Wednesday Forum: February 26, 2020

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1,771 Responses to Wednesday Forum: February 26, 2020

  1. Nob

    Porter
    #3337228, posted on February 28, 2020 at 2:31 am
    I’m just looking at how this virus is spreading and it is seems that illegal immigrants have brought it to Europe.

    That doesn’t make any sense.

  2. NoFixedAddress

    It is 2020

    The evil communist knts say that we will have ZERO something by 2050.

    The fk head so called skientists cannot even be named because they are fkn mad.

    Hey Malcolm Turnbull, debate with me on the ABC.

    Malcolm Turnbull is a Fabian Marxist xunt and dumb as dish water.

  3. NoFixedAddress

    Porter

    The poor old folk in Qam are gunna die because the despicable irranians cannot feed there own people because they are too busy protecting a shrine that according to their scm bag they should not do.

    lol

  4. NoFixedAddress

    sowdi arabia will not allow anyone near the place that they are not allowed to worship yet get zillions to circle a black rock where nothing happened.

  5. NoFixedAddress

    What a lot of Bull is Turnbull.

    C’mon you scummy communist.

    Let’s you and me debate.

    You are a filth that never ever talked to the Australian people because you are a communist.

  6. NoFixedAddress

    Turnbull

    Your son is as much a piece of filth as you are
    Ripping off Australian workers.

  7. NoFixedAddress

    Turnbull

    I merely said I would sell out Australia for USD$100 million.

    How much did you get for selling out Australia, you commo filthy prick?

  8. NoFixedAddress

    Communist Malcolm Turnbull gossiped about his ‘private’ phone call with the President of USA.

    Laughs at Trump at Mid Winter Ball.

    Hey Turnball you are a criminal.

  9. NoFixedAddress

    Talk about Laugh Out Loud

    If you live in a State or Territory in Australia that has legislated and put on the books some crap called “Voluntary Euthanasia” then may I suggest you rip your assets and person from there.

    I would even go as far to say that you make sure you have NOT A THING in your name in that killing jurisdiction.

    Dan8 the Victorian Man will look after you.

    And I laughed and laughed and laughed.

  10. Tom

    Bob Moran (London Daily Telegraph) — the British media loathes BoJo’s chief adviser Dominic Cummings as much as BoJo.

  11. NoFixedAddress

    funny how there is deep and meaningful discussion wherabouts a doctor may or may not have studied and the competence that person may or may not have to treat our health.

    yet when it comes to our very life existence we are supposed to accept the bullshit of Malcolm Turnbull the communist.

    the prick destroyed the Riverina Irrigation Area and we allow the xunt to speak in this country.

    I will debate you anywhere you filth.

  12. Trivia:
    Up to minute report on police response times:

    Triple-Zero call takes 6 minutes – but only if you can convince the telephonist taking the call to ‘extract digit’
    Arrival of actual Police officers is a further 6 minutes – not too bad considering this included;
    Waking ’em up, getting ’em out of bed, dressing – with no item on backward or inside-out, donning kit & toolbelt, getting the jeep out & proceeding to the ‘job site’.

    Hate to think how long the triple-zero lady would have kept badgering me to justify my existence had not she been spurred into some shortcuts by hearing certain background sounds coming over the phone.
    Six minutes is the ‘rush’ call, (when seconds count, etc.)

  13. DrBeauGan

    Six minutes is the ‘rush’ call, (when seconds count, etc.)

    I guess she wants to know enough information to give the cops a clear idea of what to expect, Sal. But yes, it’s all too slow and the liturgy has obviously been devised by a bureaucrat. I’ve only called triple zero once on my mobile and she obviously knew from the call my id and where I was, she was reasonably brisk given it was three o’clock in the morning, but it was still too slow. If I was under threat I’d have been dead before she’d actually done anything.

  14. NoFixedAddress

    TE,
    Sir

    Had to go and watch movie Enders Game.
    Only movie close.
    Old writing blokes karking it all over the place.

  15. Mater

    But you see it all the time. Chicks see this sort of thing as a challenge. ‘I can tame him.’
    ‘I am different, and I will prove Mum and the rest of my family wrong.’
    But you can’t, you’re not, and you didn’t.

    Reminds me of when my mates’ wife came bleating and crying to me that she’d caught him having an affair.
    ”Hang on a minute”, says I. ”Weren’t you the ‘other women’ during his first marriage? What made you think he’d change his ways? Love?”. Sheepish look ensues.

    “You can’t, you didn’t, you won’t…but I’ll give you a point for effort!”.

  16. OldOzzie

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #3337159, posted on February 27, 2020 at 11:24 pm

    Thanks too OldOzzie for the coverage above of Travel in the Time of Corona.
    We are still going, and I am still working on my immunity.

    Lizzie,

    the most important thing I think from that article for you and Hairy, is have the Flu Shots now.

  17. OldOzzie

    Thanks Tom,

    Johannes Leak today – nails Hypocrite Harry (Meghan’s Bitch Slave) perfectly!

  18. Bruce of Newcastle

    Johannes Leak

    This related story is fun:

    Meghan Markle and Harry cut off as Canada refuses to continue funding couple (27 Feb)

    Public Safety Canada threw a spanner into the works as it announced it will no longer meet the security costs for the couple who are just weeks away from their dash for freedom. … They said the Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been protected by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police since arriving in the country in November – but this will end “in the coming weeks”.

    The confirmation comes after weeks of speculation over who would pay for the couple’s massive security costs after they have broken ties with the Royal Family.

    The two loony lefty royals are too loony for loony lefty Trudy to spend loonies on.

  19. Porter

    POPE FRANCIS SICK A DAY AFTER SUPPORTING CORONAVIRUS SUFFERERS

  20. Porter

    Nob it seems to have travelled east to west in Europe.

  21. OldOzzie

    Italy needs support to cope with coronavirus

    Brussels should relax fiscal rules to help Rome deal with the outbreak

    THE FT EDITORIAL BOARD

    There is no good moment for an outbreak of a deadly virus to reach your country. For Italy, however, the new strain of coronavirus has arrived at a particularly difficult time. The eurozone’s third-largest economy was already contracting at the end of 2019. Necessary attempts to protect public health by quarantining the sick and closing businesses now risk pushing the country into its fourth recession since the aftermath of the 2008 crisis.

    The outbreak in the wealthy regions of Veneto and Lombardy in northern Italy has become the largest in the western world. In response, the government has taken the sensible step of quarantining 11 towns completely. In Milan, the country’s financial and business capital, schools, offices and tourist attractions have been closed down. The southern region of Basilicata has closed its borders to those from many northern regions.

    Shutdowns and travel restrictions strike at the supply chains that are at the core of the modern economy. Unfortunately for Italy, the outbreak is centred on the high-productivity, northern areas that are embedded into European supply chains, providing vital components to German factories. Exports have been the one source of growth in Italy since 2008 — not only engineering but also luxury food and fashion, which are already suffering from declining Chinese demand. Tourism will be hit, too.

    Attempts to contain the virus may be the immediate problem, but Italy’s economic weakness is longstanding.

  22. Porter

    No fixed address – are you in medication? Either take it as directed or see your doctor to have it revised.

  23. MatrixTransform

    I hope JC had a bet each way on Tesla

    …and … it’s gone

  24. Porter

    As the Duke and Duchess are currently recognised as Internationally Protected Persons, Canada has an obligation to provide security assistance on an as-needed basis.

    “At the request of the Metropolitan Police, the RCMP has been providing assistance to the Met since the arrival of the Duke and Duchess to Canada intermittently since November 2019.

    “The assistance will cease in the coming weeks, in keeping with their change in status.”

    Haha mega slapdown after that petulant statement by Haz and Megs and their international profile. Never thought the Canadians had it in them. Trudeau’s popularity must be tanked.

  25. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Public Safety Canada threw a spanner into the works as it announced it will no longer meet the security costs for the couple’

    Excellent. Don’t know why they would. They’re not special any more, just bog standard B listers.

  26. Mater

    Public Safety Canada threw a spanner into the works as it announced it will no longer meet the security costs for the couple who are just weeks away from their dash for freedom.

    Welcome to the real world, kids.

    Where 99% of people rely on Triple Zero for protection. Where the police arrive long after you’re raped or dead, or if you’re lucky enough to have been able to fend them off, you’re handcuffed and led away for assault (or worse).

    If you two want to agitate for social change and ‘equality’, it’s thoroughly appropriate that you experience it first hand. Don’t worry though, you’ve still got more money than most people in this world. Plenty of people will be trod into the quagmire before your feet get dirty.

  27. OldOzzie

    Media Ethics and the Trump-Russia Leak Wars

    Contrary to its first story, the Times was reporting that intelligence officials “now maintain that the House members either misheard or misinterpreted a key part of the briefing, and that the Office of the Director of National Intelligence did not mean to say that it believes the Russians are currently intervening in the election explicitly to help President Trump.”

    It doesn’t help that the Democratic chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Adam Schiff, has been caught, among other things, telling bald-faced lies on national television, deliberately mischaracterizing evidence in Trump’s impeachment trial, and leaking in an embarrassingly erroneous fashion that Donald Trump Jr. was working with Russians to hack Democratic Party emails.

    Byron York has subsequently reported that it was Schiff who organized the intel briefing in the first place, and as soon as it was over “Republicans agreed that the news would leak soon.”

    Of course, this is all just informed speculation about how the Times got burned, because, again, the sources are all anonymous.

  28. Knuckle Dragger

    More homoeroticism from Rowe today.

    Ah, but you don’t understand, the usual spacks will no doubt say shortly. The Emperor, he has no clothes. Also, his cronies also have no clothes in a like fashion.

    The problem is the Emperor, in terms of goals kicked during his first FOUR YEARS not only has clothes, but is rocking the double-denim with desert boots. Which only a select few on the plant can, or could, do *ahem*.

    Which just leaves homoeroticism.

  29. Cardimona

    Cats, this letter was intended only to explain Rafe’s renewables “choke point” concept to journos in the simplest possible terms, but two papers have printed it in today’s issues – Townsville and Gold Coast.
    (The Gold Coast paper left off the last line…)

    Renewables run risk of driving up our bills

    IN perfect wind our windmills produce about 3100 megawatts of electricity.

    In perfect sunshine our commercial solar produces about 2300MW of electricity.

    In perfect sunshine our domestic-solar produces about 4800MW of electricity.

    When we all want electricity on a hot day our total demand can be 38,000MW.

    When we all want electricity on a hot night our total demand can be 17,800MW. But calm nights are when renewables hit their choke point.

    On the night of January 2, 2020, there was zero solar and just 315MW of wind.

    By “nameplate capacity” our renewables can already produce 100 per cent of our electricity.

    In reality they produce 27 per cent of our electricity and less than 1.8 per cent of it when they choke.

    Our electricity prices fell for 40 years but then from 2005 we forced renewables into the grid.

    Those renewables have doubled our electricity bills.

    If we get rid of fossil fuels, where does electricity come from when renewables choke?

    “Batteries” is not an answer until affordable ones are invented.

    If we need 56 times more windmills for calm nights, how much will our power bills go up?

  30. OldOzzie

    Charismatic St Jacinda’s climate crusade charade

    The Australian Editorial

    Scott Morrison is hosting Jacinda Ardern in Sydney on Friday for the annual Australia-New Zealand Leaders’ Meeting. It’s usually a low-key gathering to discuss regional security, international trade and co-operation in the Pacific. How best to co-ordinate action on the coronavirus outbreak is top of the bilateral agenda. The leaders appear to have a solid working relationship, as is the way for trans-Tasman affairs. The Black Summer bushfires and the deadly Whakaari/White Island eruption in New Zealand showed how well Mr Morrison and Ms Ardern collaborate. In the wake of the Christchurch terrorist attack being live-streamed and replicated on Facebook, Mr Morrison led an effort at the G20 leaders’ summit to press online platforms to do more to protect users.

    A year after Christchurch, New Zealand’s Prime Minister is enjoying global attention, with Time asking on its latest cover how will the millennial political rock star use the moment. “Know us by our deeds,” she told the news magazine. Yet actions at home have yet to match the promises she has made on the world stage. This gap is most pronounced on climate policy. Last August Ms Ardern said Australia had “to ­answer to the Pacific” for its position on ­climate change. She did not mention, conveniently, New Zealand is forecast to fail to meet its Paris target to ­reduce emissions by 30 per cent of 2005 levels by 2030. By contrast Australia is on track to meet its 26 per cent to 28 per cent reduction target, with or without Kyoto carry-over credits. New Zealand failed to meet first-round Kyoto targets and did not sign up to Kyoto for 2020.

    That hasn’t stopped Kiwis from talking a big game on CO2 emissions or castigating nations they see as laggards. At last year’s Pacific Islands Forum in Tuvalu, Ms Ardern asked Mr Morrison to back a UN push for a carbon-­neutral economy by 2050, declaring every ­nation had to “do its bit” to fight global warming. Yet New Zealand has excluded agriculture and methane from its carbon-neutral pledge. That is cute, if not convenient, given agricultural products and meat are New Zealand’s major exports, accounting for 40 per cent of sales. Agriculture makes up half of its CO2 emissions. On Thursday senator Matt Canavan argued online that New Zealand’s “brave” target, welcomed by environmental activist groups, was “literally an example of doing things by half”. Even with some heroic assumptions (a methane vaccine for sheep), official modelling shows net zero emissions by 2050 would smash New Zealand’s agriculture and shrink its economy by 10 to 20 per cent.

    Still, it’s the vibe and sound bite that count for some. St Jacinda is the embodiment of activism, globalism and wellness. Among the Green left there’s a bit of PM envy going on — if only Ms Ardern could rule Australia, the world! First, however, she’ll need to turn her charms to her home country, where she is seeking a second term in September. Kiwis gripe that Ms Ardern’s Labour has not delivered on major promises. It pledged to build 100,000 high-quality, low-income houses over a decade via the KiwiBuild program; so far the tally is 315 houses. Ending child poverty may be as elusive for Ms Ardern as it was for Bob Hawke four decades ago. The measure of national success would be broadened beyond GDP, to take into account environmental, social and economic sustainability, a matrix that is attracting interest from Labor here.

    But hard numbers matter for voters and the New Zealand economy is going sideways. GDP is growing at a touch above 2 per cent. The small trading nation, dependent on China, will be rocked by a drying up of tourists due to the COVID-19 outbreak and a slide in global demand for its exports. Ms Ardern is tethered to periodic shocks from her “coalition of losers” partners. New Zealand First leader Winston Peters, a deputy prime minister from the Barnaby Joyce school of parochial populism and deportment, will tug Labour one way. The Greens, fixated on cannabis legalisation and carbon neutrality, whatever the cost, will push the other way. No doubt Mr Morrison will provide a warm welcome, perhaps giving his Kiwi colleague a private run-through on the imminent technology road map he is betting his emissions credibility on. One thing you can be sure about, Australia won’t be goading its Tasman cousins about the hypocrisy of their climate postures or trying to steal the Kiwi leader’s global limelight.

  31. OldOzzie

    Here is the sniper rifle that the US Army, Marines, and the special operators all want to get their hands on

    The US military’s newest sniper rifle of choice appears to be the Barrett Multi-Role Adaptive Design (MRAD) bolt-action rifle, a weapon in which the Army, Marines, and special operators have all expressed interest, Task & Purpose first reported, citing budget documents.

    The multi-calibre sniper rifle “gives more flexibility to the sniper as to what configuration to put it in and what targets they are going after” because the weapon can be chambered in three different calibers, a US Army lethality subject matter expert told Insider.

  32. OldOzzie

    Will unmanned ground vehicles replace tanks?

    The march of autonomy continues in the defence industry, with unmanned ground vehicles in development for armed forces around the globe. Harry Lye asks whether this could spell the end of the era of the manned tank.

    Tanks have dominated battlefields for the past hundred years since being introduced in the First World War to devastating effect. Now, with autonomous vehicles seeing a flurry of development in the military arena, the tank as we know it may be on its way to become a thing of the past.

    The merits of these new unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) are their size and affordability with the added benefit of survivability, a cocktail that militaries across the world are keen to get hold of as they face threats from increasingly unconventional foes. From Russia to Estonia, the UK and US, the potential of UGVs as both force enablers and combat vehicles is being explored with a range of systems turning the heads of commanders, among them Milrem’s TheMIS UGV, Russia’s Uran-9, BAE Systems’ robotic technology demonstrator and Textron’s robotic combat vehicle.

    Coming in different sizes and configurations, these vehicles fulfil different missions and different roles; they point to a future of augmenting ground forces with unmanned systems that is seemingly just across the horizon. But will they ever be able to replace the manned vehicles that came before them?

  33. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Triple-Zero call takes 6 minutes – but only if you can convince the telephonist taking the call to ‘extract digit’
    Arrival of actual Police officers is a further 6 minutes – not too bad considering this included;
    Waking ’em up, getting ’em out of bed, dressing – with no item on backward or inside-out, donning kit & toolbelt, getting the jeep out & proceeding to the ‘job site’.’

    All fair points Sal. I hear they’re introducing a different system these days.

    Everyone gets round the clock protection, Harry and Meghan style. The CPP numbers depend on the person’s mean income over five years. Bonus staff for each extra kiddie.

    They’ll be just outside and awake, should you feel the need to ask them for directions or to help move a fridge or something.

  34. calli

    Well, well, well. What was being discussed here a month ago has come to pass.

    Commenters at the Cat were serious about Covid19, but no one else seemed to be. It was all considered an outlandish conspiracy theory that would burn itself out. Many thanks to Zippy who has posted stories on the virus as new information, however odd and far-fetched, came to hand. At least we had the chance to read up and accept or discard as we pondered the implications.

    Today we are told that just about everyone will get it over the next 12 months or so. And it will kill.

  35. Top Ender

    War service?

    Malaya vets campaign on ‘war service’

    EXCLUSIVE
    PAUL MALEY

    The year is 1972 and Gough Whitlam is fulfilling an election pledge to bring home Australian troops from Vietnam, formally ending years of armed conflict with communist insurgents across Southeast Asia.

    In northern Malaysia at the Butterworth Air Base, a small contingent of Australian servicemen still carry live rounds and patrol for communist guerillas they occasionally spy peering from jungles nearby.

    “There was a Rifle Company Butterworth patrol that encountered a group of communist terrorists,’’ Ray Fulcher, chairman of the RCB review group, tells The Australian. “They went to ground but there was no shots fired.’’

    Nearly 50 years on and the men of Rifle Company Butterworth are fighting to have their deployment and its risks recognised as a warlike service.

    It has been a long, friendless fight. Official reviews have declined to upgrade their service, a move that would entitle them to a richer array of veterans’ benefits, including a much-prized Gold Card entitling them to a range of public and private healthcare services. It would also clear the way for RCB veterans to get the Australian Active Service Medal, the badge of honour bestowed upon all Australian personnel who served in “warlike’’ theatres.

    Now they are passing the hat around to fund a Federal Court challenge they hope will see their status formally changed. To Mr Fulcher, as well as to other members of the RCB veterans’ community, it is a question of fairness.

    “We were put into harm’s way to counter a threat in Malaysia and support them in their operations against communist terrorists,’’ Mr Fulcher said.

    “They cannot renege now on their responsibilities, which is what they’re trying to do.’’

    In nearly 20 years of service, RCB members never fired a shot in anger or had one fired at them. They suffered no combat casualties. The RAAF base they were sent to guard was never attacked. The base itself was a hangover from World War II.

    So it is not hard to see why the Australian Defence Force has consistently refused to recognise deployment to Butterworth as warlike.

    Yet the official designation of peacetime service doesn’t quite fit either. Soldiers on training deployments — notionally the reason the RCB was sent to Malaya — don’t pack live rounds. Nor was any training done.

    “The government’s big thing is that we were training with the Malaysians,’’ Mr Fulcher said. “There were one or two who did, but that was later.

    “There was no way we could train with the Malaysians — they were busy with their war.’’ That “war’’ was the decades-long conflict waged between the officially recognised government of Malaysia and the Malaysian Communist Party.

    It was a simmering insurgency identical in type, if not in scale, to conflicts fought in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Fifteen Australians died fighting in the First Malayan Emergency and 24 more were killed on active service.

    By 1968, the communists had regrouped and launched a fresh offensive. The base at Butterworth, which had been transferred by the British to Australia in 1957, became a strategic outpost, a means by which Australia could project force into an increasingly unstable region.

    Butterworth was the only airbase outside Australia where the RAAF maintained a permanent offensive presence.

    Even now, Australian troops still rotate regularly through it. During the takeover by Islamic State of Marawi in the southern Philippines, the RAAF used Butterworth to send P-3 Orion spy planes to surveil the group.

    In 2018, the government announced it would upgrade Butterworth to accommodate the new fleet of F-35 fighter planes.

    During the 1960s, it served as a deterrent and a backstop to the Malaysian government. For this reason, Mr Fulcher thinks the 9000-odd servicemen who rotated through Butterworth from 1970-89 deserve recognition: “If the government sends people into harm’s way, that’s warlike service. If you send them somewhere where there’s a possibility they’ll be shot at, you owe them.’’

    Mr Fulcher was there in 1979 when it was a fully fledged operating base, and a staging post for air combat missions flown by Malaysians against the communists.

    Oz print edition

  36. Mater

    Public Safety Canada threw a spanner into the works as it announced it will no longer meet the security costs for the couple who are just weeks away from their dash for freedom.

    Maybe Megs and Harry should move to the US, instead. There Harry can get a Concealed Carry Permit (for their personal protection) and thus make better use of his rather limited skill set.

  37. Top Ender

    War service?

    Malaya vets campaign on ‘war service’

    EXCLUSIVE
    PAUL MALEY

    The year is 1972 and Gough Whitlam is fulfilling an election pledge to bring home Australian troops from Vietnam, formally ending years of armed conflict with communist insurgents across Southeast Asia.

    In northern Malaysia at the Butterworth Air Base, a small contingent of Australian servicemen still carry live rounds and patrol for communist guerillas they occasionally spy peering from jungles nearby.

    “There was a Rifle Company Butterworth patrol that encountered a group of communist terrorists,’’ Ray Fulcher, chairman of the RCB review group, tells The Australian. “They went to ground but there was no shots fired.’’

    Nearly 50 years on and the men of Rifle Company Butterworth are fighting to have their deployment and its risks recognised as a warlike service.

    It has been a long, friendless fight. Official reviews have declined to upgrade their service, a move that would entitle them to a richer array of veterans’ benefits, including a much-prized Gold Card entitling them to a range of public and private healthcare services. It would also clear the way for RCB veterans to get the Australian Active Service Medal, the badge of honour bestowed upon all Australian personnel who served in “warlike’’ theatres.

    Now they are passing the hat around to fund a Federal Court challenge they hope will see their status formally changed. To Mr Fulcher, as well as to other members of the RCB veterans’ community, it is a question of fairness.

    “We were put into harm’s way to counter a threat in Malaysia and support them in their operations against communist terrorists,’’ Mr Fulcher said.

    “They cannot renege now on their responsibilities, which is what they’re trying to do.’’

    In nearly 20 years of service, RCB members never fired a shot in anger or had one fired at them. They suffered no combat casualties. The RAAF base they were sent to guard was never attacked. The base itself was a hangover from World War II.

    So it is not hard to see why the Australian Defence Force has consistently refused to recognise deployment to Butterworth as warlike.

    Yet the official designation of peacetime service doesn’t quite fit either. Soldiers on training deployments — notionally the reason the RCB was sent to Malaya — don’t pack live rounds. Nor was any training done.

    “The government’s big thing is that we were training with the Malaysians,’’ Mr Fulcher said. “There were one or two who did, but that was later.

    “There was no way we could train with the Malaysians — they were busy with their war.’’ That “war’’ was the decades-long conflict waged between the officially recognised government of Malaysia and the Malaysian Communist Party.

    It was a simmering insurgency identical in type, if not in scale, to conflicts fought in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Fifteen Australians died fighting in the First Malayan Emergency and 24 more were killed on active service.

    By 1968, the communists had regrouped and launched a fresh offensive. The base at Butterworth, which had been transferred by the British to Australia in 1957, became a strategic outpost, a means by which Australia could project force into an increasingly unstable region.

    Butterworth was the only airbase outside Australia where the RAAF maintained a permanent offensive presence.

    Even now, Australian troops still rotate regularly through it. During the takeover by Is lamic State of Marawi in the southern Philippines, the RAAF used Butterworth to send P-3 Orion spy planes to surveil the group.

    In 2018, the government announced it would upgrade Butterworth to accommodate the new fleet of F-35 fighter planes.

    During the 1960s, it served as a deterrent and a backstop to the Malaysian government. For this reason, Mr Fulcher thinks the 9000-odd servicemen who rotated through Butterworth from 1970-89 deserve recognition: “If the government sends people into harm’s way, that’s warlike service. If you send them somewhere where there’s a possibility they’ll be shot at, you owe them.’’

    Mr Fulcher was there in 1979 when it was a fully fledged operating base, and a staging post for air combat missions flown by Malaysians against the communists.

    Oz print edition

  38. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Even now, Australian troops still rotate regularly through it.’

    Sorry.

    Experience has demonstrated that this is NOT ‘warlike service’ in any way, shape or form. An AASM would be demeaned beyond reason. A benefit grab, I’m afraid to say.

    FMD. They’ll be asking for ICBs next.

  39. Tel

    Brussels should relax fiscal rules to help Rome deal with the outbreak

    Oh printing more money will make sick people get better again.

    Like some kind of Keynesian genius!

  40. Caveman

    You mean 97% of Isreli scientists will have a Coronavirus vaccine in a few weeks. That sounds more believable. 😉

  41. Mother Lode

    POPE FRANCIS SICK A DAY AFTER SUPPORTING CORONAVIRUS SUFFERERS

    Divine intervention? Does God consider we have been punished enough now?

    And this is Franks best chance of being remembered with any affection at all, if he should succumb to the coronavirus – someone is such high office struck down, snuffed out like so many nameless others.

    Same broad logic as the immortal beauty of Marilyn Monroe (if she is your type). Would she have become an icon if she had lived to eighty and memories of her were intermingled with her as her career fades, with sagging skin, spots, straggled hair like grey straw, and likely innumerable dreadful stories ferreted out by the gutter press and splayed on newspaper pages?

    Frank’s natural instinct will be, as with the African refugee flotilla, to preach openness and acceptance but for himself to stay tucked away safe behind his high walls.

  42. Mater

    Butterworth (RCB) was a training deployment. Admittedly, the range regulations seemed much more relaxed and the ammunition more plentiful (hence the training was far more realistic), but it was a funsy, nevertheless.
    Any notion to make it even a non-warlike deployment (after a specific date in the long lost past) is utterly ridiculous. It’s no more operational than a live fire exercise in Mount Bundy.

  43. Knuckle Dragger

    What’s surprising is that this is not surprising. From JC’s link overnight:

    ‘And then there is this little-known fact: Some Chinese researchers are in the habit of selling their laboratory animals to street vendors after they have finished experimenting on them.

    ‘You heard me right.

    ‘Instead of properly disposing of infected animals by cremation, as the law requires, they sell them on the side to make a little extra cash.’

    This can’t be right. This is not what we were told. We were told the Celestial Empire was the most refined and civilised and beyond reproach thing evah.

    They invented gunpowder. Most likely by accident while adding seasoning to AN INFECTED FUCKING LAB ANIMAL on a spit made of bat skeletons over an open fire.

  44. The hard lessons of privatisation need to be learned over and over again…….

    It found primarily that Healthscope has a “responsibility to maximise returns to its shareholders”.

    The inquiry has recommended that the model of a Public-Private Partnership isn’t entered into again by the Government.

  45. Caveman

    I think a recession might stop climate change, 2020 is year of recession.

  46. OldOzzie

    Trading Day: ASX set to fall again as global markets go on wild ride over virus fears

    11 MINUTES AGO | 8.11am
    US stocks drop more than 4.0pc

    Wall Street stocks were pummeled again on mounting fears the coronavirus amid outbreak will derail global growth.

    Shortly after the closing bell, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was down nearly 1200 points or 4.4 per cent, to 25,766.03, its worst session in more than two years.

    The broad-based S&P 500 also slumped 4.4 per cent to 2,978.66, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite Index shed 4.6 per cent to 8,566.48.

    ASX poised for sharp fall

    Australian stocks are poised to extend their losses after another rout on most global markets.

    At 8am (AEDT) the SPI200 futures contract was down 164 points, or 2.48 per cent, at 6,452, pointing to another sharp fall when the local market opens.

    By Thursday’s close, shares on the benchmark index had fallen to levels last seen on December 5 as $170 billion in value was wiped from the market.

    Global markets continued to fall overnight as the growth in coronavirus cases outside China jumped significantly on Thursday.

    Harvey Norman and Rural Funds Group are among the local companies reporting their earnings on Friday.

    The Aussie dollar was buying US65.80 cents, up from US65.50 cents at the market close on Thursday.

  47. Bruce of Newcastle

    You mean 97% of Isreli scientists will have a Coronavirus vaccine in a few weeks. That sounds more believable. 😉

    Worth reading the report. They were already working on a similar coronavirus:

    In preclinical trials, the team demonstrated that the oral vaccination induces high levels of specific anti-IBV antibodies, Katz said.

    “Let’s call it pure luck,” he said. “We decided to choose coronavirus as a model for our system just as a proof of concept for our technology.”

    But after scientists sequenced the DNA of the novel coronavirus causing the current worldwide outbreak, the MIGAL researchers examined it and found that the poultry coronavirus has high genetic similarity to the human one, and that it uses the same infection mechanism, which increases the likelihood of achieving an effective human vaccine in a very short period of time, Katz said.

    “All we need to do is adjust the system to the new sequence,” he said. “We are in the middle of this process, and hopefully in a few weeks we will have the vaccine in our hands. Yes, in a few weeks, if it all works, we would have a vaccine to prevent coronavirus.”

    The highlighted comment is interesting as it suggests this is actually a poultry virus not a bat (or whatever) virus. It still could be an escapee from the lab of course – the Chinese have had long experience with bugs jumping across from chickens and ducks.

    As to the vaccine – having it is one thing, producing it is another. But if the MIGAL people can develop the recipe there are a lot of industrial pharma companies that might be able to produce it using existing kit.

    So we’ll see. It’s a race, although this thing is so fast that it’s going to be very hard to beat.

  48. Knuckle Dragger

    For an accurate representation of what the fluffy-haired Bernie wants to achieve in the US, one must watch the first half hour of Scarface.

  49. OldOzzie

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3337329, posted on February 28, 2020 at 8:33 am
    You mean 97% of Isreli scientists will have a Coronavirus vaccine in a few weeks. That sounds more believable. 😉

    Worth reading the report. They were already working on a similar coronavirus:

    In preclinical trials, the team demonstrated that the oral vaccination induces high levels of specific anti-IBV antibodies, Katz said.

    In the meantime 4 bottles of NAC – Now Foods, NAC, 1000 mg, 120 Tablets have just arrived

    Thanks Winston Smith

    4 days ago – you can just buy it at iherb.com. Winston Smith. #3333334, posted on February 24, 2020 at 11:37 am

  50. Any notion to make it even a non-warlike deployment (after a specific date in the long lost past) is utterly ridiculous. It’s no more operational than a live fire exercise in Mount Bundy.

    If it is an issue for these veterans (and I can understand it may be), why not strike a medal specifically for Malaysian service?

  51. Mother Lode

    “Batteries” is not an answer until affordable ones are invented.

    Does the 56x in the final sentence include the number of additional bird-mashers and bird-flamers that would have to be built to provide the surplus electricity to charge the batteries?

  52. johanna

    Steve Trickler, Sina is a Karen Carpenter in the making. Sublime sensitivity on the drums.

    Where do you find this stuff?

    I see that someone who was banned a while back has returned with the overnight rants – can’t remember what name he used last time. Not that I mind – he (and it is undoubtedly a ‘he’) is harmless, if completely off the wall.

    Re whoever it was that claimed that my Dad’s experience in the Korean War is a made up story – you don’t have a clue. I won’t name his unit, because there are scum here who would probably report it to the War Crimes Tribunal. But it was an American unit, and it was the Americans who shot the unwelcome captives, being as how they were on the move in a serious war and didn’t have the time or the capacity to set up a POW camp that complied with UN standards, as the armchair lawyers would wish.

    The guy they saved had been the barber in his village, and was an unenthusiastic soldier. I don’t know how long he stayed with them or what happened to him in the end. After that one time, my father has preferred not to discuss it again. But he was very serious (and sad) when he told me about it, and I have never forgotten that conversation.

    The hounding of our troops has all the hallmarks of the SJW movement – applying snowflake standards to events unrelated in time and space, regarding winning the war as subsidiary to a bunch of other concerns, having NFI what being in a real conflict is like.

    For me, even if the accusations are true (which is far from proven) I would back the people who literally lay their lives on the line over a movement which seeks to turn the ADF into a laboratory for their version of a perfect world.

    Wankers.

  53. OldOzzie

    NYU Professor Notes Coronavirus May Be ‘Bi-Phasic like Anthrax’, It’s Time to Press the Chinese for More Answers

    Philip Tierno Jr., professor of microbiology and pathology at NYU School of Medicine told Reuters, “I’m not certain that this is not bi-phasic, like anthrax. Once you have the infection, it could remain dormant and with minimal symptoms, and then you can get an exacerbation if it finds its way into the lungs.”

    Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) said: “We don’t have evidence that this disease originated there, but because of China’s duplicity and dishonesty from the beginning, we need to at least ask the question to see what the evidence says, and China right now is not giving evidence on that question at all.”

    Although the theory that the coronavirus may be a weaponized virus has been disputed by the left, the Chinese cannot be trusted. In light of the uncommon characteristics of this virus, the possibility must at least be explored and ruled out before it is dismissed as a conspiracy theory.

    1. The extraordinary length of the incubation period and its transmissibility during that period.

    2. The length of time the virus remains alive on surfaces (nine days).

    3. Its high R0 or “Basic Reproduction Number,” the number of people an infected person will transmit the disease to. Holmes points out that “the 1918 Influenza had an R0 of 1.8. The novel coronavirus has an R0, thus far, of about 2.2 and it’s getting worse as the virus mutates. Putting it in terms of a pandemic, it means that new infections caused by the COVID-19 will double every 6.4 days.”

    Holmes tells the story of how the Chinese may have obtained the coronavirus in the following excerpt:

    Specifically we start at Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) in Winnipeg, and with Scientific Director Dr. Frank Plummer…On May 4, 2013 the Novel Coronavirus arrived at the Canadian lab in Winnipeg.

    It was sent by well known Dutch virologist Ron Fouchier of the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, most certainly because the National Microbiology Laboratory of Canada specializes in complete testing services for COVID-19.

    Fouchier himself had received it from a colleague in the Middle East (Dubai) who had isolated the virus from the lungs of a patient.

    The Canadian Lab grew a research bank of the new virus and set about to see what animals could be infected by it.

    The National Microbiology Laboratory is the only LEVEL 4 virology lab in Canada, capable of handling the most dangerous diseases.

    Unfortunately there were additional dangers that the lab was not aware of. And those dangers were high level Chinese staff members who were engaged in espionage and theft.

    One of the Chinese spies was Director of the Vaccine Development and Antiviral Therapies Section in the Special Pathogens Program. Xiangguo Qiu graduated from Hebei Medical University in 1985 and came to Canada for advanced studies. If the word “Hebei” sounds familiar, it’s because that’s the province in China which is the epicenter of the Corona pandemic.

    How Dr. Xiangguo Qiu morphed from a medical doctor to a virologist is not known, but she ended up doing leading work at the Canadian lab.

    And she was not alone at that lab. Her husband, Dr. Keding Cheng, a bacteriologist was also at the National Microbiology Laboratory, and who also mysteriously shifted into virology.

    Together they infiltrated the NML and engaged in theft of technology, secrets, and of actual viral samples, which they sent secretly to China.

    Of importance, is that Xiangguo Qiu is a specialist in biological warfare.

    The management and staff of the NML were sleeping at the wheel while these two engaged in theft of dangerous viral samples. Perhaps political correctness played a role in turning a blind eye to possible irregularities.

    In addition to their own espionage and thefts, these two arranged for additional Chinese nationals to infiltrate the NML…

    Stolen materials, including samples of the Novel Coronavirus were somehow taken or shipped by this group of six to Wuhan.

    And possibly taken personally by Dr Xiangguo Qiu on multiple trips she made to the Wuhan Institute of Virology in 2017 and 2018.

    It was not until early July 2019, too late, that the Canadian lab woke up to the obvious. Even then they did not act appropriately and bring in law enforcement, but simply escorted Xiangguo Qiu and her husband out of the building.

    While we can’t know exactly what these two Chinese doctors were doing at the lab or what their motives were, the timeline Holmes specifies and the fact that the couple had been escorted out of the building last July are corroborated by this CBC Canada article dated October 3, 2019. Additionally, the article confirms that they are currently under investigation by the Royal Canadian Military Police. The receipt and the timing of the coronavirus sample is corroborated here.

  54. OldOzzie

    1735099
    #3337333, posted on February 28, 2020 at 8:45 am
    Any notion to make it even a non-warlike deployment (after a specific date in the long lost past) is utterly ridiculous. It’s no more operational than a live fire exercise in Mount Bundy.

    If it is an issue for these veterans (and I can understand it may be), why not strike a medal specifically for Malaysian service?

    Agree, sensible suggestion Numbers,

  55. Tel

    Today we are told that just about everyone will get it over the next 12 months or so. And it will kill.

    Funny how quickly the story changed from “Don’t worry nothing is gonna happen” over to “Don’t worry it’s far too late to do anything”.

    There’s now additional evidence this virus came out of a lab, Big Man Xi mentioned the importance of lab security at the end of a speech recently, and everyone went, “Huh? Is he admitting it?”

    Yet another research group found RNA sequences similar to HIV stuck in there and the chance of a random mutation coming up like that is roughly the same as bankrupting every casino in Vegas all on the same night.

    When you put that together with how freaked out the Chinese government has been, while telling everyone else not to panic … they know something more than they are saying.

    The virus has stealth capabilities, not only being contagious before showing symptoms but also evading whatever test they are using giving false negatives. It has an effectively random incubation period and even if you feel better you aren’t 100% sure it gas really gone away. It also apparently can travel by air at least for short distances but no one knows for sure what the maximum distance is. Potentially all forms of public transport are risky now. It leaves people with a damaged immune system opening the door to secondary infection.

    I admit I’m worried.

  56. Knuckle Dragger

    Horse Face is apparently going to speak sternly to Morrison today about his policy of sending New Zealand crooks who spend their time in and out of Australian prisons, back to New Zealand.

    This should be good.

  57. Porter

    Frank dies of corona virus in solidarity with the people suffering under oppressive governments. Hello Iran. Pell acqitted becomes pope after suffering in solidarity with the people suffering under corrupt governments. Hello world.

    Could work.

  58. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Public Safety Canada threw a spanner into the works as it announced it will no longer meet the security costs for the couple

    Oh, the huge manatee! Of course it never would have occurred to the stupid self obsessed narcissist parasites that ol’ Blackface Justine might happen to be a republican.

  59. OldOzzie

    CNN Removes Its Description of a Baby as a ‘Fetus That Was Born,’ but Not for the Reasons You Would Think

    When do we retroactively retitle the culture’s greatest hits?

    . Dusty Springfield’s “Son of a Preacher Fetus That Was Born”
    . Tammy Wynette’s “Stand By Your Fetus That Was Born”
    . Billy Joel’s “Piano Fetus That Was Born”
    . Van Morrison’s “Brown Eyed Fetus That Was Born”
    . ZZ Top’s “Sharp Dressed Fetus That Was Born”
    . Whitney Houston’s “I’m Every Fetus That Was Born”

    Or the most woke of all: Percy Sledge’s “When a Penis Owner Fetus That Was Born Loves a Vagina Owner Fetus That Was Born.”

    Sadly, the revolution will have to wait, because CNN removed its wording.

  60. Mater

    If it is an issue for these veterans (and I can understand it may be), why not strike a medal specifically for Malaysian service?

    I trained in the US, Thailand, Japan, Kuwait, Singapore, Malaysia, New Zealand, Indonesia, etc.
    Why not strike a medal for service in all these countries?

    Short answer: There was no enemy looking to kill me in these countries!

  61. Knuckle Dragger

    NoFixedAddress is the new and improved Juan.

    Now with added meth!

  62. OldOzzie

    johanna
    #3337335, posted on February 28, 2020 at 8:47 am
    Steve Trickler, Sina is a Karen Carpenter in the making. Sublime sensitivity on the drums.

    Where do you find this stuff?

    Thanks Steve, and agree johanna, another Karen Carpenter on the drums

    Romeo and Juliet (Dire Straits); drum cover by Sina

  63. Porter

    Knuckle Dragger: I had NFA pegged for Juan as well. Ha!

  64. Tel

    Holmes tells the story of how the Chinese may have obtained the coronavirus in the following excerpt:

    He missed out a few additional facts:
    * Dr Frank Plummer was a world expert on HIV/AIDS and would have known a whole lot about the way a virus can invest T-cells, golly just like C-19 is doing.
    * Although it would be fascinating to ask Dr Frank Plummer’s opinion on this … unfortunately he died recently, supposedly of a of a heart attack while at a conference in Kenya.

    Astounding number of coincidences … they don’t make probability charts that go this far down.

  65. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Steve Breen and Chip Bok are OK today on the perils of American socialism and the Democrats running scared. Otherwise, nothing much grabs me in today’s lot, Tom. Thanks though, always a good start to the day to check your toons.

  66. OldOzzie

    Senate overstepped its position with attack on Bettina Arndt

    Henry Ergas

    To describe Bettina Arndt’s comments about the murder of Hannah Clarke and her three children as abhorrent would be a grievous understatement. But it is hard not to feel uncomfortable about the Senate motion that called for the removal of her Order of Australia.

    It is true that senator Jonathon Duniam, supporting the motion on behalf of the government senators, stressed the independence of the Council for the Order of Australia, and underlined that “it’s important that this motion is not seen as directing the council of the Order of Australia, whose independent deliberations must be ­respected”.

    But it is undeniable that the motion’s purpose was precisely to urge the council to strip Arndt of the Order of Australia.

    And it is equally undeniable that losing the Order of Australia is a severe and humiliating form of punishment that is typically inflicted by the council only when a member of the order has been found by a court to have committed a serious offence.

    To that extent, the motion came perilously close, in spirit if not in legal effect, to a bill of attainder, seeking to impose, by legislative means, a punishment on a specified individual for an action committed in the past.

    Bills of attainder are prohibited by the US constitution as an indefensible attack on individual liberties; and while the Australian Constitution lacks similar protections, the High Court found in Polyukhovich v Commonwealth (1991) that such a bill would contravene Chapter III of the Constitution, which requires judicial powers to be exercised by courts, and not by the legislature.

    Arndt was not represented in the Senate when it debated and passed the motion; she was not given a reasonable opportunity to argue against the punishment with which she was being threatened. Nor did the Senate carefully consider the motion’s possible ­implications, instead falling into a troubling near-unanimity.

    Proposed and accepted in the heat of the moment, the Senate process was far removed from any notion of prudent and responsible deliberation. The result is that the Senate has placed the Council for the Order of Australia in an extraordinarily difficult position: whatever decision it comes to will inevitably be tainted by the pressure that motion puts on it.

    To make matters worse, Arndt’s offence was plainly that she expressed views that are widely (and rightly) considered to be appalling.

    Now, there may be occasions on which it is appropriate for the Senate to condemn particular opinions; but very few decisions should be regarded with greater suspicion than those that use the machinery of parliament to brand individual citizens as heretics. Pushed, as they so readily are, to the point of making conformity with the opinions of the majority both a duty and a necessity, those decisions risk destroying that margin of freedom that gives democratic life its substance and its endless possibility for advance.

    At a time when the true believers are everywhere on the march, demanding that any opposing ­voices be suppressed, one might have hoped a party that calls itself Liberal would, before setting so dangerous a precedent, remember the biblical admonition that the sword of power, once it is unleashed, “devours sometimes one way and sometimes another”.

    That none of that seems to have troubled the overwhelming majority of senators merely highlights the deeply illiberal spirit of the age.

    It was, after all, the great achievement of the Renaissance humanists, and of their successors in the Enlightenment, to take opinion, however despicable it may be, out of authority’s stifling clutches.

    From Plato’s Republic, which distinguished mere belief from ortho doxa — correct opinion, elevated into an orthodoxy by the wise — to St Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theologica, which concluded that opinion not sanctioned by the church was inherently corrupt, it had invariably been held that the only legitimate beliefs were those authority had endorsed, or at least not condemned.

    It was therefore truly revolutionary when that logic was turned completely on its head. Immanuel Kant, in articulating his “principle of publicity”, expressed the change with considerable force: it was not authority, he argued, that determined which opinions had merit; on the contrary, it was the free play of opinions, expressed without fear or favour in the public sphere, that alone could determine whether particular ideas deserved being deemed authoritative.

    As he put it in the Critique of Pure Reason: “The sole touchstone whereby we can decide whether our holding a thing to be true is conviction or mere persuasion is the possibility of communicating it to others and of finding it to be valid for all human reason.”

    As a result, regardless of whether opinions are commendable or detestable, “the public use and expression of one’s reason must always be untrammelled, as it alone can bring about enlightenment among men”.

    To instead allow authority to determine which opinions were acceptable, and which were not, forced society into a form of self-imposed immaturity, from which it could never grow up.

    That immaturity might well be more tolerable than was the arbitrary rule of the ancient tyrants, but it was no less pernicious; by making it unnecessary for individuals to develop the courage to trust their own judgment — rather than relying on that of the state, their neighbours, or the crowd in the street — it was the means by which “despotism perpetuates ignorance and ignorance perpetuates despotism”.

    To say that is not to imply that the Senate has opened the gates to a descent into despotism. But watching the mobs on the internet baying for Arndt’s blood, it was hard not to be reminded of Norbert Elias, the great scholar of late medieval civilisation, who wrote on the basis of his experience of inter-war Europe that while going from barbarism to civility takes centuries, it took only minutes to go the other way.

    We expect the Senate to calm those passions, setting bounds on conflict and preventing the furies from getting out of hand. Today, however, our politics all too often does the opposite, transforming every issue into a morality play that invites posturing and rewards intransigence.

    By descending into what amounts to public shaming and extrajudicial punishment, the ­Senate has exacerbated that trend, compromising both the Australian honours system and its own ­reputation.

    Australia’s Senate is now among the world’s oldest. As public trust in our democratic institutions plummets, it would be a pity if Australians had to celebrate the Senate’s 120th anniversary by hurling at it the reproach Shakespeare’s fool hurls at King Lear: “Thou shouldst not have been old till thou hadst been wise.”

    Unfortunately, after this week’s vote, they may have good reason to do exactly that.

    Henry Ergas
    Columnist

    Henry Ergas AO is an economist who spent many years at the OECD in Paris before returning to Australia. He has taught at a number of universities, including Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government.

  67. Top Ender

    Latham takes aim at discrimination ‘picnic’
    YONI BASHAN

    One Nation’s NSW leader, Mark Latham, is moving to significantly raise the bar for complaints being made to the Anti-Discrimination Board, saying the agency is being exploited by political activists and vexatious litigants whose goal is to financially ruin their opponents.

    Mr Latham moved a private member’s bill in the NSW Legislative Council on Thursday seeking to end the “political persecution” and “lawyers’ picnic” incentivised by lax legal standards enshrined in the Anti-Discrimination Act.

    At present, the law allows complaints to be lodged without any cost. The board’s president can choose to discontinue the matter if they are satisfied the complaint is frivolous or vexatious, but if that occurs, an appeal can be lodged with the NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal, where penalties of up to $100,000 can be awarded. If the board accepts the complaint, it is referred to the same tribunal.

    Mr Latham told parliament the law had been passed in good faith before the advent of social media, and was now being abused by political activists and others to settle personal vendettas. “If the board, in a rare moment of common sense, decides to terminate an investigation into a frivolous and vexatious complaint, that is where the matter should end,” he said.

    His amendments were brought on in part by a serial complainant named Garry Burns, a selfdescribed gay rights activist who has lodged hundreds of complaints that have been accepted by the board for further investigation.

    Several dozen of these were aimed at Bernard Gaynor, a Catholic blogger and father of eight living in Queensland.

    Mr Gaynor invoked the ire of Mr Burns after posting a statement online claiming he did not want his children taught by gay teachers. According to an email, read out by Mr Latham in parliament, Mr Burns said Mr Gaynor “has an asset, namely his house”, and that if enough complaints were substantiated at NCAT then “we can look at taking his house through bankruptcy”.

    In a separate case, Mr Latham said a brain-damaged man named John Sunol, who was injured in an accident, had been pursued by Mr Burns for a “rant about gays in a random and incoherent fashion” on social media.

    “He has few followers, no real impact and no political influence,” Mr Latham said. “The legal types are now circling the trust fund that controls Sunol’s $400,000 compensation payment.”

    The amendments seek to stop NCAT from taking discontinued referrals from the board and stop complaints being accepted against people with a known brain injury, among other proposed changes.

    Oz print edition

  68. mh

    Knuckle Dragger: I had NFA pegged for Juan as well.

    Phrasing

  69. DrBeauGan

    To describe Bettina Arndt’s comments about the murder of Hannah Clarke and her three children as abhorrent would be a grievous understatement.

    What exactly did Arndt say that was so abhorrent?

  70. Zyconoclast

    Heathrow’s wings clipped after court rules expansion violates Paris climate pledge

    London: Environmentalists were jubilant after a British court effectively halted Heathrow Airport’s planned expansion, ruling that the government had not considered the commitments it agreed to in Paris to curb global warming when approving the project.

    Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison condemned the ruling as “madness” and said it was proof that embracing “mindless commitments” to go carbon-neutral by 2050, as he is under pressure to do, would cost jobs.

    This is the madness,” Morrison told Sydney radio 2GB when asked about the ruling.

    He said he had resisted embracing the net-zero pledge adopted by Labor leader Anthony Albanese, because no-one could tell him how it could be done while protecting jobs and avoiding spikes in power prices.

    Heathrow Airport said it would appeal the decision but Boris Johnson’s Government said it had no plans to challenge the ruling, which effectively stops dead the project.

  71. johanna

    Knuckles, nah.

    There was a serial ranter in the wee smalls a few years ago whose unmistakeable style has just popped up again. He was always demanding that this or that politician debate him on national television, and triumphantly claiming that their refusal to do so proved his point, whatever it was.

    In global pandemic/catastrophe news, I was at the mall yesterday, and still not a single facemask to be seen.

    Poor old Zippy must be disappointed that the global economy has not yet crashed, but presumably he is still hoping.

    Tens of thousands of people die of common flu viruses every year, but that is not sexy news. The exotic and unknown is always more tantalising.

    I agree that it makes sense to take precautions, but the hysteria reminds me of the fizzer BSE panic, where it was forecast that we were all gonna die, by the usual suspects. It was going to sweep the world, millions would perish, economies would crash, and so on.

    Then, phut.

    While apocalyptic scenarios obviously appeal to a wide audience, I am not one of them. That said, as a daily consumer of prescription drugs, I am concerned that China has such a stranglehold on precursors for my medications. Unfortunately, I can’t stock up, because the Health Department regards such behaviour as indicative of being a degenerate addict. I will try to get some more of the blood pressure meds, which hopefully don’t carry that stigma.

  72. Mother Lode

    Israeli Scientists Say They Will Have Coronavirus Vaccine “In A Few Weeks”

    This will pose a conundrum for the BDS people.

    Meh, I suspect more than half are anti-vaxxers anyway.

    If it is announced that the research for vaccine was involved trials on fluffy bunny rabbits and cute little mice then we could see the political left largely wiped out – the scourge that is the coronavirus would become the scouring pad that is the coronavirus, scrubbing away the dirt, the grime, and the clingy bits of society.

  73. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    ‘Instead of properly disposing of infected animals by cremation, as the law requires, they sell them on the side to make a little extra cash.’

    This is Helen’s thesis of someone in the lab’s garbage room having a little sideline in selling infected mice pups to the market for a very special live-eat treat called ‘three squeaks dipped in soy’. Tomato garnish around the edge of the squirming plateful, just to be civilized about it of course.

  74. Infidel Tiger

    Israeli Scientists Say They Will Have Coronavirus Vaccine “In A Few Weeks”

    Didn’t they just cure cancer, but decided there was no market for that?

    Call me sceptical but Israeli scientist is up there with Bernie Sander’s barber.

  75. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Bet the anti-vaxers make an exception for Corona virus. It’s biological warfare, they will shriek, so it’s not natural, so we can take the cure. What is interesting to me is the surprise that the three escaped baboons generated. What? We live test on primates?

    I wonder what people think would be the best and closest to human test case for the Corona virus, before they try it out on willing human volunteers? Rats? Mice? Or baboons? Probably all will be used somewhere in the testing chain for Corona vaccines and treatments. You don’t do LD50 on baboons usually. Too costly. But mice are cheap.

  76. Mitch M.

    High doses of vitamin C found to enhance immunotherapy in combating cancer in mice

    As far back as the 1970s, medical researchers suspected that giving cancer patients high doses of vitamin C might help to reduce tumor growth—but subsequent studies failed to find any benefits, and researchers lost interest. In recent years, interest in using vitamin C to treat cancer patients has rebounded after studies found that the earlier researchers had been giving vitamin C to patients orally.

    Nuts. The protocols always stipulated that IV administration is required because the gut won’t absorb high levels of C. Mystified as to why those trials even were approved. Very high doses are needed.

  77. Bruce of Newcastle

    Hello Iran.

    Says the bat soup critter.

    Covid-19 Infects Iranian Vice President, Kills Iran Ambassador To Vatican (27 Feb)

    Iran cancelled Friday prayers in Tehran on Friday as the virus spread further in the capital city. With Iran’s economy badly damaged by sanctions which have also contributed to shortages of essential supplies including medicine and medical products, it is uniquely vulnerable to the virus’s devastation.

    And the more the regime scrambles to try and contain it, the further it spreads, as Iran’s neighbors close their borders to its citizens and turn away from the Middle East’s worst virus ‘”hot spot”.

    And as more government officials fall ill, we can’t help but wonder how much longer until the Ayatollah gets sick?

    That is a very interesting question…

  78. johanna

    Henry Ergas is playing their game, their rules. As someone above said – what exactly did she say that was so abhorrent? And, even if she said something awfy, should we now scour the records of everyone who has ever gotten a gong in search of something we don’t like? What nonsense.

    Bettina Arndt is the victim of a political hit job, pure and simple. It is absurd to suggest that somebody should be stripped of a gong because they said something we don’t like.

  79. DrBeauGan

    I have found the ‘abhorrent’ comments by Bettina Arndt:

    Ms Arndt praised a Queensland detective Mark Thompson for saying Baxter, who allegedly killed his wife and three children by setting them on fire, may have been “driven too far” — comments which led him to being taken off the case.

    “Congratulations to the Queensland police for keeping an open mind and awaiting proper evidence, including the possibility that Rowan Baxter might have been ‘driven too far’,” Ms Arndt wrote on Twitter.

    What is wrong with this? It sounds sane and reasonable to me. She is guilty of serious non-wokeness and failing to virtue signal but this doesn’t come close to abhorrent in my book. Had she said that the woman was asking for it, that would count as bigoted, but she called for an honest review of the evidence to get at the facts.

    The senate response looks like mass hysteria.

  80. Knuckle Dragger

    johanna,

    Booooo!

    I liked the idea of good old Juan hanging off the ceiling with his eyes popping out, having been awake for four days watching Mrs Juan getting re-sleeved by Trev from the front bar.

  81. DrBeauGan

    The senate response looks like mass hysteria.

    And Ergas is just as bad.

  82. Infidel Tiger

    Hopefully Coronavirus means that all conferences and meeting can be cancelled.

    Productivity will soar.

  83. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    To describe Bettina Arndt’s comments about the murder of Hannah Clarke and her three children as abhorrent would be a grievous understatement.

    Henry Ergas, go wash your mouth out with soap. Your piece of upfront virtue signaling when commenting on the unwarranted and disgraceful pile on given by the Senate (of all places!) to Bettina Arndt, and all of it at left wing instigation with Liberal me-too’s lapdogging along, was abhorrent to me.

    Arndt merely wondered along what had ‘driven’ this man to such a dreadful action.

    That’s it. She used the word ‘driven’. A common enough term, used without receiving any abuse at all by the ABC about a woman who shuffled off the lives of her eight children. ‘Driven’ – an ordinary word, implying a need to investigate circumstances leading up to something, to ensure it might not happen again, not a disclaimer regarding any denial of responsibility for the driven action.

    Soap. Now. Ergas. How about an apology to Arndt too? And to the many men who feel she has provided the only voice that has been speaking up for them in a system research reveals has been severely loaded against them? That this was a case of inexcusable violence has no bearing upon and brings no disgrace to the good work that Arndt has done and for which she received her award of AO. Shame, Ergas, shame.
    Such egregious self-protection to start your piece with deserves some calling out.

  84. johanna

    Mitch M.
    #3337363, posted on February 28, 2020 at 9:28 am

    High doses of vitamin C found to enhance immunotherapy in combating cancer in mice

    As far back as the 1970s, medical researchers suspected that giving cancer patients high doses of vitamin C might help to reduce tumor growth—but subsequent studies failed to find any benefits, and researchers lost interest. In recent years, interest in using vitamin C to treat cancer patients has rebounded after studies found that the earlier researchers had been giving vitamin C to patients orally.

    Nuts. The protocols always stipulated that IV administration is required because the gut won’t absorb high levels of C. Mystified as to why those trials even were approved. Very high dose

    Poor old Linus Pauling – a great scientist who went off the rails because of his Vitamin C obsession.

    That said, I am a great fan of the classic Berocca – Vitamin C and various B’s. True, I piss a lot of it out, but after (or before) a big night on the turps, it definitely helps. A lot.

    I bolt a Berocca some days when no celebrations are in prospect as well, and can only say that I rarely catch anything going around, and while I am not in Lizzie’s movie star (Gloria Swanson) class, don’t look at all bad for my age. Vitamin B is definitely good for the nerves.

  85. mh

    Taylor Swift transitioning

    Taylor Swift’s ‘The Man’ music video leaves fans stunned as singer transforms into businessman

    https://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/taylor-swifts-the-man-music-video-transformation

  86. Bettina Arndt is the victim of a political hit job, pure and simple. It is absurd to suggest that somebody should be stripped of a gong because they said something we don’t like

    Some have very short memories……..

  87. mh

    If the Chinese students are banned from returning – as they should be – then it should free up a lot of rental accomodation in our inner cities.

    So many positives.

  88. amortiser

    Joanna
    #3336948, posted on February 27, 2020 at 8:01 pm
    jupes
    #3336925, posted on February 27, 2020 at 7:30 pm

    They had no capacity to look after that many prisoners, as they were a small unit moving forward. So, the enemy soldiers were all shot, except one guy who could cut hair, because they needed a barber.

    So they let a bloke with blades near their head after they killed 19 of his mates?

    The sushi cook was really pissed off.

  89. areff

    Anyone notice the wall-to-wall coverage being given the Brisbane knife maniac shot dead by the coppers last Sunday?

    No, neither have I.

  90. Infidel Tiger

    Coronavirus positives:

    No more having to touch hands with strangers.
    China decoupling
    Asian student bans
    Supply chain readjustment
    Less congestion on roads
    Cleaner inner cities
    Boomers dying en masse

    Feel free to add to list.

  91. Bruce of Newcastle

    Our recent export is doing very well in Trump’s America:

    The irony behind decline of an elite liberal private school: [Miranda] Devine (26 Feb, via BCF)

    Fascinating story of a school in NYC which is dying of wokeness and far-lefty insanity.

  92. cohenite

    Top Ender
    #3337353, posted on February 28, 2020 at 9:12 am
    Latham takes aim at discrimination ‘picnic’
    YONI BASHAN
    One Nation’s NSW leader, Mark Latham, is moving to significantly raise the bar for complaints being made to the Anti-Discrimination Board, saying the agency is being exploited by political activists and vexatious litigants whose goal is to financially ruin their opponents.

    Is there a better politician than Latham? I doubt it. He’s the best since John Tingle.

  93. Cardimona

    I’ve just listened to episodes 2, 3, and 4 of Matty and Barnaby’s podcasts – very good.

    https://anchor.fm/weatherboardandiron/
    (Also available on Apple and Spotify.)

    Episode 1 – Matt Canavan and Barnaby Joyce discuss the future of the National Party
    Episode 2 – Matt Canavan and George Christensen discuss the coal industry
    Episode 3 – Matt Canavan and Barnaby Joyce discuss reforming the Senate
    Episode 4 – Barnaby Joyce and Andrew Wilkie discuss Julian Assange

  94. Infidel Tiger

    Tesla has been destroyed too.

    A positive outlook always help.

  95. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Comment, on the Rifle Company at Butterworth article.

    mark
    9 hours ago
    I was there in the early eighties (RAAF) and I can say the only danger the RAR company faced was falling into a monsoon drain after a few hours in the BC bar (Butterworth Café).

    This claim should treated with the contempt it deserves.

  96. Coronavirus positives:

    No more having to touch hands with strangers.
    China decoupling
    Asian student bans
    Supply chain readjustment
    Less congestion on roads
    Cleaner inner cities
    Boomers dying en masse

    Add:
    If it kills me, I won’t have worry about it.

  97. mh

    Coronavirus positives:

    No more having to touch hands with strangers.
    China decoupling
    Asian student bans
    Supply chain readjustment
    Less congestion on roads
    Cleaner inner cities
    Boomers dying en masse

    Feel free to add to list.

    Public wash basins less likely to be filled with sputem
    Public transport more pleasant with fewer annoying accents
    Fewer Asians dragging their feet when they walk past in sports sliders

  98. Old School Conservative

    Trump’s India statecraft is forward-thinking and necessary

    Exactly why they played “Macho Man” for his arrival.

  99. Infidel Tiger

    Oh yeah, looks like Russia and Turkey are about to go to war too.

    Europe is about to be flooded with flu ridden Syrian youth.

    Fun times.

  100. johanna

    BoN – what a gem:

    But the event was marred by a protest staged by history and sex-ed teacher JB Brager, a self-described “trans-Jooish scholar” who goes by the pronoun “they.”

    WTF is a ‘trans-Jooish’ scholar?

    Boggle, boggle.

    Oh, and if calli missed it, someone played her clip of the annoying koel call at home – and another one answered it! Annoying birds, but you can see why they have survived.

  101. Caveman

    Tesla has been destroyed too.

    This may well be the start of a global recession, the interesting part of this is the majority of tech company’s have not experienced a recession nor have their young entrepreneurs. I don’t think hashtags will save them. But I think there will be some nasty tech crumbles happening.

    On a different note a small engineering company that my brother runs is experiencing an increase in orders from new customers.

  102. Infidel Tiger

    Fewer Asians dragging their feet when they walk past in sports sliders

    My god that’s annoying.

    We need to teach these freaks to walk properly.

  103. Johno

    Someone put up that the whole worlds population of 7.7 billion people could be housed in Texas on their own 1/4 acre block. Size of Texas 171.902 million acres,multiply by 4 equals 687.08 million people on their 1/4 acre.

    Just sayin’

  104. Infidel Tiger

    A global recession is needed. All the zombie debt cults need to die. Tesla, Uber etc.

    Only downside is that it will hurt Sir Donald Trumpington.

  105. Caveman

    Only downside is that it will hurt Sir Donald Trumpington

    I think he will be ok, it will be like the Phoenix from the ashes, at least his country has a manufacturing base and its own fuel. Plus he’s forward thinking , if decoupling from China is the go, He’s already scoped out India, which I don’t think has Coronavirus, Vindaloo kills all bad things.

  106. Leigh Lowe

    Hopefully Coronavirus means that all conferences and meeting can be cancelled.

    Productivity will soar.

    FMD!
    I used to work for a complete flog about fifteen years ago.
    Totally averse to confrontation and spent all his time flying around and avoiding doing his real job.
    He always found a phone black-spot when an awkward question arose at HQ.
    We prepared about five capex requests for full-on video conferencing, which would have a payback of about six months if we reduced airfares by half.
    All capex requests went missing.
    Probably flushed down the toilet of a 737.

  107. Old School Conservative

    Here is the sniper rifle that the US Army, Marines, and the special operators all want to get their hands on

    Oz army won’t want it.
    Not the weapon of choice for battlefield lawyers sheltering behind their desks.

  108. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    England only has 15 beds for worst respiratory cases
    NHS says system will struggle if more than 28 patients need artificial lung treatment

  109. Des Deskperson

    ‘Bettina Arndt is the victim of a political hit job, pure and simple. ‘

    Well yes, but with the initial furore after she was awarded the AM, she must have known – particularly given the reaction to DI Thompson’s statement – that her subsequent comments on the Baxter case would have further enraged her enemies. She may not have anticipated the Senate pile-on, but she must have been aware that she had, as they say, considerably upped the ante.

    So why did she she do it? Courage, stupidity or deliberate provocation?

  110. johanna

    The sushi cook was really pissed off.

    🙂

  111. stackja

    Des – Bettina Arndt is always a problem to ”them”.

  112. dover_beach

    St Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theologica, which concluded that opinion not sanctioned by the church was inherently corrupt

    This would be news to Aquinas. Sad to see Henry engage in standard boilerplate.

  113. shatterzzz

    So why did she she do it? Courage, stupidity or deliberate provocation?

    Your assuming normal folk get as excited about nuttin intended statements the same way the left & media do?
    If the media hadn’t of been looking for a GOTCHA excuse of any kind it wouldn’t have rated a mention.

  114. Zyconoclast

    Trump’s India statecraft is forward-thinking and necessary

    Exactly why they played “Macho Man” for his arrival.

    Because Trump likes gay Bollywood RomComs?

  115. mh

    Feel free to add to list.

    Greater opposition to One Belt One Road.

  116. johanna

    Old School Conservative
    #3337388, posted on February 28, 2020 at 9:59 am

    Trump’s India statecraft is forward-thinking and necessary

    Exactly why they played “Macho Man” for his arrival.

    Heh. Both the band and Trump have outplayed the hankie-wringers.

    Trump has also had YMCA played at his live gigs. The band said that they were delighted to have anyone play their song anytime, while not endorsing or disendorsing any candidate.

    Win – Win!

  117. Beertruk

    This in today’s Tele:

    Sunset clause on renewable subsidies
    JOHN ROLFE

    TAXPAYER backing for wind and solar energy is about to end, with the federal government to shift carbon-cutting support to hydrogen and even newer technologies.

    The switch will be revealed in a speech in Sydney today by Energy and Emissions Reduction Minister Angus Taylor, who will also deliver a slap-down to the Twitterati who he will accuse of driving “an agenda like no other in modern Australia” over climate change.

    “It’s a debate that has become polarised between the keyboard warriors and the quiet Australians,” Mr Taylor is due to say.

    Mr Taylor will tell a Committee for Economic Development of Australia breakfast function the government is preparing to shift support from solar and wind so as not to “crowd out” the private sector. Instead, the government will back hydrogen, carbon capture and storage, lithium and advanced livestock feed supplements.

    The goal will be to help the new technologies get on a path to “economic parity or better, which means the shift to lower emissions is zero cost or low cost”, Mr Taylor says in the speech. If any are not measuring up, the government will change “horses mid race”.

    Mr Taylor believes the world must go through rapid technology development and adoption to reduce emissions on a global scale.

  118. Old School Conservative

    It found primarily that Healthscope has a “responsibility to maximise returns to its shareholders”.

    Annecdote o’clock.
    Mrs OSC and I have spent a little time at this hospital in the last 12 months and we both got good treatment professionally delivered.
    We are privately covered.
    If our few samples are any indication, the hospital is going well.
    (Except for the suicide of the guy from level 7 to ground floor, inside the building)
    The major problem is the ongoing carnage called road building around the site.

  119. DrBeauGan

    So why did she she do it? Courage, stupidity or deliberate provocation?

    Possibly a desire to understand what led up to the appalling event? Or a distaste for moral posturing? Something Ergas doesn’t share.

  120. OldOzzie

    Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh Sentenced to Three Years in Federal Prison for Corruption and Fraud…

    Political leaders, specifically mayors in Baltimore Maryland, are predisposed toward corrupt behavior. Remember Sheila Dixon in ’08, or Stephanie Rawlings Blake in ’15… It’s a perpetual cycle. I digress…

    Into the corrupt landscape comes Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh, who was arrested in 2019 for taking bribes and payoffs through a pay-to-play bribery scandal for books she “authored” called “Healthy Holly”. Want a city contract?…. buy her books, easy peasy.

    Pugh, 69, asked U.S. District Judge Deborah K. Chasanow for mercy and apologized in court “to anyone I have offended or hurt through my actions.”

    […] In handing down the prison sentence, which was to be followed by three years of probation, Chasanow called Pugh’s crime “astounding.”

    “I have yet frankly to hear any explanation that makes sense,” the judge said. “This was not a tiny mistake, lapse of judgment. This became a very large fraud. The nature and circumstances of this offense clearly I think are extremely, extremely serious.” (read more)

  121. Old School Conservative

    The hounding of our troops has all the hallmarks of the SJW movement – applying snowflake standards to events unrelated in time and space, regarding winning the war as subsidiary to a bunch of other concerns, having NFI what being in a real conflict is like.

    Well written johanna.
    Interestingly, my lower quality comments along the same lines are getting through the Bolt screen.

  122. Mitch M.

    Des Deskperson
    #3337401, posted on February 28, 2020 at 10:10 am
    ‘Bettina Arndt is the victim of a political hit job, pure and simple. ‘

    Well yes, but with the initial furore after she was awarded the AM, she must have known – particularly given the reaction to DI Thompson’s statement – that her subsequent comments on the Baxter case would have further enraged her enemies. She may not have anticipated the Senate pile-on, but she must have been aware that she had, as they say, considerably upped the ante.

    So why did she she do it? Courage, stupidity or deliberate provocation

    It was a tweet, an off the cuff remark that was ill timed and ill conceived. She was dead wrong. He wasn’t driven too far, what we now know is that he was well down the murderous intent pathway even with his first marriage.

    The pile on is dangerous because if we’re going to attack people over a single comment we are in dangerous territory. That so many pollies made it a political issue is very concerning.

  123. OldOzzie

    Salicylates and Pandemic Influenza Mortality, 1918–1919 Pharmacology, Pathology, and Historic Evidence

    Abstract

    The high case-fatality rate—especially among young adults—during the 1918–1919 influenza pandemic is incompletely understood. Although late deaths showed bacterial pneumonia, early deaths exhibited extremely “wet,” sometimes hemorrhagic lungs. The hypothesis presented herein is that aspirin contributed to the incidence and severity of viral pathology, bacterial infection, and death, because physicians of the day were unaware that the regimens (8.0–31.2 g per day) produce levels associated with hyperventilation and pulmonary edema in 33% and 3% of recipients, respectively. Recently, pulmonary edema was found at autopsy in 46% of 26 salicylate-intoxicated adults. Experimentally, salicylates increase lung fluid and protein levels and impair mucociliary clearance. In 1918, the US Surgeon General, the US Navy, and the Journal of the American Medical Association recommended use of aspirin just before the October death spike. If these recommendations were followed, and if pulmonary edema occurred in 3% of persons, a significant proportion of the deaths may be attributable to aspirin.

  124. johanna

    Johno
    #3337393, posted on February 28, 2020 at 10:02 am

    Someone put up that the whole worlds population of 7.7 billion people could be housed in Texas on their own 1/4 acre block. Size of Texas 171.902 million acres,multiply by 4 equals 687.08 million people on their 1/4 acre.

    Just sayin’

    Johno, you assume that each suburban home will have a sole occupant. The poster assumed 4 or so.

    OK, maybe the surplus could wash over into Oklahoma or New Mexico, which are thinly populated. The point remains the same.

  125. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Many thanks to Zippy who has posted stories on the virus as new information, however odd and far-fetched, came to hand. At least we had the chance to read up and accept or discard as we pondered the implications.

    Definitely, Zippy did us proud. I’ve said this previously, all through the epidemic progress to date. I’ve previously said here that I topped epidemiology in SU Med Faculty in the 80’s (forgotten a lot of it of course), and I was early in saying here this one could be a doozy. Zippy, though, provided the base of material on which assessments could be made. Early on some here were saying what does the epidemiology say, and I was very quick to point out that epidemiology can only say useful things when we have proper information, however some flags may be raised, and I pointed to a few, the neurological expressions in particular were very concerning in some cases, and the human jumble at hospital fever clinics could have been much better handled in China, for it was a potent source of further infections. I trust our fever clinics will be better organized.

    Johanna today suggests we should have little real concern, as flu too is bad and goes unnoticed. There is some sense in that, but it is underplaying this particular virus. Nevertheless, most people may get it and most people will come through it, so the world won’t turn upside down. But there will still be some heartache in it for more people than in a usual flu season when loved ones die who would otherwise have survived an ordinary vax’d flu. It isn’t only the very old who are dying. And economic disruption is already a given. Fear too will have its own effect, so Australian stoicism and she’ll be rightism may serve us well in the end.

  126. OldOzzie

    First it was a joke, but Corona beer is really suffering from coronavirus news

    Coronavirus fear has gripped the United States. Unfortunately for one of America’s favorite beers, that fear has extended to its brand even though the illness has nothing to do with the adult beverage.

    YouGov’s Buzz score — a measure of whether you’ve heard something positive or negative — has been dropping for Corona Extra beer.

  127. candy

    I wonder what people think would be the best and closest to human test case for the Corona virus, before they try it out on willing human volunteers? Rats? Mice? Or baboons?

    I would feel a bit concerned about the rushed nature of the vaccine. How long are these things tested for before they can be safely used on people. Fear can drive this too soon?

  128. dover_beach

    So why did she she do it?

    Context is important. She was standing up for a Detective Inspector that was being pilloried in the media.

  129. OldOzzie

    2022 Subaru WRX STI: What We Know So Far

    Reports suggest that the new STI will make as much as 400 horsepower from a turbo 2.4-liter boxer-four.

  130. Struth

    Good Moaning.
    Australia in recession?

    Can’t be………………
    Sco M0 has a huge immigration scheme binging in third world shit that was supposed to magically grow the economy.
    They’ve been doing it for years…………………………no, we can’t be in recession?!

  131. OldOzzie

    12 Cars with the Best Safety Ratings

    The safest new cars you can buy in 2020 come from Honda, Kia, Lexus, Lincoln, Genesis, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, and Subaru.

  132. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    NYU Professor Notes Coronavirus May Be ‘Bi-Phasic like Anthrax’, It’s Time to Press the Chinese for More Answers

    the chicoms mentioned reinfection. possibly its ability to bind to more than just ACE2 and who knows what the recombination inserts do. does it lay dormant even when cured? has it mutated?

    south korea has pretty much lost control of the virus. I’d say iran has as well. italy is on the brink.

    nuking the chicoms is starting to look attractive.

  133. Roger

    Arndt was not represented in the Senate when it debated and passed the motion; she was not given a reasonable opportunity to argue against the punishment with which she was being threatened.

    Pfft.

    She’s a mere citizen.

    [sarc]

  134. Mr Taylor believes the world must go through rapid technology development and adoption to reduce emissions on a global scale.

    My mum told me that if everyone else seemed crazy, then I should that I was not the crazy one.

    Checking …

  135. Cassie of Sydney

    “Des Deskperson
    #3337401, posted on February 28, 2020 at 10:10 am
    ‘Bettina Arndt is the victim of a political hit job, pure and simple. ‘

    Well yes, but with the initial furore after she was awarded the AM, she must have known – particularly given the reaction to DI Thompson’s statement – that her subsequent comments on the Baxter case would have further enraged her enemies. She may not have anticipated the Senate pile-on, but she must have been aware that she had, as they say, considerably upped the ante.

    So why did she she do it? Courage, stupidity or deliberate provocation?”

    So Des…are you now saying that Conservatives, libertarians and really anyone who doesn’t conform and doesn’t prescribe to the neo-Marxist, progressive, Green far-left zeitgeist must now watch their words and vacate the public space……OR ELSE….the frenzied progressive lynch mobs will come after them…just like they’ve come after Bettina…just like they went after Margaret Court…just like they went after Izzy Folau? That is appeasement. That is craven. The truth is that they have been after Bettina for years now…for her refusal to conform to their man hating ideology…….and their fury after she was given a gong on Australia Day has been extreme…to say the least….calling Bettina a wapist and peterfile apologist…you know the usual smears that the progressive left are good at.

    And we had a so called Liberal government who went along with it…I really don’t know whether to laugh or cry.

  136. Nick

    Anyone notice the wall-to-wall coverage being given the Brisbane knife maniac shot dead by the coppers last Sunday?

    It’s not as if he assumed someone’s gender or besmirched a female.

  137. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    An oxygen concentrator can be had for $500. I m thinking if this thing runs away here, given they are now allowing chicom students in, having your own supply of oxygen could be lifesaving. I already have a pulse oximeter.

  138. OldOzzie

    Coronavirus: Low Australian dollar no help to average citizen

    ADAM CREIGHTON

    Common sense and economics sometimes part company. The benefits of a weak currency is one such example.

    The spread of the coronavirus has accelerated the decline of the Australian dollar, which touched an 11-year low this week of about US65.5c.

    In the textbooks, this significant weakening should boost net exports, encourage overseas businesses to shift their operations here and consumers to “substitute” towards goods and services produced here.

    In reality, the depreciation makes us poorer by kneecapping our purchasing power.

    Being forced to holiday at home — one of the supposed silver linings of the recent currency slump — is hardly a marker of prosperity.

    But that’s about the only form of “substitution” to “domestic production” available.

    Practically all the goods we buy, especially the advanced mach­inery required by what remains of heavy industry, are produced overseas.

    There simply aren’t many domestic alternatives.

    A weaker dollar boosts education exports, too — assuming students can get here — yet this has been a dubious benefit, fuelling a decline in standards at our universities that have blown the windfall cash on armies of overpaid administrators and “professors”, who are adding precious little to productivity growth.

    The number of manufacturing jobs has hovered around 900,000, despite the 20 per cent currency drop.

    “Importers, retailers for example, suffer and margins get squeezed, or if the lift in import costs can be passed on to consumers then consumers are worse off,” says Gareth Aird, senior economist at Commonwealth Bank.

    “It’s possible to get both a boost to output and reduction in living standards at the same time.”

    Sure, resource companies’ earnings, and hence federal company tax collections, will be higher when converted back into Australian dollars. Commodity exports are priced in US dollars.

    In a little over two years, the dollar has tumbled by more than a fifth, down from US81c. A decline of that size should increase export volumes by about 6 per cent, according to a 2016 Reserve Bank analysis, and curb imports by about 8 per cent. The combination should lift GDP by about 3 per cent over two years.

    Yet since the start of 2018, the economy, far from booming, has been weak, flirting with actual ­recession.

    It’s very hard to believe this ­depreciation has improved our standard of living.

  139. try it out on willing human volunteers? Rats? Mice? Or baboons?

    Nope. Use Gangreen voters.

  140. Mitch M.

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #3337426, posted on February 28, 2020 at 10:33 am
    NYU Professor Notes Coronavirus May Be ‘Bi-Phasic like Anthrax’, It’s Time to Press the Chinese for More Answers

    the chicoms mentioned reinfection. possibly its ability to bind to more than just ACE2 and who knows what the recombination inserts do. does it lay dormant even when cured? has it mutated?

    south korea has pretty much lost control of the virus. I’d say iran has as well. italy is on the brink.

    nuking the chicoms is starting to look attractive.

    The troubling aspect of the asymptomatic time period is that it suggests this virus can hang around the body for extended periods. There are a few viruses like that and only develop symptoms when immune function is compromised. If that is the case we are long past containing it. It may be much more devastating in countries with poor health services and widespread malnutrition.

  141. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    n 1918, the US Surgeon General, the US Navy, and the Journal of the American Medical Association recommended use of aspirin just before the October death spike. If these recommendations were followed, and if pulmonary edema occurred in 3% of persons, a significant proportion of the deaths may be attributable to aspirin.

    This is extremely interesting and seems to be a likely iatrogenic problem. In China at the height of Covid-19 we had reports of people being handed out anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen which can have a similar effect to aspirin in inducing internal tissue bleeding, which might account for some of the case fatalities there too. I think I might revise any intended use of anti-inflammatories should I start feeling ill on my travels. I note that Panadeine is the antipyretic painkiller of choice in Covid-19 treatment.

    A healthy immune system is the best defense of all. Plus avoidance of exposure, so I hope that if Mexico develops as a hotbed in some spots that our cruise ship eschews any port that seems central to it. Hairy is intent on doing some bus tours when in port so I will be taking plenty of antiseptic wipes on those for seats and handholds etc.

  142. DrBeauGan

    That is appeasement. That is craven

    .

    Exactly so. And that is the senate liberals. Gutless.

    There’s nothing wrong with supporting a cop who sought the background. Now we’ve got it and yes, the guy was a dangerous whacko and had been for a long time. But nobody knew that when the cop made an unremarkable plea for more information.

  143. Beertruk

    Also in today’s Tele (hopefully this one passes the spammultor test, unlike the original post):
    RAY HADLEY

    2. Plenty of debate about whether Bettina Arndt should retain her Australia Day honour. Perhaps we need to focus our attention on the former Anglican Dean of Newcastle, Graeme Lawrence, a convicted peterfile who remains in jail and retains his Order of Australia. While Ms Arndt’s views are bizarre she’s not been convicted of any crime.

  144. Check complete. 100% sane.

    The fixation on CO2 has to stop. These imbeciles are screwing up our infrastructure and feeding the scamsters.

  145. dover_beach

    It was a tweet, an off the cuff remark that was ill timed and ill conceived. She was dead wrong. He wasn’t driven too far, what we now know is that he was well down the murderous intent pathway even with his first marriage.

    No, here is what she said:

    Ms Arndt praised a Queensland detective Mark Thompson for saying Baxter, who allegedly killed his wife and three children by setting them on fire, may have been “driven too far” — comments which led him to being taken off the case.

    “Congratulations to the Queensland police for keeping an open mind and awaiting proper evidence, including the possibility that Rowan Baxter might have been ‘driven too far’,” Ms Arndt wrote on Twitter.

    Her tweet was not ‘off the cuff”, she was defending a Detective Inspector being lynched in the media and thrown to the wolves by Queensland Police. Nor was it ‘ill-timed’ as there is no point defending him a week later when he is long-forgotten. Neither was it ‘ill-conceived’, she used precisely the term he used in his press conference which itself marked a concern to uncover all the relevant facts from all relevant witnesses, etc. leading up to this horrendous crime. And, nor was she asserting that he was ‘driven too far’ which in the tweet she only mentions as a ‘possibility’, one of many only to be determined by a full investigation.

  146. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    That’s common Panadol (Paracetamol) not Panadeine (which has codeine in it as well, and you need a script for it now too).

  147. Roger

    The fixation on CO2 has to stop. These imbeciles are screwing up our infrastructure and feeding the scamsters.

    Meanwile, the UK Court of Appeal has blocked a third runway at Heathrow on the grounds that the government didn’t take into account its effect on the climate. The government will not appeal.

  148. johanna

    r Taylor will tell a Committee for Economic Development of Australia breakfast function the government is preparing to shift support from solar and wind so as not to “crowd out” the private sector. Instead, the government will back hydrogen, carbon capture and storage, lithium and advanced livestock feed supplements.

    Out of the frying pan into the fire.

    Stupid, stupid politics. They will infuriate the people they are taking money from, and give it to another lot of shysters, who will attack them non-stop about the ‘climate emergency.’ Cowards. When will they realise that Twitter is not the electorate?

    As for TheirABC, it is now hard to find an article which does not mention the impending catastrophe of ‘climate change.’ Pick a topic, any topic, and they will work it in. They hit the digital Rolodex and find an ‘expert’ (they love ‘experts’, especially anonymous ones) who explains that blah blah blah ‘climate change.’ It is braindead and tedious.

    Strangely enough, the responses never include building new dams or other infrastructure. What we need is more wheelie bins, regulation and less economic development. That’ll fix it. Oh, and close down mining, especially for coal.

    I don’t often agree with JC, but he is right to say that our mining industry is very high tech, more akin to manufacturing. It is dishonest to describe it as just digging holes in the ground and exporting the contents. That is far, far from the truth. The myth that Greenies and their ilk spout about mining is a big lie.

    Similarly, he is right about agriculture. That dickhead Bloomberg lost millions of votes when he said that being a farmer was just dropping a seed in a hole in the ground. Anyone in this room could do it, according to him. Well, he just lost about 20 states, at least.

    There was discussion above about food production in Holland. Subsidies or not, they produce a staggering amount of food in a very small space, thanks to technology. We need to stop thinking about farming as a kind of hayseed add-on to the economy.

  149. We should be more worried about infectious EcoLoonism than corona.

  150. C.L.

    To describe Bettina Arndt’s comments about the murder of Hannah Clarke and her three children as abhorrent would be a grievous understatement.

    No it wouldn’t.

  151. 8th Dan

    8th Dan – you are amusing.

    Sometimes, Kev … not always.
    Yeah, you could be wrong …

  152. Roger

    Instead, the government will back hydrogen, carbon capture and storage, lithium and advanced livestock feed supplements.

    Why does government need to “back” anything?

    Simply legislate the most modest regulatory framework possible and let the private sector back itself.

  153. johanna

    Definitely, Zippy did us proud.

    Lizzie is sucking up to potential allies, as usual (it’s a wonder she didn’t call him Darling Zippy) but all he did was fan the flames of ignorance and hysteria. He linked to unsubstantiated and unsourced clips to which he attached his views, went on a red cordial binge where he posted every few minutes for days, and couldn’t wait for the collapse of civilisation.

    Who is this ‘us’ you speak of, Lizzie? I hope you are not doing your old trick of claiming to speak for all women, and now everyone. Because, in the end, you encapsulate all of us, right?

  154. candy

    Instead, the government will back hydrogen, carbon capture and storage, lithium and advanced livestock feed supplements.

    This all sounds a bit confusing and dangerous.

  155. Mitch M.

    Her tweet was not ‘off the cuff”, she was defending a Detective Inspector being lynched in the media and thrown to the wolves by Queensland Police.

    The speculation was without a scintilla of evidence. Neither understanding the cause of his behavior or conducting a criminal investigation should be done with such an approach. The officer was a fool for making the comment and Arndt was silly to support a speculation pulled out of thin air. Both of them have been unfairly treated, I get that, but both of them should never have entertained such a specious possibility let alone aired it.

  156. Bruce of Newcastle

    The ASX is definitely not happy.
    Amusingly the only S&P/ASX50 stock that is up is Trea Wine.
    Drink up!

  157. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Meanwhile the NHS said it was offering a “drive through” coronavirus testing service for patients in west London. The scheme, provided by Central London Community Healthcare NHS Trust in Parsons Green, can only be accessed through a referral from NHS 111. People are invited to an appointment in their car, during which two community nurses carry out a swab in the nose and mouth, which are checked and assessed within 72 hours.
    People are asked to self-isolate while checks are completed, to prevent any potential transmission.

    Weak point – how to get the NHS 111 referral and who might you infect while you were getting it? We shouldn’t forget that China made things much worse by having infected people run around all over the place getting their names physically ticked off various lists. This, in an online world too.

    Otherwise car based referral and treatment seems a very good idea and worth us considering here for our much more car-based suburbs. Home isolation in our separate housing stock would work better too. Apartment buidings are more of a problem, especially if they have common aircon and sewage stacks.

  158. twostix

    What they mean by “ill-timed” is the person got in the way of the climax of a mob lynching.

    They should have known better than to mouth off at that moment, etc.

    It is what it is, our “elite” are gutless mob cowards who not only can’t stand up to a mob, they’re terrified even seeing someone else do it.

  159. Zaan

    Mitch M. 11:04 am
    Totally agree

  160. dover_beach

    The speculation was without a scintilla of evidence.

    Neither the DI or Arndt were speculating, they were setting out the range of the investigation. Again:

    Congratulations to the Queensland police for keeping an open mind and awaiting proper evidence, including the possibility that Rowan Baxter might have been ‘driven too far’

    Remember, the DI said this in a press conference calling for witnesses, etc.

  161. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The speculation was without a scintilla of evidence.

    It was not speculating about any particular thing, Mitch. And as I’ve pointed out to you on another thread, a terrible event does produce a generalized response – the feminist one was particularly OTT, btw. People like to express concerns to each other; that is part of our primate inheritance, to share, to wit this blog even!!

    Expressing a simple hope that a proper investigation will result is hardly a hanging offense. Except for some who deny the right of anyone to speak unless they follow a party line that is offered the moment such an event happens. It’s Orwellian, and frightening to see how many otherwise sensible people do not see that.

  162. Mitch M.

    Neither the DI or Arndt were speculating, they were setting out the range of the investigation. Again:

    A single speculation does not equal setting out the range of the investigation. That would require putting forward a number of possibilities. That would be evidence of an open mind whereas mentioning one possibility is evidence of speculation.

  163. johanna

    The troubling aspect of the asymptomatic time period is that it suggests this virus can hang around the body for extended periods. There are a few viruses like that and only develop symptoms when immune function is compromised. If that is the case we are long past containing it. It may be much more devastating in countries with poor health services and widespread malnutrition.

    You mean like herpes? Or whatever the bug is that causes shingles in adults?

    If so, hardly unprecedented, or life threatening.

    That said, you wouldn’t get me on a cruise ship just now if it was offered for free with a cash bonus. There are plenty of ways to enjoy life without being a guinea pig for the latest flu strain.

  164. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    This all sounds a bit confusing and dangerous.

    As well as quite unnecessary and completely stupid.

  165. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    I note that Panadeine is the antipyretic painkiller of choice in Covid-19 treatment.

    it’s best to let a fever run, unless it’s dangerously high. coronaviruses don’t like heat

  166. dover_beach

    A single speculation does not equal setting out the range of the investigation. That would require putting forward a number of possibilities. That would be evidence of an open mind whereas mentioning one possibility is evidence of speculation.

    He did. Go and listen to the press conference, or are you opining without have heard what he actually said?

  167. twostix

    Is there a better politician than Latham? I doubt it. He’s the best since John Tingle.

    Conservatives in NSW have no choice but to vote for One Nation.

    It is the safe Conservative party in NSW.

    The NSW Liberal party is an unholy mixture of international bolshevism and corporatism (aka neo-communism aka “liberalism”).

  168. Old Conservative:

    Some wise words:
    The widow of a man killed in the Bourke Street rampage says Victorians might be “better off protecting ourselves” than relying on “egoistic” police officers more concerned with safeguarding their careers than ensuring public safety. (The Age)

    It would be interesting to see the persons involved apply for a pistol licence on the grounds of the State is incapable of protecting citizens from rampaging loons.
    Then when the application is refused, as it will be, the case goes to the next Court and higher.
    Time for Lawfare.

  169. Infidel Tiger

    Might be time to buy the dip.

    When Biden smashes Sanders in South Carolina this weekend, expect a big bounce.

  170. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    whatever the bug is that causes shingles in adults

    Chicken pox. Varicella-zoster. It hangs around for many years on the sheaths of nerves lingering from an earlier infection often during childhood, and can erupt badly in older age or when the immune system is weakened. Particularly bad when it hits the eyes. Herpes Zoster is similar.

    Viruses are nasty little buggers. Harder to spot than bacteria, and more sneaky.

  171. twostix

    “I have found the ‘abhorrent’ comments by Bettina Arndt:

    Ms Arndt praised a Queensland detective Mark Thompson for saying Baxter, who allegedly killed his wife and three children by setting them on fire, may have been “driven too far” — comments which led him to being taken off the case.

    “Congratulations to the Queensland police for keeping an open mind and awaiting proper evidence, including the possibility that Rowan Baxter might have been ‘driven too far’,” Ms Arndt wrote on Twitter. “

    One of the golden rules that we can learn to live by, is when there’s a media lynch mob out against a “disgraceful” bigotty bigot. If, in the tens of thousands of outrageously outraged words in hundreds of articles, political shows, reports, tweets, FB posts after a week you still don’t know what the person actually said.

    Dead giveaway.

    It’s manufactured outrage.

    This goes to the “racist” incidents in hospitals reported yesterday. No details. How unusual!

  172. Nob

    Roger
    #3337445, posted on February 28, 2020 at 10:50 am
    The fixation on CO2 has to stop. These imbeciles are screwing up our infrastructure and feeding the scamsters.

    Meanwile, the UK Court of Appeal has blocked a third runway at Heathrow on the grounds that the government didn’t take into account its effect on the climate. The government will not appeal

    Because Boris never wanted it in the first place.
    Back from when he was mayor of London.

    Heathrow management is appealing though.

  173. One of my concerns is the potential for the WZV to get on board one of the US Pacific Fleets carriers or submarines.
    Should this happen, the US is quite within its rights to blockade ALL of the Chinese coastline, and for the states contiguous to China to embargo it.

  174. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The NSW Liberal party is an unholy mixture of international bolshevism and corporatism (aka neo-communism aka “liberalism”).

    Yep. Latham for me, One Nation notwithstanding. I can cope.
    Federally too if the current adherence to the climate scam continues with them and also the general wetness of most of them.

  175. Infidel Tiger

    I think I want this virus now.

    Getting it when half the country has it will not be good.

    I’m a bug chaser. If you know anyone with it, hook me up.

  176. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Corona virus is way beyond being a Chinese problem now.

  177. Johno

    Johno, you assume that each suburban home will have a sole occupant. The poster assumed 4 or so.

    If you multiply 687 by 4 you get 2,748 million, still way short of the 7,700 million claimed.

  178. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Getting it when half the country has it will not be good.

    Yes. Early adopters will be better off.
    Unless of course the virus loses its virulence over what is called ‘passage’ through others. 🙂

  179. Infidel Tiger

    Corona virus is way beyond being a Chinese problem now.

    They started it, we’ll end it.

    We will end them too. I would withhold any vaccine or treatment until the rest of the world is fixed. Filthy beasts should also pay reparations.

  180. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    I’m a bug chaser. If you know anyone with it, hook me up.

    gold coast hospital, ask to speak to quarantine, tell’em you’re a rellie

  181. johanna

    Stupid EU imagining that post Ataturk Turkey is anything other than an I s lamic vector, giving them billions of Euros to prevent invasions:

    2:16

    The Turkish government has announced that for the next 72 hours it will open its border with Syria and allow any and all migrants to go to Europe unhindered.

    A senior official has claimed that the government of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has opened the borders for Syrian asylum seekers and other migrants and will not prevent anyone from heading to Europe by land or by sea, Reuters reports.

    According to the news service, all Turkish border and police officials have been ordered by the government to stand down along with members of the Turkish coastguard.

    Angela Merkel and the frogs want to expand the EU into an empire, whatever the cost. That includes bribing the Turks, who took the money and then reneged, so now they want more.

    Britain is well out of it.

  182. I’m a bug chaser.

    metoo.
    Get it, survive it.
    If it don’t kill you, it makes you stronger.

  183. johanna

    johno, are you saying that the world is running out of space for people? If so, please say so.

  184. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    it’s best to let a fever run, unless it’s dangerously high. coronaviruses don’t like heat

    Yes, I agree, Zippy, and so does Dr. John Campbell, who queried Panadol treatment of some patients in the Covid-19 case histories he was looking at. However, too much temping is also bad for the heart and other organs, so a balance has to be struck. Heat is the body’s evolved mechanism for trying to expel an invading virus or bacterium. When it stops (‘breaks’ as in the bonnet dramas), you’re better, or you’re dead.

  185. Arky

    They started it, we’ll end it.

    We will end them too. I would withhold any vaccine or treatment until the rest of the world is fixed. Filthy beasts should also pay reparations.

    ..
    Ummmm.
    NO.
    They are at least six weeks ahead of us in dealing with it.
    They will be out the other side when we and the USA are at the peak.
    We’re fucked.
    As I have been telling anyone who will listen for at least the last five years.

  186. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    According to the news service, all Turkish border and police officials have been ordered by the government to stand down along with members of the Turkish coastguard.

    Entry of the viral Corona hordes. Germans won’t like this. More Danegeld required.

  187. Delta A

    And, nor was she asserting that he was ‘driven too far’ which in the tweet she only mentions as a ‘possibility’, one of many only to be determined by a full investigation.

    Absolutely correct, dover. Unfortunately, the MSM and the left (BIRM) don’t believe in full and thorough investigation. It’s all about the feelz.

  188. We’re fucked.
    As I have been telling anyone who will listen for at least the last five years.

    So I don’t need to pay off the credit cards?
    And should forget about servicing the car and mowing the lawn?

  189. Infidel Tiger

    ..
    Ummmm.
    NO.
    They are at least six weeks ahead of us in dealing with it.

    How are they dealing with it?

    Fudging stats and disappearing Xi’s enemies?

    The Gooks have no idea what to do. They are hoping like hell a US pharma comes up with something so they can steal the IP.

  190. Infidel Tiger

    If we’re fucked, you have no idea how incredibly fucked China is.

    The greatest ponzi in human history is over.

    Good riddance.

  191. Good morning all.
    I note that baseball players are very displeased with the Houston Astros due to sign stealing, which is tantamount to cheating. So much so that opposing pitchers, in 5 pre season matches, have plunked 7 Astros. If political figures or media lapdogs played the great American pastime, who would you like to see dropped by the opposing pitcher? Peter Fitzsimmons for mine, considering he thinks of himself as a pundit of the highest order.

  192. Geriatric Mayfly

    How many delegations from the Celestial Kingdom, will Mr Speaker be welcoming to the gallery in the House
    in coming weeks? It would be undiplomatic not to do so.

  193. Arky

    By the way.
    Great strategy.
    Hand your entire industrial base over to China. Chemicals, textiles, manufacturing. Everything.
    Salt the earth in your own countries with renewable crap and green tape.
    Orientate your remaining economic activities (lobster pots, bus tours, ore sales and fake university degrees) towards servicing China.
    THEN in the midst of a global pandemic decide it might be a good idea to decouple from China.
    No, idiots. They are decoupling from us after taking everything they wanted.

  194. Infidel Tiger

    The Astros should have their 2017 pennant stripped.

  195. johanna

    Nob
    #3337474, posted on February 28, 2020 at 11:24 am

    Roger
    #3337445, posted on February 28, 2020 at 10:50 am
    The fixation on CO2 has to stop. These imbeciles are screwing up our infrastructure and feeding the scamsters.

    Meanwile, the UK Court of Appeal has blocked a third runway at Heathrow on the grounds that the government didn’t take into account its effect on the climate. The government will not appeal

    Because Boris never wanted it in the first place.
    Back from when he was mayor of London.

    Heathrow management is appealing though.

    Actually, the court said that it did not comply with the Paris Agreement, you know, the one that was said to be non-binding. That was what was sold to the punters. ‘I’ll only put it in a little way …’

    How on earth can a proper judge bind the UK to a non-binding agreement? Well, just ask the Ninth Circuit in the US, or our own High Court.

    The law is whatever they think it is.

    Morrison has the opportunity to appoint at least one, maybe two, HC judges.

    Prepare to be disappointed.

    If only Roddy Meagher could rise from the grave.

  196. mh

    IT sees this as an opportunity. I concur.

    Others here just want to say “We’re fucked.”

  197. Infidel Tiger

    All the antibacterial wipes at the gym have been stolen by the Asian students who invade the place at night.

    They roll in late at night in their slides, and wearing face masks, lift puny weights, use We Chat, steal and leave.

    They are the globalists Perfect new Australians.

  198. Johno

    johno, are you saying that the world is running out of space for people? If so, please say so.

    The original post stated that the worlds population could all have their 1/4 acre block in Texas. I provided information that disproved this. How you could read this as me saying that the world was running out of space is beyond me.

  199. Arky

    Others here just want to say “We’re fucked.”

    ..
    We’re fucked.

  200. Roger

    Actually, the court said that it did not comply with the Paris Agreement, you know, the one that was said to be non-binding.

    Activist judges; give them an inch…

  201. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    That said, you wouldn’t get me on a cruise ship just now if it was offered for free with a cash bonus. There are plenty of ways to enjoy life without being a guinea pig for the latest flu strain.

    Lucky then you’re not married to an adventurous man with his heart set on doing the Panama Canal and tickets in hand.

    We will continue on, a decision jointly made on the basis of current risk factors and with a refusal to give way to panics when our next trip to teaming airconditioned heavily-Asian populated Westfields would be likely to expose us just as easily. With a virus you just can’t tell, although I am very mindful of 24/7 air-conditioning and won’t be using it on board in our ‘stateroom’, throwing open the balcony doors instead. All travel will subject you to the possibility of a shutdown which will include you. We are prepared for that. If it happens, it happens. We will review the situation once we are in San Diego where the ship is.

    It’s a Dutch ship. Surely that counts. 😀

  202. Arky

    We’re so fucked, you might as well all join Lizzie on her 2020 Corona Cruising Tour of Guangzhou, Shanghai, Hong Kong and Bangkok.
    Survivors get a free t shirt “I survived five months in quarantine without throttling the bloody cow”

  203. bespoke

    Des Deskperson
    #3337401, posted on February 28, 2020 at 10:10 am

    So why did she she do it? Courage, stupidity or deliberate provocation?

    Simple it’s been her profession for a for a long time not just some training +Google. I would be surprised it she didn’t or just went along with the mob.

  204. Delta A

    Daughter has just cancelled their late March cruise (two weeks around South Pacific) for herself, SiL and his elderly mother. They’ll probably be out of pocket a couple of thousand, but all agree it’s worth it for their peace of mind.

    Mine, too! I’m very relieved.

  205. johanna

    It being a Dutch ship is certainly better than it being an Italian or French (shudder) ship. German or Swiss is also better.

    That said, better you than me.

  206. Delta A

    Arky
    #3337502, posted on February 28, 2020 at 11:47 am

    In a nutshell.

  207. Just walked past a poster in this hellhole formerly known as Sydney that said (in English and Chinese) “Chinese students welcome, racists not”. On closer inspection it was made by the socialist vermin that infect our edukayshun system.
    I hope the asshats get infected and slowly choke on their own bile and phlegm.

  208. Infidel Tiger

    Others here just want to say “We’re fucked.”

    ..
    We’re fucked.

    Temporary distraction.

    This is the greatest opportunity since the end of WWII.

    We can grind the Chicoms, the neoliberals and globalists into the dirt and get our country back.

    I’m excited!

  209. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Who is this ‘us’ you speak of, Lizzie? I hope you are not doing your old trick of claiming to speak for all women, and now everyone. Because, in the end, you encapsulate all of us, right?

    Oh do shut up, you silly woman.

    People who have some knowledge have been discussing serious stuff. Go and enroll in a degree in epidemiology and come back when you can contribute meaningfully to medical-based discussions.

  210. Arky

    Don’t get the cruising thing.
    Surely being housed in small rooms in a place you can’t escape, served food that has been stored for weeks while old people die and get carted out every day, is something you will experience anyway once the kids consign you to an aged care home.
    Is it some sort of need for a dress rehearsal of the inevitable?

  211. Roger

    “Chinese students welcome, racists not”.

    Racist Chinese students?

  212. dover_beach

    Dr John Campbell’s videos have been very good this last month. No one who has watched them would be surprised about the present situation nor would they be under the illusion that this is no worse than the flu.

  213. Infidel Tiger

    Anyone going on a cruise deserves to die.

    We can all agree on that.

  214. bespoke

    Arky

    In a nutshell.

    Agree.

  215. dover_beach

    I wonder what contingencies our governments are preparing for COVID-19?

  216. mh

    This is a massive opportunity for Trump.

    He needs to go harder, and keep winning. Increase those tariffs on China and really squeeze the communists.

  217. lotocoti

    I think I want this virus now.

    Best to get it first, when there’s a deluxe isolation suite standing by and the undivided attention of every specialist in the country, rather than one thousandth, when the best you can hope for is triage,
    an aspro and a half arsed “Good luck.”

  218. We can grind the Chicoms, the neoliberals and globalists into the dirt and get our country back.

    Good.

    Unless it is a bio-weapon.

    PRC can afford to lose a few mill. They just tested it in Wuhan.

  219. Infidel Tiger

    I wonder what contingencies our governments are preparing for COVID-19?

    Closing the border should be the top priority.

  220. Bruce of Newcastle

    Speaking of cruises:

    Coronavirus: Some Diamond Princess crew members to be quarantined in Japan; World Dream to dry dock (27 Feb)

    After weeks in coronavirus quarantine that was meant to end on Feb. 19, Princess Cruises’ Diamond Princess cruise ship has officially disembarked all guests, the cruise line confirmed Thursday.

    According to a statement provided by spokesperson Negin Kamali, all guests had disembarked by Thursday and there were fewer than 500 remaining crew members on board. There were originally 3,711 quarantined people on board; 1,045 were crew members. Some are waiting to be taken home on charter flights and some will be moved to a quarantine on land.

    So after a month the last passenger has been allowed off…leaving only 500 crew still stuck on the ship. Ouch, who’d want to be a cruise ship wukka after an experience like that!

  221. Gwendolyn

    Infidel Tiger:

    A global recession is needed. All the zombie debt cults need to die. Tesla, Uber etc.

    Only downside is that it will hurt Sir Donald Trumpington.

    No. No. No. No.

    A US recession this year will hurt President Trump in November.

    And if the Left manage to defeat him we will never hear the end of it. “One Term Donald” and things like that. I feel sick just thinking about it!

  222. Arky

    Closing the border should be the top priority.

    ..
    … a month ago.

  223. mh

    Infidel Tiger
    #3337506, posted on February 28, 2020 at 11:49 am
    All the antibacterial wipes at the gym have been stolen by the Asian students who invade the place at night.

    They roll in late at night in their slides, and wearing face masks, lift puny weights, use We Chat, steal and leave.

    They are the globalists Perfect new Australians.

    This is quality.

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