Can’t See The Trees For The Forest


We didn’t require any regs or legislation to toss a few million out of work and destroy all their businesses, but to lop a tree down takes 6 months at council.”

Infidel Tiger

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35 Responses to Can’t See The Trees For The Forest

  1. That is actually a pretty good quote.

    I know a couple who move here from Hong Kong and bought a large property. Husband still worked in Hong Kong. The wife decide to have a large gum tree cut down not knowing she needed approval. $25,000 fine so I was told.

  2. egg_

    Is Scotty-from-Marketing sweating?

  3. Entropy

    A have a friend who bought a block of land for their dream home. Had a gum tree in a koala avenue or done such. It would be a $25,000 fine. They redesigned their house to accommodate the tree. “Why didn’t you just cut it down and pay the $25,000?” I asked.

  4. Rafe Champion

    Beautiful! Imagine the cost and inconvenience of redesigning the house!

  5. Docket62

    Is Scotty-from-Marketing sweating?

    No, but he has a cough

  6. Eyrie

    Cutting down a gum tree should be worth an OAM in the next Honours List.

  7. Petros

    Let’s hope the pandemic restores common sense to the various levels of government. Wishful thinking perhaps?

  8. OldOzzie

    Petros
    #3372935, posted on March 24, 2020 at 7:31 am
    Let’s hope the pandemic restores common sense to the various levels of government. Wishful thinking perhaps?

    Definitely Wishful Thinking!

    Public servants thrive on creating regulations which mean more Public Servants need to be employed to enforce those regulations, allowing existing Public Servants to rise in Seniority and Wage increase up the promotion ladder.

    From numerous years selling into and dealing with Federal and State Public Servants – never pick an Australian Firm, always go overseas to evaluate, then pick overseas, so you can continue to go and visit and be entertained by the overseas company.

    Never make a decision – always put a Committee in place to discuss – employ External Consultants, who you can blame for making any decision.

    All perfectly summed up by

    Kerry Packer’s Political Philosophy.

    Highlights of Kerry Packer’s 1991 House of Reps Select Committee on Print Media Appearance. It includes perhaps the most famous Australian anti-government quote, where Packer says that anyone who pays more tax than they can get away with needs their head examined.

  9. duncanm

    Rafe Champion
    #3372926, posted on March 24, 2020 at 6:57 am

    Beautiful! Imagine the cost and inconvenience of redesigning the house!

    it’ll fall on the house… that’s after a few good years of dropping substantial limbs through the roof every now and then. #howdumarecouncils

  10. duncanm

    this paper mentions in passing the social disruption of the 1919 pandemic. The graphs of death rates in NSW through the year are also instructive – first wave in April, then a big hitter mid-winter – similar to today’s timing.

    Does anyone have a paper with more analysis of the post-flu social impacts? I’m guessing the end-of-war footing the 1919 outbreak followed means that Australia was already in a non-standard state.

  11. stackja

    duncanm
    #3372970, posted on March 24, 2020 at 8:14 am

    Some information at AWM WW1 medical history and Trove newspapers.

  12. JohnJJJ

    Ha, wait till you try to change any part of your house (repair 1.5 square metres of decking) and have to submit an Endangered Species, Critical Habitat and Biodiversity Plan. This is in the middle of the city. Rats, pigeons, indian minors, mice ( lots of them with the compost bins nearby and no plastic bags), diverse cockroaches was all I could think of.

  13. stackja

    US-Japanese study finds genes for 1918 ‘Spanish flu’ pandemic
    By AFP – Mon Dec 29, 5:53 PM PST
    WASHINGTON (AFP) – A US-Japanese research team announced it had isolated three genes that explain why the 1918 Spanish flu, believed to be the deadliest infectious disease in history, was so lethal.
    The pandemic killed between 20 and 50 million people — more than in all of World War I, which ended in November 1918 — and spread around the world.
    The genes allowed the virus to reproduce in lung tissue, according to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
    “Conventional flu viruses replicate mainly in the upper respiratory tract: the mouth, nose and throat,” said University of Wisconsin-Madison virologist Yoshihiro Kawaoka, who co-authored the study along with Masato Hatta, also of UW-Madison.
    “The 1918 virus replicates in the upper respiratory tract, but also in the lungs,” causing primary pneumonia among its victims,” Kawaoka said.
    “We wanted to know why the 1918 flu caused severe pneumonia,” he added.
    Autopsies of Spanish flu victims often revealed fluid-filled lungs severely damaged by massive hemorrhaging.
    Virologists linked the virus’ ability to invade the lungs with its high level of virulence, but the genes that conferred that ability were unknown, the researchers wrote.
    The discovery of the three genes and how they help the virus infect the lungs is important because it could provide a way to quickly identify the potential virulence factors in new pandemic strains of influenza, Kawaoka said.
    The genes could also lead to a new class of antiviral drugs, which is urgently needed as vaccines are unlikely to be produced fast enough at the outset of a pandemic to blunt its spread, he added.
    The researchers generated Spanish flu viruses from genetic material extracted from preserved lung tissue of three of the pandemic’s victims, thanks to Jeffrey Taubenberger’s work at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology.
    Taubenberger was able to isolate the eight genes of the 1918 virus by the technique of inverse genetics.
    Kawaoka’s team blended genetic elements from the 1918 flu virus with those of current flu pathogens, generating viruses that carried different genetical combinations.
    Tested on ferrets and mice, most of the combined viruses infected the upper respiratory tract of the laboratory animals but did not cause pneumonia.
    One exception, however, included a complex of three genes that, acting in concert with another key gene, allowed the virus to efficiently colonize lung cells and make RNA polymerase, a protein necessary for the virus to reproduce.
    The other key gene makes hemagglutinin, a protein found on the surface of the virus and that confers on viral particles the ability to attach to host cells.
    The RNA polymerase is used to make copies of the virus once it has entered a host cell. The role of hemagglutinin is to help the virus gain access to cells, Kawaoka said.
    Other co-authors of the study include Shinji Watanabe, Jin Hyun Kim and Masato Hatta, also of UW-Madison, and Kyoko Shinya of Kobe University, in Japan.
    The work was funded by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and by grants-in-aid from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan.

  14. DHS

    Legal question.

    Do the state/Commonwealth governments have to compensate every single business owner they’ve just shut down as per Section 51 of the Constitution?

    Presumably the use of emergency powers can’t sidestep this.

  15. nfw

    I’m still waiting for the various gummints in this country to state how they will be suing the fascist Chinese government for inflicting all this upon us. Should be any day now. Oh, and for the federal government to ban any Chinese immigration and tourists. Back in the 1980’s when Hawke said we would become “the clever country” my wife and I said to each other it would be recipe for disaster. Not wrong were we?

    Oh well, at least the authoritarians and totalitarians and their minions (public servants) now treading upon our throats but not punishing the guilty, will continue to be paid. I wonder if they will continue borrowing money from China once they realise tax revenues are falling due to their destruction of the economy and the real producers of economic wealth?

  16. duncanm

    JohnJJJ
    #3373006, posted on March 24, 2020 at 8:47 am

    Ha, wait till you try to change any part of your house (repair 1.5 square metres of decking)

    why on earth did you even tell anyone you were doing it ?

  17. Chris M

    they will be suing the fascist Chinese government for inflicting all this upon us. Should be any day now

    No can do, maybe ask again in a couple of years? You see there is the problem of needing masks, gloves, syringes, ventilators, antibiotics and a kazillion other things.

    Meanwhile on Taobao you can buy fake medical certificates stating negative test results enabling you to fly out of China to Thailand or wherever you can still get flights to.

  18. stackja

    SECTION I – Some Technical Problems
    First World War Official Histories
    – Volume III – Special Problems and Services (1st edition, 1943)

    Chapter IV – The Influenza Pandemic, 1918–19 (pages 190 – 219 )
    pdf

  19. stackja

    nfw
    #3373020, posted on March 24, 2020 at 8:59 am

    USA tariffs on Red China go to USA people?

  20. bollux

    Maybe this will lead to a huge reduction of fruit bats in Queensland that the government and Greens are nuturing for some reason. Some common sense may come out of this if our country pulls through.

  21. duncanm

    Thanks stackja — interesting stuff, especially the notes on round one vs. round two, and the similarity with today’s pneumonia ..

    (2) Men with bad Colour, either distinctly blue cyanosis, or dusky, often without any definite physical signs of consolidation, dull to flat on percussion, especially behind, some riles or fine crackling crepitations and diminished air entry with weak or absent breath sounds.
    Pyrexia moderate or for a time high and falling without improvement
    in the general condition or physical signs.
    ..
    Many of these cases appear to be deprived of oxygen and the lower part of the chest may be noticeably indrawn with the respiratory movements. I have several times noticed a cyanosed face clear temporarily and become pink after the propped-up patient has coughed and taken a few deep inspirations

  22. JohnJJJ

    why on earth did you even tell anyone you were doing it ?
    One neighbour did.

  23. dogsbody

    why on earth did you even tell anyone you were doing it ?
    One neighbour did.

    Cup of roundup between midnight and dawn.

  24. Delta A

    Excellent comment, IT.

  25. Linden

    That’s a very moot point, with house building plans with the Yarra Ranges Council for 3 months now and a lot fuss over a couple of small gum trees running along the boundary with the neighbouring farmers property. God have mercy. This is fully developed albeit small residential housing estate, so now we suspect the council is objecting to its own protocols. Such is the nutters running these institutions these days.

  26. Clam Chowdah

    Cup of roundup between midnight and dawn.

    This. Have done it several times including the assisted deaths of replacement trees planted by the fucktards in the ACT government.

  27. calli

    Just a cup? Some suckers take a 20l drum of the stuff.

  28. Kneel

    “They redesigned their house to accommodate the tree.”

    For future reference, most councils allow you to trim a tree. You can trim it, then 3 months later trim again – repeat until under the height allowed to remove it, then remove it. Takes a bit of time perhaps, but certainly cheaper than paying the fine or for a re-design!

  29. Lee

    why on earth did you even tell anyone you were doing it ?
    One neighbour did.

    What a prick your neighbour is.

  30. JohnJJJ

    What a prick your neighbour is.
    Yep, just one though. Ex Nimbin hippy, interfering, helping the world’s poor, faux concern and a permanent victim. But I have had much worse.

  31. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Au contraire, mon amis Tigré.
    IT can’t see the legislation for the quips.
    If you don’t like it, just say you don’t like it, but don’t pretend it didn’t happen.

  32. Tim Neilson

    Colonel Crispin Berka
    #3373738, posted on March 24, 2020 at 3:53 pm

    True, but that only came into force on 19 March and they didn’t wait for that before starting to purportedly prohibit some things.

    So I think IT’s comment is not unreasonable.

  33. I’ve been shut down, totally.
    Revenue: Zero
    Refuse generated: Zero
    The Shire Council is still charging me, and will not remove, a charge of $200 per day for emptying my bins.

  34. rickw

    The Shire Council is still charging me, and will not remove, a charge of $200 per day for emptying my bins.

    Sure as shit hope you’re not paying it. Ring them up and harass the shit out of them every day. Eventually they’ll cave.

  35. Sure as shit hope you’re not paying it. Ring them up and harass the shit out of them every day. Eventually they’ll cave.

    Today is D-Day+1
    However they’re refusing to lift the charge.
    I don’t have to pay it until October or thereabouts.

    Doesn’t change that they’re still accruing bill.

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