Tuesday Forum: February 18, 2020

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2,939 Responses to Tuesday Forum: February 18, 2020

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  1. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    China fires officials over spead of coronavirus in prisons
    China has fired nearly a dozen prison and justice department officials across three provinces due to the emergence of coronavirus infections in prisons, state media reported.

    Shandong, Zhejiang and Hubei provinces, the latter of which is the epicentre of the ongoing outbreak, reported a total of 447 infections in prisons, according to the state-run tabloid Global Times.

  2. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Iraq temporarily closes border with Iran
    Iraq banned border crossings by Iranian nationals for three days from Thursday amid fears of the coronavirus, Iraq’s state news agency said on Thursday.

    The decision came after Iraqi Airways suspended flights to Iran.

    Two Iranians who tested positive on Wednesday for the disease have died, while three tested positive on Thursday, taking the total number of confirmed cases in Iran to five, the Iranian health ministry said.

  3. It’s that it goes against a world view instilled by 100+ years of Darwin, Nietszche and Marx.
    He is no more capable of studying something premised on his view being entirely wrong, than numberwang has of flying a minigun equipped pig in combat against antifa.


    Fkn hell, Arky.
    Bamn!
    #paddlingtoCubatobangMaria

  4. JC

    Tel

    Are you around. What was it that you posted last evening that was meant to argue against what I said.

    Let me repeat again the main point of the comment I made about all the monetary economists here.

    Not just you, but a large number of the commenters here made comments that QEing would cause the currencies where this was occurring to collapse as a result of the inevitable hyper-inflation. Not only did that not happen, but the Australian Dollar is actually falling against the currencies which did QE. Australia has never QE’d.

    Fact: You were all massively wrong.

  5. Are you looking to motorhome around Manhattan, JC? 🙂

    Ahahahahaha
    Epic

  6. DrBeauGan

    God is indiscriminate in his blessings, c.

    He’s certainly been generous to me, Roger. And I don’t even believe in Him!

  7. bespoke

    DrBeauGan
    #3330901, posted on February 21, 2020 at 7:46 pm
    I don’t see why, Calli. Anyone’s allowed to post, and anyone is allowed to oppose it. Freedom of speech doesn’t mean you have to agree with what others say or write.

    Get you self checked out for Alzheimer’s.

  8. JC

    Shut up Gunner. 🙂

    Man, all I did was ask how much one of those freaking things cost and all this crap gets posted.

    No, I’m not buying one and have zero intentions of ever even going near one.

  9. Mark A

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #3330920, posted on February 21, 2020 at 8:03 pm

    China fires officials over spead of coronavirus in prisons
    China has fired nearly a dozen prison and justice department officials across three provinces due to the emergence of coronavirus infections in prisons, state media reported.

    Nature of the beast zippy, remember reading about removing directors of agricultural entities in the late CCCR, as a punishment for poor harvest.

    True or not, can’t verify Boris might.

  10. vlad

    Here you are, JC.

    World’s most expensive RV. $3 million – USD, I’m guessing. Enjoy! And I hope you find a place to park it in Manhattan.

    https://www.insider.com/worlds-most-expensive-rv-2017-7

  11. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    The Foreign Investment Review Board is facing pressure from independent MP Andrew Wilkie to reject a Chinese diary giant’s bid for Lion’s dairy and drinks business after the competition watchdog gave the $600 million offer the greenlight.

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s (ACCC) decision not to oppose the deal between China Mengniu Dairy Company and Lion was criticised by Mr Wilkie, who said Australians were concerned about foreign ownership of ‘‘leading brands’’ and strategic assets.

  12. Roger

    He’s certainly been generous to me, Roger. And I don’t even believe in Him!

    He maketh His sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust. Matthew 5:45 [AV]

  13. DrBeauGan

    He’s certainly been generous to me, Roger. And I don’t even believe in Him!

    Yet he’s giving nota a hard time, and she wants people to pray to Him on her behalf. Doesn’t it mean that God thinks a hard time is good for her? And if prayers work, won’t He therefore give her an even harder time? The logic of asking for prayer escapes me.

  14. vlad

    That’s horrifying.

    Very luxurious on the inside, though.

  15. Mark A

    vlad
    #3330932, posted on February 21, 2020 at 8:15 pm

    World’s most expensive RV. $3 million – USD, I’m guessing. Enjoy! And I hope you find a place to park it in Manhattan.

    https://www.insider.com/worlds-most-expensive-rv-2017-7

    I honestly can’t think of anyone who could afford it and would buy it.
    Maybe I’m out of touch but it makes no sense to me, less even than going on a crowded germ incubator for a few weeks.

  16. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    A sixth case of the novel coronavirus has been diagnosed in British Columbia after a woman in her 30s returned to the province this week from travel in Iran.

  17. vlad

    Reminds me of the movie THE BIG BUS – which had its moments.

  18. areff

    How screwed is Australia.

    Two months ago I signed up for an Optus wireless package and was informed they’d send me a confirmation. Didn’t hear another thing.

    Went back this week and applied again. Still waiting to hear from them, so I called. Filippina on the phone says I might get my modem “next week, maybe the week after”

    Is there any class in Australia — political, managerial, corporate — that is actually, you know, efficient at doing its job?

  19. JC

    I honestly can’t think of anyone who could afford it and would buy it.

    Wealthy mid-westerners and Canadians would buy one. That’s not even up for debate.

  20. Mark A

    vlad
    #3330938, posted on February 21, 2020 at 8:21 pm

    That’s horrifying.

    Very luxurious on the inside, though.

    So is a 2Mil flat and you don’t have to drive it. You an use the leftover money to fly an be chauffeured around in comfort.

  21. DrBeauGan

    He maketh His sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust. Matthew 5:45 [AV]

    I’m just, and nothing like as evil as I might be, Roger. If I’m wrong about His existence I shall certainly have a considerable surprise. Arky thinks it will shatter me, but it won’t. Unless He’s Arky’s kind of God, in which case I shall be severely disappointed in Him.

  22. Mark A

    JC
    #3330944, posted on February 21, 2020 at 8:25 pm

    I honestly can’t think of anyone who could afford it and would buy it.

    Wealthy mid-westerners and Canadians would buy one. That’s not even up for debate.

    Sorry I was thinking of civilised people not bogans.

  23. mh

    Canadian health authorities have announced what they called a “sentinel event” with the detection of the new coronavirus in a woman who had never travelled to China.
    The woman instead had recently returned to British Columbia from Iran, which has reported just five cases of the disease. Two of those patients have died</em.

    https://www.scmp.com/news/world/united-states-canada/article/3051735/sentinel-event-new-canadian-coronavirus-patient

  24. Roger

    The logic of asking for prayer escapes me.

    It does so, at first.

    May I suggest C. S. Lewis, Miracles.

  25. JC

    Very luxurious on the inside, though.

    The interior design is like something out of a horror movie.

  26. Leigh Lowe

    areff

    #3330892, posted on February 21, 2020 at 7:37 pm

    BoN: Love the cross-eyed bear. Reminds me of juvenile Hail Marys: “…thy room Jesus

    Our Father who art in heaven,
    Harold be thy name.

  27. Roger

    I’m just, and nothing like as evil as I might be, Roger.

    No doubt, at least as far as evil is concerned, BG.

    Original sin doesn’t mean we’re all as evil as we can be, but that we have a propensity towards evil.

    But justice before God is only found through faith in Christ, the only human being to have kept the divine law in all its fullness, which we all fail at.

    Look, I have to go – dinner & family call – but I’d be happy to continue this discussion tomorrow.

    Bless you!

  28. JC

    Caroline Overington at the Oz asks:

    Why do women leaders get a bad rap?

    Oh I don’t know , Caroline. Maybe, on the whole they’re fucking terrible at it.

    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/the-deal-magazine/why-do-women-leaders-continue-to-get-a-bad-rap/news-story/683dcbe94f1e1c8dfc4413fa0fdb32f7

  29. Leigh Lowe

    Via Powerline this succint account of the Dimocrat debate from a distraught lefty:-

    Last night was the first Dem debate I tuned into, and it was horrifying.
    Bernie was an angry uncle.
    Bloomberg was an arrogant asshole.
    Warren was a ballbusting bluestocking.
    Pete was a glib greenhorn.
    Biden was barely alive.
    And Klobuchar was a smirking SNL character. . .
    It’s a f—— catastrophe!

  30. JC

    Pete was a glib greenhorn.

    Someone been referring to him as Powerpoint Pete.

  31. Snoopy

    Went back this week and applied again. Still waiting to hear from them, so I called. Filippina on the phone says I might get my modem “next week, maybe the week after”

    It’s top of the Guangzhou factory’s to do list. Once staff get back to work.

  32. JC

    mh

    I’ve never heard her talk. She sounds like she’s retarded.

  33. 1735099

    Though you are right the Karman Gaia is an elegant looking car.

    Also very well put together.
    My first car was a 1956 1200 Beetle (small window).
    I was probably lucky to survive.
    I did a 180 degree spin on a damp road after a storm one afternoon, without hitting anything and without stalling.
    It scared the daylights out of me and taught me about oversteer.
    I then did a bit of sprinting in it which also helped me learn car control.
    Eventually it put a valve through a piston, caused by overheating after I got washed down a creek near Inglewood and the cooling fins on the cylinder heads got glagged up with dried mud.
    I knew this creek, but when the Coolmunda dam was built, it changed the direction of the flow, and it was deeper than it looked, making the beetle float gently away.
    I put a motor out of a Kombi in it, and it went OK.
    My next Beetle was a 1962 and a half.
    It also put a valve through a piston on my way back to Singleton after a weekend’s leave.
    The local police sergeant flagged down a speeding motorist and I got back to 3TB by midnight and avoided AWOL.
    I put a replacement long motor in it, and sold it to my cousin when I went to Vietnam.
    I could easily afford a restored 1303, but if I’m going to have a toy, it might as well be something that’s fun to drive like my MX5 SE.
    The Beetle is still a temptation.

  34. areff

    I was probably lucky to survive.

    A view not shared by many

  35. Bruce of Newcastle

    she wants people to pray to Him on her behalf

    Which I will do DrB.
    You haven’t yet worked out what blessed is.
    It isn’t having a Ferrari in each of your three garages.

    This is what Jesus taught in the camel incident.

    7 As Jesus started on his way, a man ran up to him and fell on his knees before him. “Good teacher,” he asked, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?”

    18 “Why do you call me good?” Jesus answered. “No one is good—except God alone. 19 You know the commandments: ‘You shall not murder, you shall not commit adultery, you shall not steal, you shall not give false testimony, you shall not defraud, honor your father and mother.’[a]”

    20 “Teacher,” he declared, “all these I have kept since I was a boy.”

    21 Jesus looked at him and loved him. “One thing you lack,” he said. “Go, sell everything you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow me.”

    22 At this the man’s face fell. He went away sad, because he had great wealth.

    23 Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, “How hard it is for the rich to enter the kingdom of God!”

    24 The disciples were amazed at his words. But Jesus said again, “Children, how hard it is[b] to enter the kingdom of God! 25 It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.”

    26 The disciples were even more amazed, and said to each other, “Who then can be saved?”

    27 Jesus looked at them and said, “With man this is impossible, but not with God; all things are possible with God.”

    28 Then Peter spoke up, “We have left everything to follow you!”

    29 “Truly I tell you,” Jesus replied, “no one who has left home or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or fields for me and the gospel 30 will fail to receive a hundred times as much in this present age: homes, brothers, sisters, mothers, children and fields—along with persecutions—and in the age to come eternal life. 31 But many who are first will be last, and the last first.”

    I’ve highlighted three bits of the story.

    First Jesus does a bit of squirrel. The guy’s attention is drawn to the commandments and away from the highlighted bit, which is profound.

    Then, in the second bit he knocks the socks off his disciples. See, they thought rich people were blessed by God. That is not so (read Job). They were so socks-knocked-off that Jesus had to repeat what he had just said. Which knocked their socks off a second time. It was a widespread belief in Judea then. But wrong (if you’ve read the Psalms).

    Then, once the disciples finally get it, Jesus learns them. “Who can be saved” they ask? “What is impossible for man is possible for God” says Jesus. Which is the Gospel.

    You have to look at God’s frame of reference. A hard time now is but an instant in eternity. We are kindergarten kiddies in God’s realm. Some of us will graduate to 1st class.

  36. Chris

    Our brand has sold 7 motor homes at an average price of around $140k

    Wow.
    My FIL bought an OKA 4WD custom kitted as a camper-van sleeping 6 or 8, when they existed about 25 years ago. It cost about $105K from memory and he said a full kit Landcruiser would have been $120K at the time.

    Your unit price seems very reasonable, Custard!

  37. Oh come on

    Julia Baird over at Teh Dumb with this razor-sharp insight:

    Domestic violence shouldn’t be a culture war. Can’t we all agree killing women and children is wrong?

    Now that you mention it, I didn’t think it was wrong before, Julia, but now that you’ve posed the question, I realise that it is indeed wrong to kill women and children. Thanks Julia. You utterly daft bint.

    ffs this is such horse shit.

  38. Leigh Lowe

    I put a replacement long motor in it, and sold it to my cousin when I went to Vietnam.

    You went to Vietnam?
    I did not know that.
    Tell us more.

  39. Oh come on

    he said a full kit Landcruiser would have been $120K at the time.

    Not factory.

  40. Mark A

    Leigh Lowe
    #3330970, posted on February 21, 2020 at 8:52 pm

    I put a replacement long motor in it, and sold it to my cousin when I went to Vietnam.

    You went to Vietnam?
    I did not know that.
    Tell us more.

    You have a devious mind LL.

  41. Mater

    You have a devious mind LL.

    It was a genuine LOL moment.

  42. Chris

    he said a full kit Landcruiser would have been $120K at the time.

    Not factory.

    Correct. long range tanks, water tank, bars, all mod cons for camping.

  43. dopey

    Custard: “I’m still yet to kick a goal but still have three more days to get some runs on the board.” Playing footy and cricket at the same time won’t help.

  44. Snoopy

    Domestic violence shouldn’t be a culture war. Can’t we all agree killing women and children is wrong?

    Unless the children are prenatal. Then it’s open slather.

  45. Oh come on

    Ok, so would those who think it’s not wrong to kill women and children please form an orderly queue over there? Please don’t push and shove as you’ll all be counted. I expect there will be a great many of you.

  46. Oh come on

    Correct. long range tanks, water tank, bars, all mod cons for camping

    Oh right.

  47. Oh come on

    Unless the children are prenatal. Then it’s open slather.

    Oh yes. And ‘practising Catholic’ Julia Baird doubtless has no problem with that.

  48. Turnip

    when I went to Vietnam

    Did you volunteer or were you drafted?

  49. cohenite

    Malcolm Roberts on Hargrave; Roberts is very good, despite what campervan head prefect says.

  50. Porter

    I have no quibble about reciting the ode in Noongar AFTER it is recited in English and only if Noongar soldiers are being commemorated – but then what about the others? Aboriginals certainly served but with 200 odd tribes their traditional languages differed…and in any case they would have all served under English speaking commanders and all sworn allegiance to the King (or Queen) of the Commonwealth. So maybe sod them. Finally someone is growing a spine:

    https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2020-02-21/rslwa-bans-welcome-to-country-aboriginal-flag-anzac-remembrance/11986324

  51. DrBeauGan

    Bless you!

    Thank you, Roger.

    Oh, and BoN, I don’t think money is a blessing. It depends what you do with it. I was thinking of good health and a sunny disposition. I’m a happy person, and that’s a blessing. I’d thank God for it if I believed in Him. As it is, I thank genetics and luck.

  52. Porter

    So I see the poo blogger who likes to call everyone here a misogynist is bullying a J–ish woman. What a hypocritical creep.

  53. Porter

    areff
    #3330966, posted on February 21, 2020 at 8:45 pm

    🔥🔥🔥

  54. Mark A

    DrBeauGan
    #3330985, posted on February 21, 2020 at 9:14 pm

    Oh, and BoN, I don’t think money is a blessing. It depends what you do with it.

    You are right.

    Also without getting into a religious argument, following that advice to a logical conclusion, where would’ve all the food and services c0me from if everyone abandoned wealth, property and took up following and proselyting?

    I think a lot of stuff in the Bible needs interpreting, if that’s the case I’m a bit skeptical.

    Who does the interpreting? Why are there so many different cults/religions ostensibly following the same Bible?

    BTW I happen to believe in a supreme being call it God or whatever. Not so much in the need for organised religion. Nothing wrong with it if it makes you feel good.

  55. vlad

    Thanks, Custard. Wind resistance would be a shocker, surely.

  56. Knuckle Dragger

    I see I missed Christian Hour.

    Christian 12 hours, in fact.

    Bugger. I was going to ask who I tithe my income to, but then remembered the Great and Almighty God.

    Of Keno.

    I must worship at the temple.

  57. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Finally someone is growing a spine:

    When Get Up start honking on about Aboriginal soldiers who served, not even being citizens, you know you’re over the target.

  58. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    What was the issue between Peta Credlin and Bettina Arndt? Alluded to back thread by Herodotus.

  59. areff

    Lizzie, summed ujp in Bettina’s newsletter, which went out today. Presumably Credlin took her to task for wondering — and apparently learning — what drove the family firebomber to reach for the Redheads:

    Hi Everybody,

    Across Australia, we reeled when we heard news that former Rugby League player, Rowan Baxter had set fire to his car, killing his ex-wife and three young children, and then stabbed himself to death. Unthinkable acts that chilled everyone to the bone.

    Then came the press conference from the Queensland police, a very strange event where the police spokesman, Detective Inspector Mark Thompson, suggested it was important to keep an open mind and compile proper information about what had happened. “Is this an issue of a woman suffering significant domestic violence and her and her children perishing at the hands of the husband, or is it an instance of a husband being driven too far by issues he’s suffered by certain circumstances into committing acts of this form,” he said.

    It was an extraordinary statement, given the pressure the police are under to simply promote the violent man narrative, ignoring any inconvenient truths that muddy the waters. Thompson looked most uncomfortable, suggesting he was privy to much more information.

    My initial reaction was to stay out of it, given the battering I have taken on recent weeks. But then I discovered that even though I had made no public comment about the case, I was trending on twitter as my enemies used this tragedy as a means of beating me up, claiming I was misguided to challenge the feminist narrative on domestic violence. Baxter was proof that men are dangerous, posing immense risks to women and children.

    Immediately our media fell into line, using this tragic case to promote the need to protect women from violent men. And slamming Detective Inspector Thompson for daring to suggest that men can ever be “driven” into acting this way.

    Learning more

    Then, out of the blue, I heard from a woman who was close to the Baxter family, telling me that many in the community were alarmed that the truth of what happened was being so distorted. I had a long phone call with her where she explained the background to Baxter’s actions – information I hope will be revealed in the coroner’s inquiry. The people with real knowledge of the case are naturally nervous now of speaking publicly, although I hope they will eventually be willing to give media interviews.

    It led to a sleepless night as I wrestled with the knowledge of what would happen if I got involved in this explosive issue versus my reluctance to allow the bastards to win. That would be the result if I was cowered into silence, avoiding public engagement on an issue which is at the heart of over a decade of my writing about the way domestic violence is being misrepresented to demonize men.

    In the end I decided I have nothing to lose – and the truth matters. Someone reminded me of James Baldwin’s quote about “the most dangerous creation of any society is the man who has nothing to lose.” Man or woman. Despite the attempts to damage to my public reputation through media pile- ons, I’m still standing and will keep fighting.

    So, this morning I posted a few carefully written social media comments, starting with this one:

    image

    Next I pointed out how differently we treat women who commit similarly horrible acts, immediately searching for reasons, asking what drove them to it. I posted this blog, which outlines some of the cases where women have committed violent acts, murdering their partners and children.

    We’ve seen many cases of women committing homicide or filicide, where the press coverage is entirely focussed on explanations for her behaviour. See this article about a Cairns woman who killed 8 children.

    I’ve also posted research showing both men and women commit such crimes such as this comprehensive study published in 2009 by Nielsen et al in the Medical Journal of Australia, looking at all cases of child homicide in NSW between 1991 and 2005. It found that, in cases of family homicide/revenge/homicide-suicide like the Rowan Baxter case, men were the perpetrators of child homicide in 10 cases, while women were the perpetrators in seven cases. Yes, tiny numbers. There’s no epidemic of these violent acts, thank goodness. But men certainly aren’t the only perpetrators.

    The filicide evidence shows children are killed by mothers and fathers at roughly similar rates. The most recent figures covering 2000 – 2012 show 76% of the 284 victims were killed by a custodial parent—46% by a custodial mother & 29% by a custodial father.

    Pissing in the wind?

    Maybe it is stupid to even try to counter the mighty onslaught from the domestic violence industry, who are cynically using this tragedy to recruit politicians and prominent people to call for more funding to protect women and children. This is after many, many millions have been spent on our feminist domestic violence policies which so clearly are failing to address the complexities of the problem.

    It is just amazing that the media is so united in constructing a careful narrative of a battered woman and controlling man, with violence orders failing to protect a vulnerable family from his murderous rage. This video of Baxter rough-housing with his children is being used to demonstrate his dangerous toxic masculinity – despite the obvious delight of his children and the fact they keep coming back for more.

    How come not a single journalist has the courage to investigate what drove police officer, Mark Thompson, to risk his career by voicing concerns about the complexity of the case? Now Thompson has been forced to step down from the investigation, apologising for his “ill-chosen” words.

    This is Stasiland in action. Police across the country must be shuddering at the fate of this brave colleague who paid the price for doing his job with professionalism and honesty. Look at this article from the Courier Mail.

    I am calling on people to write to the Queensland Police asking that he be reinstated to his position in the investigation. And please write also to your local MP, asking that they resist the cynical push for more money for domestic violence policies which fail to address the real issues.

    A public inquiry

    If the coronial inquest into this case reveals the truth, it could make a strong case for a public inquiry into how this happened. Why can’t we ask the hard questions that we would have asked if it was a female perpetrator? Like:

    How did he get to such a state of irrationality, despair and desperation that he could do such a thing?

    Why wasn’t he seeking support? Is there any support available for men in his situation?

    What could we as a society have done better to prevent this?

    That does not mean we are victim blaming or seeking justification. Merely a deeper understanding. Why is this so unacceptable simply because we are talking about a man?

    Well, that’s it for now. I will keep you informed as this important issue develops, Tina

  60. vlad

    Gillian Mears, the late Australian author, outfitted an ambulance as a mobile home.

    https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/archived/pocketdocs/gillian-mears-in-ant-and-bee-2.jpg/7553572

    Hers looks more lived in than the RVs.

  61. OldOzzie

    1735099
    #3330964, posted on February 21, 2020 at 8:44 pm
    Though you are right the Karman Gaia is an elegant looking car.

    My first car was a 1956 1200 Beetle (small window).

    I could easily afford a restored 1303, but if I’m going to have a toy, it might as well be something that’s fun to drive like my MX5 SE.
    The Beetle is still a temptation.

    Numbers

    My 1962 1/2 VW 1200 with 130,000 miles on the clock in 4 years, was written off when an old guy (hmmm 54) drove head on into me in broad daylight – “didn’t see you” – due rallying had full safety harness so no injuries.

    I bought 1956 small window VW, and had purchased a 1966 cc Type 587/1 air-cooled, four-stroke, DOHC boxer flat-four (Carrera 2) – went like the clappers, but burnt out clutches and brakes iffy so sold and moved on.

    MX5 a great car to drive – good taste – my son bought first MX5 and sold it without telling me, as I would have bought if off him.

    I would like to set up a 1962 1/2 VW 1200 (start with 1600 motor and enlarge – disc brakes on front) as Vintage Rally car – front torsion bar suspension moving back and up and away from corrugations is the best setup – one dreams, just a matter of convincing wife!

  62. JC

    Cronkite

    STFU, you idiot. Roberts fucked up that Q&A appearance. Look you imbecile, you once made mention Martin Durkin screwed up his interview with Springer-Jones. So did Roberts when he was thrown those papers. Roberts should have attacked “Cocks” and violently beat to a bleeding pile. It’s not as though violent attacks aren’t tolerated on Q&A. They are. Howard was physically attacked with a shoe.

  63. mh

    Why would anyone listen to Peta Credlin?

    She is know for one thing – being a political advisor to Prime Minister Tony Abbott.

    I rest my case.

  64. DrBeauGan

    What could we as a society have done better to prevent this?

    Withdrawal from groupthink and the desperate need to be one of a virtue signalling gang would be a good start. Bettina seems to be more interested in truth than her opponents are.

  65. OldOzzie

    custard
    #3330999, posted on February 21, 2020 at 9:30 pm
    Should have pasted this one

    https://www.caravancampingsales.com.au/editorial/details/2million-aussie-mega-motorhome-hits-the-road-120866/

    What a Machine!

    My likes are smaller

    This is the 4WD Camper I rent from Travel Car Centre when I am not road testing new 4wds – like it better than Camper Trailers – it was nicknamed the “Pregnant Troopy” by others members of our 4WD Group crossing Simpson

    The Toyota Bushcamper is a comfortable 4×4 Camper.

  66. JC

    Julia Baird over at Teh Dumb with this razor-sharp insight:

    Domestic violence shouldn’t be a culture war. Can’t we all agree killing women and children is wrong?

    She’s kind of okay looking, but she’s totally retarded. Just agree with her and move on. Something along the lines of if you’re unattached.

    Sure Julia, sheilas and kids shouldn’t be murdered. What are you doing on Wednesday night, it’s the only spot I have open for the week.

  67. JC

    Roger Stone shouldn’t be going to jail. Roger should be in a psyche ward as he’s totally insane, but not in a bad way.

  68. cohenite

    Head prefect.

    I think travelling around in a campervan would suit you. You could drive to QLD and say hi to Malcolm Roberts.

  69. JC

    Roberts and I would get on well, Cronkite. I think he’d appreciate my advice that if he had his time again, his reaction should have been violent.

  70. old bloke

    Gwendolyn
    #3330585, posted on February 21, 2020 at 2:56 pm

    The Jooish Messiah (meaning your saviour as well as mine) came and corrected that faulty teaching. See Matthew 19.

    Gwendolyn, you are correct in saying the “Jooish” Messiah is the same as the “Christian” Messiah in so far as they are one and the same manifestation of Elohim, but “they” have different roles for different folks at different times.

    The Joos (apologies for using that awful spelling to avoid the spaminator from hell) believe in two Messiahs (Mashaichs), actually they believe in many mashaichs (meaning, anointed – Aaron was the first,) but in two principal Mashaichs, Mashaich ben Yosef, and Mashaich ben David.

    Mashaich ben Yosef, according to Jooish teaching, comes before Mashiach ben David. He, according to Jooish teaching, is a son of Yosef (Joseph), He comes for the Lost Sheep of Israel, he is killed, and mysteriously self-resurrects. Sound like anyone you’ve heard of?

    The Joos generally don’t accept Jesus (Yahoshua ben Yosef ben David ben Elohim) as the Messiah Son of Joseph as he is a descendant of David through both Yoseph and Miriam’s bloodlines. Yet, Yahoshua was named in honour of Yahoshua (Joshua,) son of Nun, a descendant of Yoseph through Ephraim’s line, and his foster-father was also named Yosef.

    So, yes, “they” are one and the same, who have come / will come for different purposes at different times.

    I repeat, God hates divorce.

    God hates covenant breakers, and there’s a lot of that happening.

  71. JC

    Do people have any thoughts on who’s going to match up against Trump on the D’rat side.

    1. I keep reading we shouldn’t count Biden out yet because of the big states
    2.Bloombox was horrible in the debates because High Cheeks totally fucked him with the Lesbian, horseface, billionaire comment and he didn’t skittle out of it.
    3. High Cheeks appears to have two weeks to live at the most.
    4. PowerPoint Pete is donesky I think.
    5. Amy sounds too retarded.
    6. Bernie appears to be the front-runner and could win but it all depends how Biden goes in the big states and how much more money Bloombox will spend.

    I think Biden’s done, so it’s between Shortie and Bernie.

  72. bespoke

    DrBeauGan
    #3331007, posted on February 21, 2020 at 9:55 pm

    Withdrawal from groupthink and the desperate need to be one of a virtue signalling gang would be a good start. Bettina seems to be more interested in truth than her opponents are.

    Exactly, I don’t see anything contradictory in condemning the act but also exploring the mitigating circumstances.

  73. cohenite

    More interesting book titles:

    The big pop up book of factory injuries and deaths
    One Long Sentence about Handjobs by James Joyce
    Stuff Christians Like
    Colonic Irrigation.

  74. cohenite

    You probably didn’t know head prefect but Malcolm Roberts has met Trump. So have I.

  75. Steve trickler

    A cheeky shit will name their car, Greta. It’ll probably happen soon.

    😁



  76. Leigh Lowe

    Turnip

    #3330982, posted on February 21, 2020 at 9:05 pm

    when I went to Vietnam

    Did you volunteer or were you drafted?

    Well, that is a trick question.
    One could be drafted into the Army in Australia back in the day and complete basic training.
    At some point all these draftees would then be asked if they wished to have a tour of Vietnam.
    Everyone knows this.

  77. stackja

    areff
    #3331000, posted on February 21, 2020 at 9:35 pm
    How did he get to such a state of irrationality, despair and desperation that he could do such a thing?

    Murphy’s Family Law Act?

  78. JC

    cohenite
    #3331022, posted on February 21, 2020 at 10:24 pm

    You probably didn’t know head prefect but Malcolm Roberts has met Trump. So have I.

    Cronkite, yes I did know that. Trump mentioned you to me. He asked if most Australians are as stupid as that “fella, Cronkite” and also asked me to tell you that you’re banned from entering the US for the period of his term in office. He reckoned you started to talk about penises and wouldn’t stop.

    But seriously, why did you meet Trump?

  79. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Thanks, areff. I am with Bettina on this one, as my previous comments on this case may suggest. Men need support too in times of marital breakdown, and blame is not always readily sheeted home re any break up. Luckily, as Arndt points out few people, men or women, lose it so badly as to extend to commiting murder.

    As a mother of three sons and three grandsons and having experienced one traumatic marital breakup and holding together a step-parenting marriage, I know the issues are human in scope, not simply a matter of victimising women but of many people having many emotions.

  80. Leigh Lowe

    Two million dollar camper van?
    Has the world gone mad?
    I could stay in hotels at $300 per night for 20 years with that.
    Twenty years.
    In hotels.
    Nice hotels.
    With limitless running water.
    And heating and cooling.
    And a mini-bar.
    With my bed made and bathroom cleaned every day.
    And no tiger snakes hiding under my doormat in the morning.
    FMD!
    Madness!

  81. mh

    You probably didn’t know head prefect but Malcolm Roberts has met Trump. So have I.

    I note that Trump still has no intention of visiting Australia as President.

  82. Arky

    Domestic violence shouldn’t be a culture war. Can’t we all agree killing women and children is wrong?

    ..
    By implication killing men isn’t wrong.
    What a turd.

  83. stackja

    mh
    #3331036, posted on February 21, 2020 at 10:38 pm

    Australian MSM insist Trump’s popularity is determined by polls in Australia.

  84. Geriatric Mayfly

    I think a lot of stuff in the Bible needs interpreting, if that’s the case I’m a bit skeptical.
    Who does the interpreting?

    Which itself caused quite a ruckus in the early translations into English. One approved version contained explanatory footnotes, or side notes I think they were. For many these ‘interpretations’ fouled the true essence of the scripture, and they opted for an unvarnished version.

  85. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    At some point all these draftees would then be asked if they wished to have a tour of Vietnam.
    Everyone knows this.

    It seems it wasn’t unknown for National Servicemen not to take any opportunity to “opt out” so they could claim the benefits available to “returned soldiers.” When they perceived that popular opinion in Australia had turned against the war, they claimed they had been sent to Vietnam against their will.

  86. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    My daughter and two grand-daughters are of course also included in any emotional equations in understanding both men and women

    My four kids have produced seven long–term relationships (not a lot really), a mix of strong and fragile, and I too have had my fair share. There’s a lot of human emotional investment in all of those experiences. Most people would know this from their own lives and their own extended families, as well as from work and professional lives. Stop the gender blame game.

    ‘Tis all a vale of tears with peaks of joy.

  87. Arky

    1735099
    #3330964, posted on February 21, 2020 at 8:44 pm
    Though you are right the Karman Gaia is an elegant looking car.

    Also very well put together.
    My first car was a 1956 1200 Beetle (small window).
    I was probably lucky to survive.
    I did a 180 degree spin on a damp road after a storm one afternoon, without hitting anything and without stalling.
    It scared the daylights out of me and taught me about oversteer.
    I then did a bit of sprinting in it which also helped me learn car control.
    Eventually it put a valve through a piston, caused by overheating after I got washed down a creek near Inglewood and the cooling fins on the cylinder heads got glagged up with dried mud.
    I knew this creek, but when the Coolmunda dam was built, it changed the direction of the flow, and it was deeper than it looked, making the beetle float gently away.
    I put a motor out of a Kombi in it, and it went OK.
    My next Beetle was a 1962 and a half.
    It also put a valve through a piston on my way back to Singleton after a weekend’s leave.
    The local police sergeant flagged down a speeding motorist and I got back to 3TB by midnight and avoided AWOL.
    I put a replacement long motor in it, and sold it to my cousin when I went to Vietnam.
    I could easily afford a restored 1303, but if I’m going to have a toy, it might as well be something that’s fun to drive like my MX5 SE.
    The Beetle is still a temptation.

    ..
    Why are you telling us?
    Don’t you remember that you only come here to tell everyone how shit they are.
    At least be consistent man.
    You are as bad as that fuckwit 2sticks banging on about tax mooching teachers, only then we find out the hypocrite is sucking over $40 000 p.a. from the taxpayer to put his own thick as shit ugly sprogs through the local rainbow unicorn indoctrination barn.
    Pair of dickheads. the both of you.

  88. JC

    Alex Jones shares his “views” on the virus. According to Jones and his pal, the virus was engineered in the US, taken to China and then accidentally released.

    Jones calls it very serious news.

  89. stackja

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #3331042, posted on February 21, 2020 at 10:46 pm
    Stop the gender blame game.

    Many make a living from the gender blame game.

  90. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Enough of the man made religionist bullshit, thanks people.

    We are born, we exist, we die.

    There are no fabulist fairy tales that need to be tacked on to that very simple set of concepts, you stupid superstitious idiots.

  91. dover_beach

    Maybe it is stupid to even try to counter the mighty onslaught from the domestic violence industry, who are cynically using this tragedy to recruit politicians and prominent people to call for more funding to protect women and children.

    It’s been relentless on the ABC.

  92. Arky

    facemasks don’t stop coronavirus

    ..
    It’s probabilities.
    Every viral particle that meets one of your membranes has a probability of infecting you.
    The more you cut down the number of particles you ingest the less your chance of contracting it.
    Wear a mask, stay the fuck away from people. Stay home if possible, Wash your hands regularly. Keep your fingers out of your nose, mouth and eyeballs.

  93. DrBeauGan

    There are no fabulist fairy tales that need to be tacked on to that very simple set of concepts, you stupid superstitious idiots.

    Some people seem to need the bullshit, spurgeon. It’s very strange, but there you are.

  94. Leigh Lowe

    That Dimocrat cluster in Las Vegas.
    Jeez, Week in Pictures is going to be epic this week.

  95. Arky

    facemasks don’t stop coronavirus

    ..
    It’s probabilities.
    Every viral particle that meets one of your membranes has a probability of infecting you.
    The more you cut down the number of particles you ingest the less your chance of contracting it.
    Wear a mask, stay the fuck away from people. Stay home if possible, Wash your hands regularly. Keep your fingers out of your nose, mouth and eyeb-lls.

  96. Leigh Lowe

    Wash your hands regularly. Keep your fingers out of your nose, mouth and eyeb-lls.

    And don’t kiss a Chinaman.
    Well, if it can’t be avoided, no tongue.

  97. Leigh Lowe

    Question:-

    Is the “witching hour” 11:00 pm to midnight, or midnight to 1:00 am?

  98. mh

    We are born, we exist, we die.

    And don’t forget to worship government.

  99. Arky

    We are born, we exist, we die.

    There are no fabulist fairy tales that need to be tacked on to that very simple set of concepts, you stupid superstitious idiots.

    ..
    ..
    Apparently we do:
    ..

    Religious people live on average four years longer than their agnostic and atheist peers, new research has found.

    The difference between practising worshippers and those who were not part of a religious group could be down to a mix of social support, stress-relieving practices and abstaining from unhealthy habits, the authors suggest.
    ..

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/religion-live-longer-muslim-jewish-christian-hindu-buddhist-life-expectancy-age-a8396866.html

  100. Arky

    We are born, we exist, we die.

    There are no fabulist fairy tales that need to be tacked on to that very simple set of concepts, you stupid superstitious idiots.

    ..

    ..
    Apparently we do:
    ..

    Religious people live on average four years longer than their agnostic and atheist peers, new research has found.

    The difference between practising worshippers and those who were not part of a religious group could be down to a mix of social support, stress-relieving practices and abstaining from unhealthy habits, the authors suggest.

  101. Arky

    Researchers at Ohio State University found that religious people live an average of four years longer than atheists. Their study was published Wednesday in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

    Laura Wallace, the study’s lead author and a doctoral psychology student at Ohio State, said the effect that religion has on life span is comparable to that of gender.

    ..
    So all these highly rational, evidence- based individuals embrace a view of the universe that leads to them, on average, dying four years earlier than the “fools” who believe.

  102. cohenite

    But seriously, why did you meet Trump?

    He wanted to meet the best and brightest.

  103. Steve trickler

    Anyone winging over smoke from car burnouts! Go away.



  104. Arky

    As well as dying young, atheists also aren’t reproducing or forming lifelong relationships. Great philosophy, dickheads:
    ..

    According to the Pew Forum a whopping 37% of atheists never marry as opposed to 19% of the American population, 17% of Protestants and 17% of Catholics.[3]

  105. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Doc – throughout history, their lives have been decreed to be so pointless that they have tolerated all sorts of vile abuse of themselves and their kiddies and wider society on the basis that their weird, evidence free preposterous and fantastical beliefs (BIRM) would allow them a free ticket into a mythical unicorn and pixie laden afterlife.

    Except that it doesn’t.

  106. bespoke

    Us agnostics have the best of both worlds.

  107. dover_beach

    Re COVID-19, I don’t like what I’m seeing in South Korea, Japan and Singapore. Plus 200 cases in SK now.

  108. JC

    Okay, obviously you’re lying now, Cronkite .

  109. Arky

    Re COVID-19, I don’t like what I’m seeing in South Korea, Japan and Singapore. Plus 200 cases in SK now.

    ..
    Some of us suspected it coming weeks ago and got called hysterical.

  110. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    LOL – so, Arks, as well as being a kiwi, you’re a religionist.

    Twice cursed. Anything else you’re not telling us about, such as that regrettable first flight with your comfort Armadildo?

  111. dover_beach

    Doc – throughout history, their lives have been decreed to be so pointless that they have tolerated all sorts of vile abuse of themselves and their kiddies and wider society on the basis that their weird, evidence free preposterous and fantastical beliefs (BIRM) would allow them a free ticket into a mythical unicorn and pixie laden afterlife.

    Except that it doesn’t.

    What a truly stupid thing to say.

  112. Arky

    Spurgeon Monkfish III
    #3331081, posted on February 21, 2020 at 11:18 pm

    ..
    Stop trying to infect me with your Godless nihilism.
    The armadildo is the patron saint of your ideology, not mine. I hate ’em.

  113. Arky

    All you old codgers should consider a strategy of licking Chinamen and getting infected early so as to secure a intensive care bed before they are all booked out.
    It might be more survivable for those who get in early before the rush.

  114. mh

    Headlines at SCMP

    China’s answer to Davos the latest high-profile event derailed by virus

    Coronavirus cases have not yet peaked, Xi Jinping tells Politburo

    China’s car collapse sign of coronavirus impact to come

    Four Hong Kong officers at banquet with infected policeman show symptoms

    Coronavirus ‘dents plans’ for EU-China investment deal by September

    Coronavirus: South Korea in crisis mode as Daegu cases surge

  115. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Hey Christian – you’ll need to do better than that low energy response.

  116. DrBeauGan

    Those would be the fashionable atheists, not the sceptics, Arky. They know they deserve to die young.

    Can you really believe in some religion just so you might get an extra four years? It’s not much of a consolation for living a lie.

  117. dover_beach

    Hey Christian – you’ll need to do better than that low energy response.

    Not at all. It was equal to the task.

  118. Arky

    It’s not much of a consolation for living a lie.

    ..
    What is more likely to be the lie?
    The thing that works in real life or the thing that demonstrably leaves 40% of its adherents loveless and kills you on average four years early?

  119. mh

    Some of us suspected it coming weeks ago and got called hysterical.

    Hi Gilas!

  120. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Godless Nihilism

    LOL. Fabricated deities are the last refuge of a drooling imbecilic machine tooling numptie (his own of course) who’s been permanently scarred by existing in a big stupid sheep infested hellhole, bro.

  121. Cassie of Sydney

    Apparently I need “perfecting”…..those Cats who know me personally can vouch that I am pretty perfect already.

  122. Fisky

    China’s answer to Davos the latest high-profile event derailed by virus

    Coronavirus cases have not yet peaked, Xi Jinping tells Politburo

    China’s car collapse sign of coronavirus impact to come

    Four Hong Kong officers at banquet with infected policeman show symptoms

    Coronavirus ‘dents plans’ for EU-China investment deal by September

    Coronavirus: South Korea in crisis mode as Daegu cases surge

    About two days ago, XJP was bragging to Macron about how he had this thing sorted. The message was sent out through the official media, right down the food chain. Feelthebern even started doing the pretend sarc thing again like he was 3 weeks ago.

    So yeah, there’s shit judgment and then there’s globalism.

  123. mh

    Can you really believe in some religion just so you might get an extra four years? It’s not much of a consolation for living a lie.

    I would guess, but don’t know, that there would be evidence that living a lie would lead to poorer health and well-being.

  124. Arky

    LOL. Fabricated deities are the last refuge of a drooling imbecilic machine tooling numptie (his own of course) who’s been permanently scarred by existing in a big stupid sheep infested hellhole, bro.

    ..
    I’m adding you to my prayer list.
    Because I know you fucking atheists hate that even more than the j-ws do.

  125. Fisky

    Some of us suspected it coming weeks ago and got called hysterical.

    You have to wonder at this point if it’s a deliberate CCP strategy to spread the thing everywhere else, and thereby minimise the long-term risk to its supply chains. No point moving to VN if they’re copping it just as hard!

  126. Fisky

    Starting to see cities in SK and Iran moving towards lockdown.

    Just a normal flu season!

  127. bespoke

    There’s a lot of human emotional investment in all of those experiences. Most people would know this from their own lives and their own extended families, as well as from work and professional lives. Stop the gender blame game.

    Sounds like pointless dibble that’s spouted for decades Lizzie. Only a few incels would say it’s ok to be violent but there is no unambiguous point going out to girls not carry on like freightbat’s it’s celebrated as being powerful.

  128. DrBeauGan

    ..
    I’m adding you to my prayer list.
    Because I know you fucking atheists hate that even more than the j-ws do.

    #metoo, Arky, please. I don’t believe it will have any effect on me, but it might help with the model A.

  129. Fisky

    I would guess, but don’t know, that there would be evidence that living a lie would lead to poorer health and well-being.

    Nah, doesn’t work like that. Every human has something of a religious-like schema, but the atheists kid themselves by pretending they used pure reason to arrive at their beliefs.

  130. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    No it wasn’t, you glib sanctimonious hypocrite.

    Your stupid religion is a sham and has condemned countless people to poverty in its name.

    You are the sort of numptie who gets around like the Francis Bacon popes, while smearing with an evil sludge anyone who has the misfortune to encounter you in real life.

  131. DrBeauGan

    Nah, doesn’t work like that. Every human has something of a religious-like schema, but the atheists kid themselves by pretending they used pure reason to arrive at their beliefs.

    I must have successfully fooled myself then. Just like the rest of you.

  132. dover_beach

    SK was around around 50-70 three or four days ago, but is now over 200. That’s a big jump in confirmed cases.

  133. Cassie of Sydney

    Watching Credlin which I recorded earlier. I have now lost ALL respect for Peta Credlin….and will no longer watch her programme.

  134. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Pray away, Arks. Don’t forget to conscript your beloved Armadildo in the performance of this mighty task.

    🙂

  135. Fisky

    SK was around around 50-70 three or four days ago, but is now over 200. That’s a big jump in confirmed cases.

    It’s a very big jump. Also, a district in Beijing has gone into lockdown with concentrations approaching the level of Wuhan. I’m that wiped the smug smile off XJP’s face. He was on the brink of declaring victory about 2 days ago and claiming sole credit for it.

  136. Arky

    Don’t forget to conscript your beloved Armadildo in the performance of this mighty task.

    ..
    The only things I like about the armadildo is it annoys Tom and it’s potential as a differential lubricant.

  137. Arky

    Live, and it has a funky soundtrack.
    The apocalypse will be live on Youtube and Facebook:
    ..


  138. Arky

    I can’t wait for Joe Rogan to interview the four horsemen and the whore of Babylon.

  139. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Wonderful, Arks. So we don’t get to see the viral videos of your good self and the comfort creature off on the first Air NZ flight to Antarctica since the regrettable Erebus Incident?

  140. mh

    Fisky, the point I was making is that the better health and well-being of religiously inclined people suggests they are not living a lie.

    Misguided maybe, but not living a lie.

  141. Arky

    Gold on a run and oil turning back down.
    Might be sinking in that this isn’t going to blow over by the end of the month.

  142. dover_beach

    No it wasn’t,..

    It was most certainly on the mark and each moment your finger hits the keyboard you provide further evidence.

  143. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    You are seriously Jebbish, Christian.

  144. dover_beach

    LOL, I was calling Trump when you were still supporting Chris Christie.

  145. DrBeauGan

    Fisky, the point I was making is that the better health and well-being of religiously inclined people suggests they are not living a lie.

    Misguided maybe, but not living a lie.

    Anybody who becomes a fake believer in exchange for four more years would be.

  146. mh

    Anybody who becomes a fake believer in exchange for four more years would be.

    That’s correct.

    But I don’t think humans are following that train of thought – become religious to live longer.

  147. Arky

    Watch that countries by GDP above and keep an eye on the yellow component (investment) particularly in Japan from the eighties, then China in the 2000s.
    Fascinating.

  148. DrBeauGan

    But I don’t think humans are following that train of thought – become religious to live longer.

    Humans perhaps not, but Arky maybe

  149. Arky

    But I don’t think humans are following that train of thought – become religious to live longer.

    ..
    Why not?
    In the absence of actual evidence one way or the other, the rational thing to do is to choose the beliefs that work in reality.
    At least as a working hypothesis. It is quite valid to have a gander about the world and say to yourself: “Those voodoo cannibals seem to be having a good time, but they also seem to die young from brain parasites, maybe voodoo isn’t the religion for me, as it doesn’t work good in reality”.

  150. Arky

    And the way our brains work is they become what you tell them to do, with training.
    No one is born a doctor or an engineer.
    Fake it to make it works baby. Why should your beliefs be any different to anything else in life?
    You make the best decisions you can on rational grounds then train and practice.
    Simple.

  151. mh

    Becoming religious to live longer is not really a search for anything outside the material world.

    Of course religion has played a role in healthy societies, I’m sure there are plenty of verses in the Bible, such as don’t eat bats.

  152. Arky

    “`These are the birds you are to detest and not eat because they are detestable: the eagle, the vulture, the black vulture,
    14
    the red kite, any kind of black kite,
    15
    any kind of raven,
    16
    the horned owl, the screech owl, the gull, any kind of hawk,
    17
    the little owl, the cormorant, the great owl,
    18
    the white owl, the desert owl, the osprey,
    19
    the stork, any kind of heron, the hoopoe and the bat. [2]

  153. mh

    That is a great religious verse, Arky. It would have served many people well through the ages.

    But a western society should have the discrimination and knowledge to know that eating those things comes with risks.

    The bat bothering societies are not there yet.

  154. DrBeauGan

    “`These are the birds you are to detest and not eat because they are detestable: the eagle, the vulture, the black vulture,
    14
    the red kite, any kind of black kite,
    15
    any kind of raven,
    16
    the horned owl, the screech owl, the gull, any kind of hawk,
    17
    the little owl, the cormorant, the great owl,
    18
    the white owl, the desert owl, the osprey,
    19
    the stork, any kind of heron, the hoopoe and the bat. [2]

    Can we infer that you don’t eat bacon, Arky? And that you recoil in horror at the thought of a pork chop?

  155. Arky

    “`Of the animals that move about on the ground, these are unclean for you: the weasel, the rat, any kind of great lizard,
    the gecko, the monitor lizard, the wall lizard, the skink and the chameleon.

    ..
    Leviticus doesn’t directly mention the armadildo, probably comes under weasels and rats though.

  156. Fisky

    The belief in divine intervention and laws was based originally on empirical observations. If two men bugger each other, they tend to get sick, or at least sicker than heteros. If you mix the wrong crops together, everyone starves. Adultery is a bad idea for numerous reasons, one of which is you suddenly have competing claims over the family estate. Now all these things don’t always end in tears, but they usually do or at least did. And because the same disastrous results happened again and again, it wasn’t unreasonable for ancients to believe that there was a divine hand behind it.

    We actually think exactly the same way in the post-Enlightenment era, but don’t realise it. We’re always watching bushfire season with trepidation, because whatever happens reflects the judgment of the climate gods. If we don’t close our coal mines down immediately, there will be more bushfires. If we tax electricity, the climate gods will reward us by breaking the drought. Then there’s the entire Woke cult which has replaced original sin with Whiteness, minus the possibility of redemption.

  157. mh

    Last year a guy in Logan ate a gecko 🦎 and died!

  158. mh

    In a way a religious person that is searching for God has something in common with an atheist who has come to his conclusions through genuine inquiry and reflection. They have both pondered on the reality of the universe, and what is beyond the material level.

    Whereas someone who takes up religion to get a benefit at a worldly level is in a different category, imho.

  159. DrBeauGan

    Last year a guy in Logan ate a gecko 🦎 and died!

    I ate a filet mignon with bacon and didn’t.

  160. DrBeauGan

    Whereas someone who takes up religion to get a benefit at a worldly level is in a different category,

    Tell Arky.

  161. DrBeauGan

    In a way a religious person that is searching for God has something in common with an atheist who has come to his conclusions through genuine inquiry and reflection. They have both pondered on the reality of the universe, and what is beyond the material level.

    I agree. Both BoN and I pursue truth. The difference is that he thinks he’s caught it.

  162. OldOzzie

    How Mary Barra and General Motors treated drivers with contempt

    John Connolly
    Motoring Columnist

    Mary Barra earns $33 big ones, or about 634 times what an average Holden worker takes home.

    She’s worth about $90m and she’s the chairman and chief executive of General Motors in Detroit. She started in the CEO job in January 2014, when the GM stock price was $US40. Today after closing five factories in the US, punting 14,000 employees, “winding down” sales, design and engineering operations in Australia and New Zealand, “retiring” the Holden brand by 2021 and flicking about 6000 people, most of whom won’t get similar jobs, despite Ford’s callous PR offer, the stock price is $US35. Sensational.

    One year after Mazza took over, Pete Flaherty, the boss of the National Legal and Policy Centre, wrote to then GM chair Timmy Solso, claiming that GM was giving large cash donations to charitable causes to effectively buy honours for Mary.

    “The company has vigorously publicised these awards, apparently as part of a campaign to promote and rehabilitate Ms Barra’s image in the wake of the ignition switch recall delay, for which the death toll continues to rise. Unfortunately, this campaign has backfired and resulted in negative publicity for the company,” Pete wrote. “On November 10 of last year, we asked the National Women’s History Museum to rescind a planned Katherine Graham Living Legacy Award, a request also made by the GM Survivors group. Barra’s travel around the country to accept awards has really been unseemly. I hope she will now instead focus on the safety issues before her. Since May, we have repeatedly asked for a recall of SUVs and light trucks with a brake line corrosion defect, only to be rebuffed by GM.

    “On November 17, NWHM withdrew the award, an event that garnered more media attention than the original award ever would have received.”

    In 2005, GM sent a letter to their US dealers warning them that faulty Chev Cobalt ignition switches could cause the cars to suddenly stall. In the first three months of 2014, GM recalled 2.6 million cars because of the same faulty ignition switches that were now linked to more than 100 deaths of mainly young people.

    The GM Ignition Compensation Fund found 12 cases where people suffered quadriplegia, paraplegia, amputation, brain damage or burns from a crash for which the defective ignition switch was the primary cause. By June, GM had recalled 28 million cars for a variety of reasons.

    Vox’s Brad Plumer investigated the scandal and wrote: “On March 31, 2014, GM CEO Mary Barra appeared before congress and couldn’t explain why it took a decade for the company to recall its vehicles after identifying the problem as far back as 2001 and 2004.

    “It looks like regulators were slow to respond, although the agency in charge has blamed GM for not being forthcoming with information.”

    A 2014 New York Times investigation found that while Mazza Barra called her company’s slow response an “extraordinary” situation, “an analysis by The New York Times of the automaker’s recalls since it emerged from bankruptcy in 2009 shows its handling of the ignition problem was not an isolated event: GM has repeatedly used letters, called technical service bulletins, to dealers and sometimes to car owners as stopgap safety measures instead of ordering timely recalls.

    “The review by The Times found multiple instances in which the company used service bulletins instead of immediately recalling cars, with the gap between a bulletin and a recall ranging from six months to nine years.”

    In October 2011, “Ms Barra, who was then vice-president for global product development, received an email from a senior GM engineer telling her that the Ion might have the same power steering problems that led to the recall of the Cobalt and G5. “Mary,” the email said, “during the initial ­Cobalt case, the Ion data did not justify being included. The situation has been evolving. We will meet and understand the latest data.” In May 2012, the company sent out two more bulletins, one for dealers and one for owners. In bold, the letter to owners stated: “Do not take your vehicle to your GM dealer as a result of this letter unless you believe that your vehicle has the condition as described above.”

    Shara Lynn Towne was a 37-year-old mother of five. In July 2004 Shara’s new Saturn Ion went into a power pole. Shara died on impact. She was wearing her seatbelt, but the airbags didn’t inflate. In the first case on behalf of a victim of GM ignition, the family sued GM. Family lawyer Brian Chase said: “GM knew of this defect back then, and yet made a decision to quietly settle out of court so there would be no media or government attention.”

    The March 2006 action sued GM, the dealership and two of GM’s parts suppliers. GM chose to confidentially settle out of court in 2007, and the case was dismissed. At the time of the settlement, the Saturn Ion had been on the market for five years. This means that the defect posed a potentially fatal hazard for five years before the public got its first clue that a defect might exist. However, it was quickly covered up by GM’s confidential settlement. Shara’s son Arron Burdge says: “My mother was a light switch in any dark room. She was radiant and beautiful, full of life and laughter.”

    Sixteen-year-old Amber Marie Rose was adopted at birth by Terry DiBattista. In 2005, Amber was reunited with her birth mother Laura Christian. In July that year, driving her new 2005 Chevy Cobalt, alcohol-affected and after a fight with her boyfriend, her car left the road and hit a tree. The Chevy’s airbags never deployed after the crash because of the faulty ignition. The carmaker admitted it knew about the problem as early as 2004. Her family’s lawyers, Chaikin, Sherman, Cammarata & Siegel, said: “Large manu­facturers should not be able to hide defects in their cars just because they have the money to pay off families.”

    Outside the congressional hearings, Terry DiBattista said: “It is clear that GM is only concerned with their bottom line and not the safety of our loved ones.”

    This is the same GM that sucked Holden dealers into investing significant millions in upgrading or building showrooms, an investment demanded of them by Holden, while knowing they were going to end the brand.

    It’s the same GM that only told the government and dealers minutes before the press release went out. This is the same GM that happily took more than $2bn from the government to keep the business going.

    This is not the death of Holden, that was in 2017 when they shut manufacturing. This is the funeral of an arrogant multinational that treats countries like Australia as if they were a dealer in Toad Suck, Arkansas.

    To paraphrase commentator Alan Jones, “if we go the way we are, GM and the like will share the goldmine with someone else and we’ll be left with the shaft”.

    To you leave on a brighter note, today’s pic is of a 1931 Alfa Romeo 6c 1750 GTC Fifth Series Cabriolet, which Bonhams will have ready for you at Amelia Island in March. Yours for about $1.2m with no ignition problems.

  163. OldOzzie

    Labor’s senior frontbenchers eyed putting cap on coal exports

    Greg Brown
    Journalist

    Senior Labor frontbenchers considered a tightly held proposal to cap thermal coal exports in the ­national interest ahead of the 2019 election as Bill Shorten ­grappled with how to respond to the Adani mine backlash dividing the ALP’s support base.

    As Anthony Albanese set up a new political clash over climate policy on Friday by committing Labor to a net zero emissions target by 2050, The Weekend Australian can reveal a confidential six-page document was drafted in late 2018 after the idea was discussed by the party’s most senior frontbenchers.

    The document originated in the office of climate change spokesman Mark Butler and ­included an analysis of a “national interest test” for the $26bn-a-year export industry after the leadership group discussed the proposal in November 2018.

    The document canvassed a new position requiring thermal coal exporters to apply for limited licences to be administered by a proposed “Thermal Coal National Interest Test Board” — a policy that was ultimately rejected.

    Discussions over the proposal worried senior right-wing MPs Jason Clare, Chris Bowen and Don Farrell, and the idea was killed before it reached shadow cabinet. The Weekend Australian understands Mr Shorten was ­involved in the discussions.

    Scott Morrison on Friday condemned Labor’s embrace of a net zero emissions target, a position being pushed by a powerful coalition of businesses, investor groups and climate activists.

    The Prime Minister branded Mr Albanese “Bill Shorten 2.0” for adopting the policy without costings and argued he had no plan on how to reach the target.

    “Anthony Albanese is just as much the Bill you couldn’t afford today as Bill Shorten was before,” Mr Morrison said.

    “Bill Shorten couldn’t tell you when he had a 45 per cent emissions reduction target what it would cost, what the jobs loss would be, how much it would put up electricity prices, whether he’s going to put a tax on.”

    Mr Albanese’s adoption of a net zero emissions target is his first major policy decision since Labor’s shock election defeat in May. It comes at a time of growing concern within opposition ranks over how the ALP balances its response to climate change and the “black summer” bushfire season while also winning back disillusioned voters in resources seats.

    The 2018 document — briefed verbally to The Weekend Australian as Mr Albanese moved to ­announce his net zero emissions policy — identified “risks” with the proposal to limit coal exports, including the prospect the party would be viewed as anti-­coalmining. A benefit of the ­policy, according to the ­document, was better managing the economic transition as coal declined and mitigating the attack on Labor’s ambivalence on the Adani mine.

    Under the proposal, mining groups would have had to publicly report the carbon risks of their operations. The creation of the new board would have allowed it to recommend the blocking of new coalmines or restriction of coal exports based on the proposed ­national interest test, that included consideration of the global implications of new mines.

    The philosophical battle within Labor pitches Mr Butler against Joel Fitzgibbon. The resources spokesman has declared his ­desire to put “labour back into the Labor Party” after nearly losing his NSW Hunter Valley seat last year and believes a different approach in climate policy is needed to pick up seats in Western Australia and central Queensland.

    Mr Butler, whose views have the support of about two-thirds of the caucus, is pushing for the party to hold the line on ambitious climate action and for MPs to showcase the party’s progressive credentials on the issue.

    Both MPs have spoken out on each other’s portfolios since the election, with Mr Fitzgibbon urging the party to adopt the Coalition’s 2030 emissions target while Mr Butler has talked down the future of international demand for coal.

    Shadow cabinet’s decision in January to back a net zero emissions target before it was costed has Mr Fitzgibbon’s supporters conceding they have an uphill battle to get their way on policy outcomes before the next election, due in 2022. While there is not outright opposition to the 2050 target, adopting it early in the electoral cycle without costings has left some MPs worried Labor is again making itself the focus of the climate change debate.

    “This is despair,” one MP said. “This is about the people we have always represented and we are losing them. Part of the problem we have is our primary keeps dropping and if we don’t appeal to a broader cross section of society we are doomed.”

    The net zero emissions target is backed by more than 80 countries, state and territory governments, and business. Labor is likely to release costings on its climate policies before the election and is trying to shift the debate to focus on the cost of inaction through more wild weather such as bushfire, floods and drought.

    Mr Morrison is expected to adopt a “technology target” to ­reduce pollution and has said he will not commit Australia to a net zero emissions target without providing details on the economic consequences.

    Mr Butler would not comment on Friday on his involvement with the proposal for a control on thermal coal exports or the six-page document. “I have a longstanding practice of not canvassing discussions that take place in shadow cabinet or the former leadership group,” he said.

    Mr Butler broke ranks with the Labor policy on Adani in the last term of parliament, declaring he was opposed to mining in the Galilee Basin because it was “not in the national interest”. Mr Butler, who is yet to decide on a 2030 emissions reduction target, said on Friday that a carbon price would not be needed to hit a net zero emissions goal.

    Mr Albanese has backed coal exports since the election and declared international demand for coal would determine whether new mines would be developed in the Galilee Basin.

    Comments not Kind to Labor

  164. OldOzzie

    The Xi Jinping Flu

    Despite holding more power, wealth and influence than ever before, China’s government is rotting from within. Beijing’s handling of the coronavirus makes that clear. Such an outbreak would have taxed the resources of any nation, but Xi Jinping’s China is not just another country. It is a high-tech authoritarian state experimenting with complete social control. To succeed it requires lies, intimidation and obfuscation. These very ingredients have exacerbated a public-health crisis and laid bare a government that fears the truth. Worse yet for the Chinese president, China’s people know it.

    The telltale signs of a panic-driven cover-up are clear: Despite an outbreak that likely began before December 2019, the Chinese government allowed no hint of a problem until a month after that. It silenced whistleblowers who knew the extent of the problem and took its time trying to contain the outbreak. Worse still, Beijing worries that accepting Washington’s continuing offers to help would be to admit it has failed.

    For those who noted Xi’s obsession with dictatorial control during the Hong Kong protests, his use of concentration camps to control the Uighur Muslims, and his Mao-like clamp down on intellectual, religious and cultural life, it is no surprise that the Chinese dictator has exacerbated the health crisis in his desire to exert absolute control. In the current climate of fear, Chinese healthcare and other professionals are afraid to communicate even basic facts. Indeed, those Chinese who did warn international media and their fellow citizens have been punished by the Communist Party of China.

    Last week a prominent Chinese law professor, Xu Zhangrun, was swiftly punished and banned from writing after he wrote that the virus “revealed the rotten core of Chinese governance,” and that “groundless decisions from authorities have pushed powerless citizens to despair, and the disease to the globe.” Unlike so many Westerners who assume Xi’s omnipotence, growing numbers of Chinese know what Xu knows: that Xi’s increasingly harsh rule is a hallmark of weakness, not strength.

  165. OldOzzie

    The Xi Jinping Flu

    Despite holding more power, wealth and influence than ever before, China’s government is rotting from within. Beijing’s handling of the coronavirus makes that clear. Such an outbreak would have taxed the resources of any nation, but Xi Jinping’s China is not just another country. It is a high-tech authoritarian state experimenting with complete social control. To succeed it requires lies, intimidation and obfuscation. These very ingredients have exacerbated a public-health crisis and laid bare a government that fears the truth. Worse yet for the Chinese president, China’s people know it.

    The telltale signs of a panic-driven cover-up are clear: Despite an outbreak that likely began before December 2019, the Chinese government allowed no hint of a problem until a month after that. It silenced whistleblowers who knew the extent of the problem and took its time trying to contain the outbreak. Worse still, Beijing worries that accepting Washington’s continuing offers to help would be to admit it has failed.

    For those who noted Xi’s obsession with dictatorial control during the Hong Kong protests, his use of concentration camps to control the Uighur M*slims, and his Mao-like clamp down on intellectual, religious and cultural life, it is no surprise that the Chinese dictator has exacerbated the health crisis in his desire to exert absolute control. In the current climate of fear, Chinese healthcare and other professionals are afraid to communicate even basic facts. Indeed, those Chinese who did warn international media and their fellow citizens have been punished by the Communist Party of China.

    Last week a prominent Chinese law professor, Xu Zhangrun, was swiftly punished and banned from writing after he wrote that the virus “revealed the rotten core of Chinese governance,” and that “groundless decisions from authorities have pushed powerless citizens to despair, and the disease to the globe.” Unlike so many Westerners who assume Xi’s omnipotence, growing numbers of Chinese know what Xu knows: that Xi’s increasingly harsh rule is a hallmark of weakness, not strength.

  166. Helen

    Do you know if Japan and Germany declared war on all the many Aboriginal ‘nations’ separately, or was it a job lot?

    Dunno but have it on good authority that all war Morse code and secret missives were prepared in aboriginal language, and passwords and war correspondence in general – orders etc.

    It is a shame that this has all been lost in such a short time. If these guys hadn’t started this ANZAC Day stuff it would have been lost foreva.

  167. Zyconoclast

    Very luxurious on the inside, though.

    The interior design is like something out of a horror movie.

    Hammer Horror Films

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