What they said: On Thatcherism

Tony Abbott:

…your invitation to give this lecture suggests there was at least a hint of Thatcher about my government in Australia …

Adam Creighton:

… indeed the biggest similarity was in the manner of their removal — by furious parliamentary colleagues.

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47 Responses to What they said: On Thatcherism

  1. C.L. says:

    Not furious parliamentary colleagues.

    Cowardly parliamentary colleagues.

  2. Infidel Tiger says:

    Both replaced with softcocks who laid the way for two decades of debt, high taxes and massive government.

  3. Infidel Tiger says:

    Thatcher for Major was one of the greatest cock ups of all time.

  4. Pyrmonter says:

    IT

    No. Thatcher had to be removed (sad it had to end quite when it did – would have been good for her to see ou the 80s), but Major’s government did well, and is vastly under-appreciated. For one thing, it was only under Major that inflation was finally brought under control: for all Thatcher’s reputation as an economic reformer, she never managed two years in succession when inflation was less than 2%.

  5. Gibbo says:

    I just checked and http://www.tonguebathingturnbull.com is still available for you Sinclair.

  6. Ant says:

    Furious parliamentary colleagues?

    On what issues that mattered were they furious to the point that they would engage in that kind of behaviour with a view to installing somebody who would get the issues right?

    Well, let’s see; there’s the….and then there’s the…um, er, ah, I know, SAME SEX MARRIAGE, ABC FUNDING AND GLOBAL WARMING.

    Run with that at the next election.

  7. Toiling Mass says:

    Sorry Sincers, but gloating after cheering on Turnbull just seems inappropriate. He gives all the signs of Abbott’s weaknesses plus some of Shorten’s.

    Certainly not some great vindication. Just one putz for another, while pissing off much of the base as an extra.

  8. Old School Conservative says:

    For all of Abbott’s strengths and positive results, he was losing the conservative base by ignoring freedom of speech and the ballooning Government debt. He and his ministers were not trumpeting their achievements enough.
    I had a lot of time for Abbott as PM and dearly wanted him to listen to those who voted for him. Reducing Government expenditure, scrapping 18c, and slashing the ABC would have seen him soar in the polls and those cowardly parliamentary colleagues would have fallen into line.
    Hindsight must be a harsh mistress for Tony.

  9. Gab says:

    One of things that used to frustrate me about the media was the almost blackout against transmission of anything he said when he said it right. Unless one read his transcripts from his website or watched QT or read Hansard transcripts, you’d think the bloke never ever said anything of import and gravitas. But snack on an onion? Oh that we heard about for days. But mistaken say “Canadia” and quickly correct himself, we heard about that for days on end.

    Well it seems NOW the media can’t get enough of what Abbott has to say.

    As Chairman Mal has said, it’s an exciting time.

  10. Iren says:

    There was another close parallel. I know Thatcher was very unpopular because of the proposed poll tax, but the real reason she lost power was that she wasn’t prepared to sign away British rights to the EU. They were already in the common market but I think there was a treaty she refused to sign, so she was deposed.

    Sound familiar?

  11. Leon says:

    I am not going to hold my breath waiting for big Maolcolm T to mimic Thatcher.
    I’ll bet now that Tony Abbott is going to be way closer to Mrs. T. than Maolcolm.
    As Maocolm delivers (rather than promises) policies that please everyone, it will be interesting to watch Sinclair’s response, given the necessity of the leadership change.

  12. Amused says:

    he was losing the conservative base by ignoring freedom of speech and the ballooning Government debt

    They better buckle up and prepare to lose more of the base then, because Lord Waffles the Cat Strangler isn’t going to do anything about 18c, the ABC and will only ever increase government debt.

  13. Snoopy says:

    Pyrmonter:

    for all Thatcher’s reputation as an economic reformer, she never managed two years in succession when inflation was less than 2%.

    Damning evidence. That certainly justifies the Turnbull coup.

  14. H B Bear says:

    One of things that used to frustrate me about the media was the almost blackout against transmission of anything he said when he said it right.

    The media never forgave Abbott for tearing down their own red Queen. They were determined to ensure he didn’t succeed. Anyone comparing Abbott’s treatment by the ALPBC and Fauxfacts to Howards hasn’t been paying attention.

  15. Sinclair Davidson says:

    I’m not gloating or promoting anyone – just pointing to Abbott’s delusions of grandeur.

    “a hint of Thatcher”? FFS.

  16. Aussiepundit says:

    lost control of the nation’s finances;
    lost control of his own chaotic, capricious, Rudd-like PM’s office;
    broke election promises made on-camera and thereby lost the trust of the Australian people.

    He had to go.

  17. I am the Walras, Equilibrate and Price Take says:

    Margaret had the bigger, brassier set of cojones.

  18. Aussiepundit says:

    The media never forgave Abbott for tearing down their own red Queen. They were determined to ensure he didn’t succeed.

    Oh boo hoo.

    Tony Abbott attacked his own parliamentary colleagues as sexist, because they insisted he fire a misbehaving female staffer.

    He didn’t. Instead he went out, attacked them publicly in the media, and started defending his fucking staffer against people who had put themselves on the line and won seats in the national parliament.

    Now. Why would he do that?

    I expect, from comments here, a range of lame-arse stupid explanations for why he would do that, but wake up.

  19. calli says:

    If it’s a “hint” it’s hardly grandeur.

    Grandeur would be “there was an unambiguous, nay, a consummation of Thatcherism evident to all but the ignorant bout my government in Australia”.

    Unless Thatcherism is like pregnancy.

  20. notafan says:

    I’m not swayed by the allegations about Credlin.
    Especially after the scurrilous piece in the AFR 2 days ago.

  21. Snoopy says:

    Sinclair Davidson
    #1840251, posted on October 28, 2015 at 9:10 pm
    I’m not gloating or promoting anyone

    It’s on! Turnbull for PM.
    Posted on 4:36 pm, September 14, 2015 by Sinclair Davidson
    My Canberra sources tell me that Turnbull has the numbers. As such I expect a new Prime Minister tomorrow.

    Good.

    Turnbull did not raise taxes.
    Turnbull did not abandon 18c.
    Malcolm Turnbull, I believe, can deliver Liberal government to Australia in a way Tony Abbott cannot.

  22. Snoopy says:

    Small steps…….

  23. Aussiepundit says:

    I’m not swayed by the allegations about Credlin.

    It’s a matter of public record that he denounced cabinet colleagues as sexists because they told him to fire a troublemaking staffer.
    Once he did that he was toast. Any parliamentary leader who did that would be.

  24. Aussiepundit says:

    After he went to war against his own colleagues in public, they were morally obliged to roll him. It was beyond polls or political tactics, and one of personal integrity.

  25. Ant says:

    Not even a hint?

    A hint’s not that much, you know.

    His action on asylum sneakers alone saved lives, saved this country billions, crushed the racket in Indonesia, proved the left monumentally wrong and irresponsible and shut the mouths of a thousand pretend journalists from sea to shining bloody sea.

    He was no Thatcher, but I’d say that’s a hint and then some.

  26. Ant says:

    BTW, Britain could use a few hints like that, too, compared to the crap they have now.

  27. . says:

    Aussiepundit
    #1840285, posted on October 28, 2015 at 9:34 pm
    After he went to war against his own colleagues in public, they were morally obliged to roll him. It was beyond polls or political tactics, and one of personal integrity.

    But why did he do that?

    Remember what Freidman said: Now WHY did the railroads get behind it?

    Do you think Turnbull could have white anted him? As for some of them like Hunt, they just seemed incompetent.

    I think Abbott actually erred in sacking Johnston. I don’t care if the ADO didn’t like him. He was the boss and his word was the word of god. He spoke truth about Adelaide Subsidised Canoes and he got belted to the backbenches.

  28. Aussiepundit says:

    But why did he do that?

    Let’s not go there. The point is, he did it.

    Do you think Turnbull could have white anted him?

    This crap about Turnbull white anting.
    Turnbull didn’t make him break his promise to pensioners. Turnbull didn’t make him blow the national debt to historic levels. Turnbull didn’t make him stand by a goddamn staffer against cabinet.

    As for these infamous leaks. What was the most damaging cabinet leak anyway? The leaks were mostly to the effect that ‘cabinet has lost confidence in the PM.’ Well sorry but that’s information we, the public, would like to know.

    As for some of them like Hunt, they just seemed incompetent.

    Unlike Turnbull, Hunt actually was undermining Abbott.

  29. Aussiepundit says:

    He spoke truth about Adelaide Subsidised Canoes and he got belted to the backbenches.

    The truth about the Subsidised Canoes is that the current plan is that the people of the east coast (ie QLD, NSW, VIC) could have relatively cheap, excellent submarines protecting them, but instead will be forced to pay billions extra so as to create a ‘busy-work’ jobs scheme for Adelaide unionists.

  30. notafan says:

    What promise did Abbott break to pensioners?
    Do you mean the change to the age limit which doesn’t affect current pensioners or the change to the assets test proposed from 2017 for people with a million dollars in assets?

    I don’t know how it is possible to both cut spending and not make some changes to generous welfare entitlements which make up the bulk of federal government spending.

  31. Aussiepundit says:

    What promise did Abbott break to pensioners?

    “No change to the pension.”

    Do you mean the change to the age limit which doesn’t affect current pensioners or the change to the assets test proposed from 2017 for people with a million dollars in assets?

    both.

    When analysing this promise, people always falsely assume he was making the promise to pensioners.
    No, he made it to Australians, including future pensioners.

    I don’t know how it is possible to both cut spending and not make some changes to generous welfare entitlements which make up the bulk of federal government spending.

    I don’t either, which is why I’m not sure why Abbott proposed a truckload of new welfare spending like the PPL and NDIS, when he was so concerned about the budget.

  32. notafan says:

    On one occasion Abbott said no cuts to pensions which I think most people would read as no cuts to the rate of pension.
    On 6 September 2013 he said no changes to pensions and given the ALP cuts advertising campaign I would give him that as a no cuts to pensions.
    Even the ABC didn’t call the proposed changes as a proven promise breech.

    Ppl was dropped, another broken promise. NDIS was a teary Gillard unfunded promise that he was in a rock and hard place on.
    In any case cuts to NDIS had nil chance of being passed in the senate.

  33. Snoopy says:

    “No change to the pension.”
    …..
    When analysing this promise, people always falsely assume he was making the promise to pensioners.
    No, he made it to Australians, including future pensioners.

    Abbott promised not to increase the pension? Ever?

  34. Aussiepundit says:

    Abbott promised not to increase the pension? Ever?

    Yep.
    Stupid, wasn’t he?

  35. Aussiepundit says:

    On one occasion Abbott said no cuts to pensions which I think most people would read as no cuts to the rate of pension.

    No. He said, “No change to the pension.”

  36. Leon says:

    If stopping the boats doesn’t have a HINT of Thacherism, what does?

  37. Grace says:

    I’ve listened to TA’s speech. What delusions of grandeur? He used the word hint. My interpretation was that he was being polite and expressing gratitude for the opportunity to speak.

    If it wasn’t for TA’s absolute conviction to stopping the boats, we would be in a similar situation to Europe. We should be eternally grateful to TA.

  38. Econocrat says:

    So how is Turnbull different to Rudd? Anyone? Anyone?

  39. Chris says:

    Yeah all those above criticisms – and positives – of Abbott have a hint of fairness and truth.

  40. Aussiepundit says:

    So how is Turnbull different to Rudd? Anyone? Anyone?

    Fair question. Abbott and his allies have been painting Turnbull as the “new Rudd” for well over a year now. This is essentially the subliminal message that was coming out of the PM’s office. But they’re both like Rudd in different ways.

    Abbott:
    – chaotic, non-consultative internal leadership style
    – dictatorial, out of control PM’s office
    – habit of making policy on the run
    – lost control of the nation’s finances
    – fan of big-picture social policy
    – took Australia’s debt to historic, record-breaking levels
    – went back on key election promise
    – lost the trust and confidence of his colleagues

    Turnbull
    – in line with high profile “Mood of the moment” progressive issues such as same-sex marriage
    – has an image as an urban intellectual
    – huge personal wealth
    – has actively promoted more interventionist climate change policies
    – unclear what his overall economic or social strategy is.

  41. kraka says:

    Hey Sinc-how about we let history decide if your asslicking of Turnbull is well placed or not

  42. George Tee Gee says:

    Sinc

    Congratulations in advance for the sinecure your friend Malcolm will gift you. (has he told you yet?)

    Undoubtedly, your enthusiasm and praise for this unproven narcissist must get some goodies. It deserves a reward as I am sure you are aware.

  43. Sinclair Davidson says:

    has he told you yet?

    Ambassador to the US? Okay, I’ll settle for the UK.

  44. Pho says:

    So how is Turnbull different to Rudd? Anyone? Anyone?

    Abbott is a peasant.

    Turnbull is an aristocrat.

    Choices, choices.

  45. Slayer of Memes says:

    It’s on! Turnbull for PM.
    Posted on 4:36 pm, September 14, 2015 by Sinclair Davidson
    My Canberra sources tell me that Turnbull has the numbers. As such I expect a new Prime Minister tomorrow.

    Good.

    Turnbull did not raise taxes.
    Turnbull did not abandon 18c.
    Malcolm Turnbull, I believe, can deliver Liberal government to Australia in a way Tony Abbott cannot.

    I had my doubts when he posted this but I am now convinced, after the latest guest post, that Sinc has ‘gone native’ and is now just trolling his own blog for shits’n’giggles…

  46. Damienski says:

    So how is Turnbull different to Rudd? Anyone? Anyone?

    Turnbull hasn’t crashed, burned, and run looking for his Mummy whilst clutching his tear-stained hanky.

    Yet.

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