Wednesday Forum: February 26, 2020

This entry was posted in Open Forum. Bookmark the permalink.

1,771 Responses to Wednesday Forum: February 26, 2020

  1. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    “You used jargon and bullshit to try to gaslight us.”

    “dying … because wokebugman hospital administrators say so”

    I have no idea what those wanker bolded words mean, and I have no need to know.

  2. JC

    Rover:

    The board doesn’t decide who you choose as a GP. You do that. Just remember they aren’t all as bright as each other. Some end up at the top tier in the class and others are struggling at the bottom. Relying on the board is not great advice to be giving someone.

  3. Tel

    They’re basically just script vending machines.

    Effectively selling a way to bypass government regulations that shouldn’t exist in the first place … the market is defending itself from interference.

    Even so, isn’t the market doing exactly what it should be, which is separating the good from the chaff? You said yourself everyone avoid them.

    I would guess that the people who know what they want, and are willing to pay would not avoid them. I would like to have some spare antibiotics on the shelf as a reserve in case I get sick so I can take them and clear out any secondary infections without hanging around a doctor’s office, that being the most dangerous place to be.

  4. Roger

    The board doesn’t decide who you choose as a GP. You do that.

    But the board decides who’s qualified to practice as a GP in Australia.

    The average layman isn’t qualified to do so; he relies on the judgement of the board.

    An Australian citizen, resident or visitor has the right to expect that the board is doing its job.

    If that registration regime is properly in place, the market can then decide on the basis of wait times, fees, and a host of other factors. General competence shouldn’t be one of them when it comes to the practice of medicine.

  5. herodotus

    Peter Gleeson on Sky tonight, very funny.
    Relating how Katter allegedly said that Canberra public servants (senior ones) spend “too much time in front of the mirror with no clothes on”, Gleeso said “I think he was trying to say that they were emperors with no clothes on. That’s my guess, anyway”.

  6. Cardimona

    Gleeso said “I think he was trying to say that they were emperors with no clothes on. That’s my guess, anyway”.

    I’m from Katter Kountry, I speak Katter.
    I can confirm that is an accurate translation.

  7. johanna

    jupes
    #3336925, posted on February 27, 2020 at 7:30 pm

    They had no capacity to look after that many prisoners, as they were a small unit moving forward. So, the enemy soldiers were all shot, except one guy who could cut hair, because they needed a barber.

    So they let a bloke with blades near their head after they killed 19 of his mates?

    I’m pulling the bullshit card on that one.

    He was given a pair of scissors and a towel, with lots of burly soldiers waiting in line.

    Truth can be stranger than fiction.

  8. JC

    Roger

    The board decides on the bare minimum qualifications. That’s all they do.
    Here’s my test. I can’t ask them for their school grades, however I do look at the degree/ what med school they attended. If is not Melbourne, Sydney or Adelaide uni, I wouldn’t touch them.

  9. Twostix

    Even so, isn’t the market doing exactly what it should be, which is separating the good from the chaff? You said yourself everyone avoid them.

    They move or are moved around so much.

    They’re great temporary money makers for clinics – especially clinics with a pharmacy. Until racist bigot patients catch on and stop going (or they get caught and pack up, go home and live like a king).

  10. Roger

    Qld’s “Tahitian Prince” deported to NZ after a few years in gaol for defrauding tax payers of millions of dollars while working in Qld Health.

    How he got the job in the first place with a lengthy criminal record in NZ remains unanswered.

    I don’t suppose anyone lost their job over this debacle.

  11. Tel

    An Australian citizen, resident or visitor has the right to expect that the board is doing its job.

    It’s job is to keep the wages of doctors higher than average but not so high that the government central planning medical system cracks down on them.

    I think they are achieving said objective.

  12. Twostix

    The board doesn’t decide who you choose as a GP. You do that.

    Who even does this?

    When you get sick and need to go to the doctor do you ask to get a photocopy of their credentials when on the phone making an appointment to see a doctor?

    Is this real life?

  13. calli

    Mick, gaslighting is shorthand for what happened in the film, Gaslight. It’s the subtle, psychological process of making someone doubt their own sanity.

    Woke is a lefty term for the old fashioned “being a wake-up”, or understanding whats really going on. In this case though it’s misplaced as they’re more asleep, or lulled into a state of incurable smugness.

    Bugman – well that’s just a de-humanising term to describe the hive-mind.

  14. Knuckle Dragger

    vicki,

    Appreciate the reply earlier on.

  15. Roger

    The board decides on the bare minimum qualifications. That’s all they do.

    They also have a duty to decide upon the veracity of the claimed qualifications, JC.

    Not all parchments are of equal value.

  16. Cardimona

    Bad news for hipsters.

    Bad news for long-flowing-beard mountain men…
    (*sad face*)

  17. Knuckle Dragger

    And here I was thinking that the Bangladeshi cricketers were the worst of all time.

    The worst cricketers of all time are Bangladeshi women cricketers.

  18. JC

    Not all parchments are of equal value.

    That’s my point, Roger.

  19. Snoopy

    Media reports of former Egyptian president Mubarak’s funeral are strangely silent on Obama’s support for the Arab Spring revolution which deposed him from power.

    Did Barry land on the wrong side of Egyptian history?

  20. dopey

    ‘ Actors are generally stupid people.’ but they sure know when they’ve won an award.

  21. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From Old School Conservative at 7:46 pm:

    Now I just wonder where the Rugby rot started?
    ARU board member Liz Broderick believes Rugby can change Australia and she, Ann Sherry and Pip Marlow, are three women who want to help it along.
    Liz Broderick says the international nature of Rugby lured her to the sport originally.
    “blah, blah, blah, inane, facile gossip”
    (Rugby.com.au Feb 2016). Castle was appointed CEO of RA in Dec 2017.
    QED.”

    Buck and a half public servants, a Suncorp failure and equal opportunity leg ups into jobs for which they were unqualified, this lot.

    The blokes on the ARU board fell for the Andrew Demetriou garbage about wymminses having something to offer in business. Two of them have since taken the money for doing nothing and scuttled off to lie to some other board or government about their worth.

  22. Tel

    Bugman – well that’s just a de-humanising term to describe the hive-mind.

    It’s from a song by Blur about a drug addict/dealer who hung around in the city.

    https://genius.com/Blur-bugman-lyrics

    That gradually expanded to be a term of derision for ANY city dweller … especially the inner-city class of hipsters who tend to drift towards admin jobs, social media, voting Green, being Queer and often also smoking some weed.

  23. Roger

    Not all parchments are of equal value.

    That’s my point, Roger.

    OK; so our disagreement is about who judges this.

    The common man shouldn’t be expected to do so as he doesn’t have access to the knowledge needed to do so.

    That knowledge is, however, available to the medical board (and if they say it is not so they are lying).

  24. Roger

    Bugman – well that’s just a de-humanising term to describe the hive-mind.

    Cf. the ‘other directed person’ or the ‘social personality’ delineated in Davd Riesman’s ‘The Lonely Crowd’ (1950).

    A remarklably prescient work.

  25. JC

    Roger

    The test is what medical school they went to. That’s the only test we can do. The medical board registration is basically useless. In any event even if there wasn’t a government registry, the market would create one that would likely be superior.

    Let me ask you. You have the choice of two doctors. One went to Sydney uni and the other Buttfuck University. Both are registered with the medical board. Which would you choose?

  26. notafan

    Exactly Twostix.

    Reminds me of a particular doctor.

    Always with a eye on the clock and given a second chance after one lazy misdiagnosis, after the second never again.

  27. vlad

    Let me ask you. You have the choice of two doctors. One went to Sydney uni and the other Buttfuck University. Both are registered with the medical board. Which would you choose?

    The one who had been in practice longer.

  28. 8th Dan

    They had no capacity to look after that many prisoners, as they were a small unit moving forward. So, the enemy soldiers were all shot, except one guy who could cut hair, because they needed a barber.

    So they let a bloke with blades near their head after they killed 19 of his mates?

    I’m pulling the bullshit card on that one.

    Absolutely. Same for the Japs on the plane story too.

    And, while I’m at it … twostix and his antibiotic dispensing Indian GP story too.

  29. vlad

    Another withering putdown undone by open tags.

  30. vlad

    I’ll try that again.

    Let me ask you. You have the choice of two doctors. One went to Sydney uni and the other Buttfuck University. Both are registered with the medical board. Which would you choose?

    The one who had been in practice longer.

  31. JC

    Okay, now we’re getting silly. Then docs a year apart in age.

  32. Top Ender

    Try this then:

    Prisoners are hard work: the WWII philosopher/soldier Glenn Gray was present on an occasion when one soldier complained in his hearing about the work prisoners were causing the unit, and another soldier said: “I am doing my best, sir, I started with six!” and got laughter as a response – presumably he had despatched any troublesome ones already. Captain Henley, fighting in the Battle of Hurtgen Forest noted “six less to feed” when a German artillery round killed six prisoners who were being taken to the rear for interrogation.

    The same battle saw another soldier comment:

    Sometimes you take five or six prisoners and there is what they call a ring of steel behind you with artillery firing in behind you and the Germans were just there to keep you from getting reinforcements or ammunition…What are you going to do with prisoners? If you try to take them back you’re taking your life in hand twice. Once going through the terrain to get them back. If you get through it safely that time and don’t get killed then you still have to go back up front after you get rid of them. So a lot of them never reached the rear that way.

    Daniel Webster, fighting with the 101st Airborne, was part of a force that held several streets of a town with Germans in front of them across a small river. Eventually the Americans tried an assault across the river. A wounded prisoner was taken, and then the assault went wrong, and the prisoner was abandoned, to die, it was thought. However, some hours later, his cries could be heard and it was feared he would be taken back by the Germans and reveal the American positions and strength. Several attempts were made in the night to reach him and despatch him, and he was even the survivor of several thrown grenades before one finished him. A savage example of the reality of the tactical situation, but what else was to be done?
    Major FP Crozier and his orderly were on an investigative patrol in No Man’s Land in WWI when they were surprised by a German sentry and realised they had gone too far. Crozier fired at the man with his revolver, and missed, but his orderly didn’t. Another German behind the sentry tried to surrender, but realising the “hornets’ nest” behind him, Crozier shot him and the two hurried off. It is difficult to see an alternative, but have they committed a crime?

    Parachutist David Webster’s unit participated in a surprise night assault a few days after their D-Day landing. They were exhorted to use their knifes and bayonets, then grenades where necessary, but not to take prisoners, because “…we can’t be dragging a lot of prisoners around with us at night”. US Army General Maxwell Taylor apparently told US paratroopers before their jump on D-Day not to take prisoners, a command passed down by his officers, who told their men on getting into their aircraft: “No prisoners. We are not taking any prisoners”. Some of this may well have been due to the realisation of the nature of this attack: it depended on speed and surprise, and it was essential to get enough men ashore fast and to push the Germans back far enough to allow that, otherwise the precarious foothold on Europe may well have been lost.

    Link

  33. Kev

    So they let a bloke with blades near their head after they killed 19 of his mates?
    I’m pulling the bullshit card on that one.

    Not necessarily. We had a Hoi Chan (Surrendered VC used as a scout) who used to give us haircuts and only ever used a safety razor. I did however keep my rifle in my hand during the procedure.

  34. JC

    Kev

    Did he see 19 of his pals murdered in front of him?

  35. NoFixedAddress

    Cardimona
    #3336793, posted on February 27, 2020 at 4:57 pm

    Cats, a mate just drew my attention to Concetta Fierravanti-Wells in the Senate today.
    Here – https://www.aph.gov.au/News_and_Events/LiveMediaPlayer?vID={3A74D7FB-C237-4564-9E83-355191C8977F}&type=1
    From 16:06:24 to 16:11:39.
    Perhaps she belongs on the sceptical pollie list….
    What’s the Catsensus on the three with question marks at the bottom of the list?

    Malcolm Roberts,
    Craig Kelly,
    Barnaby Joyce,
    Gerard Rennick,
    George Christensen,
    Keith Pitt,
    Matt Canavan,
    Eric Abetz,
    Angus Taylor,
    Llew O’Brien,
    Michelle Landry,
    Scott Buchholz,
    Andrew Hastie ,
    Amanda Stoker,
    Concetta Fierravanti-Wells.

    Pauline Hanson…?
    Jim Molan…?
    David Littleproud…?

    Cardimona

    For some time I have considered the LNP to be Liberal Nationalist Socialist Party (communists).

    If the above folk were fair dinkum for Australia they would join Pauline Hanson in OneNation and get away from the LNP Socialists (communists).

    Ask Barnaby what he thinks his kids will be doing when Zero Carbon occurs in Australia!

    Has anyone worked out that to get to Zero Emissions by 2050 that there are only 30 years left to do that so whom are they going to kill for that to happen?

    Australia needs Nuclear Power Generation now.

  36. vlad

    Okay, now we’re getting silly. Then docs a year apart in age.

    Who’s getting silly now? Depends on how long they had in practice. One year versus two years, I’d choose two years.

    Twenty years versus thirty years, I’d choose thirty years.

    Seven years versus eight years I’d flip a nickel.

  37. johanna

    Thanks, Topender.

    The expression ‘take no prisoners’ has a real meaning.

    It’s not pleasant, but then, war isn’t.

  38. Knuckle Dragger

    They’re Asian JC. They don’t have pals.

    They have potential food sources.

  39. vlad

    The point is that book smarts and a fancy-shmancy testimur matter less than practice.

  40. NoFixedAddress

    Malcolm Turnbull is a Fabian Marxist

  41. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Another German behind the sentry tried to surrender, but realising the “hornets’ nest” behind him, Crozier shot him and the two hurried off.’

    Investigators are trying to determine whether the Chermans were kicked off a small cliff first.

  42. Cardimona

    Australia needs Nuclear Power Generation now.

    I feel your pain, NFA.

  43. Top Ender

    Surrender concepts also vary from theatre to theatre and war to war – depending on the nature of the combatants:

    The Nippon Army had a bad reputation for treachery and cruelty. Australian servicemen found early in the New Guinea campaigns that the Japanese treated prisoners badly: Signalman George Barker said of two comrades that they had been “tied and bayoneted”. Captain Charles Bicks found several men, including some of his own battalion, who had been captured, and then executed, their hands tied behind their backs. A later Report by Sir William Web, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Queensland, found that between 26 August and 6 September 1942 at least 24 Australian soldiers were executed. The Americans encountered the same sort of actions. Nine American Marines left behind after a submarine-borne raid on the Gilbert Island were executed soon after their capture. An American patrol on Saipan found five of their comrades dead, their legs bound with wire, and bullet holes in the back of their heads.

    One Marine noted that very early on in the war prisoner-killing was confirmed when a Japanese bivouac was taken and pictures of mutilated Marines were found. The Marines began taking ears off dead Japanese in retaliation. Bergerud comments that ”The hatred of the ground soldier toward the Japanese was on a completely different level from that found among sailors on warships or airmen….a sense of restraint existed in Europe that was absent in the Pacific.” Not all of this was due to every soldier seeing atrocities. In fact the psychologists surveying three divisions of US troops in the Pacific found that only 13% reported sighting personally such actions – the same rate as in the European theatre – but 45% said they had heard stories of them, as opposed to 24% in Europe.

    The attacking armies reacted by becoming more ferocious in their assaults. Australian Imperial Force infantryman Ben Love passed through a Japanese encampment the US forces had taken at night “…twenty-three days ago. They caught the Nips asleep – killed over 100 of them.” It is worth noting in passing here that infantry combat did not then, and does not now, giving the enemy a “sporting chance”, so enemy found asleep were routinely despatched. Captain “Chips” Heron, MC was leading a patrol of British Commandos at Pauktaw against the Japanese when they came across 10 of them, six of whom he killed, including one officer, saying afterwards: “The fellow had his back to us, sir! Thought I ought to shout ‘Oi’, or something.” Similarly Private Bill McGee of the Australian Army commented in a matter of fact way on finding a Japanese asleep in a hut: “…he didn’t last long”. Marines EB Sledge, training in WWII, was told by his hand-to-hand combat instructor: “Don’t hesitate to fight the Japs dirty. Most Americans, from the time they are kids, are taught not to hit below the belt. It’s not sportsmanlike. Well, nobody had taught the Japs that, and war ain’t sport. Kick him in the b alls before he kicks you in yours.” If a soldier runs away he is still a target, years later in Vietnam: “Forty yards away a young North Vietnamese soldier popped up from behind a tree. He started his limping run back the way he had come. I fired two rounds. He crumpled.”

    ….

    Sometimes despite the best of motives surrender was not countenanced by the enemy. A WWII chaplain tried to get some Japanese to surrender.

    He yelled into the bunker, which was inhabited by several enemy, “Come out and be saved.” He was met by a hail of rifle fire. He dumped in a couple of hand grenades. Debris came out the slit. Then he took his pistol and fired all six rounds through the slit. From that point on he was known as “Come out and be saved.”

    The incoming forces fighting the Japanese in WWII quickly adopted to new tactics in the face of the level of resistance. Japanese in a hospital were given no chance to surrender, because some held grenades under their blankets. On Tinian Island, where it was thought that there were Japanese soldiers in caves, they were, in some areas, targeted with loudspeaker broadcasts urging them to surrender. Individual caves were given a call from outside by Marines, and if there was no response, the cave was sealed. In New Guinea in January 1943, despite being in hopeless positions, they “…actually charged forward to a defiant, faster finish”.

    ….

    We can see that in most wars surrender is difficult in the midst of combat. However, it dies happen, but such events are almost discrete in themselves in that they are a unique set of circumstances where in many situations the captor and captive are involved in a one-on-one scenario where the two of them must set the rules, with disastrous consequences for one side if many variable factors are not understood. Having said that, the situation in WWII with the Japanese is unique, at least in this study.

    In conclusion, we can gather that routinely in hot-blooded combat, the line between death at the enemy’s hands and being able to take surrender is extremely fine. Living on the edge of their reflexes, people in combat are not machines but human beings, prone to error and their feelings. It is unfair to judge them by standards set by others who do not understand the true nature of combat.

    Link

  44. 8th Dan

    The expression ‘take no prisoners’ has a real meaning.

    In Lawrence of Arabia, when Peter O’Toole said it, sure. Otherwise, no.

    Both the 19 Korean soldiers murdered story and the Japs disappeared from the plane story are absolute bullshit.

  45. vlad

    Australia needs Nuclear the New Power Generation now.

    FIFY.


  46. JC

    Nice piece in NRO.

    The excuse that Bernie’s bullshit is being tolerated because a large number of young people never experienced the cold war and therefore have no understanding of its venomous character is just that, bullshit.

    Try this on, he argues.

    Go in the public square and loudly suggest we should give democratic Nazism a burl or how about offering up some made up examples that American slavery wasn’t all bad. No one has experienced slavery nor Nazism in that age group. You wouldn’t last a second.
    The author argues it’s something else.
    How Can Bernie Sanders Happen in America? How Can Bernie Sanders Happen in America?

  47. Top Ender

    My last big post on the subject, but those judging our people in Afghanistan and Ben Roberts-Smith VC might do well to consider the ad hoc nature of “the rules” of surrender. Consider some of these scenarios and ask yourself what you would do if you were a soldier in these situations:

    John Keegan points out that “surrendering was a ticklish business in trench warfare”. The prisoners had no especial value; prisoners had to be managed, and soldiers on “hair-trigger reactions” would shoot rather than risk being shot at. That was what Argentine soldier Oscar Carrizo experienced when he crawled quietly out of a Falklands foxhole and tried to present himself to two British soldiers standing nearby: one of them reacted to the movement and shot him in the head, but not fatally. In another incident in the same war an Argentine failed to put his hands up and just kept repeating to the four British soldiers confronting him the words “Por Favor”. He was wearing a poncho and when after the third command his hands were seen moving underneath the garment all four of the soldiers immediately fired.

    If the initial distrust could be overcome, then the enemy can become what the captors are – human beings – and trust can be set up, and good feelings displayed. Glenn Gray was an Intelligence Officer in WWII, and recounts the experience of newly-captured German prisoners being regarded with mistrust by their American captors, who had weapons trained on them, as they were no doubt “treacherous and fanatical storm troopers”. Then one of the Germans was heard humming, and he was joined by three others, who apparently had previously formed a singing quartet. Within a few minutes communication was being struck up and a friendly atmosphere prevailed. In the fierce fighting after D-Day a soldier of the German Army and a soldier of the Canadian Army – the former taken prisoner by the latter – found the hot blood of the encounter they had just survived rapidly defused by finding they were both Polish: “…they got talking together and forgot the war and became buddies”, in the words of one of the Canadians.

    If you surrendered you had to do it properly. Trooper Frederick Tucker, fighting in the Boer War, said that the Boers used treachery in displaying a white flag and then firing. He noted that the action was soon concluded and “soon everything was quiet”, with no further information given about prisoners. George Clarke Musgrave, fighting at the Battle of Elandslaagte, saw white flags hoisted when the Boer position was about to be overrun, then a Red Cross flag, and the orders were given to cease fire. Then, to the victors’ fury, they saw the Boers run to their horses in the rear and ride off. The same writer describes a similar incident a little while later, and another occurred where the Red Cross flag was displayed by the British but the medical soldiers were shot down by the enemy. In a further example the Boers used a white flag to stop firing but in actuality were bringing up soldiers crawling through long grass. On another occasion a Red Cross-flagged ambulance was used to bring up a Maxim gun. Such actions, of course, can well lead to the white flag being disregarded in future, and an increased level of ferocity arising on both sides. Trooper Donald Macdonald in the same conflict saw a lancer lift his spearpoint rather than kill a Boer who screamed for mercy, but turning saw the man he had spared reach for his thrown-down Mauser. The lancer turned back and killed him. Corporal Abbott, writing in his account of Australians in action, said of white flags that “…they had three of them over Du Ploy’s chimneys when they fired on the English scouts”. He also describes another action where one “Hans Larsen and his son” were shelled because they had fired from a kraal over which a white flag flew.

    It is the same in all battles: the rules of surrender must be adhered to or dire consequences follow. In WWI a Turkish sniper “…put up his hands but still held his rifle and fired point blank. Instantly, the Australian swung his rifle and struck the head of the Turk. There was no need for a second blow…” Australian troops at Paschendaele stormed a two-storey pillbox and the survivors in the lower section had begun surrendering when a shot from the upper was fired, killing one of the Australians. They immediately shot all of the Germans. A well-known incident in WWI saw Germans advancing towards the positions of the British “’B’ Company of the Queen’s”, as Private George Coppard described it. Around 18 March 1917, three hundred Germans apparently advanced with their hands up, but upon reaching the British wire pulled out grenades from their pockets and flung these into their opponents’ trenches. “From then on”, said Coppard, “the advance of a crowd of Jerries with their hands up would be the signal to open fire”. Captain Ambrose Cull tells of a similar incident in the early days of the European campaign, when three Germans surrendered in a dugout, and then as they came out with their hands up two of them suddenly reached revolvers and opened fire, hitting one of the Australian troopers; their sergeant responded with three shots of his own, killing the two Germans. Then the Australians opened up on every other one of the enemy in the trench, killing around 60 of them.

    An Australian military pocket book published in 1941, and written by a Major with WWI experience, outlined situations like this with bluntness:

    Germans fired their machine-guns from the pill-boxes of Flanders, reaping a harvest of our men at the last moment. Then,, they often put their hands up and “kameraded”. Our men, maddened by the loss of mates, frequently slaughtered them to the last man. I quite agree with that action. Let the enemy know that your coming means death to him, unless he surrenders early. This knowledge will cause him to break when attack becomes threatening. And this breaking will save half you men who would otherwise be knocked out in the close fighting. Always kill an enemy who fights till you get close. He seeks an unfair advantage by trying to save his life at the last moment. When the enemy learns the price you exact for prolonged resistance, unless he be very brave, he will either run or surrender early….Not for a moment, however, would I suggest that prisoners should be wiped out indiscriminately. No great victory was ever won except by the surrender of large bodies of enemy….The time to kill is when they are by the smoking weapons they have used too long. Otherwise it is not proper to slaughter them.

    Once Surrendered…

    When does a prisoner become a combatant again, and what happens to their status if they do? In the Battle of Bardia a large number of Italian troops had surrendered when six Italian tanks appeared. The six soldiers guarding around 500 of the enemy had no anti-tank weapons, and took cover. One of them was captured and sent off by the triumphant tankers to the local HQ to request surrender. This was refused, and the tanks attacked by a small force sent out to deal with them. They departed, and one of the attackers “fired a few bursts into the clustered Italians, who re-surrendered”. A similar situation was seen after the D-Day landings when some German prisoners had been taken by American paratroopers. Then an enemy machine gun opened up on the Americans, and the surrendered Germans attacked their captors. One of the US soldiers shot them all dead. It is clear that in such situations confusion reigns, and the chance of firing on a non-combatant – and committing a technical crime – is high. But what other recourse is there?

    Sergeant John Halpin, captured by the Turks in 1918, was under escort when other British captives began calculating that there were 15 Turks and 25 prisoners. Plans began to be made by some, others urged caution, and then one of the captives began urging the prisoners to attack. Their guards grew suspicious, rifle bolts were cocked, and as the movement to revolt grew into commands, they shot the chief instigator. It is hard to know what else they could have done. Soldier Richard Weston was present when three British tanks herding a large group of Afrika Korps prisoners to the rear were delayed. The Germans took the opportunity to make a break for it. Within seconds all three tanks opened fire with their machineguns and kept shooting till none were left standing.

    Link

    (I interviewed Weston, the last bloke mentioned. He also said he occasionally felt sad about them dying, but because they were fellow-soldiers, not in that he’d done something wrong.)

  48. Top Ender

    BTW, the sources are fully footnoted and/or endnoted in the book, but the Cat won’t allow them to come across when pasted.

  49. jupes

    Let me ask you. You have the choice of two doctors. One went to Sydney uni and the other Buttfuck University. Both are registered with the medical board. Which would you choose?

    I’ve never known which uni my doctors have come from and for most of my life didn’t have a choice of doctors anyway. Now I’m old enough to have a bit of a clue about whether a doctor is competent or not, and just as important, actually cares about my health.

    My current doc is more than 10 years younger than me and is a beaut, so I hope to keep him until he retires or I drop off the perch.

  50. vlad

    “What is a pris­on­er of war? He is a man who has tried to kill you and, hav­ing failed to kill you, asks you not to kill him.” – Winston Churchill.

  51. cohenite

    FMD, maosim, Stalinism, Marxism, socialism, fascism, they’re all the same thing. Someone tell me how living in any of these regimes is different to the ordinary slob. There’s no difference, your life continues at the will of the dictator who is inevitable since none of them allow for individual rights and an infrastructure which protects such rights.

  52. JC

    Jupes

    We all have different ways of deciding who WE accept as our doctors. “We” is capitalized because we shouldn’t lose sight of the fact that they are our servants and not the other way around as we’re paying for the service. I chose mine, possibly because I learnt it in the US. The schools doctors went to is pretty important in the decision making.
    There’s no fucking way I’d allow a so called doc who graduated from Deakin medical school 50 miles of me for a medical consult, let alone a procedure.

  53. cohenite

    My current doc is more than 10 years younger than me and is a beaut, so I hope to keep him until he retires or I drop off the perch.

    Correct; it’s no point having an older doctor who will likely drop off his perch before you. You need someone who does what you want within reason; and if you’re a bloke, someone who has small fingers to check your prostate.

  54. vlad

    You need someone who does what you want within reason

    Beware of the older docs who over-prescribe. Truman Capote had to go into rehab because of them and denounced them (courteously) on the Dick Cavett show when he came out. They’ve probably all retired by now.

  55. JC

    cohenite
    #3337009, posted on February 27, 2020 at 9:09 pm

    FMD, maosim, Stalinism, Marxism, socialism, fascism, they’re all the same thing. Someone tell me how living in any of these regimes is different to the ordinary slob. There’s no difference, your life continues at the will of the dictator who is inevitable since none of them allow for individual rights and an infrastructure which protects such rights.

    Do you ever get the point? Ever? And you claim you’re a lawyer yet missed the central point of the argument the author was making.

    Socialism is okay but try proclaiming the virtues of Nazism or that slavery was great. There piece wasn’t an attempt to distinguish living standards in each system.

    Cronkite, you really can be a blockhead at times.. well most times.

  56. jupes

    BTW, the sources are fully footnoted and/or endnoted in the book, but the Cat won’t allow them to come across when pasted.

    Thanks for that TE. Excellent work as usual.

  57. JC when you ask a plurality of students at Deakin who the university was named after, and all you get in return is blank stares, then you know you are fucked

  58. vlad

    You never talk about booze, JC. Do you ever take a drink? Worth doing in moderation.

  59. BorisG

    FMD, maosim, Stalinism, Marxism, socialism, fascism, they’re all the same thing. Someone tell me how living in any of these regimes is different to the ordinary slob. There’s no difference, your life continues at the will of the dictator who is inevitable since none of them allow for individual rights and an infrastructure which protects such rights.

    I agree, though we should not underestimate that even within these there are huge variations in the degree of badness and misery.

    But some Cats still think Putin’s dictatorship is better than say Sweden. Because he is a ‘conservative’.

  60. JC

    Cronkite

    Correct; it’s no point having an older doctor who will likely drop off his perch before you. You need someone who does what you want within reason; and if you’re a bloke, someone who has enormous fingers to check your prostate.

    It’s always about that, isn’t it.

  61. vlad

    ask a plurality of students at Deakin who the university was named after

    It was named after a Melbourne graduate.

    Melbourne thought enough of him to name a courtyard after him.

  62. Bar Beach Swimmer

    Whoever claimed my parents’ generation left school with a reading level of ten hasn’t picked up a copy of the old Victorian School Reader of late.

    Areff, my grandparents gave me A.A. Milne’s Now we are six when I was that age. Recently, I had a look at it and discovered the author’s very impressive use in rhyme of the word ‘supercilious’. From that one example, is suggested that six year olds from previous generations were a tad more educated than thought of by the poster to which you responded.

    As to the story about the roast pork. The recent fires prompted a discussion with family members about the numbers of animals killed and injured in the catastrophe. One relo noted that pigs are the worst affected of animals because of their fat content and must be put down if found still alive.

  63. Knuckle Dragger

    ’19 Korean soldiers murdered’

    Murdered, you say? On the battlefield?

    Have you a considered legal opinion to share as a rationale behind your assertion?

    This should be good.

  64. JC

    You never talk about booze, JC. Do you ever take a drink? Worth doing in moderation.

    Only partake in one glass when we go out. I really don’t like drinking much as I don’t like the effect.

  65. Kev

    Did he see 19 of his pals murdered in front of him?
    JC No but he would’ve lost hundreds of his mates to Diggers – I just didn’t trust him as I knew if the positions were reversed I wouldn’t be meekly giving haircuts.
    8th Dan – you are amusing. You deliver your opinions like a judge – I can almost hear the gavel hitting the bench. I could be wrong but I’ve never thought you had military experience so I wonder where you get your very firm opinions from. I do have experience and it would lead me not to discount stories like that out of hand. It might sound iffy but we weren’t there. We are dealing with men under extreme stress and often strange stories are true. Too strange for non military to grasp.

  66. cohenite

    Do you ever get the point? Ever? And you claim you’re a lawyer yet missed the central point of the argument the author was making.

    The point, head prefect, is Alinsky and Gramsci, who figured out that left to the merits communism could never win the hearts and minds so the strategy was infiltration, subversion and indoctrination using the West’s own institutions, particularly education and the media. Your brilliant article was merely describing something known for yonks. I didn’t want to say this so as to spoil your epiphany but as usual you shit all over my consideration. I don’t know why I bother, you’re such an ungrateful swine.

  67. Geriatric Mayfly

    You have the choice of two doctors. One went to Sydney uni and the other Buttfuck University. Both are registered with the medical board. Which would you choose?

    Doesn’t matter. Either will do.
    “Are you a smoker?’
    “Yes.”
    And it’s all downhill from there.

  68. mh

    But some Cats still think Putin’s dictatorship is better than say Sweden. Because he is a ‘conservative’.

    Boris, you are the only one here who raises the topic of Putin.

    No one else gives a shit.

  69. vlad

    One relo noted that pigs are the worst affected of animals because of their fat content and must be put down if found still alive.

    And then eaten, I hope. The French have a saying that you can eat all of the cochon save la merde.

    And that includes chitterlings – the guts. Down south they call em “chitlins”. Mmm, yummy.

  70. Bar Beach Swimmer

    and if you’re a bloke, someone who has small fingers to check your prostate.

    There’s a blood test for that now.

  71. JC

    Kev

    I have no idea of the history of hairdressing in the military during a war like in Korea. Wouldn’t it have been a requirement to be shorn to crew-cut length.. I’m guessing to keep the lice away. One dude would use clippers on the dude next to him, no? If that’s the case, what would be the need to have a full time hairdresser in tow?

  72. cohenite

    It’s always about that, isn’t it.

    Head prefect, do you prefer 2 fingers or one; and the nails long are neat. Be honest.

  73. bespoke

    Too strange for non military to grasp.

    Not all Kev.

  74. vlad

    There’s a blood test for that now.

    They do both anyway. Old habits die hard.

  75. cohenite

    There’s a blood test for that now.

    And a prostate biopsy. But it all starts with the finger; or in head prefect’s case, fingers.

  76. mh

    A woman in Japan tested positive for the coronavirus for the second time on Wednesday, as the country grips with 190 cases separate from the Diamond Princess cruise ship outbreak, according to multiple reports.

    The tour bus guide in her 40s first tested positive in late January and was released from the hospital after recovering. She was readmitted after having a sore throat and chest pains, according to the local government.

    It’s a first known case of a second positive test in Japan, which prompted Health Minister Katsunobu Kato to inform Japan’s central government of the need to review previous patient lists and monitor the condition of those previously discharged, according to Reuters…

    https://www.foxnews.com/health/coronavirus-infects-woman-in-japan-for-the-second-time-a-first-in-the-country

  77. vlad

    If you pass the blood test and the digital test you don’t have to undergo the biopsy.

  78. JC

    Cronkite

    The point of the piece, you imbecile is that some of us were having a discussion in the past few evenings wondering how Bernie had become so popular and therefore how the D’rat lurch to the left had been possible. I posted the link to the piece because it was pertinent to those discussions. You would know about this, because you read every single post here.

    You’re well aware these discussions took place but didn’t add anything – obviously because they weren’t dealing with Gools and numbers nuts penis size of lack thereof.

    In your first response to the piece this evening, you babbled on about how these “isms” are all the same. Well thanks for adding that, Albert, but the piece wasn’t focused on that.
    So STFU.

  79. BorisG

    JC:

    The excuse that Bernie’s bullshit is being tolerated because a large number of young people never experienced the cold war and therefore have no understanding of its venomous character is just that, bullshit.

    I have read it. Not a bad piece. The other day I expressed this more succinctly.

    20-50 years ago socialism was firmly outside of US mainstream politics, but popular in Academia and art world. Now they have brainwashed a generation of lunatics.

  80. vr

    Leon Cooperman on coronavirus and and the Dem Socialist virus.

    CNBC

  81. JC

    If you pass the blood test and the digital test you don’t have to undergo the biopsy.

    Not true. I’m heading in for the camera job the week after even though the blood test and the other disgusting act were all good.

  82. Fisky

    Is there any evidence that CnV can ever be eliminated once infected? Seeing lots of people getting infected, recovered, reinfected, but maybe it just never goes away at all.

  83. mh

    SMH

    Tokyo: Japan is announcing the closure of schools nationwide to help control the spread of the new virus.

    Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says he asked all elementary, middle and high schools to remain closed until spring holidays begin in late March.

    The measure comes amid growing concern about the rise in the number of untraceable cases in northern Japan and elsewhere. Japan now has more than 890 cases, including 705 from a quarantined cruise ship.

    Officials in Japan’s northernmost main island of Hokkaido said earlier Thursday that they were closing all 1,600 elementary and middle schools in the island prefecture, with the governor saying the coming one to two weeks are crucial in fighting the virus.

  84. JC

    Fisk

    I think the reinfection thing is what we call relapse. You get that with flues and colds too. You get hit with the bug, then its a couple of days of torture, you recover slightly and then it hits you harder and you’re off to the races again with say a lung infection.

  85. JC

    cohenite
    #3337033, posted on February 27, 2020 at 9:25 pm

    It’s always about that, isn’t it.

    Head prefect, do you prefer 2 fingers or one; and the nails long are neat. Be honest.

    Cronkite, sure, let me be honest. I could never be a homo. There’s nothing worse in terms of a medical examination as far as I’m concerned. Try someone else.

  86. cohenite

    In your first response to the piece this evening, you babbled on about how these “isms” are all the same. Well thanks for adding that, Albert, but the piece wasn’t focused on that.

    Au contraire head prefect; the piece was entirely focused on that. It was about why Bernie is accepted in the US; and the answer is the commie infiltrators have whitewashed the image of communism and brainwashed the young: classic Gramscian and Alinsky tactics as your article states:

    Most educated Americans have not only seen movies depicting the Holocaust, but they’ve seen the horrifying real-life pictures of that genocide. How many of Americans have looked at pictures of the Ukrainian famine? Or the Great Leap Forward? How many Americans have ever even heard of those events?
    Maoism was responsible for 50 million or more deaths, and Stalinism another 20 or 30 million, but I can’t think of a single important American novel or film depicting those holocausts. Offhand I can recall one American movie that seriously portrayed the inhumanity of collectivism — The Killing Fields, though one hopes there are at least some others I’ve forgotten. That movie is now 36 years old.
    Today, though, a person can watch more than one movie romanticizing a murderous thug like Che Guevara (two of them were produced in the 2000s), but not one about the bravery of refuseniks (a group that Bernie, a man who claims he is deeply moved by his Judaism, couldn’t spare a single word for on his Soviet Union honeymoon) or courageous anti-Communist fighters of Latin America, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, or anywhere else. It’s a shame. Plus head prefect likes dick.
    No, Bernie isn’t Stalin. He claims to be a democratic socialist. I get it. But there’s an array of good reasons no one says, “Hey, let’s give democratic fascism a shot.” There are just as many good reasons not to normalize socialism. At their core, both ideologies are authoritarian. The only difference is that academics and our cultural stewards have whitewashed one of them.

  87. vlad

    Not true. I’m heading in for the camera job the week after even though the blood test and the other disgusting act were all good.

    Good luck.

  88. vlad

    There’s nothing worse in terms of a medical examination as far as I’m concerned.

    Same. Full rectal exam – not for the prostate, for the colon – was the single worst physical experience of my life.

    “You mean there are people who do this for fun?” I was thinking – afterwards. During, I wasn’t thinking anything. There was too little consciousness to spare for coherent thought.

  89. Lazlo

    PSA and the finger are approximate JC. Biopsy is the only way to be sure, and I am sure you would prefer to know. Spoken from experience.

  90. Knuckle Dragger

    Excellent.

    The sodomy thread has segued nicely into the relative merits of different prostate exam techniques.

  91. JC

    Au contraire head prefect; the piece was entirely focused on that. It was about why Bernie is accepted in the US; and the answer is the commie infiltrators have whitewashed the image of communism and brainwashed the young: classic Gramscian and Alinsky tactics as your article states:

    Correct. Unfortunately though your first was response was this.

    cohenite
    #3337009, posted on February 27, 2020 at 9:09 pm

    FMD, maosim, Stalinism, Marxism, socialism, fascism, they’re all the same thing. Someone tell me how living in any of these regimes is different to the ordinary slob. There’s no difference, your life continues at the will of the dictator who is inevitable since none of them allow for individual rights and an infrastructure which protects such rights.

    Irrelevant claptrap, which is why I protested you irrelevant bullshit. Enough!

  92. Nick

    There’s something wrong about this thread. I just can’t put my finger on it.

  93. NoFixedAddress

    BorisG
    #3337017, posted on February 27, 2020 at 9:17 pm

    But some Cats still think Putin’s dictatorship is better than say Sweden. Because he is a ‘conservative’.

    BorisG

    Name me the great orators of Russian Jurisprudence.

    Russia is lawless and subject to the power elite like all communist/socialist countries.

  94. Candy:

    I don’t think it is racism, unless the parents are using particular language that is abusive or some such or not even bothering to speak politely as they refuse treatment by Asian staff.

    You’re assuming two things – the first is that the stories are true, and it isn’t someone telling lies, and the second is that the abuser is a WASP.
    Stop it.

  95. Armadillo

    I’m a bit confused. Why are you people letting anyone stick their finger in your butt?

    You haven’t been conned by the “bowl scan” scam have you?

  96. jupes

    Regarding the stupid Brereton inquiry and TE’s posts above.

    The reason that soldiers back in the day’s of TE’s anecdotes treated POWs in a realistic manner is because the army at the time was trying to win a war. Victory was the priority. Not any more.

    Another reason is that the contemporary military employs, and deploys with, lawyers on operations. These clowns have to keep themselves occupied somehow, so they monitor the battlefield and treat it like a crime scene. They are encouraged by ADF leadership of course, who have formed new units specifically to investigate soldiers and new positions such as the Director of Military Prosecutions specifically to prosecute soldiers. We all know what happens when public servants are given a new toy to play with: they feel the need to use it and expand its budget.

    The main reason for the Brereton inquiry though, is the lack of leadership of the ADF and governent. The ADF is currently lead by a cabal of girly-men with no appetite for war but a huge appetite for social engineering. Their mission is to emasculate the armed forces and to that end they are unfortunately very competent.

    Disgusting traitors the lot of them.

  97. Knuckle Dragger

    Gwendolyn!

    What scripture guides us in penetration for medical purposes?

    Is it okay if the practitioner frowns throughout?

  98. cohenite

    Irrelevant claptrap, which is why I protested you irrelevant bullshit.

    Make up your mind, head prefect: claptrap or bullshit; in any event it was relevant, pertinent even, certainly irrefutable.

    Good luck with the biopsy.

  99. Lazlo

    Was thus long before communism NFA. Ivan the Terrible made the Romanovs look like the rule of law.

  100. Armadillo

    To be more precise, why did you walk into the doctors office and ask him/her to stick their finger in your butt?

    It makes no sense. It’s not something that most sane people consider over an evening beer.

  101. NoFixedAddress

    jupes
    #3337060, posted on February 27, 2020 at 9:55 pm

    Regarding the stupid Brereton inquiry and TE’s posts above.

    ……

    The main reason for the Brereton inquiry though, is the lack of leadership of the ADF and governent. The ADF is currently lead by a cabal of girly-men with no appetite for war but a huge appetite for social engineering. Their mission is to emasculate the armed forces and to that end they are unfortunately very competent.

    Disgusting traitors the lot of them.

    And so say all of the Australian people.

  102. Cardimona

    There was too little consciousness to spare for coherent thought.

    I tried to make a joke: “If my ring is on your finger does this mean we’re engaged?”

    I think it came out: “Aaarghhh!”

  103. JC

    Good luck with the biopsy.

    Thanks.
    He decided to go ahead because I was a one pack a day smoker for decades. But I’m fine though. 🙂

  104. vlad

    why did you walk into the doctors office and ask him/her to stick their finger

    You don’t ask.

    They tell.

  105. NoFixedAddress

    Lazlo
    #3337063, posted on February 27, 2020 at 9:57 pm

    Was thus long before communism NFA. Ivan the Terrible made the Romanovs look like the rule of law.

    Even the original Khan.

  106. jupes

    Incidentally I met a couple of Brereton’s investigators a couple of weeks ago.

    They were staying at the pub next door where I was having a morning coffee. I overheard them mentioning something which made me interrupt.

    The conversation was polite but willing. They tried to convince me that the soldiers had asked for it. As if. I told them their work was unethical and counter to the national interest. Plus they were taking too long. My parting advice was that the best result was to come up with no recommendations for prosecutions.

  107. vlad

    I know someone who smoked five packs a day.

    The seventies. A wonderful time to be alive.

  108. JC

    I know someone who smoked five packs a day.

    Five packs a day! How did he even breathe? I notice you use the past tense. 🙂

  109. mh

    To be more precise, why did you walk into the doctors office and ask him/her to stick their finger in your butt?

    I heard that procedure is no longer required.

    Is someone here insisting on it?

  110. Armadillo

    All the blokes I know don’t wake up of a morning and think to themselves – “I probably should phone my doctor and ask him/her to stick their finger in my butt”. It makes no sense.

  111. Lazlo

    Because you are a smoker!? You are seeing a urologist, I hope.

  112. MatrixTransform

    The $500 highly accurate temperature sensor and bespoke insertion probe that I ordered 4 weeks ago?
    …still in China

    A mate who runs a biz installing solar … hmm no panels available

    Rang a supplier today after finding a particular widget on their website that said they has 3off in-stock. I need 7off … cannot put a date on when they can get more. Have a guess why

    Our main supplier of Widgetry in Singapore that sends their stuff all over the planet. Yep. running out of stock

    at least we make beer here so, all is not lost

  113. Knuckle Dragger

    The Cat.

    Australia’s leading genitalia blog.

    You can tell by the banner.

  114. Geriatric Mayfly

    There’s a blood test for that now.

    The local clinic has abandoned the the PSA (subs check) test. Not reliable enough, and results coming in that distressed clients when nothing was amiss in the first place.

  115. JC

    The ADF is currently lead by a cabal of girly-men with no appetite for war but a huge appetite for social engineering.

    I (100%) disagree with you on that one.

  116. Armadillo

    You don’t ask. They tell.

    No means no. Be strong.

  117. Lazlo

    Arma,
    I may be wrong, but maybe you are of a young demographic who don’t think about prostate cancer, or superannuation – too far off. But if you are 60+ at a dinner party, odds on at least 50% of the men will have been cursed. Real men don’t like to talk about it but.

  118. MatrixTransform

    Zero Emissions by 2050

    show me a solar farm or turbine installation that is older that 25 years.

    Tony Heller says the same

  119. JC

    Lazlo
    #3337077, posted on February 27, 2020 at 10:06 pm

    Because you are a smoker!? You are seeing a urologist, I hope.

    Yep.

  120. vlad

    I notice you use the past tense.

    He stopped smoking – that’s what’s past.

  121. Lazlo

    True GM. You can have high PSA without cancer. That’s why you go for biopsy.

  122. Geriatric Mayfly

    Name me the great orators of Russian Jurisprudence.

    Give that Bandt commo a call. He snared a PhD in Marxist Law.

  123. MatrixTransform

    But some Cats still think Putin’s dictatorship is better than say Sweden. Because he is a ‘conservative’.

    may your Slippery Slope always be uphill, Boris

  124. JC

    And yet she married him.

    Hannah Clarke had every reason to be scared of estranged­ husband, Rowan Baxter — he told her how he had planned to murder a former partner and young son from a previous relationship.

    Baxter’s advanced plans to kill his ex-partner and son years earlier hung over Hannah in her final months, which were marked by ­repeated contact with the system that failed to protect her.

    Baxter’s history of impulsive and violent behaviour also includ­ed, on his own account, a road rage assault in which he “nearly beat someone to death’’, Hannah’s closest friend, Nikki Brooks, has revealed.

    Before Baxter married Ms Clarke, he was in a relationship with another woman and had a son, Isaiah. Baxter told Hannah that when the earlier relationship ended, he was going to kill the woman and his son.

  125. Nob

    BorisG
    #3337017, posted on February 27, 2020 at 9:17 pm
    But some Cats still think Putin’s dictatorship is better than say Sweden.

    Not me, and I’ve only spent one night in Sweden. Many in Russia, over last 20+ years.

    Things have improved under Putin but he and his mafias are incredible thieves.

    And, random quote from a Russian colleague there: If we/they really closed our borders we’d be fucked. We don’t make anything.

  126. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Thanks for the Burned Pig Reader, areff.

    I also burned a pig today; roast pork tonight and delicious it was too.

    Burning came before broiling of course. You need a pot to broil things in but chucking something on the fire is easily done. Roast Kanga or Lizard anyone? Stone Age Ireland though has examples of broiling in an oven made of hot sealed stones. Bruce Pascoe will certainly be looking for one of those. The early Polynesians managed something similar but they had some pots too.

    Atishoo. Oh hell, I am getting a cold. If you are going to get one, have it now, advises Hairy.

  127. vlad

    We don’t make anything.

    Sounds like Australia.

  128. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Love your travel tales, Nob. Trust all is going well with you still.

  129. vlad

    From memory the school reader prefaced that Lamb piece with a quote:

    “A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.”

  130. Armadillo

    But if you are 60+ at a dinner party, odds on at least 50% of the men will have been cursed.

    Definately. Probably wondering why the hell they got dragged away from the pub to listen to a bunch of sheliahs garbling on about total bullshit.

  131. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Baxter told Hannah that when the earlier relationship ended, he was going to kill the woman and his son.’

    This will of course, and according to the nature of stupid women the globe over be completely unexpected when it actually happens to them.

    I am NOT blaming Clarke personally. I AM blaming Baxter personally.

    But you see it all the time. Chicks see this sort of thing as a challenge. ‘I can tame him.’

    ‘I am different, and I will prove Mum and the rest of my family wrong.’

    But you can’t, you’re not, and you didn’t.

  132. JC

    Yes we do. Mining is our Silicon valley. Our agri industry is the best in the world. These aren’t attributes to sniff at. In my mind, this is a category error because mining and agri should belong in the same line item a manufacturing.

  133. vlad

    We had another school reader here in suburban Melbourne in the late sixties, early seventies, that included lots of stories about scientists – Tycho Brahe seeing a new star, the Curies isolating radium – the only phrase I can remember from the entire book was a title of one of the pieces, “Burst Pipes”. The nun explained to us that this was a book from England where that happened.

    Would love to read that book again. Had a mate at university who remembered it well, despite different schools.

  134. vr

    Zippy — As it turns out, I watched their three part series on bail-ins. I was a tad unsettled by it.

  135. Lazlo

    Ho, ho, Arma, just you wait and see..

  136. vlad

    Our agri industry is the best in the world.

    Yep. We could feed the entire fucking planet with food to spare.

  137. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    And yet she married him.

    Yes. Unbelievably stupid. He was obviously a raving nutcase even then.
    One of those who do give men a bad name.

    Maybe not beyond professional help at the time, but definitely not a keeper.

  138. Jupes:

    The main reason for the Brereton inquiry though, is the lack of leadership of the ADF and governent. The ADF is currently lead by a cabal of girly-men with no appetite for war but a huge appetite for social engineering. Their mission is to emasculate the armed forces and to that end they are unfortunately very competent.

    I’m curious. What’s the fatality rate for these Lawyers on Patrol?
    Are they prone to falling over cliffs or kicking IEDs in their bunks?

  139. NoFixedAddress

    jupes
    #3337071, posted on February 27, 2020 at 10:03 pm

    Incidentally I met a couple of Brereton’s investigators a couple of weeks ago.

    They were staying at the pub next door where I was having a morning coffee. I overheard them mentioning something which made me interrupt.

    The conversation was polite but willing. They tried to convince me that the soldiers had asked for it. As if. I told them their work was unethical and counter to the national interest. Plus they were taking too long. My parting advice was that the best result was to come up with no recommendations for prosecutions.

    ADF Fighting Forces 2050
    Dateline Bumfkistan

    Australian General Dick Deskjockey over the 5G Huwai console to his men’s complete integrated helmet consoles.

    “Remember my darling Tranas, Ladies and Amazons, we bring peace and comfort to the poor unenlightened folk in that village below.

    Do we have the goat brigade ready?”

    Tran1 interrupting,, “My General they are shooting at us”

    General Desk, “Nonsense. Its just bees buzzing”.

    despicable toxic males

  140. Knuckle Dragger

    I’m completely serious about this.

    It’s like working on a station and finding a taipan before dawn stretched out across a road. So you pick it up and put it inside your shirt, intending to keep it as a pet.

    ‘Stop that!’ everyone says. ‘It’s a fucking taipan!’

    ‘No no,’ you say. ‘This taipan’s dangerous but it’s okay with me.’ And everyone spends the next few hours telling you how awesome you are to have a taipan, and privately telling each other how fucked you’re going to be.

    At then at mornos the taipan, having warmed up and returned to type, bites you in face a dozen times and you die in the dirt, bleeding from the arse.

    And you friends all gather round and look down at your corpse, and say ‘Man, she loved having that taipan.’

  141. Lazlo

    Every person on the planet right now (~7.7 billion) could own a quarter acre block and still fit into the state of Texas. But you have to wonder where the lawn mowers would come from.

  142. JC

    You know, this is a truly incredible story.

    The second largest global food exporter is a small country, which is one of the most densely populated in the world. The Netherlands is No 2 after the US in the world rankings.
    Amazing, but I would also like to know what the rate of return is on invested capital and what are the subsidies if any.

    https://www.ideatovalue.com/curi/nickskillicorn/2018/12/how-the-netherlands-has-innovated-agriculture-to-become-the-worlds-2-exporter-of-food/

  143. Geriatric Mayfly

    Glen 20 under serious review.

    MUST SEE: Online Videos Show Lysol Products Are Effective in Killing Versions of Coronavirus (VIDEO) Gateway Pundit

  144. vlad

    Way past my bedtime. Goo’ nigh’.

  145. jupes

    What’s the fatality rate for these Lawyers on Patrol?

    They don’t go on patrol (but get the same gongs as the blokes who do).

  146. JC

    Shit.

    Japan’s Prime Minister has asked all elementary, junior high and high schools to close until the end of March as coronavirus spreads

  147. Armadillo

    Ho, ho, Arma, just you wait and see..

    You elderly people seem hellbent on self preservation. It’s almost as if you think the planet won’t keep spinning if you aren’t on it.

    The last time I saw a doctor (involuntary) was when he smacked me on the arse. That was in 1968.

    I’m hardly going to be going back and voluntarily ask him to finger me. You have to draw a line in the sand somewhere.

  148. mh

    Time for Morrison to step up.

    Ban foreigners.

  149. JC

    Jeez lord. If this is true the D’rat party should no longer be in existence.

    Recommended For You
    BREAKING:

    Three Chinese nationals were apprehended trying to cross our Southern border illegally

    Each had flu-like symptoms

    Border patrol quickly quarantined them and assessed any threat of Coronavirus

    Our weak border is a health risk

    Close the border—Build. The. Wall.

    Charlie Kirk.

  150. What’s the fatality rate for these Lawyers on Patrol?

    They don’t go on patrol (but get the same gongs as the blokes who do).

    As Winston said, the bullets that killed them would be unlikely to have “Made in Japan” written on them.
    (that saying should be updated – but y’all know what I meant)

  151. Mitch M.

    JC
    #3337094, posted on February 27, 2020 at 10:18 pm
    And yet she married him.

    Hannah Clarke had every reason to be scared of estranged­ husband, Rowan Baxter — he told her how he had planned to murder a former partner and young son from a previous relationship.

    Before Baxter married Ms Clarke, he was in a relationship with another woman and had a son, Isaiah. Baxter told Hannah that when the earlier relationship ended, he was going to kill the woman and his son.

    I am not surprised. How does that history square with the driven too far motif? The man was a nutjob and a drive across the intersection was too far for him. The woman was an idiot.

  152. Knuckle Dragger

    Modern medicinal theory can cure anything (the Hun):

    ‘Government guidelines are telling quarantined Chinese students to “walk quickly” past members of the public under loose rules that could potentially spread the deadly coronavirus.

    ‘Hundreds of Chinese Year 11 and 12 school students hosted by Aussie families are expected to arrive in Australia shortly to continue their studies but they will have to be in home isolation for 14 days after arriving from China.

    The students will be living in the same household as Australian families who are allowed out into the community to go to work and to school every day – even though they are cohabiting with someone who potentially has the coronavirus.

    ‘The slack quarantine rules recommend the Chinese student stays in their own room and to “walk quickly “if they have to cross commonly used spaces in the hosts home.’

    See? Nothing to worry about.

  153. Arky

    JC
    #3337105, posted on February 27, 2020 at 10:25 pm
    Yes we do. Mining is our Silicon valley. Our agri industry is the best in the world. These aren’t attributes to sniff at. In my mind, this is a category error because mining and agri should belong in the same line item a manufacturing.
    ..

    This is just the bloody “comparative advantage” garbage again.
    How bloody good will those mines or farms be if deprived of chemicals or machinery?
    Those bloody farms and mines were built up over decades using generations of manufactured goods.
    They are the product of the industrial society we have packed up and sent to China.
    China will eventually run them too.

  154. vr

    Casey Mulligan on the cost of Sanders’ plans

    Sinc — You should add his blog to the blog roll.

  155. Kev

    JC I have no idea of the history of hairdressing in the military during a war like in Korea.
    In Vietnam we just kept it short – not buzz cut short and no one had hair clippers. The ex VC/barber only cut hair when we were back in base camp. Otherwise he patrolled with us. There were no barbers on establishment so we used him or local Viets at Vung Tau or Baria.
    I’ll shut up now – don’t want to wake up Numbers. I’m sure he would disagree on principle.

  156. NoFixedAddress

    Lazlo
    #3337117, posted on February 27, 2020 at 10:35 pm

    Every person on the planet right now (~7.7 billion) could own a quarter acre block and still fit into the state of Texas. But you have to wonder where the lawn mowers would come from.

    funny as.

    thanks for that.

  157. Lazlo

    Not surprising JC. If you fly out of Schiphol over a land flight path you fly over miles and miles of greenhouses. These are all built on reclaimed land, uninhibited by ancient common law land claims from either gentry or commoners. It’s like colonialism without the hassle – nearby, no nasty diseases or restless natives. They couldn’t believe their luck, except greed got the better of them with the Tulip thingo. Now it is better managed.

  158. Snoopy

    What’s the fatality rate for these Lawyers on Patrol?

    Surely interviewing Afghans accusing Australians of war crimes must be dangerous work?

  159. MatrixTransform

    look down at your corpse, and say ‘Man, she loved having that taipan.

    works equally well if you swap the sexes

    and swap taipan for some other heartless killer

    not all deaths are corporeal

  160. Lazlo

    You aren’t into self preservation Arma?

  161. Nob

    I was going to mention Netherlands but I see JC got in there first.

    Very intensive and a lot of greenhouse farming.
    I do some work in drilling geothermal wells for greenhouse heating.
    Those are definitely subsidised through money coming down via EU and local or regional government. If they attach it to a turbine generator, if there’s a suitable power station, they can get feed-in tariffs guaranteed for twenty years.

    Farmers get together and form companies in conjunction with local authorities.

    I’ll learn more when I go on site after my employer drops its travel ban. Whenever that will be.

  162. Lazlo

    You are banned from going to the Netherlands Nob?

  163. JC

    Nob

    It would be worth getting a real looksee:

    1. If there are subsidies and how big

    2. What is the return on capital, if any.

    Look, don’t get me wrong, it’s great if it’s the real McCoy in the sense that they are making a decent return and there are next to no subsidies. However, being Euroweenies I have my doubts, which is why I asked.
    Very little in Europe makes a decent return on capital and because I’ve never read anything this sector is a stand out, I have real big doubts.

  164. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Those are definitely subsidised through money coming down via EU and local or regional government.

    I don’t have a reference, but apparently E.U. farmers also have access to taxpayer funds for replacement machinery, and I’ve met English, Irish and Scots farmers who can’t understand how Australian farmers manage without subsidies.

  165. areff

    Ban foreigners?

    Too late now. Incubatin’, incubatin’, incubatin’.

    Interesting read here about a tiny, isolated island in the Atlantic where 90%+ of residents got a w o g and about a third of them got it again after giving the impression of having been cured. Thoughts about current patient doubling up on a dose in Japan come to mind. Cats with white-coated brains will make more of it than I, but interesting even for the dim, I would think.

    The six possible explanations for re-infection:

    — Although originally dismissed [13], the first biological hypothesis (subsequently referred as the 2 Virus, or 2Vi, hypothesis) assumes that two separate viral agents, with different transmissibility, were introduced at the beginning of the epidemic.

    — The Mutation (Mut) hypothesis assumes that a single initiating virus mutated within an infected host during the first epidemic wave, leading to the emergence of a new antigenic variant [8].

    — The All-or-Nothing (AoN) hypothesis assumes that following recovery from infection, some hosts did not develop a long-term protective immunity and remained fully susceptible to reinfection by the same strain [9,11].

    — The Partially Protective Immunity (PPI) hypothesis assumes that following recovery from infection, all hosts developed a long-term immunity that is not fully protective but reduces the risk of reinfection by the same strain [12].

    — The In-Host (InH) hypothesis assumes that following infection some hosts were unable to completely eliminate the viral load and suffered from an intra-host recrudescence of infection [13].

    — The Window-of-reinfection (Win) hypothesis assumes that following recovery, long-term protective immunity can take some time before becoming effective [9], resulting in a time window of susceptibility to reinfection by the same strain.

  166. NoFixedAddress

    Lazlo
    #3337134, posted on February 27, 2020 at 10:49 pm

    Not surprising JC. If you fly out of Schiphol over a land flight path you fly over miles and miles of greenhouses. These are all built on reclaimed land, uninhibited by ancient common law land claims from either gentry or commoners. It’s like colonialism without the hassle – nearby, no nasty diseases or restless natives. They couldn’t believe their luck, except greed got the better of them with the Tulip thingo. Now it is better managed.

    Nah

    Best ones are the grotesque UN, World Bank, NGO’s in African countries.

    I would not be bothered talking to World Wildlife Fkers.

    Just filth.

  167. Lazlo

    NFA No problem. There was a similar spoof back in the 90s when the meme was about how many football pitches were being cleared from the Amazon every day. This prompted a concern about where we were going to find all the Referees and Touch Judges (as they were then known, now Assistant Referees).

  168. areff

    Dr Phranger’s prescription: stock your larder with canned goods, don’t answer the door, and make sure your elderly rellies don’t either — especially your elderly rellies.

    Oh, and go long on undertaker stocks and casket makers.

  169. Armadillo

    You aren’t into self preservation Arma?

    Not particularly. Everything in life happens for a reason.

    Spend your time here wisely, until fate intervenes. If I got diagnosed with cancer (which I won’t), I certainly wouldn’t go down the chemotherapy route. I’m not that important that 6 months or a couple of years would make any difference to any of my loved ones lives (other than to be a total and utter burden on them).

    Play the hand you are dealt.

  170. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Beautiful reflections on the life and death of your old girls, Helen.

  171. Has anyone got around to asking Numbers what it feels like to use the wanking device (as featured in “Odd Angry Shot”)

  172. JC

    Oh, and go long on undertaker stocks and casket makers.

    I knew a dude in NY who had an undertaking business, which he expanded nationally. It went broke. No kidding.

  173. NoFixedAddress

    Snoopy
    #3337135, posted on February 27, 2020 at 10:51 pm

    What’s the fatality rate for these Lawyers on Patrol?

    Surely interviewing Afghans accusing Australians of war crimes must be dangerous work?

    Great comment

  174. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Has anyone got around to asking Numbers what it feels like to use the wanking device (as featured in “Odd Angry Shot”)

    Curse you, Salvatore, that’s a double Scotch and a new keyboard you owe me..

  175. Mark A #3337147, posted on February 27, 2020 at 11:13 pm
    Some lame cracking wise and smutty old postcards.

    A particularly good set.
    Thank you.

  176. DrBeauGan

    Mark A
    #3337147, posted on February 27, 2020 at 11:13 pm

    Some lame cracking wise and smutty old postcards.

    Thanks, Mark A for those. Some were so bad I sent them to Spiky. She considers that some of yours are better than the WiP ones I send her.

  177. Lazlo

    Chemo is not the only treatment. Don’t be so fatalistic. You sure you won’t be diagnosed? Check your family history.

  178. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The six possible explanations for re-infection:
    — Although originally dismissed [13], the first biological hypothesis (subsequently referred as the 2 Virus, or 2Vi, hypothesis) assumes that two separate viral agents, with different transmissibility, were introduced at the beginning of the epidemic.
    — The Mutation (Mut) hypothesis assumes that a single initiating virus mutated within an infected host during the first epidemic wave, leading to the emergence of a new antigenic variant [8].
    — The All-or-Nothing (AoN) hypothesis assumes that following recovery from infection, some hosts did not develop a long-term protective immunity and remained fully susceptible to reinfection by the same strain [9,11].
    — The Partially Protective Immunity (PPI) hypothesis assumes that following recovery from infection, all hosts developed a long-term immunity that is not fully protective but reduces the risk of reinfection by the same strain [12].
    — The In-Host (InH) hypothesis assumes that following infection some hosts were unable to completely eliminate the viral load and suffered from an intra-host recrudescence of infection [13].
    — The Window-of-reinfection (Win) hypothesis assumes that following recovery, long-term protective immunity can take some time before becoming effective [9], resulting in a time window of susceptibility to reinfection by the same strain.

    And there you have it, areff. Why I used to like doing epidemiology.

    Logical possibilities. Especially with communicable diseases.
    Uncertainty principle always at work too. Complex statistical work can help. 🙂

    Thanks too OldOzzie for the coverage above of Travel in the Time of Corona.
    We are still going, and I am still working on my immunity.

    Time for a long sleep to get that titre right up again. G’night all.

  179. JC

    Okay, Dutch “farming” appears to be subsidy whoring.

    The ‘entrepreneurial agriculture’ (ondernemerslandbouw) which is embracing high-tech, industrial agriculture, is not only financed by loans from the bank: also with huge amounts of subsidies. Eighty percent of the EU subsidies go to only 20% of the wealthiest farmers,

  180. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Where’s dan8?’

    If you mean the petulant little girl, she promptly buggered off when asked to explain why shooting POWs whilst still on a battlefield was murder, as she claimed.

    Dunno why. Her track record on these things is immaculate, specially ‘cos she’s a LawyerDoctor.

  181. JC

    Lazlo
    #3337160, posted on February 27, 2020 at 11:25 pm

    It’s a dying trade JC.

    Lol.

  182. Caveman

    “walk quickly “if they have to cross commonly used spaces in the hosts home.’

    No different to the 3 second rule if food hits the ground, pick it up before 3 secs and it s ok.

    I think this will work out.

  183. Knuckle Dragger

    Right now she’d be polishing up her Coral Belt.

    Available for $8.99 from something called mmadirect.com.au.

  184. Top Ender

    RIP Clive Cussler:

    Clive Eric Cussler (July 15, 1931 – February 24, 2020) was an American adventure novelist and underwater explorer. His thriller novels, many featuring the character Dirk Pitt, have reached The New York Times fiction best-seller list more than 20 times. Cussler was the founder and chairman of the National Underwater and Marine Agency (NUMA), which has discovered more than 60 shipwreck sites and numerous other notable underwater wrecks. He was the sole author or lead author of more than 80 books.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clive_Cussler

  185. Steve trickler

    Some good stuff out of Canberra. Albeit a few years old.



  186. Bar Beach Swimmer

    Is it okay if the practitioner frowns throughout?

    That reminds me of the gastroenterologist who, in a newspaper column iirc, related his patients’ comments to him during their colonoscopy – the awake ones, of course. The one I remember was the bloke who said ‘Doc, can you please inform my wife that my head’s not up there’!

  187. Steve Trickler: Is that an International Scout?
    If so, it’s in its normal position – up on a hoist.
    Apparently there’s someone somewhere who has seen an International Scout moving under it’s own power, in the manner of an actual automobile – however that report has never been verified.

  188. NoFixedAddress

    Top Ender
    #3337168, posted on February 27, 2020 at 11:39 pm

    RIP Clive Cussler

    Amen

  189. Clive Cussler.
    “Raise the Titanic” remains his best novel IMHO.
    Used to read lots of his stuff, but after a while it sorta became like reading Bison westerns.
    I’ve moved to J.E. MacDonnell for my nautical fix.

  190. Caveman

    Can see another 2% shave off the DOW tonight. Mate was saying that Bakers delight shop in Glen Waverly in Vic, down about 70% in sales compared to same time last year. Alot of the Chinas staying well away, how can we make them visit a Chinese restaurant.

  191. Old School Conservative

    Bloody Michael Smith – reminds us that that terrorist James Gargasoulas ran over three-month-old Zachary Bryant and killed him.

    Some wise words:
    The widow of a man killed in the Bourke Street rampage says Victorians might be “better off protecting ourselves” than relying on “egoistic” police officers more concerned with safeguarding their careers than ensuring public safety. (The Age)

  192. Indeed.
    R.i.P. Clive Cussler.
    Outstanding success in his chosen field.
    Brought enjoyment to millions.
    One of the leading couple of dozen novelists.

    He broke a barrier very few novelists ever achieve;
    His name, in simple block print, on a cover was a better sales tool than the title or the cover art.
    & that’s quite something!

  193. Armadillo

    I knew a dude in NY who had an undertaking business, which he expanded nationally. It went broke.

    Here is a “freebie” idea for Cats with some get up and go. A “Virtual Funeral”.

    There are plenty of funerals people can’t attend for a myriad of reasons (time, distance, other commitments and so on). Have the undertaker film it, and make the video available on your/their website.

    It’s “workable” if done tactfully, and it would be quite profitable if you have the nous.

    The fact it’s not an “add on” to funeral plans tells me that if anyone has tried it so far, they haven’t done it properly. Lots of scope there. It’s a massive industry.

  194. JC

    Alot of the Chinas staying well away, how can we make them visit a Chinese restaurant.

    Isn’t that wacist?

  195. Top Ender

    Interesting bloke, Cussler, according to the Wiki bio.

  196. Top Ender

    Books reminiscent of Alistair MacLean‘s stuff – was a fixation for me as a young bloke.

  197. NoFixedAddress

    Top Ender
    #3337181, posted on February 27, 2020 at 11:56 pm

    Books reminiscent of Alistair MacLean‘s stuff – was a fixation for me as a young bloke.

    same

  198. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Books reminiscent of Alistair MacLean‘s stuff – was a fixation for me as a young bloke.

    Read almost everything Alistair MacLean wrote – Besides fiction, he wrote a very good biography of James Cook.

  199. Top Ender #3337180, posted on February 27, 2020 at 11:54 pm
    Interesting bloke, Cussler, according to the Wiki bio.

    So he was. Thank you for the link & reminder TE.

  200. Mitch M.

    areff
    #3337143, posted on February 27, 2020 at 11:09 pm
    Ban foreigners?

    Too late now. Incubatin’, incubatin’, incubatin’. …

    There is a strange experimental result in animal and human studies: starve them and the immune system can regenerate. One of the surprising things I recently learned about the hematopoietic stem cells(those which generate immune and red blood cells) is that whereas other stem cell populations decline with age those stem cells keep on keeping on. So perhaps there is no intrinsic reason for age related immunosuppression. Here’s the catch: you have to do this prior to infection and during the fasting there is an increased risk of infection because T cell numbers decline.

    FASTING FOR 72 HOURS CAN RESET YOUR ENTIRE IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Research reveals not all fasting diets are created equal

  201. areff

    Lizzie, if only this had remained in the realm of theoretical epidemiology.

    I don’t see anyway of us getting out from under this. There’s no practical way to seal the ports and, if there were, it would be too late anyway.

    Victoria will be particularly hard hit. With everyone staying home, the roads will be empty and the state’s fine-led economy will crash. The Hunchback must be beside himself with worry.

  202. JC

    Here’s the catch: you have to do this prior to infection and during the fasting there is an increased risk of infection because T cell numbers decline.

    It’s basically unworkable then, because you won’t be able to starve yourself prior to being infected unless you have a time machine or deliberately cause an infection to yourself.
    It doesn’t even sound plausible because I can’t imagine it’s ever been tested.

  203. Armadillo

    You sure you won’t be diagnosed?

    Absolutely. I smoke 50 cigarettes a day. It’s hard enough walking into a shopping centre, let alone being allowed within 10 metres of a doctors surgery or hospital.

    The track and the bowling green are my last refuge. No one there is in a fit state to judge anyone else, let alone diagnose them.

  204. JC

    Absolutely. I smoke 50 cigarettes a day.

    I don’t believe you,Arma. No one does anymore.

  205. areff

    No chance of me fasting, Mitch. I have a cupboard full of pies in tins. When they’re gone, I have a very fat cat (two good meals at least, plus fur collar and cuffs to trade for a winsome fellow survivor, perhaps two, with whom to bestride the post-apocalyptic landscape).

    Bring on the triffids!

  206. Mitch M.

    JC
    #3337187, posted on February 28, 2020 at 12:09 am
    Here’s the catch: you have to do this prior to infection and during the fasting there is an increased risk of infection because T cell numbers decline.

    It’s basically unworkable then, because you won’t be able to starve yourself prior to being infected unless you have a time machine or deliberately cause an infection to yourself.
    It doesn’t even sound plausible because I can’t imagine it’s ever been tested.

    Read the bloody article JC, it’s already been trialed on chemo patients. The effects will be long lasting, probably years. Fasting also gives tumours a hard time. That’s been known for 20 years.

  207. JC

    How do you starve prior to being infected unless you’re living in Mali and starvation is a natural state of affairs?

  208. NoFixedAddress

    Dateline 1968 Club of Rome
    – get those white fkrs out of Australia so the original folk can shine

    Dateline 2020 Australian Universities
    – whites are baztads

    Dateline 2030 Aboriginal Camps
    – fk the kntsare leaving

    Dateline 2040 Australian Continent

    Dateline 2050

  209. NoFixedAddress

    What’s Your Price

    I’ll take 100 million to forgo being an Australian.

    How much will it cost to buy you?

  210. Armadillo

    I don’t believe you,Arma. No one does anymore.

    OK. I lied. It’s actually more than that.

    I “roll my own”, but I roll them thin out of necessity. Forever dodging “non-smoking zones”. I religiously buy a 25 gram packet of tobacco every morning, which equates to a $350 per week habit.

    A standard “tailor made” cigarette is supposed to be 1 gram. So in “real terms”, it’s probably a pack a day. Difference is that a “roll your own” isn’t filled with chemicals to make them burn quicker. They won’t “burn away” in an ashtray.

    Value for money.

  211. NoFixedAddress

    NoFixedAddress
    #3337195, posted on February 28, 2020 at 12:31 am

    What’s Your Price

    I’ll take 100 million to forgo being an Australian.

    How much will it cost to buy you?

    That will be USD$100 million,

    Thanks

  212. JC

    It’s actually more than that.

    Dude, that’s seriously impressive. I’m humbled.

    How do you find walking up stairs?

  213. slackster

    Melbourne will record a February 1 deg c below maximum average for Feb for 2020

  214. NoFixedAddress

    slackster
    #3337200, posted on February 28, 2020 at 12:44 am

    Melbourne will record a February 1 deg c below maximum average for Feb for 2020

    hottest day evah

    well done BOM

  215. Armadillo

    How do you find walking up stairs?

    No worries. Ladders, stairs, bookies stands, climbing on the roof. No issues really.

    I can still run even. Not that I would jog around the block or anything. That’s just stupid. It’s why we have cars.

  216. Porter

    Poor bastard. He probably finally realised that whatever he tried he could never really be a woman and then even if he had regrets he’d gone too far to go back to being a man.
    The story is repeated endlessly. Transitioning exponentially increases the risk of suicide https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-8050163/Gentefied-writer-trans-Latinx-advocate-Camila-Maria-Concepcion-dies-suicide-28.html

  217. Armadillo

    Handy Tip: Avoid anyone who says they enjoy bushwalking or cycling.

    You are only asking for trouble.

  218. DrBeauGan

    Poor bastard. He probably finally realised that whatever he tried he could never really be a woman and then even if he had regrets he’d gone too far to go back to being a man.
    The story is repeated endlessly. Transitioning exponentially increases the risk of suicide

    And it’s illegal to say so publicly in case we hurt their feelings.

  219. NoFixedAddress

    Armadillo
    #3337205, posted on February 28, 2020 at 12:53 am

    Handy Tip: Avoid anyone who says they enjoy bushwalking or cycling.

    You are only asking for trouble.

    Depends if you meet them in a National Park

  220. Armadillo

    It’s why we have cars.

    Well, most of us do (Arky excluded).

  221. Steve trickler

    I tell ya.

    If you raise your voice in anger around this girl, give her grief, the chimps would be on the attack. The ultimate bodyguards. Along with an elephant, a tiger…..the list goes on and on.

    Piss off, PETA.



  222. Armadillo

    Depends if you meet them in a National Park

    Arky was a prime suspect in the Backpacker murders until the plod had a look at the Model A.

  223. JC

    The theory the virus escaped from a lab gets curiousor and curiousor.

    And then there is this little-known fact: Some Chinese researchers are in the habit of selling their laboratory animals to street vendors after they have finished experimenting on them.

    You heard me right.

    Instead of properly disposing of infected animals by cremation, as the law requires, they sell them on the side to make a little extra cash. Or, in some cases, a lot of extra cash. One Beijing researcher, now in jail, made a million dollars selling his monkeys and rats on the live animal market, where they eventually wound up in someone’s stomach.

    and

    Also fueling suspicions about SARS-CoV-2’s origins is the series of increasingly lame excuses offered by the Chinese authorities as people began to sicken and die.

    They first blamed a seafood market not far from the Institute of Virology, even though the first documented cases of Covid-19 (the illness caused by SARS-CoV-2) involved people who had never set foot there. Then they pointed to snakes, bats and even a cute little scaly anteater called a pangolin as the source of the virus.

    I don’t buy any of this. It turns out that snakes don’t carry coronaviruses and that bats aren’t sold at a seafood market. Neither, for that matter, are pangolins, an endangered species valued for their scales as much as for their meat.

    The evidence points to SARS-CoV-2 research being carried out at the Wuhan Institute of Virology. The virus may have been carried out of the lab by an infected worker or crossed over into humans when they unknowingly dined on a lab animal. Whatever the vector, Beijing authorities are now clearly scrambling to correct the serious problems with the way their labs handle deadly pathogens.

  224. NoFixedAddress

    Dateline 2030 Australia.

    All mining has shut down

    BHP announces from England that they support Australia.

    Dateline 2035 Australia

    African Black slavery increases 10 fold as BHP-Billiton expands mining.

    Most of South Americans are now starving to death as Communism takes over and wipes out indigenous populations.

    Dateline 2040 Australia

    Indianian and Brazilian forests completely cleared to provide environmental burning wood for EU electricity.

    NGO’s in Africa kill off the people so animals can live.

    UN secretary general says Australia is given back to the black

    Dateline 2050
    ,
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .

  225. Armadillo

    The theory the virus escaped from a lab gets curiousor and curiousor.

    It was a military biochemical warfare lab, JC.

    and even a cute little scaly anteater called a pangolin as the source of the virus.

    Arky has been peddling this line. He’s obviously a stooge for the Chinese. His wife is Asian.

    Connect the dots.

  226. NoFixedAddress

    Armadillo
    #3337211, posted on February 28, 2020 at 1:03 am

    Depends if you meet them in a National Park

    Arky was a prime suspect in the Backpacker murders until the plod had a look at the Model A.

    Dateline 2020
    When the fking filth like the backpack prick who finally died or garglearse or how many other evil fks are not shot out of hand like the fk that killed the abc gal!

    Dateline Australa 2025
    Politicians, Police, judges, law are now controlled by commoners.

    if you are an evil knt that does evil sht then you do not go to jail. You are fed to sharks. And your family is inspected up the wahzoo.

  227. NoFixedAddress

    Armadillo
    #3337211, posted on February 28, 2020 at 1:03 am

    Depends if you meet them in a National Park

    Arky was a prime suspect in the Backpacker murders until the plod had a look at the Model A.

    i like your comments most times.

    I bet I can beat you at bowls.

    And betting.

  228. NoFixedAddress

    Where is Dan8?

    I miss your erudite and definitive comments that absolutely tear and shame commenters on here.

    But please tell me,

    are you a Bernie Bros?

  229. NoFixedAddress

    I’ve met some blokes.. not these.. from this place.
    good folk

  230. NoFixedAddress

    but they don’t understand

    adf is fucked communists

    australian government communist knts think they cntrl

    cnt wait for 2050

  231. NoFixedAddress

    kan u blv wat its like to walk thru sneaky peaky places?

    lol

    jc is the best

  232. Nob

    Lazlo
    #3337140, posted on February 27, 2020 at 11:00 pm
    You are banned from going to the Netherlands Nob?

    Employer had brain fart and said no nonessential travel until this thing is under control. I said, OK, whatever and cancelled next week’s trip. I’ll wait a few weeks then go anyway.

    What JC and others said is true: all EU farmers are subsidised, often to “not grow” stuff. Southern Italy is incredible like that.

    The geothermal subsidy is something on top of that.

  233. Porter

    I’m just looking at how this virus is spreading and it is seems that illegal immigrants have brought it to Europe. The familiar track across northern Greece Macedonia into Northern Italy. That northern Italy seems to be a quite hotspot made worse by aging population and then the trek northwards Into all the welfare junkie states like Germany and England. The Brits got out just in time. If Morrison was clever then if this drags on he can use it to highlight the importance of border control.

  234. Nob

    Lazlo
    #3337140, posted on February 27, 2020 at 11:00 pm
    You are banned from going to the Netherlands Nob?

    Employer had brain fart and said no nonessential travel until this thing is under control.

    I said, OK, whatever and cancelled next week’s trip. I’ll wait a few weeks then go anyway.

    What JC and others said is true: all EU farmers are subsidised, often to “not grow” stuff. Southern Italy is incredible like that.

    The geothermal subsidy is something on top of that.

  235. NoFixedAddress

    if you think that HU #2 as above does not represent their reality then go and die.

  236. NoFixedAddress

    Grow up you fk heads

    Tell me who in Australia is NOT socialist, communist that controls.

Comments are closed.