The Liberals finally get serious

The AFR reports:

Malcolm Turnbull has personally instructed the federal division of the Liberal Party to cease legal action against the Liberal Democratic Party to avoid jeopardising sensitive Senate negotiations over the government’s flagship industrial relations legislation.

Overnight Monday, the Senate was due to sit late and pass one of the bills to establish a registered organisations commission. The government hopes that by next week, it will have also passed a bill to re-establish the Australian Building and Construction Commission.

Speaking of the government’s IR legislation the first bill passed the Parliament last night:

The legislation passed after 2am this morning after the government secured the support of crossbencher Derryn Hinch and the Nick Xenophon Team, along with One Nation.

The Senate had been forced to sit indefinitely on Monday night until the legislation was voted on.

Senators Xenophon and Hinch insisted they had secured what could be the best whistleblower protections in the world in exchange for their support for the bill to establish a Registered Organisations Commission to oversee unions and their officials.

They secured amendments to protect and compensate union whistleblowers while also obtaining an undertaking from the government to extend the same protections — or stronger ones — to whistleblowers in the corporate and public sectors. A parliamentary inquiry will examine the whistleblower protections in the legislation and if it recommends a stronger regime for corporate and public sector whistleblowers, the government will establish an expert advisory panel to draft legislation to implement those reforms.

The legislation needs to be introduced by December 2017 and dealt with no later than June 30, 2018, according to the undertaking.

This is a good outcome for the government – although it remains to be seen if they renege on the committments given the Hinch and Xenophon. I think we should use the term “Leyonhjelmed” to describe broken legislative promises given to Senators. I suspect also that the ALP and Greens will support that legislation.

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30 Responses to The Liberals finally get serious

  1. Rafe Champion says:

    Good news!

  2. Andrew says:

    Can someone explain why explicitly trading a senate vote for personal advantage is not the same as trading it for $500,000?

  3. Baldrick says:

    The Walking Dead of Australian politics finally get a victory, of sorts.

    I can understand your elation Doomie but how is another government quango, ready to be filled with Leftards, in the form of a Registered Organisations Commission, a reason to start popping champagne.

  4. Tel says:

    Look at that, being a stubborn prick pays off. I must try that sometime; about my turn to be owed something I think.

  5. Bear Necessities says:

    This is Diet Coke type serious. After this and the ABCC bill, what are they going to do next?

  6. Hydra says:

    I have zero issue with extending whistleblower protections to Corporates and Public Sector workers. Particularly the Public Sector, where whistleblowing should be a rite of passage.

    Good effort by the Government.

  7. Combine Dave says:

    Based on the current polling Turdball’s regime won’t be long for this world.

    It’s a shame the ALP is so much worse.

    Although there’s still plenty of third parties to vote for now like the LDP.

  8. memoryvault says:

    also obtaining an undertaking from the government to extend the same protections — or stronger ones — to whistleblowers in the corporate and public sectors.

    Haha hehe hoho. Anybody dumb enough to think this – or any other future government – will, or even could, protect public sector whistleblowers, is too stupid to be allowed out in public unsupervised. It comes as no surprise that such a naive, unworkable notion was proposed by Xylophone and the Walking Headline.

  9. John64 says:

    I will concede that Lord Waffleworth might have taken his first tentative step towards Potential Greatness(TM) if the Libs manage to get the ABCC legislation through the Senate this side of Christmas.

    That being said, it all seems a bit pointless. When the Shorten-led Liars Government takes over at the next election with a Liars/Filth majority in the Senate, it’s certain to be scrapped once again.

  10. Up The Workers! says:

    Crikey, if Mal Jellyback keeps this burst of frantic activity up, Ted Bailed-out and Denis Nap-time might just have to expel him from the Liberal Leaders’ Mattress-Testing Collective!

    Now, roll over and go back to sleep.

  11. jupes says:

    I have zero issue with extending whistleblower protections to Corporates and Public Sector workers.

    The problem I have with ‘whistleblower’ protections is that they are good in theory. However like most things they don’t quite work in practice and rather than protect the ‘good guy’, they allow self-serving fuckwits to disrupt the system.

    Also a union ‘whistleblower’ would need a different type of protection to a public sector worker I would think.

  12. . says:

    I would never want to be a whistleblower.

    Who would want to employ you after that?

    The only way you can make good is to make a huge media deal.

    The only thing where it might work is forcing the APS to keep you employed.

  13. H B Bear says:

    What happens when Lord Waffleworth runs out of baubles, glass beads and trinkets for the cross bench?

  14. Philippa Martyr says:

    John64, YOU ARE JOKING.

    Surely.

    This bunch? They’re about as serious as a clown car, and about as good at governing.

  15. Mr Rusty says:

    “finally get serious”… Jesus H Christ we have some low fucking standards. Getting part of a Bill passed – with some faggy amendments from the narcissistic Senators – is “serious”. Are we so cucked that this is what is now considered “serious”?
    The latest IPA review has on it’s front cover “A win for freedom of speech” and a picture of a letter with about 20 signatures on it calling for reform of 18c. 18c is still here, it will be in 3 years time, so will the entire RDA and the AHRC (just with another Triggs-esque lefty in charge appointed by Turnbull of course). A letter with some signatures on it (one now gone from the Senate) is, apparently, a “win”.
    “Yeah!” say the Comical Ali Conservatives, “We’re winning! Things are getting serious!” as the Progressive Panzers circle them.

  16. Atoms for Peace says:

    And didn’t ” Oi. Mind ma tea ” go off !! More fun than watching Taggart..

  17. mosomoso says:

    So, right under the heading “The Liberals finally get serious” we get “Malcolm Turnbull has personally instructed etc”.

    Yet if the subject is 18C you won’t read those words “Malcolm Turnbull” from Sinclair. Nope. It’d be like pulling teeth.

    Fact is, Turnbull is inarticulate, indecisive, unpopular, a fantasist, a wastrel…and he has to go. That’s if we don’t want to end up with a Labor government that will take the last of the economy to the pub.

    The tricksy Turnbull boosting has to stop. Everyone’s had a good look at the bloke and you are not going to fool a starving pigeon with “Malcolm Turnbull has personally instructed etc”. It was probably always too late to be putting lippie on this grunter. Now it’s definitely over.

  18. Combine Dave says:

    . It was probably always too late to be putting lippie on this grunter. Now it’s definitely over.

    Look at the fucking alternative!

  19. struth says:

    Nice try Sinclair but …..nah.
    Move on.
    Nothing to see here folks.

  20. wreckage says:

    The Liberals finally make a small, feeble move towards not losing as hard and as fast as they possibly can.

    If those cuckservatives put as much energy into winning as they do into losing, they’d have a permanent majority.

  21. Art Vandelay says:

    So the “at least we’re not as bad as Labor” Party finally gets a bill (creating yet another regulator) through Parliament and this is considered a win?

    Given the headline, you would have thought that they might have given up on their ham-fisted and suicidal attempts to outflank the Greens and Labor from the left with their superannuation changes, but I guess the rubes that supported Turnbull have to find a silver lining anywhere they can these days.

  22. duncanm says:

    .. establish a registered organisations commission

    more quangos ?

  23. Robber Baron says:

    If an election were held tomorrow who would win? I’d say Shorten would be PM and Turnbull would lose another 15 seats (that’s even more than he lost at the last election (net -12)). His leadership would have delivered around 27 seats to the ALP. He’s be a legend in Curtain House! That there is greatness!

  24. Andrew says:

    So the “at least we’re not as bad as Labor” Party finally gets a bill (creating yet another regulator) through Parliament and this is considered a win?

    Would you prefer this parliament passed MORE bills? On that theory, Gillard ran a good govt which passed a lot of bills.

  25. So, right under the heading “The Liberals finally get serious” we get “Malcolm Turnbull has personally instructed etc”.

    Yet if the subject is 18C you won’t read those words “Malcolm Turnbull” from Sinclair. Nope. It’d be like pulling teeth.

    Fact is, Turnbull is inarticulate, indecisive, unpopular, a fantasist, a wastrel…and he has to go. That’s if we don’t want to end up with a Labor government that will take the last of the economy to the pub.

    The tricksy Turnbull boosting has to stop. Everyone’s had a good look at the bloke and you are not going to fool a starving pigeon with “Malcolm Turnbull has personally instructed etc”. It was probably always too late to be putting lippie on this grunter. Now it’s definitely over.

    Neil Brown’s 12 November ‘Brown Study’ in The Spectator was a scream. I’m not sure if it’s meant to be satirical or not.

    On the available evidence, and on his persistence, he seems genuine.

    First, he has shown a firm commitment to bring extremist trade unions under the rule of law. It also seems to me that he is not just mouthing platitudes on this issue but genuinely believes in the cause. Then, he has made a commitment to cutting government spending, despite the howls of protest whenever an attempt is made to get people off the welfare teat. And the new refugee law is absolutely right. Moreover, he has stuck to the plebiscite on same sex marriage as a reasonable way of gauging public support for the proposed change to one of our most basic institutions. (He should have opposed same sex marriage outright, but you can’t have everything). Moreover, although I hate giving praise to politicians, he should be given credit for arguing for all four of these policies with enthusiasm. Most importantly, he has clearly come to the view that something must be done about the iniquitous section 18C and the conduct of the Human Rights Commission that veers between labyrinthine incompetence in the case of the QUT students and touting for business in the case of Bill Leak’s cartoon. He seems to have realised that section 18C is defining our perception of ourselves and the sort of society we are; at the moment that perception, and at least partially the reality, is that we are burdened by a severe law that restricts one of our basic freedoms, the freedom to speak our mind, whether we are bigots, hysterics or ratbags and that we are content to let that burden remain. Again, I think Turnbull is genuine in espousing the need for change in one form or another. At the same time, he has certainly committed himself to taming the monster that the HRC has become. We now know that the HRC inflicts sustained stress, financial cost and considerable disruption to the lives of anyone who is on the wrong end of a complaint, no matter how absurd or fanciful it may be. We also know that it prolongs the agony for defendants by taking an inordinate time to work out whether the complainant has made out a prima facie case or not. The Prime Minister has recognised these evils and should be encouraged to remove them. It will not be easy, but those of us who can help, should do so. It is extremely unlikely that the Senate will ever amend the Act in the way many of us would like. And here, I may as well say that tinkering around with words, taking some out and putting others in, would not be much of an improvement to anything; true change can only be achieved by repealing the whole section and all that goes with it. But there are at least three useful changes that could be made and which no-one could reasonably oppose. The first is to put a time limit on how long it takes the HRC to investigate a claim, so that after say three months, a complaint will automatically lapse if a prima facie case has not been made out by then or if, more likely, the HRC cannot make up its mind whether there is one or not. Secondly, there should be an automatic award of costs against a complainant who is found by a judge to have brought a manifestly baseless complaint. Thirdly, when a claim gets to court, there should be a jury trial, as the only way of testing whether the public is really outraged by the offending words or not. So let me throw into the public debate the notion that we should congratulate Turnbull on how far he has come on these different policies, urge him to keep it up and encourage him to continue to campaign for real reform. We could do worse.

    I really couldn’t believe it when I read it. The man has done absolutely f*** all, but he’s a past master of seeming, appearing, thinking, believing, committing.

    Smoke and mirrors. Or, in rough demotic, a very practised con man.

    I also love the way Neil Brown puts forward his own agenda in the same article, apparently in the belief that if he writes down his ideas and then the words ‘Malcolm Turnbull’, that this will somehow make Lord Waffle embrace his agenda. Probably with enthusiasm and commitment.

  26. Yon Toad says:

    Yeh, right, sure they are. They could demonstrate the depth of their collective seriousness by taking on the ABC, that creepy guy who leads the Opposition and his fellow bottom feeders, those deranged drongoes that make up The Greens, that mendacious bint that runs the AHRC and her pudgy deputy Tim MT Sout, and that is just for openers.

  27. Art Vandelay says:

    Would you prefer this parliament passed MORE bills? On that theory, Gillard ran a good govt which passed a lot of bills.

    Err, you’ve completely missed my point.

  28. rafiki says:

    Things have progressed in the right direction. The LNP was returned, and signs are that the Greens have lost their position as controllers of what government bills will pass the Senate. If the group that supported the law to rein in the union bosses, and one hopes, that will support the ABCC bill, act together so that they can say to the LNP, ‘deal with us and you’ll get your bills through’, then we might get progress on other matters. Even 18C might be vulnerable.

    At least the LNP can now tell the Labor/Greens alliance to get stuffed. The most difficult task will be to convince this group to see the need for fiscal reforms. We might need to experience some crisis to prompt a change. Or we might need to wait until the next election. If Trump-type candidates replace the Greens in the Senate, or even win some HR seats, things will be very different.

  29. Up The Workers! #2215846, posted on November 22, 2016 at 9:54 am

    Crikey, if Mal Jellyback keeps this burst of frantic activity up, Ted Bailed-out and Denis Nap-time might just have to expel him from the Liberal Leaders’ Mattress-Testing Collective!

    Now, roll over and go back to sleep.

    Thanks, mate. Superb.

    Another reaction might be… bwahahahahahahahahahahahaha!

  30. BorisG says:

    When the Shorten-led Liars Government takes over at the next election with a Liars/Filth majority in the Senate, it’s certain to be scrapped once again.

    More reasons to vote Libs despite all their flaws.

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