How is that feral cross bench voting?

One of the things that has really annoyed me about the Abbott government narrative is how they have faced a feral cross bench in the Senate.

Well the numbers are in:

how_the_cross_bench_votes_729-2

The Labor Party, Nick Xenophon, and the Greens have been frustrating the government. Yet the Abbott government is going to collude with Labor and the Greens in an attempt to drive the cross-benchers into electoral oblivion.

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38 Responses to How is that feral cross bench voting?

  1. Infidel Tiger says:

    They are brainless. Just really dumb people.

    Ironically Bernardi and Leyonjhelm appear to have the best working relationship.

    Lazarus appears to have gone completely off chops so they can kiss him goodbye and unless Lambie cops a length or two from some desperate she’ll be worse than ever.

  2. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    Looks pretty feral to me. Reminds me of this, especially this one.

  3. Fleeced says:

    I don’t know that I’d say 50% is that much support – having nearly half your legislation rejected is actually quite high… If they only had to contend with Day and Leyonhjelm, they’d be fine (since even legislation they oppose often just needs tweaks to get their support). Palmer and the rest, though… they tend to be a bit more obstructive, with little room to compromise.

  4. Habib says:

    They think they can shut out the LDP and the like, and their voters will drift back to the Liberal party through lack of options. Arrogant swine- I’ve news for them, they’ve lost me and many others permanently. That particular genie’s out of the bottle, and ain’t going back in. They can try to disenfranchise classic liberals and conservatives, Cameron thought likewise but UKIP showed him otherwise. Only the dodgy electoral system in the UK prevented the Conservatives having to rely on UKIP to form government, and their apparent return to small c conservatism indicates at least they recognise the reality. I don’t think the local crew have the intellect to realise their position.

  5. Habib says:

    This also assumes that blocking passage of legislation is necessarily a bad thing. Blocking repeal on the other hand is almost invariably malicious.

  6. Tel says:

    Yet the Abbott government is going to collude with Labor and the Greens in an attempt to drive the cross-benchers into electoral oblivion.

    It’s almost like the voters want new ideas in politics, but the established parties will do anything to prevent that happening.

  7. . says:

    Habib
    #1689596, posted on May 22, 2015 at 9:31 pm
    They think they can shut out the LDP and the like, and their voters will drift back to the Liberal party through lack of options

    Correct.

    Look at the informal vote. By 2016 or 2019, it may well hit 10%.

    Then look at how many people are no shows now.

  8. JC says:

    Bob Day is a pretty decent bloke and so is David Leyonhelm. We need more of them.

  9. james says:

    The 50% one indie supports. Another rejects. As long as more than 2 reject, the bill cannot pass

  10. Memoryvault says:

    Look at the informal vote. By 2016 or 2019, it may well hit 10%.

    I’m aiming for 12.5% with the Vote4Themm campaign in the next Federal election.
    In a non DD election that would be enough disgruntled voters to elect either side.
    In a DD election it would be enough to elect at least one Senator in each state.
    Assuming it isn’t a DD, 18% would be heaven for the same reason, but probably unobtainable first time around.

  11. Sean says:

    Day is probably more of an economic dry than your usual FF candidate. Probably more than 90% of the Liberals too. I’m not sure we would get the same from other FF candidates.

  12. Snoopy says:

    Shallow. What counts most is how Senators voted for significant legislation.

  13. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    One for you from a few days ago MV:

    Why You Should Vote For Nobody

  14. Memoryvault says:

    Thanks for that, Bruce.
    Excellent and I will see if I can get permission to use it.
    Did you check out the source?
    Some interesting thoughts in the comments section.

  15. Seco says:

    So Bob Day you can set your watch to, next DL and then it’s 1 in 2 at best.

    So hardly “easy” to work with. It would be interesting to see a graphic of the “bought and paid for independents” during the GilRudd era.

  16. Seco says:

    Unfortunately our politicians listen to the press gallery and not to Joe Public. Hence the steady shift to the Left.

    Can Cory Bernardi go Independent? He doesn’t appear to have a lot of Lib support. They spend most of their time apologizing on his behalf and distancing themselves from his comments.

  17. Yohan says:

    Xenophon got 28% in the last election, not due to his policies, but due to an SA protest vote that had nowhere else to go.

    I’m hopeful Bob Day’s profile will be big enough for him to collect some of this vote, and get over 5-10% in 2019 and another term with preference flows.

  18. Blogstrop says:

    Labor’s determined opposition to nearly everything puts the onus on the crossbench. By the figures given here, only Bob Day respects the government’s mandate, while Layonhelm is lujkwarm.

    It’s an awful Senate, but not entirely the fault of the crossbenches.

  19. Can Cory Bernardi go Independent?

    I’d hope not, Seco. Personally, I refuse to vote for independents because they almost invariably turn out to be sockpuppets for the Left. He’s better off being in the party and trying to counterbalance the big government socialists.

  20. Big_Nambas says:

    Two things nearly guarantee the end of Conservative government in Australia, The ABC/Fairfax press and the “Give me something for nothing voters”.

  21. Sydney Boy says:

    And the ALP, The Greens, and their media arm (the ABC) are constantly harping on about how the government is “not keeping their promises”. This is why. They can’t due to the Senate vote.

    And yes, the results of the UK election was crazy. SNP winning 56 seats with 1.5M votes, LDP with 8 seats from 2.5M votes, and the UKIP with 1 seat from 3.8M votes. Whatever happens, we don’t want to see results like that.

  22. Yobbo says:

    A lot of legislation this government has tried to pass is utter shite, so thanks to the senate for rejecting it.

  23. candy says:

    I think Senator Xenophon is the one who will create the most problems. He’s media crazy for attention and will bring the cross benchers along with him as he guides them and manipulates them.

    The poker machine issue he has completely dropped because he gets no attention for it. I tend to think for him it’s all about getting his face on TV. Not a peep about the addictions to gambling, he’s friended up with Twiggy Forrest to bring down big miners as that gets him attention now and he’s looking at inquiries for anything to get himself in the media. It’s all a farce, just in my opinion.

    If he really cared about the distressing situation of gambling addiction, he would still pursue it.

  24. johno says:

    David Leynhjelm has been telling anyone who wants to listen that the government is likely to do a deal with the Greens to change the Electoral Act to make it harder for true liberals like himself and Bob Day from being elected. The government wants the deal because it believes it will help it get a majority in the Senate and the Greens want it because the independents and minor parties are taking away those who don’t want to vote for either Coalition or Labor. Labor isn’t interested because they don’t want to strengthen the Greens.

    The really scary part is that the Greens’ spokesman on electoral matters is their Stalinist-in-residence, Lee Rhiannon. A nasty piece of work with rat cunning. She has the political skills to stitch up a deal that will do over the independents and minor parties and be able to sell it to the Coalition as being in their interests.

    If the Coalition go along with her plans, it will be their greatest betrayal of democracy in this country’s history. They will really have sold their soul to the devil.

  25. Ex-Adelaidean says:

    Ironically Bernardi and Leyonjhelm appear to have the best working relationship.

    Not to DL’s advantage I’ll venture (or, perhaps, revealing some true colours?).

    Aligning himself with the Coalition’s self-appointed “C” conservative is a funny thing for a “Libertarian”. CB wouldn’t know a market-oriented or liberty-enhancing reform if it punched him in the face, and has made great truck with whipping up both anti-gay and anti-Halal hysteria. He has more in common with the Ray Hadleys and Bob Francises of this world than any principle classical liberal or libertarian. On the other hand, CB’s been virtually silent on the fiasco of the government owned Submarine Corp in his own backyard and on the national benefits of free trade in food and vehicles. There isn’t much political bravery taking on the causes of people who wouldn’t vote for you in a fit.

  26. Shelley says:

    Hear, hear Candy.

  27. Shelley says:

    I would not like to see electoral reform such that the independents and minor parties don’t get a look in. The electorate needs to better its understanding of preferences, but I question when there are ‘secret’ deals done, how an even well educated electorate can be reassured of where their senate vote ends up. Also how to address the issue of quality candidates, so we can get more Days and less Xenophons and Lambies.

    I agree with other commenters that the informal vote will rise as the switched on/non low info electorate grows weary.

    I used to be all for compulsory voting, but have done a complete turn on that too.

    Slightly off topic but related – the other issue that bothers me is that where the likes of Thomson, Gordon (Qld), Hamilton-Smith (SA) suddenly become ‘independents’. Usually after some misdeed, but in the case of Hamilton-Smith betrayed his voters by switching from the Libs to Independent to get a Ministry and seat at the Cabinet table in a Labor government – and only weeks after the election.

  28. Rob says:

    Hey Sinc, perhaps you are too easily “really annoyed” about collateral issues and avoiding the big point – our election mandated government being unable to govern because of a buggered up “feral Senate”.
    What “really annoys” me is those parading Senators who, with piddling voter support, constantly claim the high moral ground yet are abysmally ignorant when it comes to understanding the issues they vote on.
    Xenophon – the media’s go to arm of government on every political issue.
    Lazarus – the brick ……. !
    Lambie – Minister for Packages ?
    Muir – wants a new car.

  29. Rabz says:

    Two things nearly guarantee the end of Conservative government in Australia, The ABC/Fairfax press and the “Give me something for nothing voters”.

    If the liberals had any balls and functioning brain between them, they could very quickly engineer the long overdue demise of both the ALPBC and Fauxfacts – but they don’t, so they won’t, thus ensuring their own demise.

    Our so called political system, system of government, etc, has now become such a vile, obscene criminal farce that I no longer want any part of it. I have been ‘disenfranchised’ so to speak. So no more voting for me.

  30. braddles says:

    Are there any figures on Xenophon’s votes when Labor were in power?

    Another phony independent I suspect.

  31. . says:

    The really scary part is that the Greens’ spokesman on electoral matters is their Stalinist-in-residence, Lee Rhiannon. A nasty piece of work with rat cunning. She has the political skills to stitch up a deal that will do over the independents and minor parties and be able to sell it to the Coalition as being in their interests.

    If the Coalition go along with her plans, it will be their greatest betrayal of democracy in this country’s history. They will really have sold their soul to the devil.

    A man might sell his soul for the world, but for the Senate, Tony?

  32. strange says:

    Its simple really. There is nothing feral about these senators. They didn’t stand on a coalition ticket so why should they vote all the time with the coalition? Those who elected them don’t expect them to vote with the government all the time. They have every right to oppose coalition policy – most of what it brings forward was never raised prior to the election (remember as one with Gonski, no cuts to education, health etc etc) so much for “our election mandated government”. Davidson, like the rest of the fascist idiot right, for some reason expect the opposition and other senators to just roll over. A quite undemocratic stance that is at odds with their so called libertarian views. Oppositions do what their numbers allow. Abbott and company simply don’t know how to negotiate and are surprised when their bullying doesn’t get them results. Go figure.

  33. wreckage says:

    Davidson, like the rest of the fascist idiot right, for some reason expect the opposition and other senators to just roll over.

    That’s the opposite of Davidson’s stance, but HEY, don’t let the actual people you hate get in the way of your spit-flecked, ranting bigotry!

    Maintain the rage!

  34. Sydney Boy says:

    @strange – Perhaps you don’t realise how few votes many of these Senators actually received.

    David Leyonhjelm received 416,000 first preference votes; Jacquie Lambie received 22,000 first preference votes; and Ricky Muir received just 17,000 first preference votes. I am including the party votes in those totals – Ricky Muir himself scored just 479 first preference votes.

    In contrast to Ricky Muir, in Victoria the Liberal/National coalition scored 1.3 million first preference votes, and only had two Senators elected. So don’t crap on about how their voters “elected” them to oppose coalition policy. If the Senate had any kind of proportional representation – even within the state – these micro parties voted for by micro numbers of people would never get a seat.

    The thought that the 17,000 people who voted for Ricky Muir as first preference should be able to hold back legislation voted for by 4.8M people who voted for the coalition as first preference is ludicrous in the extreme.

  35. Memoryvault says:

    Two things nearly guarantee the end of Conservative government in Australia, The ABC/Fairfax press and the “Give me something for nothing voters”.

    Yeah, if only those greedy gimmee gimmee voters had heeded Tony and Joe’s warnings of an impending financial crisis. If only they had accepted that we had to tighten our belts and voted LNP. If only they had given Tony and LNP a mandate to cut expenditure, red tape, and taxes like he wanted to. But no. Those greedy, selfish bastard voters went with . . . . .
    . . . oh . . . wait . . .

    FFS – we quite rightly question the sanity of climate cultists still pushing the impending doom message of global warming, despite it’s no-show for nearly two decades. Yet the equally insane dolts here who continue to blame “the greedy voters”, for electing an LNP government that was pushing an austerity package, are considered “normal”. It beggars belief.

  36. sandfly says:

    The Greens will always be the same unless they accidentally slip into power when their true face will be revealed. Xenophon has got away with his sly deceit for too long, his only objective is to promote himself as an honest broker…in reality he’s a Trojan Horse for the Left.

  37. Fisky says:

    Even the most extreme of the cross-benchers, Lambie, has supported the government nearly 50% of the time. Sounds like a pretty good cross-bench overall. Maybe Abbott/Hockey should learn how to negotiate properly instead of bagging them. Scott Morrison showed the way, getting TPVs approved by the “ferals”.

  38. Rabz says:

    Gee, Clive’s done well with his mighty “bloc of four” hasn’t he?

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