Australia Day Roundup – the Lucky Country!

I don’t have any special thing to say except that we are incredibly lucky that Australia was developed by the British at a time when classical liberalism permeated official thinking, see Kemp’s history of Australia Volume One.

The biggest hit on the indigenous population was the unwitting introduction of exotic diseases. There were criminal acts but nothing like the damage inflicted when criminals run the country, like every socialist state we know about. Admittedly crony capitalism promotes the same evils but that is not limited government under the rule of law.

The second biggest hit on the indigenous population in Australia was the calculated and deliberate welfare policy introduced by Whitlam and Coombs.

After clearing the cache I can now access the site directly, some bastard ought of told me to do that when I signaled  the problem last week.

On the topic of criminals taking charge, did you ever wonder how come Cuba has such great infant mortality statistics? Simple, they are fake. Who would have thought?

A glimpse of the lunacy at Davos and what it means for proper climate science. Nothing new, just a reminder.

Some good news, a look at the runs that Trumpie has put on the board for deregulation of energy, actually across the board his record is sensational and someone can post a link to some site that shows it, I have lost track. Those advances plus tax relief must be having compounding effects by now.

More later after mandatory yoga and a nourishing breakfast. Over an hour late this morning.

This entry was posted in Global warming and climate change policy, Rafe. Bookmark the permalink.

20 Responses to Australia Day Roundup – the Lucky Country!

  1. Entropy

    Amazon has vegemite jars at half price.

  2. Mark M

    Payra coal power plant takes off

    One of the mega projects of the AL-government, Payra power plant is the first in Bangladesh to run on imported coal. Now Indonesian coal is being used and later Australian coal would be used.

    These plants are at the heart of the government plan to produce 40,000MW electricity by 2030 when coal would produce 35 percent of the power from about 2 percent now.

    https://www.thedailystar.net/frontpage/news/payra-coal-power-plant-takes-1853791
    h/t: [email protected]

    >> We’re gonna need to blow up more of our coal-fired power stations to stop the bushfires.

    Happy Australia Day.

  3. BrettW

    Lucky as in it was the Brits who colonised it.

  4. mem

    Yoga is Australia’s preferred cardio, strength and flexibility exercise with 2.18 million Australians participating in yoga in the year to December 2017. Yoga participation has continued to increase. … Over 1.7 million women do yoga regularly or occasionally compared to just under 480,000 men. Roy Morgan Research

  5. rickw

    @Corowa watching the last gasps of Australia.

  6. Up The Workers!

    To Mark M at 9.55 a.m.:

    Can Australia apply to the U.N. to Officially become a third world country too, so that we, too, can use cheap Australian coal like Bangla Desh does, and maybe one day, we could become rich and prosperous, too?

    Why don’t we have “finkers” like these “progressive” Leftard Australia-haters do?

  7. duncanm

    More later after mandatory yoga and a nourishing breakfast. Over an hour late this morning.

    quiche ?

    .. but I jest.

  8. P

    We are lucky also to have the ABC to keep us informed, and really lucky to have a Science Minister!

  9. Roger

    I don’t have any special thing to say except that we are incredibly lucky that Australia was developed by the British at a time when classical liberalism permeated official thinking, see Kemp’s history of Australia Volume One.

    I must say I’m looking forward to seeing how this exponent of classical liberalism and historian of our fair country Australia handles his own role in depriving land owners of their property rights when he was Environment minister under John Howard 2001-2004.

    Australian political conservatives…they love to talk and write about classical liberalism, but it’s what they do when they have power that will be their legacy.

  10. Ubique

    Australia Day is when all Australians should celebrate that the continent wasn’t settled by the Belgians, Dutch, Germans, French, Chinese or the Javanese (ask the indigenous peoples of Irian Jaya). I imagine Aborigines we’re fortunate too it was Captain Cook who lobbed rather than war canoes full of warlike, fearsome and hungry Maoris.

  11. Vicki

    The second biggest hit on the indigenous population in Australia was the calculated and deliberate welfare policy introduced by Whitlam and Coombs.

    How great to see this recognised, Rafe. Most people seem to have no understanding of the impact of Nugget Coombs’ utopian policy of returning the Aborigines in remote Australia back to a hunter/gatherer lifestyle.

    It didn’t work, of course – it merely created dysfunctional indigenous communities which had to be supported by continuous white welfare. It is impossible to turn back history in this way. While many clan groups did maintain local language & customs, the dependence on “white” foodstuffs & alcohol debased their existence.

    It is infuriating that the apologists for this policy routinely ignored the evidence of extreme violence in these communities – particularly towards women & children. Instead, they perpetuated the myth of the cruel white settlers in the “stolen children” saga.

    In every way, do-gooders like Coombs & Whitlam effectively prevented remote Aboriginal communities from living productive and comfortable lives while still preserving their culture and beliefs.

    It is a disgrace that I hope future generations will one day understand.

  12. Vicki

    Further to my last comments – Coombs et al also did not recognise that it was inviting disaster to settle different clan & skin groups in the same communities.

    Integration and assimilation of Aborigines was never going to be easy or without failures. But where it did occur in coastal & regional communities, it provided their children with far more opportunities than the kids in the appalling conditions of the remote outstations.

  13. Rafe Champion

    Good point Roger, I seem to recall he would not touch school vouchers with a stick as well.

  14. rickw

    Talking to people you realise the impact of MSN’s propaganda machine. People think DJT and his Twitter account are a threat to them when in fact he’s doing his best to save them and The West in general,

  15. John A

    Entropy #3302559, posted on January 26, 2020 at 9:12 am

    Amazon has vegemite jars at half price.

    Yes, but are they full or empty?

  16. Beachcomber

    By far The second biggest hit on the indigenous population in Australia was the calculated and deliberate welfare policy introduced by Whitlam and Coombs.

    FIFY

  17. Beachcomber

    Vicki at 12:05 pm

    In every way, do-gooders like Coombs & Whitlam effectively prevented remote Aboriginal communities from living productive and comfortable lives while still preserving their culture and beliefs.

    It is a disgrace that I hope future generations will one day understand.

    Not much hope that future generations will have any understanding of this. To even express such a view will lead to a severe reprimand and probable sacking for any schoolteacher or University tutor. Students will also be be marked down, reprimanded and probably expelled if they show any such wrong-think.

  18. Bruce

    About the “introduced diseases” that tore through the indigenous population in the late 18th Century.

    Bill Shorten should be remembered for his “infected blankets” accusation and mocked for ever. IF the First (and subsequent) fleets were carrying people infected with Smallpox, there is little chance many would have landed alive in Botany Bay. The whole infected blankets thing is a part of North American lore and utterly inapplicable to Australia..

    The First Fleet set sail on 13th May, 1787. Anyone care to guess the date they arrived “down under”? Incubation time for Smallpox? Note also that the ships made a few stops along the way. They initially sailed to Rio de Janeiro, then across to Capetown and picked up the edge of the “Roaring Forties” to get across the Indian Ocean. Navigational note: The charts at that time showed Tasmania connected to the mainland, thus the fleet had to go much further south than if they had known about “Bass Strait”. That should have been sufficient time for all manner of nasty diseases to ravage the passengers and crews. I suspect if any such cases were boarded in England, somebody might have noticed, more-so when they rocked into Rio or Capetown.

    No, the REAL source of the hideously disfiguring and often lethal disease was the Mollucan Trepang / Beche de Mer fishermen who traded with the locals in what is now, the Northern Territory. The Molluccans had been exposed to Smallpox for a significant time and whilst not “immune”, seemed to have developed some tolerance for it. Their unfortunate trading partners on the “really big island” were utterly unprepared for it. Because of the great swirl of nomadic movements; inter-tribal trading, ceremonies and PARTICULARLY “marriages”, (incest was a KNOWN bad idea.), the disease spread from North to South, albeit at “walking pace”, wiping out some districts and utterly disrupting normal life for the survivors in others.

    Edward Jenner would discover inoculation against Smallpox only a few years later, in 1796.

  19. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Bill Shorten should be remembered for his “infected blankets” accusation and mocked for ever

    He should have been, but he wasn’t. Got away with that claim.

  20. duncanm

    A very heartening piece on Ash Barty (YAOTY) in the Oz.. That girl certainly has a sensible head on her.

    Some choice snippets:

    .. so to her, what does it mean to actually be an Australian?

    “It’s just an ease of conversation and approachability,” she said before her extraordinarily complicated 6-3 1-6 6-4 win over American Alison Riske in the fourth round of the Australian Open on Sunday night.

    “And just knowing that there’s no kind of BS. We say it how it is. And that’s what I love. I love the honesty. I love the humility and I love how humble Aussies are.

    “I think Australian values are very strong. We love someone who has a crack, puts themselves on the line, and regardless of whether they win or lose, just goes out there and does their best, goes about it the right way. When you become vulnerable and put yourself out there, it’s very challenging. It’s very confronting. But it’s very rewarding.”

    Barty said she had no problem with Australia Day being held on January 26. Tens of thousands of protesters took part in “Invasion Day” rallies on Sunday.

    “I wasn’t aware of the protest,” she said. “I wasn’t keeping an eye on it. I’m a proud, indigenous woman. I’m a proud Australian

    “For me, it doesn’t matter what day of the year it is. I’m going to stay true to my values all throughout the year, all throughout my life. Every single day I want to be kind, I want to be honest, I want to be humble, I want to give the best that I can.

    That’s all that matters for me.”

    Asked if it was awkward to be asked in her on-court interview about Australia Day, Barty replied: “Why should it be awkward? I’m an extremely proud indigenous woman. It’s not for me to decide what day Australia Day is on.

    “Like I said, I’m staying true to my values. I am extremely proud of my heritage. That’s going to remain the same every single day of every single year for the rest of my life. It doesn’t really matter what day it is.”

Comments are closed.