing citizens’ rights to free expression because they did not like what they had been saying about them at a particular moment in history.

    Scratch the surface of this proposal and you will find a harsh new regime which stands to damage Australia’s reputation as a democracy and might well come back to bite the politicians, academics and publishers who are supporting it today.

    — Mark Pearson

  181. Rockdoctor

    FMD, jusw a Government ad for Teaching. Glossy & features prominant PC people/images in the background with the ATSI flags & Chinese red adornments. Victoria just gets worse each time I visit… More of the opinion to write off any states south of the Murray & SA…

  182. 1735099

    Peugeot

    business partner bought one.
    top of the line too
    7 years … couldn’t sell it

    There hasn’t been a real Peugeot since the demise of the 505.
    I owned three down the years, and two 404s.
    The pick of them was the 505 wagon – a true 8 seater, and built like a tank.
    I owned two of those, and regret selling both.
    The 404s were wonderful cars – you could cruise in near silence at top whack, and get 35 mpg on a long trip.
    My first one broke a camshaft, so I bought another which a friend had stored under his house in Townsville when his dad who owned it died.
    I paid $200, restored it with the best bits from both, and drove it to Mt Isa to use as a daily driver when I was posted out there.
    Rust was a problem in Townsville, especially in the hollow front sub frame.
    They don’t rust in the Isa.
    It would go anywhere, and I’d startle the locals by turning up at camp sites considered 4WD only.
    The big wheels, excellent clearance and torque tube rear axle worked a treat off road, so long as you maintained momentum.
    For a while they were assembled in Oz from CKD kits and were good value.
    They’d run rings around the Holdens of the time.
    Their reputation here was built on the success of the 203 in the redex trials.

  183. Entropy

    I would support anyone who would call for the new state of North Queensland. Even the Katter Mouth. Make the border the Tropic of Capricorn, and it’s first clause in its new constitution is that federal law does not override state law. Then…Freedom.

  184. Gab

    Consider helping Cdl Pell with legal fees. He gets no money at all from the Church towards his legal fees. Details at the link https://wdtprs.com/2019/12/card-pells-high-court-appeal-and-appeal-for-support-action-item/

  185. Frank

    Southbank in Melbourne sure is a lot like J.G. Ballard’s books isn’t it.

  186. Entropy

    Apparently Falou on top of the apology got $8 million according to the Tele.

    How come the Gothic Vicar of Rugby has not resigned for impoverishing and bringing the game into disrepute?

  187. Bruce of Newcastle

    Aquaman gets woke.

    Jason Momoa apologizes after plastic-shaming Chris Pratt: ‘Bro I love u but wtf’

    “Aquaman” star Jason Momoa apologized Tuesday after he called out fellow actor Chris Pratt for posing with a plastic water bottle in an ad for Amazon.

    Mr. Pratt was recently featured in the Amazon ad posing next to a treadmill while holding the beverage and “gazing into the distance,” as the actor put it in an Instagram post.

    Yep, plastic-shaming is a thing. We already have plane-shaming. I wonder what else-shaming they’ll come up with next?

  188. Rockdoctor

    Entropy . Was against a north Queensland state for ages because of the cluster that is Townsville City Council and a few vested interests the have been fleecing NQ through their closed shop practices. Have to say now am all for it. The capital 1500km away is too far, Brisbane governs for the south east which Beattie confirmed with his backhand comment that he really didn’t care they will never vote for me anyway. Another consideration, probably mostly right leaning senators to rebalance the chamber in Canberra…

  189. 1735099

    The relative decline in school performance in Australia commenced when politicians decided they had to “do something” about education.
    That “something”, usually did not involve consultation with teachers, and was almost always based on approaches employed in industry using economic rationalist theory.
    Out of that grew NAPLAN (Napalm??), league tables, and teacher burnout.
    Education is a birthright, not an industry, and the closer it resembles an “industry”, the less effective it will become in terms of student performance.
    High performing systems invest relentlessly in their teachers.
    They focus on recruiting the best, training teachers well, paying them well, and giving them practical support and development.
    In-service training should ideally continue right through all teaching careers, and involve release from teaching for at least one year every five, to be coached and mentored in best practice.
    Teachers should also be required to take on substantially different teaching assignments regularly and routinely.
    Mr/Mrs Jones who has been teaching year six since 1990 and is using the same strategies applied back then needs to be dragged into reality, or they will ossify professionally.
    High performing East Asian systems – Hong Kong, Korea, Shanghai (the region of China that participated in PISA before 2015) and Singapore show they follow an intensive process of seeing these changes all the way through into the classroom.Hence the success of community models of education observed in many Asian countries and Scandinavia.

  190. Twostix

    Education failed in australia when teaching fell under the control of retards boomers like bob here.

    It’s an industry full of mediocrites who have created a culture of telling themselves how special and amazing they are.

  191. I would support anyone who would call for the new state of North Queensland.

    And support from this Viktorisani.
    If you wish to see the irrelevance of govt. Go to Normanton or Laura or anywhere in between.

  192. Val Majkus

    about that review of the MDB from the Oz

    Victoria and South Australia will not support changes to the Murray-Darling Basin Plan that reduce their water entitlements, as federal Water Minister David Littleproud urges states to back a review of the system.

    South Australian Water Minister David Speirs said the state would consider how much power it would give Mick Keelty to review the system as inspector-general.

    “We’ve advocated for the creation of the inspector-general position and we support all efforts to improve compliance and delivery of the Murray-Darling Basin Plan,” Mr Speirs said. “We are seeking further detail about the proposed review; however, we would only be interested in looking at water-sharing changes that improve long-term outcomes for all jurisdictions.”

    Mr Kelty’s role as inspector-general needs to be legislatively supported by the states that are part of the basin plan: South Australia, NSW, Victoria and Queensland.

    If he is backed, Mr Keelty will examine whether the water-­sharing agreement is still workable, amid complaints from NSW irrigators that too much water is going to South Australia.

    The treaty, which goes back to 1914, ensures South Australia gets a large amount of water from upstream states, regardless of ­whether the river system is experiencing normal flows.

    Mr Speirs stared down NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro, who is threatening to walk away from the plan unless the state does not have to contribute to an extra 450 gigalitres of water into the system by 2024. The Nationals leader has said the plan was too favourable to South Australia.

    Mr Speirs said he would support a change in the water-sharing rules only “if South Australia is guaranteed not to be worse off”.

    “What is needed now is mature, balanced leadership from all basin jurisdictions to deliver what has been agreed for the benefit of all those who rely on the Murray-Darling Basin system,” he said.

    Victorian Water Minister Lisa Neville said the Andrews government would “not support the ­inspector-general having powers to change water-sharing rules”.

    “I support ensuring the best use of all available water but I won’t stand by and let water-sharing rules be changed to the detriment of Victorian communities,” she said.

    “While we agree the basin plan needs to be adaptive — these water-sharing rules pre-date the plan and are the basis for states making the best decisions possible.”

    Mr Littleproud announced the inquiry on Monday and has asked Mr Keelty to report back by March.

    Queensland Natural Resources Minister Anthony Lynham said the state had “always met its commitments to the plan”. “We will make sure that Queensland farmers, communities, the environment and Queensland traditional owners all have their fair share,” he said.

    Federal Nationals MP Barnaby Joyce said there should be less water given to the environment. “We must put forward an amendment so that critical human needs and economic needs are taken into ­account in a more formidable way,” he said.

  193. Snoopy

    Feminisation of the teaching profession. Decline in educational standards. Coincidence or causation?

  194. Bruce of Newcastle

    Numbers – Teachers in China actually teach real stuff. They do so with a fraction of the salary and resources we have here. Their PISA numbers are mind blowing.
    Maybe we should adopt their methods and curriculum?

  195. Twostix

    I mean we have the perfect displau right here. The numbers are in: despite childten now spending almost their entire life in the hands of “educators”, many literally starting age six months old in “early learning”, children are not being taught anything.

    Whose fault is that according to the resident teacher / education administrator? Everyone else’s of course!

  196. pete m

    Daily Telegraph reporting folau got 8 mil.
    Can 8th Dan take a dozen eggs and once an hour each time it thinks about posting smash 1 on its head?

    Seeing their relief and smiles no way did izzy settle for less than 1 year income.

    Well played izzy.

  197. Twostix

    The issues are:

    – Teaching in australia is dominated by self righteous mid IQ dumb-people-who-think-they’re-smart ideologues like bob here.
    – Teachers have created an armored cult of self praise and adulation and placed themselves as a class apart (and above) parents.
    – There is absolutely zero way for parents to influence or provide effective feedback to the cultish system they have created – this is of course by design.

  198. Entropy

    Snoopy
    #3252433, posted on December 5, 2019 at 7:23 am
    Feminisation of the teaching profession. Decline in educational standards. Coincidence or causation?

    I was at an awards cero,only the other day where miss Entropy was picking up a few, despite the principals and deputy principals best efforts ( they want her to lead a dance troupe, she does enough dance outside school already and these fat, short haired dangly earringed puffer fish clones idea of dance seems to involve interpretive dance of the fight to save the endangered Pygmy sugar glider). Anyway they grudgingly had to hand out the achievements.
    The principal arrived at the school, which parents and students loved, a couple of years ago, and she appears to have spent most of her time forcing out the older (male) subject heads into early retirement, and installed clones of herself, all puffer fish with often stated views of their own own exulted capability. Legends in their own classroom.

    We have decided to pay for private tutors on top of whatever the school is up to.

  199. Entropy

    Note to self: do not right long comments while travelling in a bus: grammar, spelling and punctuation suffers So much I look like a product of the Australian National Curriculum.

  200. Snoopy

    Unbelievable. Jacindastan is now a humourless bog hole.

    A cartoonist in New Zealand has been stood down and his editor could face the sack after an offensive cartoon was published about the Samoan measles epidemic.

    Protesters are demanding the resignation of Garrick Tremain and his editor Barry Stewart after the cartoon was published in the Otago Daily Times yesterday.

    The cartoon in question shows two women walking out of a travel agency with a quote underneath which reads: “I asked: ‘What are the least popular spots at the moment?’ she said: ‘The ones people are picking up in Samoa'”.

  201. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Education failed in australia when teaching fell under the control of retards boomers like bob here.

    The rot in teaching started in the early Sixties. The eldest boomers would have been in their late teens. The bulk of boomers (born 1950 to 1960) were just starting high school, or still in primary school.

    But hey, don’t let your pig ignorance get in the way of a good hatefest.

  202. Entropy

    On that awards ceremony, I noticed that even in construction (what in the olden days was called “manual arts) it was nearly all girls wot won the academic achievement awards.
    On querying Miss Entropy (who was one of the recipients) as if it was that the chairs , tables and tool boxes they made were all better built by the girls, she replied “Not really. The boys made good stuff, it is just they didn’t take the write up seriously”.

    I queried as to what this write up consisted of, and learned that apparently for each product a student makes, they must manage the project: write up the construction plan, list potential risks and how to mitigate them (these must include a range of environmental risks), how you felt about making the item, and how you felt on completion etc.

    She wasn’t sure, but understood a lot of the marks were based in the write up, with how well made something was only a bit of the marks. It was more about the process.

  203. Mater

    The relative decline in school performance in Australia commenced when politicians decided they had to “do something” about education.

    So says someone who’s not only retired but spent so much time at the low end of the spectrum that he has no idea at how badly the capable students are being hobbled, in the name of equity (and modern techniques).

    Science is now almost totally ‘collaborative’ work with little to no individual work or assessment. In essence, that means that for any work, the willing and able students are sprinkled in among the disruptive and disinterested sea anchors, in the hope they will be dragged up. Predictably, and in the great socialist tradition, it has the opposite effect. The keen kids do all the work, strive hard to keep the group afloat and then, eventually, resign themselves to the old adage – “if you can’t beat them, join them”.

    But, hey, no one feels inferior. They all get the same mediocre mark…and sub-standard education.

  204. Entropy

    The rot in teaching started in the early Sixties. The eldest boomers would have been in their late teens. The bulk of boomers (born 1950 to 1960) were just starting high school, or still in primary school.

    The boomers have been in charge for the last twenty five years.

  205. Shy Ted

    Bit more to declining academic standards IMHO.
    Start with mum & dad. Increasing use of alcohol, drugs, cigs etc makes for poorer pregnancies and parenting.
    Massive increase in minimal brain damage in neonates as a result – poorer concentration, memory, behaviour etc not offset by good parenting.
    Lack of fear factor in classrooms due to the feminisation of teaching – remember the teachers in whose classes you wouldn’t dare not apply yourself.
    Reduced sport and activity in general, sport being wonderful for increasing cognitive capacities.
    If everything is made safe it doesn’t prepare the frontal lobe, where it all happens, for a life full of danger.
    Diet. We know where the poor diets are.
    Lack of immediate discipline & painful punishment. hit your thumb with a hammer, you soon learn not to.
    Lack of streaming and no opportunity to become better at what you’re good at.
    Almost every kid can do a little better, usually if they’re pushed a bit.
    But I think the failure is in getting the early years right.
    Oh, the media, insisting you’re a victim. But little kids don’t understand that concept.
    Think of it as a cumulative thing – genes + pregnancy + environment + exercise + restriction & so on.

  206. Snoopy

    Entropy, I went to an awards night at a Brisbane northside co-ed high school a couple of years ago. Girls dominated. Even in maths and science. Boys only dominated in IT and the school-based apprenticeship stream.

    I raised it afterwards with the Executive Principal who I knew and he basically just shrugged.

    I would love to see those proficiency test results disaggregated into boys and girls. I reckon it would be a scandal.

  207. Entropy

    The boomers have been in charge for the last twenty five thirty five years.

  208. Entropy

    Science is now almost totally ‘collaborative’ work with little to no individual work or assessment. In essence, that means that for any work, the willing and able students are sprinkled in among the disruptive and disinterested sea anchors, in the hope they will be dragged up.

    Ah yes, forgot that too. Bossy types like miss entropy always end up running the project, and the boys sit back because hey, she wants to, and I just want to get on the lathe.

  209. 1735099

    I would support anyone who would call for the new state of North Queensland.

    Queensland has always been different and never properly understood by southerners.
    We identify by our distance from the capital (Brisbane), more strongly than by any other factor.
    The further we live from Brisbane, the more militant and contrarian our opinions.
    I learned this when working in regional administration in Mt Isa. We talked bitterly about BFBs (Bastards from Brisbane) and saw our main function as opposing every suggested initiative that came from Central Office.
    This identity by region probably derived from the history. Unlike other mainland states, Queensland was settled district by district, from the productive inland to the coast, rather than from the capital outwards.
    The east/west railway links were completed before the north/south Brisbane/Cairns link.
    Prior to the Second World War, many Queenslanders lived out their lives in their own regional areas without ever travelling to the capital. The distances and the state of the roads saw to that.
    This geographical history underpins our political consciousness, and creates an electoral environment beyond the ken of journalists in NSW and Victoria.
    Every now and again, this lack of comprehension by the commetariat is revealed by unexpected (to them) election results, as demonstrated in 2012 – and again in May this year..
    Having said that, Queensland can surprise from the other side of the political spectrum.
    Remember Red Ted Theodore?
    Remember the shearer’s strike?

  210. Farmer Gez

    The great Bob Willis has died after a battle with cancer.
    At his very best against quality opposition like Australia. Eight wickets in 81 in the Ashes.
    Contrast the skill and standing of Willis compared to the little Warner cheat, beating up low quality opposition.
    Well played Bob.

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