Future prosperity and its enemies

There are three pertinent pieces in today’s media covering the economy-crippling policies that our political elites are pursuing by attacking property rights and promoting their own favoured economic and political outcomes.

First we have Barnaby Joyce with a wonderful op ed which is worth quoting at length

I listened to Professor Hugh Possingham talking on the ABC radio last week about the benefit of more restrictive tree-clearing laws that it is claimed will save endangered species, and reduce global warming.  A noble cause; but paid for by divesting private individuals of their property rights without payment and making some land useless and unsaleable by reason of new government caveat.

Heading further south, Victoria’s Hazelwood Power Station is closing and apparently a new water feature will be built to fill the hole where the coal came from.  This feature will presumably assist in mollifying the increase in power prices from losing 22 per cent of Victoria’s power supply.

In South Australia the attraction of industry is impeded by a power grid over-reliant on a naive zealot-like approach to a heroic ­renewable power target.

In Queensland the government is trying to sidestep building dams in the regions because it will not be accepted by an inner-urban Green constituency.

Daniel Andrews (is) talking about how he “acknowledges the burden on families” by people losing their jobs at Hazelwood.  He sounds pathetic as he talks about building new hospitals that require people to be gainfully employed to live there to use it, and he is apparently creating a new “hub”— for what Daniel? Unemployed angry people?

Service industries need industry to service.

Dams create new agricultural wealth with waiting markets in a hungry world. Cheap power creates manufacturing.

Social infrastructure, however, such as hospitals, is a legacy of a strong and vibrant economy in meaningful production, not the creator of it. Social policy is the colour of the icing, not the cake.

We better hope for a real epiphany in the way we do business — or get ready to be smacked between the eyes by an economic stick called reality.

All too true but Barnaby himself, rather than promoting such issues, has of late been sidetracked into railing against the so-called supermarket monopolies and assuaging his Alan Jones prejudice-fuelled attacks on coal seam gas.

Then we have a piece in the AFR,  regarding the Hazelwood closure.  This is largely based on an interview with Josh Frydenberg, who blamed the Labor government for putting pressure on Engie to shut the plant to encourage the exit of coal-fired power stations, adding, “The closure of Hazelwood has long been Labor’s policy”.

Frydenberg may be one of the nation’s better politicians but he neither mentioned nor was prompted by the journalist to explain that the policy is actually close to consensus.  The closure of Hazelwood, like that of the two South Australian coal power stations, is due to the subsidies consumers are forced to give to wind generators, subsidies that are largely provided by federal government policy and deliver wind a price three times that of commercial generators.  Subsidies to renewables started small under John Howard and have been expanded considerably; the current Coalition Government has maintained them and they are central to the climate policy that it took to the Paris greenhouse conference in December of last year.

Finally we have an article by Graham Lloyd in The Australian which is a preview of the policy conclusions that Senator Roberts is announcing following a very detailed briefing from CSIRO. One Nation’s view is that Australia’s climate change response is a waste of money. Senator Roberts says, “CSIRO’s approach has serious deficiencies.  Policy failures at global, national, state and regional levels based on failed and ridiculous forecasts are costing lives, costing taxpayers billions of dollars, exporting jobs and destroying energy security and reliability,”

In a statement with which few of us would disagree, he added,

“The ultimate goal of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation party is to dismantle Australia’s obsession with green guilt and assist in ­restoring our country’s former agricultural, manufacturing and economic base.’’

One of the international experts Malcolm Roberts has brought out to Australia to support his views is Canadian Professor Tim Ball.  Professor Ball is to address the Australian Environment Foundation’s inaugural Robert Carter Commemorative Lecture in Melbourne on Wednesday, 9 November at CQ Functions, 113 Queen Street, Melbourne. 5 30 for 6:00 pm concluding at 7:30 pm. (The entry fee to the event is $25 and is payable at the door).

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12 Responses to Future prosperity and its enemies

  1. John Michelmore

    Joyce might make the right noises on occasion, but to seriously believe he will do or achieve anything in relation to deregulation is away with the fairies. One prime example is the Senate Inquiry into bef cattle transaction levies where he in effect adopted zero recommendations!

  2. A Lurker

    We need more One Nation people in Parliament, especially those of Senator Roberts’ calibre.

  3. Heretic

    (((Frydenberg))) is another Turnbull.

  4. Entropy

    Finally we have an article by Graham Lloyd in The Australian which is a preview of the policy conclusions that Senator Roberts is announcing following a very detailed briefing from CSIRO. One Nation’s view is that Australia’s climate change response is a waste of money. Senator Roberts says, “CSIRO’s approach has serious deficiencies. Policy failures at global, national, state and regional levels based on failed and ridiculous forecasts are costing lives, costing taxpayers billions of dollars, exporting jobs and destroying energy security and reliability,”

    Roberts can very easily dealt with because Denier. Instant delegitimisation.

    I suggest railing against the gross unfairness of the financial impacts of all the these policies on low income, migrant, indigenous, and how nasty big windmill is making life harder for the little people. Develop a meme of fat pig alt energy barons snouting at the the taxpayer trough. Discuss the Evil Immorality of making little people pay more for energy for their homes. Trot out little old lady pensioners who can’t afford to heat their home in winter. Frailer the better. Make sure she brings angel cake to the interview.

    And always, always ask what actual difference to the world’s temperature will any of these ‘ruinous’ policies make. Eventually even the most stupid leftist may pause for at least a few minutes to consider what they have wrought.

  5. incoherent rambler

    Cheap power creates manufacturing.

    Yep. True.
    It can also be said that Cheap power creates jobs.

    Expensive power (State and Federal Government policy) destroys jobs.

  6. Roger

    Barnaby is basically a good, common sense bloke who has made a Faustian pact with Alan Jones.

  7. herodotus

    The new “lake” is to render the coal source too hard to start up again. We need to drain the swamp these destructive politicians live in.

  8. Botswana O'Hooligan

    herodotus

    The problem about draining swamps is that most of the time you set out to complete that very simple task you find out the hard way that you are up to your arse in alligators, or in this case politicians, and the problem is compounded.

  9. I liked Frydenbergs line that went something like – Labor policies amount to – “sacking the Hazelwood workers to buy green votes in Melbourne” –

  10. 1234

    All conspiratorial bullshit. Is this the same Joyce who predicted $100 roasts due to the carbon tax? And won’t release to cost benefit analysis for the transfer of agricultural chemicals and pesticides from Canberra to Armidale in his electorate? Its also nice to hear that a priority for PHON is “restoring our country’s former agricultural, manufacturing and economic base”. Restored to when – the 1950 model or the 1960 model? They haven’t got a clue. As for dams, dams, dams will it be the taxpayer who coughs up for them, or those who benefit. Ah, I thought so. Just more agrarian socialism from Joyce. Moran shows again he is a complete fool.

  11. Leo G

    What of this claim of an Alan and Barnaby conspiracy to inflate the price of a carbon tax roast, fumigate Armidale, torpedo power station dams, and damn windfarms?
    Surely, the very stuff of the conspiratorial bull.

  12. John Carpenter

    Joyce’s comments don’t sit well with the fact that it was the LNP coalition that signed the economy killing Paris agreement on GHG emissions.

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