Failed policies – failed implementation

Chris Kenny is right

Rudd has conceded that Abbott is right on both those policies [carbon tax and border protection]. He couldn’t really object to moves to curb union power either. The core message of the Rudd sequel so far is that Labor has been wrong, and trust Labor to fix it.

Rudd is appalling at developing policies. He is even worse at implementing them. Why would anyone think they should trust Labor to fix problems of its own making?

Don’t forget that in 2006 Rudd said that the Pacific Solution was unethical. In 2007 he said he would turn back the boats. In 2008 he dismantled the Pacific Solution and encouraged 1100 people to sacrifice their lives on that appalling Rudd policy. In 2013 he is promising a policy that is tougher than the Pacific Solution. What really can we expect from a re-elected Rudd Government in 2014? Certainly no coherent, sensible and consistent policy implemented well.

No, a re-elected Rudd Government would be a magnet for more people to travel by boats to Australia, knowing that Rudd and his ilk can only tough it out for a little while and the compassionistas will force a wind back in any policy intent, let alone in policy outcome. Rudd hasn’t a solution. He has a thought bubble which cannot be implemented by any Labor Government.

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37 Responses to Failed policies – failed implementation

  1. blogstrop

    the compassionistas will force a wind back in any policy intent, let alone in policy outcome.

    Once again, this will only be achieved via a complicit media, who’ll tailor the reporting to suit.

  2. Lucie

    It’s like hiring a tradesman to do a job, having him make a complete, hopelessly incompetent hash of it, and then agreeing to let him have another go, and another.

  3. Louis Hissink

    I thought the ALP worked on consensus – and that meant implementing the planks of the official policy as laid down in their social bible.

  4. H B Bear

    Expect KRudd’s hypocrisy to be repeatedly highlighted by the Australian media, who have rigorously held the KRudd-Gillard government to the highest standards. It is difficult to imagine what a truly incompetent government they might have been without the sustained efforts of Fran “I’m an activist” Kelly, Phabulous Phil, Ol’ Leathery, La Tingle, Le Snore, Mark Kenny, Farr Out, Jabba, The Bonge and the other outstanding members of the Fourth Estate.

  5. Hugh

    “Rudd is all bubble, no thought”

    yep!

    or:

    all spin and no frisbee.

  6. It’s a brave man who can nebulously allude to the vague possibility that he might possibly have slightly and imperceptibly without admitting any error and not acknowledging any cowardice or negligence whatsoever nor confessing to any wavering doubts have, uhm… jumped possibly intemperately and perhaps precipitately too soon to a nervous conclusion.

    Not that you were wrong, ha ha, but…

    Well done, Samuel.

  7. Ivan Denisovich

    Rudd is appalling at developing policies. He is even worse at implementing them.

    http://www.thepunch.com.au/articles/the-world-according-to-rudd-an-insiders-guide/

  8. News poll: coalition 52%, scumbags 48%

  9. Louis Hissink

    52/48 – Oh dear, another plan of mice and men.

  10. JohnA

    I would like to implement one plank from my policy of accountability: dimensions approx 4×2 in the old money and about 3′ long – enough to get a decent swing at the heads of these imbeciles!

  11. The Consigliere

    KRudd’s tacking on to coalition policy isn’t going to win him any friends from the redneck side of aisle. They are not gonna walk away from their natural home at the LNP. All it serves is to drive labor voters away to either vote donkey, or even worse, for the Greens.

    I see a reversion to the Coalition landslide we were expecting for most of the last two years.

  12. Pickles

    4 be 2 is useless. But you can get a vice like grip on 2 be 1. Ironbark is best.

  13. Siltstone

    The only boats this Government ever stopped were fishing trawlers and ones carrying live cattle.

  14. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Rudd wants the G20 – it’s his failsafe measure, a finale for when all else fails.
    Till then, suffer peasants.

  15. calli

    4 be 2 is useless. But you can get a vice like grip on 2 be 1. Ironbark is best.

    Pickles, I prefer the Louisville Slugger myself, but then, I am a lady. 🙂

  16. stackja

    All ALP policies are thought bubbles which cannot be implemented by any Government.

  17. Leo G

    No, a re-elected Rudd Government would be a magnet for more people to travel by boats to Australia
    Rudd’s IEV magnet could well be a more powerful attractor before the election. There’s about 100 days until Java’s wet season, and anything up to 10,000 prospective refugees in the pipeline.
    Many of those ‘clients’ will be prepared to be part of a smugglers’ challenge to Rudd’s bluff.

  18. candy

    It’s hard to know what a re-elected Rudd government would do, as they’ve just stolen the Coalition’s policies and after that he’d have to think of his own.
    I reckon they’re be a high unemployment rate causing a lot of unhappiness but.

  19. And Another Thing

    Between now and the election the Labor Party will come to bitterly regret having brought Rudd back. Any integrity or principles it had have been jettisoned in the interests of electoral expedience.

    This shows that all in caucus who follow him can be bought by the trappings of office.

    As for Rudd, no sacrifice by his party, Australian taxpayers, or third countries are enough to keep him in power.

    Rudd is the Darkness on the Hill.

  20. Makka

    This is Rudd all over- stealing policies. But in doing so he exposes his shallowness and lack of conviction.What can easily be exploited by the LNP is the filth’s complete and utter ineptitude at execution and how that leads to disastrous results, deaths and higher costs. All of which, although unintended, regularly become the consequences.

    But that is for the thinking in the electorate. For the ones that decide these things, the LNP will need to dumb it down somewhat. Where? The Debt and financial management. The natural consequence of Too Much Debt is Too Much Taxes. Which ultimately means a mismanaged choked economy,with less job opportunity, a wind back of Govt services and less freebies. Only a healthy economy delivers the benefits this demographic enjoys. And Labor’s history of Budget mismanagement, lies and deceit renders them entirely UNtrustworthy and UNreliable- witness how they stab each other, undermine their leaders, LIE to get Govt, LIE to us , try to stifle information, and generally fk up everything they touch – like Border protection and the Carbon Tax. People, do you really think these clusterf*^ks will stop blowing things up? Noooo, it’s in their DNA. We are US, it’s what we do.

  21. TP

    Never send a boy to do a man’s job

  22. Jack Spratt

    Axe handles
    Nothing says ‘I care’ like an axe handle.

    Only a global catastrophe can save the ALP, and Rudd’s going to the G20.
    Nothing to worry about, I’m sure.

  23. JohnA

    Ironbark 2×1, a Louisville Slugger and axe handles.

    My my, we have co-operation in policy development AND consensus around multi-faceted policy instruments – wonderful!

  24. calli

    John A, is there something about metaphor that you don’t understand?

  25. Toiling Mass

    Rudd characterises himself as ‘a policy wonk’.

    I think this exemplifies the true nature of Rudd.

    It’s a lie.

  26. Tator

    John A,
    as a Mr Plod of 24 years experience, I prefer the good ole Monadnock PR24 side handled baton. Best hitting implement known to man. Well tested on greenies the world over.

  27. I am starting to wonder whether politics would be a simpler place if Turnbull and Rudd swapped partys. They both seem to have a preference for the other sides policy.

  28. Rudd wants the G20 – it’s his failsafe measure, a finale for when all else fails.

    It’s like a security blanket for his mind. Once he gets within sight of that world stage, all the difficult domestic problems (electrocuting mentally retarded roof installers, drowning a thousand brown people at sea, etc. etc.) disappear, and he once more becomes Kevin from Queensland, Here to Help. I’d almost make comparisons to Walter Mitty, except that Mitty knew himself to be an incompetent liar. The scary thing about Rudd is that there are moments where I think he believes his own publicity.

    It’s hard to know what a re-elected Rudd government would do, as they’ve just stolen the Coalition’s policies and after that he’d have to think of his own.

    This is where even Keating was better than he is. Keating may have got things horribly wrong, but he never had the appearance of a man who seemed lost for what to do.

    52/48 – Oh dear, another plan of mice and men.

    LOL yes. I bet Rudd was almost ejaculating in his pants when he saw that meteoric rise in Labor’s 2PP vote – almost vertically upwards in short order. Now it seems that things are correcting themselves a little.

    IIRC 52/48 is a comfortable win for the 52, but with the obvious exceptions – Monty, Numbers, etc. – I don’t think anyone here is going to be happy with anything less than the annihilatory figures we were getting before they dumped Gillard.

    (Speaking of the obvious exceptions, where’s Hammygar these days?)

  29. Buzz

    Hi all, question for you
    i keep seeing the proported ’90 percent of boat arrivals are genuine refugees’ stats.

    But like many stats one needs the correct source and context.
    Does anyone have any proper data on this?

    buzz

  30. JimmyS

    Alan Jones describes Rudd rather eloquently:

    “The arsonist has now become the fireman”.

  31. JohnRMcD

    I prefer the Louisville Slugger myself, but then, I am a lady.

    Suitable for all ages and sexes.

  32. Jim Rose

    see david I levine’s “The Economics of International Refugee Law,” with Ryan Bubb and Michael Kremer, forthcoming, Journal of Legal Studies.

    ABSTRACT
    We model the current system of refugee protection as a contract that bound states to provide a more efficient level of the public good of refugee protection.

    We show how the screening problem caused by economic migration has strengthened states’ incentives to shade on their obligations under the 1951 Convention, resulting in more refoulement of refugees to their place of persecution.

    We also model reform schemes in which wealthy states pay poorer states to host refugees.

    A system that transfers refugee claimants from wealthy states to poorer states could ameliorate the screening problem by inducing self-selection among refugee claimants but would also create negative externalities for third countries.

    We argue that reforms in which wealthy states paid poorer states to resettle refugees from other poorer states would be more efficient than current refugee policies that focus on providing aid in refugee camps and resettling refugees from camps to wealthy states.

  33. Louis Hissink

    Jim Rose,

    Repost that in plain English. Please.

  34. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    “Jim Rose,

    Repost that in plain English. Please.”

    That’s the Abstract? Gees I’d like to be on the other end of the gummint grant that deserves!

  35. Louis Hissink

    Mick, try to understand the first paragraph! How the hell that statement could be modelled is mind boggling. That’s an acute state of Mathematicitus – a fatal condition due to losing one’s way in an abstract intellectual maze.

  36. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    “Mick, try to understand the first paragraph!”

    I did, I honestly did Louis and failed.

    Further, I would not be minded to ask Ryan Bubb or Michael Kremer to elucidate. I doubt I could cope.

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