Thai massage: private health insurance refund available

One of my friends tells me around where she works that lots of the Thai massage shops carry the information that private health insurance refunds are available.  Yes, that’s right – select the right extras cover and you can be partly reimbursed for the cost of your fortnightly Thai massage (therapeutic, of course, although health claims unproven).

One of the most appallingly thought-out and executed policy areas of this government (and the previous one) is HEALTH.  Peter Dutton as Minister was pathetic, unable to explain even what was being proposed (the copayment – a price signal? saving money? directing money at the mega-medical research fund?) and completely unaware of the details of his policy area.

His mega-department has remained untouched, apart from a homeopathic (geddit?) efficiency dividend.  Gosh, even the long-serving secretary, Jane Halton, couldn’t explain to Senators what the department does; she was awaiting an upgraded computer system (laughter accompanying these remarks).

BUT HERE ARE TWO PIECES OF LOW HANGING POLICY FRUIT:

REMOVE THE PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE REBATE FROM EXTRAS COVER (INCLUDING ALL THESE UNPROVEN ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES);

THE PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE REBATE SHOULD ONLY APPLY TO COMPREHENSIVE PRIVATE HOSPITAL COVER (AND NOT FOR PRIVATE TREATMENT IN PUBLIC HOSPITALS).

And just think about, these changes could save the long-suffering taxpayer some money and ensure that the rebate is doing what it was intended to do – take pressure off public hospitals.  It is a no-brainer.

No doubt, all the providers funded by the extras cover will squeal.  Who cares?  They clearly have been pushing up their fees.  In any case, just tell them to suck it up.  The private demand for their services will continue and if people want to throw away their own money, that is their business.

(Check out the last sentence of the article – proves my point.)

Here is a relevant story:

NONE of 17 natural therapies, from aromatherapy to reflexology and yoga, that are covered by health insurers and partially subsidised by the government rebate has been ­conclusively shown to work on patients.

The finding is contained in a draft Health Department report that will put pressure on the ­Abbott government either to strip the rebate from policies that cover unproven therapies, or to commit to an expensive research program to resolve the efficacy and effectiveness issue once and for all.

A leaked “confidential draft” of the review, which heralds the end of a long-running review of so-called alternative or complementary medicine, finds little, if any, proof the 17 natural therapies work. The draft was written under the name of Chief Medical Officer Chris Baggoley, with significant input from the National Health and Medical Research Council.

“Based on the evidence considered within the context of this review, there were no health ­conditions for which there was ­reliable, high quality evidence that any of the natural therapies considered were clinically effective,’’ the 202-page draft concludes.

“For a few modalities (Alexander technique, massage, tai chi, yoga) there was low to moderate quality evidence that these natural therapies may improve certain health outcomes for a limited number of clinical ­conditions.

“However, in most cases the quality of the overall body of evidence was not sufficient to enable definite conclusions regarding the clinical effectiveness of these therapies to be drawn.”

Sydney yoga instructor Sarah-Jane Perman, who has been ­practising the discipline for 15 years, yesterday said her students reported relief from a range of physical ailments and mental ­diseases.

“People come for these incredible benefits,” Ms Perman said. “Whether it is back pain, depression, anxiety or they are here to rehabilitate injuries, for most injuries (yoga) is way better and cheaper than physiotherapy because you’re giving people tools so they can heal themselves long term.”

Ms Perman said yoga was practised by thousands of Australian and had become a mainstream therapy. “Not subsidising yoga is disempowering people to make good choices about their bodies,” she said.

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74 Responses to Thai massage: private health insurance refund available

  1. mundi says:

    I don’t know enough about the system, but why is it that I cannot find extras cover that lets me exclude only the new-age crap. Surely my premiums would be lower with out hippies making claims against the fund for nonsense like reflexology.

  2. Barry Bones says:

    My favourite one is when you go to Chinatown for the free sunglasses.

    You walk in to the eyewear shop, look at the sunnies, then wink wink, nudge of the nose – or better yet, have an Asian girlfriend – and say to the boss “may I get some sunnies on the cheap”.

    Once the boss is ok with you, they make you do an eye test (on Medicare). Then they wave their magic wand and the sunnies go on your healthcare plan…and whalla – a free pair of RayBans – do it every year !

  3. Badjack says:

    Does this mean that “ALBO’ is getting a refund on his ‘happy endings’ as well as the taxpayer funding the ‘rub n tug’ in the first place. Geez, these Pollies get it every which way. Fair dinkum, fair suck of Kevvies sav.

  4. Barry Bones says:

    I should also say that I feel a tad guilty about doing that re. the sunglasses. But every one else is (well, at least 9 /10 Mando speaker are) so I might as well get my share as well.

    Hey, I pay my taxes – shouldn’t I get something back ?

  5. . says:

    THE PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE REBATE SHOULD ONLY APPLY TO COMPREHENSIVE PRIVATE HOSPITAL COVER (AND NOT FOR PRIVATE TREATMENT IN PUBLIC HOSPITALS).

    So why will I nominate that I’m a private patient if I’m admitted with a serious illness or an accident?

    I am unsure how you would disentangle the risk from the payers, and keep as much of the system as there is now, in the private sector

  6. Mayan says:

    REMOVE THE PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE REBATE FROM EXTRAS COVER (INCLUDING ALL THESE UNPROVEN ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES)

    You do know, of course, that extras can include dental, psychiatric, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, podiatry and other things of real value. Such ill-considered blanket statements debase your argument. Precision in the use of language is essential.

    On the other hand, I also resent not being able to exclude wanky new age spa treatments from the price of my cover.

  7. min says:

    Albanese would be the one to ask about True Thai Massage. Investigators going in after he was photographed going in and coming out 1hour later for back massage so he said in parliament , discovered that rub and tug was a popular request by clients in that place.. All this on Michael Smith.

  8. Judith Sloan says:

    I don’t think we should have private patients in public hospitals. (There may be some very rare exceptions where treatment is not available in a private hospital.)

    What is going on at the moment is a rort, whereby public hospital managers try to force patients to reveal their private health insurance status to double dip.

    The doctors are also on the take as it is easy for many of them to treat private patients in the public hospitals and be paid extra.

    You cannot be forced to reveal your private health insurance status if you are admitted to a public hospital, by the way.

  9. Judith Sloan says:

    People can still sign up to extras cover; it will just not be subsidised. Just because dentistry is good doesn’t mean that the taxpayer should contribute to its cost.

  10. I am the Walras says:

    I suspect Albo lobbied hard for the rebate to be extended to Thai massages during the goat rodeo that masqueraded as the last commonwealth government.

    That way he could get ‘full service’ from the taxpayer as well.

  11. Peter from SA says:

    I had the idea these procedures were offered as a price-capped extra (e.g. $200 per year), along with gym fees etc. All you really need is a tax invoice to claim it back. I thought it was a marketing gimmick, separate from the main claims system which is highly regulated.

    If this stuff has gotten into the regulated private health system … christ. There definitely are a lot of massage joints popping up in shopping centres these days. Guess that explains it.

  12. Leigh Lowe says:

    People can still sign up to extras cover; it will just not be subsidised. Just because dentistry is good doesn’t mean that the taxpayer should contribute to its cost.

    I was gob-smacked to find that these hippie remedies were subsidised in the first place.
    I thought they were merely mareting ploys by the Health Funds.
    I am going to look seriously at extras cover to ensure they aren’t bundling moondance/essential oil shit in with my dental and optical.

  13. Peter from SA says:

    What is going on at the moment is a rort, whereby public hospital managers try to force patients to reveal their private health insurance status to double dip.

    I know one public hospital surgical unit that did this. They thought it was “fine” because they donated the private income into a research fund.

    There is a lot of money spinning around the health system and the mentality is to grab it while you can otherwise somebody else will.

  14. Leigh Lowe says:

    I thought it was a marketing gimmick, separate from the main claims system which is highly regulated.

    Snap, Peter.
    I couldn’t believe that one cent of Government money was going into these benefits.

  15. pete m says:

    You had me until you had a go at Yoga.

    I was sceptical of it too, then I joined a class with my then gf (now wife), and said class consisted of mostly 20’s something girls in tights bending over in all sorts of ways and I was hooked.

    I’ll have to check my cover again – joints feel a little creaky …

    Middle class welfare Judith – sorry, but the public have sucked too long on that teat and it wont be going away.

  16. notafan says:

    My sister lives in the country, the only hospitals within cooee are public, will country people have to go to the big smoke to have babies etc if they want to go private?
    I don’t believe doctors treating their private patients in a public hospital where they have an arrangement makes any difference to public patient lists.
    I paid extra insurance for dental for thirty years , it made a huge difference when my kids needed orthodontic treatment. I don’t have a problem with extras cover for the tradition stuff like dental, podiatry and physio attracting a rebate, its only been the last several years when the silly stuff got added.

    medibank clamps down on remedial massage parlours offering rebates for sex services

  17. rebel with cause says:

    I can’t understand why so many people have extras cover anyway. The one time we had a major medical expense that didn’t involve a hospital visit (emergency dental procedure) our health fund contributed bugger all, despite us being in a high level of extras cover.

    If you can afford to pay a hundred bucks (or more) a month for extras cover you can probably afford to pay the full cost of a massage or a new pair of specs, so what do you need extras cover for? It certainly wasn’t economical for the rebel family when we sat down and did the sums.

  18. Peter from SA says:

    I don’t think we should have private patients in public hospitals. (There may be some very rare exceptions where treatment is not available in a private hospital.)

    We’re doing it differently here in SA. Building a massive new public hospital, the size of which Stalin would have been proud of. Every patient will have their own room with a river view and en suite. I can just imagine, in times of overflow, the public patients whining when they are sent to a private hospital instead.

  19. . says:

    Should we subsidise Yoga Pants?

    The Chive may out forward a strong argument.

  20. Craig Mc says:

    Most of the public have a fundamental misunderstanding of what insurance is for.

    It isn’t for an all-you-can-eat smorgasbord.

    It isn’t there to cover you for inconvenience.

    It exists solely to cover you for disasters.

  21. Stimpson J. Cat says:

    Poor Albo.
    Lifes tough in Struggle Town.

  22. Craig Mc says:

    Albo must have a lot of tension in his caucus.

  23. . says:

    “Yeah baby…release my caucus from my chakrah…”

  24. Lem says:

    I can see where this is all heading. Let’s do some imagining:

    Ms Perman said yoga walking was practised by thousands of Australian and had become a mainstream therapy. “Not subsidising yoga walking is disempowering people to make good choices about their bodies,” she said.

    Because unless a government gives you a rebate for your activities…man, you are disempowered……….

  25. H B Bear says:

    When asked to comment on the change in government policy Albo said, ” Uuugh, uugh … oh yeah … that’s it baby … right there.”

  26. rebel with cause says:

    A couple of years back I remember reading a story about a particular Thai massage parlour that was allowing customers to claim ‘happy ending’ massages on their health fund. The health funds got tipped off by the fact that some of their policy holders were going to this particular massage place several times a week. Not sure if this kind of thing still happens.

  27. calli says:

    Lem…you’ve nailed it. When did yoga become a therapy rather than a pastime?

    My blood boils when I see this stuff…

    Please sir, can I get a rebate for my interest in photography…or sewing…or jazz ballet? It really is therapeutic….

    Arrrgh…now I need a Bex and a good lie down. Is there a subsidy for that?

  28. Talleyrand says:

    Craig Thomson and the Speaker Slipper were influential in keeping the theraputic massage option available.

  29. Baldrick says:

    Do these Thai massages come with a happy ending?

  30. Talleyrand says:

    Bring back the Fish Slapper rebate

  31. wreckage says:

    In rural areas, public hospitals practically beg you to use your private cover. They get more money and more personnel to cover the procedure out of private insurers than out of the public insurer. Private insurers using public health facilities actually increase the total funding of public health facilities.

    In addition, why should a privately insured individual have the choice of provider restricted?

    The medicare levy does not even close to cover the cost of medicare, so a person who is fully self-insured is subsidizing the system even if they can find someone to insure for a weekly poor-man’s special at the local brothel.

    The massive variety of unproven treatments should be excluded from private cover, but only to keep the cost of private cover down. To the best of my knowledge they are all offered as enticements to the potential insured. Assuming a person is self-insured, surely the market can sort that out?

    If there are people receiving alternate therapies at such cost to taxpayers as to be worth pursuing, then perhaps only medicare-eligible treatments should be considered for subsidy.

  32. Baldrick says:

    THE PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE REBATE SHOULD ONLY APPLY TO COMPREHENSIVE PRIVATE HOSPITAL COVER (AND NOT FOR PRIVATE TREATMENT IN PUBLIC HOSPITALS).

    Judith, the public hospitals want and actively seek, privately covered patients. It gives them extra cash, above and beyond what the government offers, which goes to pay for much needed equipment.

  33. Squirrel says:

    “…His mega-department has remained untouched, apart from a homeopathic (geddit?) efficiency dividend. Gosh, even the long-serving secretary, Jane Halton, couldn’t explain to Senators what the department does; she was awaiting an upgraded computer system (laughter accompanying these remarks)….”

    The federalism review may bring some common sense to the national government’s role in health, and in education, but more (much more, probably) of the same is the likely outcome, of course. The Abbott Cabinet should watch the penultimate episode of Yes, Prime Minister – Sir Humphrey’s explanation of the role (largely duplication) of the Department of Education and Science might just cause a penny, or two, to drop.

  34. JohnA says:

    Ms Perman said yoga was practised by thousands of Australian and had become a mainstream therapy. “Not subsidising yoga is disempowering people to make good choices about their bodies,” she said.

    Lem & Calli – +1 each.

    Since when can a few thousand out of a population of 23 million plus be called “mainstream”?

    Notice Ms Perman only cites “thousands,” rather than “hundreds of thousands.”

  35. . says:

    If there are people receiving alternate therapies at such cost to taxpayers as to be worth pursuing, then perhaps only medicare-eligible treatments should be considered for subsidy.

    Sensible idea, but how to implement that with a fund?

    Premiums don’t make any assumption as to how benefits are spent.

  36. 2dogs says:

    Also, if someone does have private cover, back charge all their Medicare use to the private insurance. i.e. including GP visits. We can’t keep up the middle class welfare.

  37. Dave Owen says:

    I can’t imagine Tony Abbott doing too much. His government is a big disappointment. I resent having to pay for these extras. I saw at my local Chinese massage place the other day that they provide “cupping”. I wonder if that is subsidised too?

  38. Lem says:

    I saw at my local Chinese massage place the other day that they provide “cupping”. I wonder if that is subsidised too?

    Hope not. The last time I saw someone come in to the A&E after being cupped (trust me there were marks all over this poor moribundAsian womans back) for her chest pain, she expired soon after from overwhelming sepsis due to bilateral lobar pneumonia.

    Still, that was 25 years ago in my youth, maybe the technique has been refined…

  39. Chris says:

    Previously to getting really ill I would do Yoga regularly. Given my occupation of sitting on my bum most of the time (though for exercise I did a few 5k runs a week) I was surprised to discover I no longer needed a massage once a month. Yoga was not subsidised at all, massage was minimally subsidised but at a small amount that is really only offered as a hook to get people to the fund.

    There are funds now which are very flexible in what you can exclude – eg you can exclude cardiac care which is pretty hard to predict.

    Anyway the extras benefit caps for even things like glasses are pretty tight these days, certainly compared to actual private hospital care. I’m pretty sure I’ve cost my health fund, let alone Medicare more than $100,000 in 2014 – they send me friendly updates every now and then. Don’t think they’ll ever be getting that back in premiums.

  40. Lem says:

    Previously to getting really ill I would do Yoga regularly

    Okay. So have you thought about that, Chris? Cause and effect?

    I wonder…

  41. Chris says:

    Lem – sure as someone who ended up with lung cancer and never smoked I’ve thought a lot about what might have caused it. As far as I’ve been able to find there is no link between Yoga and cancer. Yoga is essentially just exercises strengthening core body strength which is why it helps people who sit a lot. Having the balance and core strength post major operations has however helped a lot with rehab and I’m usually out a of ICU ans hospital a bit earlier than average.

  42. Lem says:

    A lot of lung cancer sufferers never smoked. Bad luck on that score Chris.

    On the up side I have never seen any epidemiological evidence that Yoga causes lung cancer.

  43. Chris says:

    Lem – yea it’s probably just really bad luck. There’s a few low probability environmental causes it could be but nothing I’d pursue unless I thought it was an ongoing risk for others. I’ll leave that to the statisticians and concentrate on living.

  44. Lem says:

    @Chris

    Wise man.

  45. Leigh Lowe says:

    Because unless a government gives you a rebate for your activities…man, you are disempowered……….

    Exactly.
    Channel 9 was running this story tonight with the biggest bunch of hippie whingers you have ever seen.
    “This therapy really gives great results and improves people’s well-being, but they won’t do it without a rebate”
    Huh?

  46. mundi says:

    Just pigs squealing over their free feed ending.
    They have no morals, the government is just a cash cow to them.

  47. Robin Barker says:

    ‘Alternative’ therapies are, in the main, self-indulgent twaddle and if people want to use them they should pay for them. It would make more sense to subsidise shoes – a necessary item – than the secret-to-life, cure-all snake oil offered by these practitioners, many of whom, interestingly, stick Dr in front of their name.
    Yoga, with the right teacher, under the right circumstances can be excellent but why should the taxpayer even partially subsidise yoga classes? Learning to ride a surf board is also good for the body and soul, as is Scottish dancing, bushwalking, acting classes, singing in choirs – the list is endless.
    This, of course, is the problem with creeping socialism, everyone’s entitled to whatever is going to empower them.
    And, as for the platitudinous nonsense these people talk – ‘not subsidising yoga is disempowering people to make good choices about their bodies’…what on earth does this actually mean?

  48. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B. says:

    Should we subsidise Yoga Pants?

    I am fond of Yoga pants; Country Road make some very acceptable ones, with a tied draw-string.
    I hate Yoga though. So boring doing contortions in the name of serenity.
    Neither the pants nor the contortions should be subsidized.

    A girlfriend of mine in the US taught Yoga for many years – California, of course.
    She is in her mid-forties and is now having her second hip replacement.
    Yoga, of course. Totally wrecked both of her hip joints with bending over double in some pose.
    A mindless ideology, imho. Far easier and cheaper to watch paint dry.

  49. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B. says:

    Hope not. The last time I saw someone come in to the A&E after being cupped (trust me there were marks all over this poor moribundAsian womans back) for her chest pain, she expired soon after from overwhelming sepsis due to bilateral lobar pneumonia.

    That’s one of the main problems with these ‘therapies’. They can mask serious underlying health problems. Another dear friend of mine was seeing an osteopath for her back pain for several years which he claimed was due to an earlier whiplash injury; until she was finally so ill she presented at a hospital, where x-rays showed she had terminal bowel cancer. She died very shortly after that.

    I’ve also heard that ‘cupping’ breaks blood vessels and can lead to Hep B and C infections. Take care.

  50. Andrew says:

    The last time I saw someone come in to the A&E after being cupped (trust me there were marks all over this poor moribundAsian womans back) for her chest pain, she expired soon after from overwhelming sepsis due to bilateral lobar pneumonia.

    You means the cups didn’t fix it?

    Believe it or not, my ex thinks Chinese herbs are genuine medicine. (She was also a filthy Green voting scum until she met me.)

  51. Alfonso says:

    THE PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE REBATE SHOULD ONLY APPLY TO COMPREHENSIVE PRIVATE HOSPITAL COVER (AND NOT FOR PRIVATE TREATMENT IN PUBLIC HOSPITALS).

    Exactly. The public system can cease bludging on private health insurance. It’s just another form of “progressive” taxation.

  52. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B. says:

    I’ll leave that to the statisticians and concentrate on living.

    A wise choice, Chris. Good luck and I hope you do well. Keep coming to the Cat. Always a laugh here somewhere to cheer up the day.

  53. Motelier says:

    New OT peeps

  54. Yobbo says:

    I hope various racist posters here realise that Thai massage is not the same thing as going to a prostitute. And it’s not “alternative medicine” any more than getting a rubdown from a physiotherapist is.

  55. Yobbo says:

    Believe it or not, my ex thinks Chinese herbs are genuine medicine. (She was also a filthy Green voting scum until she met me.)

    Some of them are. For example, Chinese herbalists are the only legal place to buy ephedra in many countries. Which as some of you might recall, was a very effective treatment for colds and flu before most governments banned it in a panic over meth.

  56. wreckage says:

    Nope, I was saying that if your fund covers massage, hurrah! If it covers prostitution, the mind boggles, but hurrah! No business of mine; don’t care, unless it actually accrues cost to me. Which claim is at present basically an assertion.

    “Thai massage” was turned into innuendo when there were some scandals over illegal or unlicensed sex-services being run out of “massage parlours” many years ago. By reputation a lot of the employees were immigrant women, but since I was about 8 years old at the time I have no idea what the real situation was.

  57. Yobbo says:

    Yeah, like I said. A racist stereotype.

  58. . says:

    Robin Barker
    #1560500, posted on January 6, 2015 at 11:08 pm
    ‘Alternative’ therapies are, in the main, self-indulgent twaddle and if people want to use them they should pay for them. It would make more sense to subsidise shoes – a necessary item – than the secret-to-life, cure-all snake oil offered by these practitioners, many of whom, interestingly, stick Dr in front of their name.

    Name the snake oil and say what works. We can’t have you slagging off good practitioners for no reason.

  59. Boambee John says:

    “rebel with cause
    #1560150, posted on January 6, 2015 at 5:06 pm
    I can’t understand why so many people have extras cover anyway. The one time we had a major medical expense that didn’t involve a hospital visit (emergency dental procedure) our health fund contributed bugger all, despite us being in a high level of extras cover.

    If you can afford to pay a hundred bucks (or more) a month for extras cover you can probably afford to pay the full cost of a massage or a new pair of specs, so what do you need extras cover for? It certainly wasn’t economical for the rebel family when we sat down and did the sums.”

    rebel:

    We had a similar experience with a son’s orthodontic treatment many years ago. After paying extras for the qualifying period, and getting the rebate, we would have been no worse off just paying the lot and taking the tax rebate on the high end part of the cost.

  60. Awesome Wells says:

    Many chinese herbs are indeed genuine medicine: the manufacturers include high levels of “western” medicines – just not labelling them as such, see cortisone in skin balms. Bad luck if they also get the mushroom wrong and kidneys die or need to be removed due to cancer – see chinese herbs, europe early 2000’s.

    As for doctors being “on the take” most are on a 100% donation model so patient fees, all bulk billed, goes back into general hospital revenue, with a little bit for the department not the individual dr. Just more cost-shifting madness from the fed-state divide.

    Finally, unfortunately its not just useless (or very slightly useful and not worth the $) alternative therapies funded by public and private health. Arthroscopy for knee osteoarthritis is shown to be useless (not just no evidence, evidence of NO benefit) but still on medicare. Australia has one of the highest rates of this procedure in the world.

  61. And, as for the platitudinous nonsense these people talk – ‘not subsidising yoga is disempowering people to make good choices about their bodies’…what on earth does this actually mean?

    It means, Robin, that the conductor is showing you the door off the gravy train.

  62. Chris M says:

    Wouldn’t bother with health insurance anyway – I just use the local medical system for low level stuff, check-ups and the possible emergency. All dental and other medical work done overseas – better quality of service, quicker service, often better equipment and MUCH cheaper. For optical get the check-up & prescription done on medicare then buy online.

  63. Walter Plinge says:

    Yoga is essentially just exercises strengthening core body strength which is why it helps people who sit a lot. Having the balance and core strength post major operations has however helped a lot with rehab and I’m usually out a of ICU ans hospital a bit earlier than average.

    You don’t need yoga for that and it could be a bad thing if it bends something that shouldn’t be bent during recovery. If you really need strengthening following an operation you are referred to a physiotherapist, a profession which involves lengthy tertiary education and uses sound methods. If you sit a lot just get and take a walk, jog, or cycle.

    I hope various racist posters here realise that Thai massage is not the same thing as going to a prostitute.

    Pretty much the same, temporary semi-private cubicles in shopping centres excepted. It strikes me as odd that the Thai massage shop at the bottom of the street has as customers only men, mostly young tradesmen. I’ve never seen a woman customer. There are only nubile young women on the front desk, never men. Perhaps that’s why the owner of the adjacent Thai restaurant, whose wife (the chef) was Thai, believed it was a rub-and-tug joint.

  64. James says:

    Why does yoga need to be subsidized? You only need to lay a mat on the floor and do it yourself.

  65. DaveA says:

    I like my mobile phone bill insurance. Rather than pay my phone service provider I pay a middle guy the same amount, plus overhead, and they pay it for me. Much better to be ‘insured’.

  66. notafan says:

    I have a ‘remedial’ massage shop next door to mine, male clients only, different girls working all the time, in high heels and minis, heavy makeup and the shop blinds are always closed . I’m sure it’s legit.

  67. Yobbo says:

    The fact that some rub and tug joints are disguised as massage parlours doesn’t make Thai massage akin to prostitution.

    Thai massage is a legit form of deep tissue massage and pretty effective at easing muscle aches and pains. You don’t hear anyone saying the same thing about Swedish massage (essentially the same thing), because this point of view is mostly based in racism.

    In Thailand, massage operators are licensed and regulated by the government. It’s a serious industry.

    If you think Thai massage is the same thing as a rub and tug then you’ve never had one.

  68. Yobbo says:

    A generic rubdown doesn’t even qualify as a “Thai massage” in Thailand. There is a specific technique involved in Thai massage. The generic kind of massage is called an “Oil Massage” here in Thailand to differentiate it from “Thai Massage”.

  69. JC says:

    Yobbo

    yes but is it possible to get both in a thai massage?

  70. calli says:

    A generic rubdown doesn’t even qualify as a “Thai massage” in Thailand. There is a specific technique involved in Thai massage. The generic kind of massage is called an “Oil Massage” here in Thailand to differentiate it from “Thai Massage”.

    I foolishly asked for a Thai massage in Bangkok. Yobbo is correct.

    The masseuse was Cruela Deville’s sister…I came out black and blue. But felt great after I recovered. I’ll go for the oil one next time…

  71. Snoopy says:

    Yobbo, if you think a physiotherapist simply dishes out a ‘rub down’ then you must have walked in the wrong door.

  72. Yobbo says:

    Yep I guess they were all imp0sters during my 16 year football career.

  73. Infidel tiger says:

    Thai massage isn’t very relaxing. Bloody good if you have a sore back though.

    Australia’s one million DSP moochers should have to get one each month.

  74. wreckage says:

    Thai massage is a legit form of deep tissue massage and pretty effective at easing muscle aches and pains.

    The masseuse was Cruela Deville’s sister…I came out black and blue. But felt great after I recovered. I’ll go for the oil one next time…

    Right, so Thai’s the good stuff. I’ll keep that in mind!

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