The Golden Globes and The Descendants – Mills and Boon go to the movies

The Golden Globes are decided by a vote amongst the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA), that is, by a bunch of journalists so you can be very sure what kind of judgement they will apply. And true to form, their best picture went to The Descendants, as cliched a film of leftist pieties as you are ever likely to see. I will get back to Meryl Streep in a minute, but first to this award winning piece of schlock.

Since some of you may see the film, either stop reading now, or be content with my trying not to go beyond what you anyway find out from watching the trailer.

What is interesting, you see, is that the film is about aboriginal land rights and Clooney, along with Beau Bridges, are cousins and descendants from the native royalty of Hawaii. It is a film, therefore, that Andrew Bolt may not wish to comment on. And the plot builds around determining which consortium should an absolutely stunning piece of land that he and his family communally own be sold to for development, ie should it be sold to some foreign developer or to someone native to Hawaii. Meanwhile, the major plot tension of the film revolves around Clooney’s discovery that his wife had been having an affair before the boating accident that starts the film on its way. He has been an absentee husband and father, so part of the film is about Clooney trying to get closer to his daughters as he repents his distant past.

Need I point out that every dilemma raised in the film is resolved in exactly the way to satisy every lefty taste found amongst your typical foreign news journalist. That they are not ashamed to choose such an empty piece of rubbish as their chosen film of the year says unfortunately a very great deal about the politicisation of everything and especially the kinds of fantasy outcome these people find in perfect accord with their fundamental beliefs.

In this regard, I might draw your attention to this from the HFPA website:

As representatives of the world press, the group’s members felt it was incumbent upon them to give their audience their judgments as to Hollywood’s finest productions. The organization’s first awards presentation for distinguished achievements in the film industry took place in early 1944 with an informal ceremony at 20th Century Fox. There, Jennifer Jones was awarded Best Actress honors for “The Song of Bernadette,” which also won for Best Film.

In case you don’t know, The Song of Bernadette is a serious movie about a nun. Fat chance a film like that winning the Golden Globe today. Fat chance that such a film would even be produced.

Anyway, let me get on to Merryl Streep, best actress for her role in The Iron Lady.This is the speech she gave to those unbiased and straightshooting journalists through whom our news is filtered.

Earning her eighth Golden Globe, the 62-year-old said: ‘I gotta thank everybody in England that let me come and trample over their history.’

And talking about her role at a press conference afterwards, Meryl admitted she did not have a positive view of Lady Thatcher.

‘I think coming into this I had a very reductive view of Margaret Thatcher, so I sort of did what we all do to political figures we don’t agree with — we turn them into something more than human and less than human at the same time.

Having mentioned in my review that Margaret Thatcher may have been the most consequential woman of the twentieth century, the fact is that thinking about it since, I cannot think of anyone else who was even close. That these people, these journalists, feel perfectly content in desectrating the memory of this woman makes you realise that the movies for all their pretentions are now no better than Mills and Boon and journalists may be the last people in the world you should go to for their political views.

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101 Responses to The Golden Globes and The Descendants – Mills and Boon go to the movies

  1. Winston Smith says:

    Thank you Steve – Mills and Boone history is exactly right.

  2. Infidel Tiger says:

    The only body on earth that can rival the HFPA for corruption is the UN.

    Uppity foreigners.

  3. Les Majesty says:

    In case you don’t know, The Song of Bernadette is a serious movie about a nun. Fat chance a film like that winning the Golden Globe today. Fat chance that such a film would even be produced.

    Hahahahah. Fail.

    How about Proof, starring – cough – Meryl Streep?

  4. Les Majesty says:

    Sorry, not Proof – Doubt. Nominated for abunch of Golden Globes.

    Not too strong on the whole empirical evidence thing, are you Kates?

    Doesn’t give me much confidence in your economic prognostications.

  5. Les Majesty says:

    But apart from that an excellent post.

  6. Steve Kates says:

    To tell you the truth, Les, Doubt seems like a perfect film to win the Golden Globes, especially with Meryl Streep in the lead. Hardly The Song of Bernadette.

    In 1964 a Catholic elementary school has just admitted its first Black student, a 12-year-old boy transferred from public school. The principal, a rigid disciplinarian nun, and the liberal parish priest are both concerned for the boy’s welfare in a predominantly Irish/Italian school. The nun becomes convinced that the priest has, or is planning to have, an improper relationship with the child and is determined to force him to leave the school. A third compassionate person is the boy’s mother, who has another point of view. The fourth person is a young teacher who is concerned but confused by the conflict between the nun and the priest.

  7. cohenite says:

    Hitchcock said actors should be treated like cattle; I agree; they should be fattened, slaughtered and cooked on a barbecue.

  8. Abu Chowdah says:

    Les Majesty: give yourself an uppercut. You’ve gone and fouled yourself in public.

  9. Abu Chowdah says:

    Les Majesty is Tillman, right?

  10. JC says:

    Of course he is. He’s no longer Tillman because of his numerous run ins with the site masters.

  11. JC says:

    He really seems to have it in for SteveK for some unknown reason.

  12. C.L. says:

    Having mentioned in my review that Margaret Thatcher may have been the most consequential woman of the twentieth century, the fact is that thinking about it since, I cannot think of anyone else who was even close.

    Mother Teresa was greater.

    The Song of Bernadette was about Lourdes visionary St Bernadette Soubirous. Most of the story is about her girlhood. But yes, it would be inconceivable that such a film would either be made or lionised today.

    Tillman’s comparison of St Bernadette’s story with Doubt is, of course, idiotic.

  13. C.L. says:

    It’s a lovely film, by the way.

    I recommend it.

    Vincent Price plays the local atheist prosecutor who imprisons and otherwise attacks Bernadette.

  14. Abu Chowdah says:

    How was mother theresa greater? She was just a charity worker, wasn’t she?

  15. bruce says:

    Are the young completely brainwashed? The current PC solipsism/pietism is almost total. A critic of Downton Abbey (from unlinkable Amazon is spot on:

    “Servants are rude to their masters (or to aristocrats to whom they are subservient) as if modern employment tribunals existed and they were safe from being sacked. Servants steal from the master but are glibly forgiven. A housemaid purchases a typewriter (from where? at what cost? how on earth could she afford it?) with a view to becoming a secretary (how was she pursuing her secretarial course?) as if it was the modern age in which we all buy a personal computer. A servant who is crippled purchases an appliance to correct his limp (when he asks the price the camera cuts to a new scene – what proportion of his wage would such a thing be?) and when he is fed up with it, casts it dramatically into the lake rather than attempting to get any of his money back. It’s a world very like our own, in other words, and I half expect the servants to browse their iPhones while they dither about pretending to work. The scriptwriters are very interested in sex and romance but not in painting an accurate picture of the period.”
    etc etc

  16. bruce says:

    But Steve, it isn’t really about leftism is it? In my example, a true leftist would want to present an accurate account of Edwardian economic deprivation among lower classes.

    The real problem is the triumph of style over substance. Lazy cliched superficiality.

  17. Rococo Liberal says:

    The real problem is the triumph of style over substance. Lazy cliched superficiality.

    That is the definition of leftism, isn’t it Bruce?

  18. Peter Patton says:

    Steve

    I actually saw Doubt for the first time only last week. It was anything but a luvvie cliche. Streep was brilliant, as were the other actors, including Philip Seymour Hoffman.

  19. Peter Patton says:

    Camille Paglia once said that Madonna should never be allowed to open her mouth in public unless she is singing the words others wrote for her. That advice could be extended to most actors, including Streep.

  20. Peter Patton says:

    As Brad Pitt so sagaciously said:

    Reporters ask me what I feel China should do about Tibet. Who cares what I think China should do? I’m a fucking actor! They hand me a script. I act. I’m here for entertainment, basically, when you whittle everything away. I’m a grown man who puts on makeup.

  21. C.L. says:

    Well said.

    I remember seeing Bob Hoskins interviewed and the interviewer asked him who his “heroes” were – you know, actors who were tough manly men etc.

    He replied with an uber-dismissive laugh, saying he (and they) were just blokes pretending for a living.

  22. Abu Chowdah says:

    No, really CL, how was Theresa greater than thatcher?

  23. C.L. says:

    In what ways was she not? would be an easier question.

    She didn’t liberate a goat island, to be sure – but still…

  24. Abu Chowdah says:

    But she wasn’t the first charity worker. How is she distinguished?

    Thatcher did quite a bit more than the Falklands. Don’t base your knowledge on a Meryl Streep film.

  25. bruce says:

    Rococo Liberal asked:

    ‘”The real problem is the triumph of style over substance. Lazy cliched superficiality.”

    That is the definition of leftism, isn’t it Bruce?’

    Ben Chifley is an example of a true leftist. Would you say it described him?

    Or EP Thompson, who wrote this masterpiece of observation?

    No I’d say it’s the definition of bourgeois cultural liberalism, and the Americans have their terms right in this case.

    Mrs Thatcher and Mother Theresa, both very great women in different spheres. I’ve seen the horror M Theresa faced in Calcutta. So unworthy to fight over them.

  26. Abu Chowdah says:

    I’m not fighting over them. I’m just curious that CL considers a nun social worker to be greater than thatcher.

  27. Les Majesty says:

    As Patton – who seems to be the only person on this thread who has actually seen the film – points out Doubt is hardly full of left wing pieties.

    It is actually a very sympathetic portrait of the traditional church, with Streep sympathetically portraying a hard line old school nun. The film is not however blind to the undeniable corrupt and decadent elements in the church; perhaps that disqualifies it in the eyes of the typical Catellaxatard?

    In any event, it is certainly a serious recent film about a nun, which Kate’s denied existed. Moreover, it starred Streep and was nominated for a bunch of Golden Globes.

    Which led me to conclude that Kates had suffered a massive empiricism FAIL.

    Anyway, I can certainly see why Kates would hate the film.

    As its title suggests, the them of the film is certainty – moral, empirical and metaphysical – and the extent to which that certainty can be achieved.

    Kates, who calls himself a conservative, is in fact anything but conservative in his epistemological arrogance. Any true conservative is full of doubt – it is that doubt that leads him to the intellectual modesty of conservatism.

    But Kates is a man of total certainty. He ascribes not just stupidity but also immorality and bad faith to all those with whom he disagrees on matters of policy or in interpretation of empirical fact.

    He regularly expresses amazement that those he doesn’t agree aren’t ashamed of the fact that they disagree with him.

    It is this arrogant certainty of his, and his eagerness to ascribe bad faith to those who have a different point of view, that leads me to call him the Robespierre of the Cat.

    Kates strikes me as more totalitarian than conservative in any western sense.

    Thank god he has no power.

  28. Les Majesty says:

    Thatcher was no day at the beach, but mother Theresa was probably more appalling. I’m with Hitch on that one.

  29. JC says:

    Les, over-egging the omelet, no?

    I saw Descendants under sufferance and it is exactly as Steve describes it… a lefty sop story of a weak man (Clooney) and the film’s attempt to make him appear a little stronger than jelly.

    Of course, not that i think I’m giving the story line away as it’s so predictable, but the land was never sold, because Clooney stopped it at the end. In other words he fucked everyone else’s life so he could satisfy his own selfishness. Yes, weak men are also selfish.

    I strongly recommend people not to waste their money with this swill and Clooney is an over rated twerp who has a real funny way of running.

  30. Les Majesty says:

    HRC was the greatest woman of the 20th C and come 2016 undoubtedly of the 21st also.

  31. JC says:

    And Steve, thanks for the heads up on Iron Lady. I won’t be seeing it, as I don’t want to be giving money away to a bunch of leftie ratbags who lie about one of the most significant figures of the 20th Century.

    That woman was all class and old bent nose Streep won’t change history with lying bullshit.

  32. Peter Patton says:

    JC

    I went to a reunion the other week, and was gassing with a group of old straight female friends, who all roared with laughter when I was shocked they could say so decisively, “of course, George Clooney is gay; straight from the Rock Hudson textbook”.

    WTF?

  33. JC says:

    HRC was the greatest woman of the 20th C and come 2016 undoubtedly of the 21st also.

    Dude, she spent the 8 years her hubby was in the White House telling reminding everyone she was a “woman”. She must have thought we were confused with her gender.

  34. JC says:

    Peter:

    Dunno if he’s gay, but I got to tell you his decoys are 10’s. I’ve never seen him with less than a 9.8.

    I’d pretend I was gay if i could score gals like that (and I wasn’t married of course).

  35. Peter Patton says:

    JC

    That was one of the signs the gals reckoned ‘outed’ him. Overkill, they reckon.

  36. Peter Patton says:

    My response was “more like lucky”.

  37. JamesK says:

    I saw Descendants under sufferance and it is exactly as Steve describes it… a lefty sop story of a weak man (Clooney) and the film’s attempt to make him appear a little stronger than jelly.

    I dunno.

    I thought he was super brave to confront the man that was bangin’ his missus with his aggro 17 yo daughter by his side, JC.

  38. hzhousewife says:

    Crumbs JamesK – it is only a MOVIE durrrrr

    PS I lurve movies and now reading all this
    I’m put off seeing anything current – maybe
    I’ll splurge on Hugo in 3D after all, just
    for the cultural experience.

  39. Quentin George says:

    Downton Abbey is written by a Tory peer, hardly a “leftist”.

    And I saw Descendants and enjoyed it, didn’t really notice any alleged “leftism”, unless every Clooney character is a leftist by default. (seriously, a lawyer who has a cheating wife who has a fatal accident…I really didn’t see any political statement. Even the ending was more about the character’s personal problems with the man his wife cheated with, not any high-minded political principle.)

  40. JM says:

    exactly the way to satisy every lefty taste

    Personally, I’m sick to death of this type of criticism and commentary.

    It is empty, sterile and totally devoid of content. (Is that enough repetition to earn me “Tautology of the Month”?)

    Seriously, who cares? Is the film good or not? Tell me why?

  41. Quentin George says:

    But she wasn’t the first charity worker. How is she distinguished?

    And she’s done far less than other, less heralded charity workers in India. Her reuptation is inflated by the marketing of the Catholic church.

  42. JC says:

    I thought he was super brave to confront the man that was bangin’ his missus with his aggro 17 yo daughter by his side, JC.

    To tell him she was in hospital dying? James that’s not super brave. It’s sop.

    I did like the daughter’s boyfriend though. He was really funny kid.

  43. C.L. says:

    But she wasn’t the first charity worker. How is she distinguished?

    This is like saying Neil Armstrong wasn’t the first astronaut.

    It’s completely illogical.

    Using the criteria of popular acclaim and veneration, Margaret Thatcher doesn’t even come close. That she’s the greatest woman of the twentieth century™ is a woefully deluded bit of Anglophone nonsense. Most people in the world wouldn’t know anything about her.

    Typically, Quentin – notwithstanding your Masonic Lodge mythologies – the Catholic Church doesn’t usually ‘market’ saints in their lifetimes. It tends to be suspicious of them until the eleventh hour, Bernadette Soubirous (mentioned above) being a classic example.

  44. C.L. says:

    Don’t forget we have Thatcher to blame for mainstreaming globular warmening – the hoax that now constitutes perhaps the greatest statist threat to free markets in the last 50 years.

    Thanks, Madge. Heckuva job.

    I admire the woman, don’t get me wrong.

    But let’s not go overboard.

  45. JamesK says:

    Maybe I don’t do irony well.

  46. JC says:

    lol… okay. I thought you’d gone soft and mushy there for a second.

  47. Infidel Tiger says:

    Maggie saved 60,000 Limeys from socialism and helped free 500,000 eastern Europeans from communism, can Mother T beat that?

  48. JC says:

    CL

    Okay, who is your prefect specimen of a leader?

    Mine is perhaps Lincoln.. of all time.

  49. C.L. says:

    …mother Theresa was probably more appalling. I’m with Hitch on that one.

    Of course you are. That’s because you’re a gullible idiot. Even a New York Times reviewer ridiculed Hitchens over this clumsily obvious exercise in atheist Talibanism.

  50. Infidel Tiger says:

    CL

    Okay, who is your prefect specimen of a leader?

    Jesus is $1.01.

  51. JamesK says:

    What price Moses?

  52. JC says:

    IT

    No one ever satisfies CL.

  53. Gab says:

    I’m tipping Nigella.

  54. Peter Patton says:

    I always thought Mother Theresa was a creepy old hag, who seemed to get off on keeping the wretched of India, wretched. I’d bet she was one of those sado-masochistic lezzie nuns. The world is better off without her.

  55. C.L. says:

    Thatcher admirably stood side by side with Reagan and we’re all grateful for that.

    Apart from that, Britain didn’t do much. The Russians only fear the Brits in James Bond movies, I’m afraid.

    John Paul II was the principal human catalyst in the collapse of the USSR, according to Mikhail Gorbachev.

  56. Infidel Tiger says:

    I’m tipping Nigella.

    I’ve been watching her show a lot lately. Gods she’s a good cook.

  57. JC says:

    IT

    Wifey told me her first hubby died of cancer is that true?

  58. C.L. says:

    Okay, who is your prefect specimen of a leader?

    That’s easy. The younger Bobby Kennedy.

    As a much loved author once wrote:

    The decline into bitterness and ill-concealed loathing for everyman is the obvious contrast between today’s Democratic frontrunner – a man who recently mocked humble Americans who “cling” to religion – and a man the press and public could approach in 1968 even when he was eating a waffle. Bobby Kennedy’s personification of transition itself is less widely understood. He is perhaps more important than President Kennedy in this respect. Jack Kennedy was not a believer in anything particularly. His knowledge of foreign affairs was quite impressive but his practical application was not. Bobby was always the true believer. He was no saint but he relentlessly hammered racketeers, humiliated union wiseguys, viscerally despised communists – never abandoning Senator McCarthy – adored his enormous family and, yes, clung to his Catholic faith. Had he not changed his mind about the war in Vietnam it’s very likely he’d be a hate figure to modern Democrats. Sadly, that’s all they remembered. In The Spectator last week Gore Vidal bitterly remarked: “Bobby was the biggest son of a bitch who ever came into American politics.” From him, that’s a real badge of honour.

  59. Gab says:

    I can understand why men admire Nigella. She’s gorgeous, sensual and she can cook too.

  60. Infidel Tiger says:

    He did, JC. She’s lost a lot of family to cancer.

  61. Infidel Tiger says:

    JC, Nigella is also related to George Monbiot!

  62. Steve Kates says:

    To tell you the truth Les, I’m not entirely sure you would be able to tell whether Doubt is or is not filled with left wing pieties, although given how much you like it, the only conclusion I can come to is that it is. If you can think that Doubt is in the same zone as The Song of Bernadette – and we are here talking about a picture that stars Merryl Streep, was given the Golden Globe for best picture by the HFPA and is about whether some priest has, or is planning to have, an improper relationship with some twelve year old boy – and you also somehow think that non-entity Hillary Clinton is even in the running for the Greatest Woman of the Twentieth Century, I must tell you it does not strike me you would recognise a conservative disposition if it came up and introduced itself to you at the next meeting of the MPS. But when it comes to dealing with people such as yourself, in truth it does annoy me, because really, to be so self-unaware of who you are, what you believe and the consequences of the views you hold is an irritation. So let me just say this. You have no idea what conservatism is or what conservatives believe. You have to dredge up Robespierre from amongst the worst of the totalitarian left because there is literally no equivalent on the conservative side whatsoever. Every totalitarian of the twentieth century called themselves a socialist. These people still exist in plague proportions to this day and they will yet take down this civilisation of ours, the sweetest, kindest, wealthiest civilisation the planet has ever managed to produce, and it will be people like yourself who will be the reason why.

  63. Infidel Tiger says:

    My god, Nigella once went out with that absolute slaphead Geoffrey Robertson. I’ve gone right off her.

  64. JC says:

    JC, Nigella is also related to George Monbiot!

    WTF? No.

  65. Peter Patton says:

    Robertson started stuffing Kathy Lette while he was stuffing ‘Melons” Lawson.

  66. C.L. says:

    OK, I’ve thought this over.

    Mother Teresa herself wouldn’t want to be called the Greatest Woman of The Twentieth Century.

    It’s too apples and oranges.

    So I guess the greatest public woman was Thatcher.

    OK.

    Or Joan Kirner.

  67. Les Majesty says:

    But when it comes to dealing with people such as yourself, in truth it does annoy me, because really, to be so self-unaware of who you are, what you believe and the consequences of the views you hold is an irritation.

    Sounds like exactly the sort of thing Robespierre would have said about people who didn’t understand the genius, necessity and inherent rightness of the Committee of Public Safety.

    By the way, which of my stated views would you characterise as representing a threat to western civilisation?

  68. Les Majesty says:

    Cheryl Kernot FTW.

  69. Les Majesty says:

    More similarities between Kates and Robespierre: both self-important, humourless twats with delusions of apocalypse.

  70. JC says:

    Les… stop the hate speech. It’s a friendly blog and this sort of talk only creates antagonism and unnecessary tension.

    If you want to carry on like that, take it to LP.

  71. C.L. says:

    Good point.

    Let’s not be rude to one another.

  72. Abu Chowdah says:

    CL, I didn’t sat thatcher was the greatest. I just cant see how Theresa was greater. You still haven’t explained it.

  73. C.L. says:

    Well, you haven’t explained how Thatcher is greater.

    Mother Teresa served the poor by the thousands and saved very many of them; she worked bravely and militantly against the ‘untouchables’ culture and had a red hot go at doing something for the poorest, most wretched people in the world.

    Against this, liberating a goat island, taking on the miners and pushing climate hysteria don’t compare.

    Mother Teresa is also more widely known and revered.

  74. Abu Chowdah says:

    I didn’t say she was greater. You’re the one engaged in classification.

    I just want to know why Theresa, a social worker like many others is greater. Lots of people have worked in trying circumstances to aid people suffering poverty and discrimination. But you seem to think, in response to (was it Steve?) someone saying thatcher was the greatest woman of the 20th century, that instead Theresa was the greatest. So far, not demonstrated.

    Thatcher led a great (waning) nation, went to war with the Argies and the unions, and was time and again shown to be strong and decisive leader. (i.e., operation nimrod). She was a great leader. Maybe not the greatest woman of the 20th century, but not to some social worker.

  75. Les… stop the hate speech. It’s a friendly blog and this sort of talk only creates antagonism and unnecessary tension.

    If you want to carry on like that, take it to LP.

    JC

    19 Jan 12 at 11:48 pm

    Good point.

    Let’s not be rude to one another.

    Pretty funny, you two. (Either that, or you’re insane.)

  76. JC says:

    Stop being a moron every day, Steve as it’s oppressive.

  77. C.L. says:

    Abu, it was Steve who began the classification:

    …Margaret Thatcher may have been the most consequential woman of the twentieth century…

    I said I thought Mother Teresa was greater – perhaps inadvertently muddying the argument.

    But yes, I do think St Teresa was more consequential because I personally value what she did for nobodies – the most wretched of nobodies – more than I value Thatcher’s resume (as fantastic as it was).

    It’s a subjective thing, there being no quantitative criteria for making the call.

  78. Abu Chowdah says:

    Fair enough. Thanks.

  79. Jazza says:

    That journalists are the last people to trust on political matters is alas so true!

    And, whoever posted the suggestion that Proof could win an award has rocks in their head. That film was definitely B grade,drab and unenlightening!

    Next, you will tell me the pa p”New year’s Eve’ deserves something other than forgetting it!

    Sadly it seems anything with Clooney in it gets the sugar coated opinions.

    Personally. I think if it comes on FTA tv in a couple years and I have nothing better to watch, I’ll view it, but I wouldn’t pay money for soppy native title guff or climate scam material ,both of which make me mad, and I don’t find Clooney a good actor.

  80. Michelle says:

    Greatest woman? Whatever happened to Mary, mother of JC? Virgin birthing the messiah takes some beating.

  81. jtfsoon says:

    What do people have against Geoffrey Robertson? I’ve been reading his Tyrannicide Brief about the Puritan lawyer John Cooke. Great book, great story

  82. . says:

    Jealousy.

    Kathy and Nigella are MILFs.

  83. C.L. says:

    What do people have against Geoffrey Robertson?

    Um, he’s a left-wing tosser, pretentious Eastwood scrubber with a contrived wanker’s accent who hates Australia?

    How’s that for starters?

  84. Ben says:

    Most consequential woman of the twentieth century = Ayn Rand. (Though Margaret Thatcher was certainly up there.)

  85. Adrien says:

    I don’t see movies much at the moment ( I saw three last year, total) so I have no idea what any of them are like. But I can tell from Hollywood’s agit-prop that competition for acting Oscars is fierce and calculated. I’m not sure about directing. A lot of the Oscar flicks are directed by new dudes with not much of a track record but impressive potential like Tomas Alfredson or Bennett Miller. (I think Brad Pitt was too early out the gate.)

    But Glenn Close and Meryl Streep are obviously reigniting their 1980s rivalry. Scorsese has a fantasy film. Fincher has The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. But Clint Eastwood has a movie about J. Edgar Hoover starring Leo de Caprio, released at just the right time. Maybe Eastwood wants to match John Ford’s record.

    They should give it to Scorsese. I haven’t seen Hugo and it’s not the kind of movie that would usually get nominated. But considering how different it is for a ‘quality director’ it might. And Scorsese deserves at least two other gold statues. He wuz robbed.

  86. Les Majesty says:

    Bullshit.

    Scorcese is perhaps the most overrated director of all time.

  87. I agree with Les on Scorcese. He’s competent, sure, but I just don’t see why people get excited about his direction.

  88. JC says:

    I agree with Les on Scorcese.

    I thought Gangs of New York was a good movie.

    Boardwalk Empire is great and I also think the Aviator was a good movie.

    He’s done some pretty decent stuff.

  89. JC says:

    The Departed

    Goodfellas.

    Taxi

    These are all great great movies.

    Les, WTF are you talking about?

    Steve, please stay out of this as grown up men are talking.

  90. I knew JC couldn’t go more than one comment without gratuitous insult.

  91. Les Majesty says:

    I like Goodfellas but The Departed was a popcorn movie at best and Boardwalk Empire is no Sopranos, to say the least.

    He directs great scenes but I think ultimately his films are completely insubstantial.

    Raging Bull I think is about the most overrated film of all time.

  92. Les Majesty says:

    Taxi Driver was pretty cool.

    Haven’t seen Hugo but am planning to.

  93. JC says:

    Steve:

    That wasn’t an insult.

  94. Adrien says:

    Scorcese is perhaps the most overrated director of all time.

    I haven’t seen The Departed so I can’t comment. Goodfellas was a masterpiece. Check out the soundtrack. It’s pretty standard to use period music to, like, evoke the period but Scorsese’s showing Brooklyn gangsters who are behind the times. So it’s not ’til you get to the mid-70s that you hear rock music because drugs have invaded the mafia. The first rock music you hear is the ‘Rape! Murder! refrain from “Gimme Shelter”. the effect is magnetic.

    He’s class. Shame you don’t plug in.

    When a director becomes ‘esteemed’ they have a way of becoming kinda boring as well. The Aviator was a really well made Hollywood movie. But I wasn’t all that fussed. The docos he’s done tho’, are pretty good.

  95. C.L. says:

    Goodfellas was great. Smidgen lengthy.

    Adrien, The Departed is also very good.

    See it.

    Inter alia, Alec Baldwin’s macho Boston copper is a riot.

    Both GF and Departed feature, you guessed it

  96. Adrien says:

    Both GF and Departed feature, you guessed it…

    And Mean Streets too. But Shine A Light strangely not.

  97. C.L. says:

    Actually, re being lengthy, I think I’m remembering Casino.

  98. Infidel Tiger says:

    Goodfellas is on Foxtel right now.

    Whatever happened to Ray Liotta’s career?

  99. JC says:

    Whatever happened to Ray Liotta’s career?

    Dunno

    Last time I saw him was in a third rate movie playing a third string part and looking much older than he is…

    I reckon to much nose candy there. Just a hunch.

  100. JC says:

    He does seem to have a lot of post production stuff coming out, IT.

    Take a looksee.

    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000501/

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