Wind and sun at noon providing 23% of electricity in SE Australia

Monday Feb 25 in the morning. Not a sceenshot so it will change. At 9am (Sydney time) the wind was delivering less than one GW, 13% of plated capacity and 3.5% of demand (25GW).  I check daily at 9am and 6.30pm and I don’t recall any time in the last week when wind topped 10% of plated capacity. Mostly it was under 5%.

Don’t get over-excited about South Australia despite the beatup of their RE industry in a colour supplement to The Weekend Australian. They can produce about half of the Australian windpower at present but last  night it was not enough and they were taking power from Queensland and Tasmania via  NSW and Victoria.

Fun times ahead.

6.30 Dinner time update. The sun and the wind are now providing 3GW that is 12% of demand. The sun will soon set and it is all up to the wind that is blowing almost 1GW(4% of demand.) So we will need about 25 x windmills. What a good thing RE is so cheap or it might have to be subsidised. But wait…

Beware of the green energy transition. Check out the German experience!

Approaching noon on a late summer Sunday morning the sun and wind are contributing  5 GW to the total consumption of 22 GW. That is less than a quarter. On weekdays the demand rises over 25 and of course in high summer it gets well over 30.

The wind is  delivering 1GW. That is 4.5% of the demand and 15% of the plated capacity.

Someone work out the cost of increasing the capacity of wind and sun power to meet this level of demand and also the demand at 30GW or so. It will be easier when the aluminium  and  steel industries close. Just as well we have given up on car-making.

In Germany.

Because RE zealots crowed about Germany’s ‘inevitable transition’ to wind and solar from the outset, it’s no surprise that its disastrous conclusion is attracting attention, much like a freeway pileup.

Germany’s so-called Energiewende (energy transition) has turned into a power pricing and supply calamity. Which was as perfectly predictable as it was perfectly avoidable.

Its the choke point, stupid!

Unfortunately, most of the time the actual amount of electricity produced is only a fraction of the installed capacity. Worse, on “bad days” it can fall to nearly zeroIn 2016 for example there were 52 nights with essentially no wind blowing in the country. No Sun, no wind. Even taking “better days” into account, the average electricity output of wind and solar energy installations in Germany amounts to only about 17% of the installed capacity.

Why have trees when you can have windmills?

See also The ALP Steps on More Rakes.

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11 Responses to Wind and sun at noon providing 23% of electricity in SE Australia

  1. Rusty of Qld

    Official Labour Policy:
    Live in caves, Eat Grass, Burn Cowshit (thats if cows are allowed).
    See Zanetti cartoon.

  2. Professor Fred Lenin

    Is there any truth in the rumour that labor is going to form an AUEC( Australian Unreliable Energy Commisariat with Mr wong in charge ? Wouldnt surprise me with those ztossers .

  3. Kneel

    “Someone work out the cost of increasing the capacity of wind and sun power to meet this level of demand…”

    Emma Chissit?
    all you have x 10
    Plus increase your power cost by 5x
    Plus no guarantee on 24/7/365 availability
    OTOH, you’ll know your saving the planet and can feel superior thereby.
    Besides, no-one will have to do without anything – well, no-one worth speaking about anyway.

  4. mem

    Germany is just starting to work it out.

    “The coal exit changes the CO2 emissions of the European Union by 0,” FOCUS quotes economics professor Christian Bayer of the University of Bonn at Twitter. “A German coal phase-out in itself only shifts emissions abroad.”

    In summary, the 2038 coal exit will cost the German government (taxpayers) 80 billion euros, will have no effect on CO2 reductions, have no impact on climate, will ultimately lead to higher electricity costs, result in a more unstable grid, make Germany more dependent on foreign energy, and encourage companies to leave for places with more stable and cheaper electricity.”

    https://notrickszone.com/2020/02/22/expert-german-coal-exit-will-cost-80-billion-euros-but-changes-europe-co2-emissions-by-0/#comments

  5. Robbo

    Can someone get a comment on this from one of the loonies who think that solar and/or wind power is the way to go.

  6. BoyfromTottenham

    ALP: Please explain how many jobs and $ billions of exports will be lost from the coal, steel, aluminium and copper refining, industrial chemicals, brickmaking, fertilizer and glassmaking industries due to the lack of reliable base load power, and therefore $billions of unnecessary new imports, wrecking our balance of payments. And please explain how you plan to replace fossil fuels in agriculture, road transport and mining, and of course our beloved aviation industries. The voters are waiting to hear!

  7. Roger

    …the 2038 coal exit will cost the German government (taxpayers) 80 billion euros, will have no effect on CO2 reductions, have no impact on climate, will ultimately lead to higher electricity costs, result in a more unstable grid, make Germany more dependent on foreign energy, and encourage companies to leave for places with more stable and cheaper electricity.”

    ALP: Hold my beer.

  8. H B Bear

    Also was on Insiders parroting the usual renewable lies while David Speers spoon fed lines to him.

    By 2050 when Albo will be long gone and just another failed ALP leader two things can be guaranteed 1. Your power bill will be higher 2. Coal will still being burnt in Australia.

  9. Squirrel

    Energiewende = Energy Wind-Up = Economy Wind-Up

  10. Terry McCrann aptly put it the other day. We have 3 choices; Coal, nuclear or chaos

    Nuclear is the obvious choice here, but the alarmist zealots hate it as well. Funny, they seem to hate anything logical.

    I think we will have some chaos but in the end we will either have the current coal plants extended in life by endless upgrades, or eventually people will work out that HELE coal is a good idea.

    The renewable lobby continue to avoid talk of storage and backup costs which are absolutely massive = hello high power bills .

  11. Anthony

    Hi Rafe,

    I was thinking that when you do these posts you should link to OpenNEM .

    I personally prefer it to the anero site as it gives you more control over the period of time you want to look at, as well as look individually at the NEM member states.

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