Roundup Feb 4

Gerard Henderson’s media watchdog back on duty. h/t Fess in the comments. Freedom of speech evening. Looks interesting. What is the Q Society of Australia?

Trumpwatch. Polls suggest his move on refugees has popular support. And why not, he is just following Bill Clinton and Barack Obama in some respects.

A Dan Mitchell collection. Hot off the press – just say no to the addictive drug of Keynesian spending. On rentseekers backing a carbon tax. On smaller government as the ultimate anti-corruption policy. On border-adjustable taxation.

Left-leaning advocates like “destination-based” tax systems such as the DBCFT because such systems undermine tax competition and give politicians more ability to increase tax rates.
The “border adjustability” in the plan is contrary to the rules of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and there’s a significant risk that politicians might try to “fix” the plan by turning it into a value-added tax.
In theory, the import tax in the DBCFT is not necessarily protectionist, but the machinations of to justify that assertion, combined with the conflict it creates in the business community, undermine the consensus for reform.

The weather. Briefing notes for debates with warming alarmists. See how you go on the New York Times test of your position on climate and power-related issues facing the Donald. Alan Moran’s energy report. Elron Musk, a superstar of moochers.

World trade – visual. Striking map of world shipping.

Think tanks at work. Recent activities at the Centre for Indonesian Policy Studies. Think tanks of the world – more than you ever wanted to know.

Aint Science wonderful! Flipping the poles.

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20 Responses to Roundup Feb 4

  1. Bruce of Newcastle

    Hehe…

    “You did a very bad job protecting the environment and may have made many of the worst effects of climate change more likely. It could hardly have been worse.”

    I don’t think the New York Times likes me.

  2. Dianeh

    Me either Bruce.

    I got the same result as you.

  3. Tintarella di Luna

    Nor me – same result – loved the ascending admonitions as choices were made – I suspected an agenda

  4. Myrddin Seren

    I don’t think the New York Times likes me.

    The NYT had some brilliant arguments to support their case, didn’t they Bruce !

    ‘But Gweenies won’t like that’. Oh well – if Gweenies won’t like it – then double down on it !!

    BTW – from Drudge.

    A little taste of the Maunder Minimum redux –

    European consumers have been plunged into crisis by a vegetable shortage caused by severe weather.
    The problems stem from a blast of cold weather which has overtaken large parts of southern Europe.

    The Recoldening is not going to be pleasant – given how many resources have been diverted in to fragile, unreliable energy systems.

  5. Bruce of Newcastle

    The Recoldening is not going to be pleasant – given how many resources have been diverted in to fragile, unreliable energy systems.

    Myrddin – Much squawking going on in the old country at the moment…

    Npower’s shocking 15% energy price hikes spark calls for government crackdown on Big Six

    Don’t bother hitting the link as it’s the Mirror who want you to do all sorts of flaming hoops to read the story. But the headline is fun because it is due to government policy that they’re hiking the power price, so Mirror wants the government to crackdown on their own policy or something.

    For a better link here’s the Daily Caller:

    British Power Bills To Rise 15% Due To Green Energy Policies

    I think if UK consumers want electricity prices to be sane again they’ll have to go find a Trump of their own. Incidentally UKIP’s Paul Nuttall looks like romping home in the upcoming byelection.

  6. Mark M

    Hottest Year Evah!
    Vikings grew barley in Greenland.
    “A sensational find at the bottom of an ancient rubbish heap in Greenland suggests that Vikings grew barley on the island 1,000 years ago.

    The find is final proof that the first Vikings to live in Greenland did grow barley – the most important ingredient in brewing beer, making a form of porridge or baking bread, traditionally seen as staple foods in the Vikings’ nutritional diet.”

    http://sciencenordic.com/vikings-grew-barley-greenland

  7. Stackja

    Will NYT stop publication to save the environment?

  8. old bloke

    Freedom of speech evening. Looks interesting. What is the Q Society of Australia?

    “Q Society of Australia Inc is a not-for-profit civil rights organisation, run by a dedicated group of volunteers. Our supporters come from different ethnicities and creeds, all bound by a common goal: To inform Australians about Islam.” – from this link.

    There will also be a “Defending Freedom of Speech” dinner in Melbourne on the 10th February. Speakers will include the “Halal Choices” girl Kirralie Smith, Senator Cory Bernardi, Dr Mark Durie, George Christensen MP, Debbie Robinson (President, ALA), Angry Anderson, Ross Cameron, Larry Pickering and Gabrielle Lord. Details and bookings for both the Sydney and Melbourne events can be found here.

  9. Ant

    Great Roundup, Rafe. Thanks.

  10. Fess

    To add to Rafe’s roundup… Gerard Henderson is back from his WEB with a new edition of media watchdog http://thesydneyinstitute.com.au/media-watch-dog/

  11. Rafe Champion

    Thanks Fess, and Ant. I will put Gerard in the body of the post for people who are too busy to scan the comments.

  12. Another old bloke

    Hi Rafe,

    Under the “Weather” sub-heading, you refer to “Elron Musk”.

    Perhaps you were confusing him with L. Ron. Hubbard. Easy to do.

  13. Fess

    Thank YOU Rafe. Always interesting links in your roundup and I often get to Gerard’s mwd through your link. I don’t often comment here but I follow the Cats with great interest. Thanks again to all of you.

  14. Frank Carter

    Am I still banned from commenting?

  15. Andrew M.

    “Rentseekers” ?

    You are confused. One minute you were telling us how great “negative gearing” is for encouraging expansion of housing stock through investment properties, the next minute you’re using rentseekers as a pejorative term.

    Is seeking rent good or bad? If it is bad, and the “rentier class” are bad, how do you excuse people owning homes they don’t live in? If rentseeking is good, why is it bad for people like Musk and Big Oil trying to make profit by offering a solution to a problem that a government-enforced scarcity helped create, when housing matches that description too?

    Perhaps the issue here is that Dan Mitchell never described this carbon-tax-courting behaviour as “rentseeking”, he described it as “crony capitalism” seeking after “unearned income”, and the word “rentseeker” should not be considered pejorative.

  16. Kev from Canberra

    Success!

    “You did a very bad job protecting the environment and may have made many of the worst effects of climate change more likely. It could hardly have been worse.”

    Thanks NYT – happy to help further the meltdown (of liberal legacy media journalists)!

  17. Rafe Champion

    why is it bad for people like Musk and Big Oil trying to make profit by offering a solution to a problem that a government-enforced scarcity helped create,

    Andrew, what is the problem that Musk and Big Oil are trying to solve with the aid of subsidies and other forms of government assistance?

  18. Andrew M.

    They are the problems of creating transport and energy when both have a government capped amount of waste emission that can occur without taxation or punishment and conventional solutions are perceived by many as “dirty”. All problems are perceived problems. My emphasis was that a double standard was being applied. If rent seeking is okay as long as the rentier actually provides something in return, then what Musk and Big Oil are doing is okay – they provide a solution to a problem. It is totally irrelevant at that point as to whether government created the problem de novo rather than discovering it de facto when deciding if rent-seeking in general is okay.

    The real problem is not that anyone is seeking rent, but rather that the perceived problem was conjured out of thin air and 20 years of relentless propaganda.

  19. Rafe Champion

    OK so if people get cash in hand in return for destroying value in the community rather than creating it, we blame the rules of the game put in place by the government. Like the folks who make money out of chopping trees in Oregon to ship pellets to England to fire power stations instead of cheaper and more efficient coal. And the people who have rorted the carbon credits for billions. Just as long as we don’t think that those things are really ok and on a par with “rent seeking” by claiming normal business expenses for maintaining a rental property and other business ventures which add value.

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