David Leyonhjelm: Whatever you do, try not to be poor

According to the most recent Global Wealth Report by the Credit Suisse Research Institute, Australia leads the world for having the largest proportion of adults who can be described as middle class, and also the smallest percentage of people who are very poor.

This is nothing to complain about, but the imbalance might explain why our poorest people are routinely confronted by policies that would make Marie Antoinette blush.

In my state of New South Wales – as in most states – the ruling classes are shameless. Let me count some of the ways.

Technical students find subsidies and scholarships few and far between, while their middle class friends go to heavily subsidised universities. Thousands of smokers are fined for not standing in chilly allocated areas. Soccer supporters are hounded by police. The public is locked out of national parks and fishing grounds. Modified cars are confiscated. Late drinks in the city have been banned. And billions of dollars are poured into light rail to ensure middle class suburbs are suitably delightful.

Federal politicians tend to be more subtle about it, but are even more committed to keeping poor people miserable.

Despite around 2.5 million people being unemployed or underemployed, minimum wages, penalty rates and unfair dismissal laws are vigorously enforced to make sure they stay that way. Unless they are worth paying at least $17 an hour, and in some jobs quite a lot more, the Government compels them to remain on unemployment benefits.

Then there is the rising cost of electricity. The impact on prices of subsidising renewable energy has resulted in our poorest people being asked to decide if they want air conditioning in summer, heating in winter, or food.

And if they want to use a short term loan to pay a power bill, they are being told how much they are allowed to borrow.

If any of this makes them sick, their medications are more expensive thanks to the Government’s policy of protecting pharmacies from competition, to satisfy the demands of the Pharmacy Guild.

If they have a television or radio, the poor can discover why all this is good for them via the two media channels they help pay for, ABC and SBS. While they’re at it, they will probably hear about the arts festivals that make the wealthier suburbs such vibrant cultural centres.

Should they enjoy a drink or smoke while watching an arts festival on TV, they can take pleasure in knowing that their taxes are contributing significantly to it, with Australian cigarettes the most expensive in the world and alcohol taxes not far off it. Of course, the most prolific smokers are our poorest people including regional Aborigines. So much for closing the gap.

And should they speak up about the less successful aspects of multi-culturalism, they can be hauled before a bunch of anti-discrimination bodies to explain themselves.

We have arrived at this state of affairs because no major political party is interested in winning the vote of Australia’s poor.

Labor is no better than the Liberals on this. They might claim to stick up for battlers, but rarely take their side on any of the issues mentioned here. This is mainly due to Labor’s relationship with the unions, which care about workers who have jobs rather than those who don’t. And Labor is also now competing with the Greens for middle class progressive voters who couldn’t give a fig about the impact of power prices or the price of cigarettes on the poor.

In fact, every week we hear how progressives have a new idea to make life harder for poor people. Even the push to replace cage eggs with free range eggs will lead to substantial price increases, and now they’re talking about a sugar tax.

The poor are hectored and spoken down to. They have few choices in relation to their education and health. They are told when, where and how they can drink, smoke, eat, gamble and enjoy themselves. They are told they are cruel if they enjoy greyhound racing and too ignorant, stupid or incoherent to manage their own lives. Increasingly they are considered less important than animal rights and the environment.

Our governments are elected by the middle class to serve the middle class, so it’s hard to see how any of this is going to change.

So whatever you do, try not to be poor.

David Leyonhjelm is a Senator for the Liberal Democrats

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57 Responses to David Leyonhjelm: Whatever you do, try not to be poor

  1. Fisky

    It is vitally important that we don’t introduce open borders policies. That will do more than anything else to make Australia a poor country. Resist!

  2. Zyconoclast

    The politicians love the poor.
    That’s why they keep trying to make more of them.

  3. Fat Tony

    Zyconoclast:The politicians love the poor.
    That’s why they keep trying to make more of them
    .”

    And they hate the middle classes – who have political power.
    It was the growth of the artisans and merchants that created the middle classes and took power away from the royalty.
    Our governments now work towards destroying the middle class.

    Look at all the totalitarian states – no middle class, just an “elite” and masses of (unarmed) poor.

  4. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I spent four years living in a tent with no running water, electricity, refrigeration or sanitation. We had to borrow money to be considered poor.
    Young people these days have no idea…

  5. Zyconoclast

    The alleged poor can afford not to work, to have 4 children, eat take away junk food 3-4 days/week, send them to a fee paying catholic school at $2.5k each, pay for private guitar lesson.
    They can access a cleaner, via a government sponsored provider, to clean their pensioner mothers house at $10/ 90 minutes. Heavily subsidised daycare so they can wobble around at the gym then go for coffee and cake after. This is just the stuff I know about.

  6. Baldrick

    … and we have John Howard and Peter Costello to thank for creating the middle-class welfare hords.

    Stupid.Fucking.Liberals

  7. Helen

    It’s late, but I’ll jump in first with a couple of comments.
    “While they’re at it, they will probably hear about the arts festivals that make the wealthier suburbs such vibrant cultural centres.” I live in the NSW country near a vibrant cultural centre, Mildura. On Saturday night I went to the Arts Centre to see the dance group Bangarra. Their next stop is Hobart. In Mildura I got a seat in the second front row for $35 ($30 c0ncession, and even cheaper, ca $22, for a group of four – cheaper than ciggies?), the equivalent seat in Hobart costs $80. That’s an example where poor people in country areas can be better off than in the city.
    “The public is locked out of national parks. ” As a member of the public I’ve never been locked out a national park (except when rain closed the roads) – but then I didn’t want to shoot anything there.
    Smoking: having seen my step-mother die of emphysema due to smoking and myself suffering from asthma which if not caused, wasn’t helped by living and working in smoky conditions, I think poor people (in fact all people) need help to throw the habit. Yes, cigarettes are expensive and poor people smoke: so we lower the price and let them die sooner?
    I am disappointed by this article, in that in muddles up problems that need resolution, with a rave about how trying to find solutions is cruel to the poor in that it will take away their pleasures, some of which are killing them prematurely.
    I have a couple of suggestions, Mt Leyonhjelm, help the poor to give up smoking and gambling, then they’d have more money, they’d be less ill, more able to find work, and perhaps be less poor.; or give the poor some of the riches’ money.

  8. Jannie

    I have been trying not to be poor all my life, and I am not. But still there is not a single politician in the country who ticks all my boxes. I have felt inclined to vote for the Liberal Democrats, but you scared me away when once wrote an article advocating open borders, which is a way to import poverty for all Australians.

  9. Andrew

    If the govt is trying to serve the middle class they’re doing a piss poor job of it

  10. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The alleged poor can afford not to work, to have 4 children, eat take away junk food 3-4 days/week, send them to a fee paying catholic school at $2.5k each, pay for private guitar lesson.

    My father was developing a “sandplain block” in Western Australia in the late 1950’s and 1960’s. That’s how we came to be living in a tent. I had the first set of clothes that hadn’t been worn by someone else, from my first wages at sixteen, and the first new shoes, courtesy of the Australian military, at 18.

    I’ve done well since – I’m now a self funded retiree – but I bepi$$ myself laughing when I’m told by people such as are described above “You don’t know what it’s like to be poor, you don’t know what it’s like to struggle…”

  11. Some History

    Yes, cigarettes are expensive and poor people smoke: so we lower the price and let them die sooner?

    What an utter nitwit. The poor might be pleased that since they are under your purview that you might let them do anything. You can go to the poor suburbs and put up flyers of what you’ll let them do.

    BTW Government budgets forecast an INCREASE in revenue from eye-wateringly high tobacco taxes. A few may quit but for most they are simply being fleeced by larger and larger amounts, i.e., regressive. The relief is a contraband market.

    There are folk on this comments board that sound like the “religious” (and Eugenics) fanatics in America of a century ago – anti-tobacco/alcohol/gambling. The current lot probably aren’t even “religious”. They’re just pompous megalomaniacs.

    ….and myself suffering from asthma which if not caused, wasn’t helped by living and working in smoky conditions, I think poor people (in fact all people) need help to throw the habit.

    When smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke were pervasive, asthma was a rarity. As smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke have had a large decline, the incidence of asthma has INCREASED. And Australia is right up there for a ballooning asthma rate (Australia also has some of the most draconian antismoking laws in the world). Even China with its high smoking and exposure to ambient tobacco smoke together with cities draped in industrial smog has a lower asthma rate than Australia.

    I have a couple of suggestions, Mt Leyonhjelm, help the poor to give up smoking and gambling, then they’d have more money, they’d be less ill, more able to find work, and perhaps be less poor.; or give the poor some of the riches’ money.

    Are you familiar with the 1950s/60s? It’s considered the “golden era” of smoking. Immediately post-WWII most folk were poor. Yet the “smoke-filled” period produced a baby boom and an economic boom.

    Sorry, Helen, but your comment is a sanctimonious wankfest.

  12. Jannie

    Are you familiar with the 1950s/60s? It’s considered the “golden era” of smoking. Immediately post-WWII most folk were poor. Yet the “smoke-filled” period produced a baby boom and an economic boom.

    What’s more, that generation enjoyed a longer average life span than the current generation of molly coddled nanny state snowflakes are likely to obtain.

  13. King Koala

    Technical students find subsidies and scholarships few and far between, while their middle class friends go to heavily subsidised universities. Thousands of smokers are fined for not standing in chilly allocated areas. Soccer supporters are hounded by police. The public is locked out of national parks and fishing grounds. Modified cars are confiscated. Late drinks in the city have been banned. And billions of dollars are poured into light rail to ensure middle class suburbs are suitably delightful.

    Leyonhjelm proves once again he is an out of touch elitist cockhead.

    Technical students are mostly middle class. Soccer is a game supported in Australia by the middle class, upper middle class and trendy poor hipsters. National parks are mostly used by middle class and upper middle class people. Poor people cannot afford a single drink in the city, let alone a night of it.

    Modified cars, smoking and fishing are far from exclusive to the poor.

    Finally, its clear Leyonhjelm is rich enough to not ride the rail, or else lives in a very rich suburb with a very nice rail line. The majority of rail lines are used by poor and most middle class people avoid the rail if they can to avoid the poor people David gushes over (but clearly does not spend any time around).

    The best thing that can be done for poor people is an immediate halt to all low skilled and non skilled immigration. Jobs that would have supported these poor people are increasingly being done by migrants but an open borders loonie like Leyonhjelm does not really care about poor people, he is merely posturing.

  14. James Gibson

    Technical students find subsidies and scholarships few and far between, while their middle class friends go to heavily subsidised universities

    This is a very important point. Why do our criminal politicians continue to underfund TAFEs and apprenticeships while increasing funding for many pointless university degrees?

  15. BorisG

    sorry I think this is mostly a rant with very little substance or data. Is rail helping or harming the poor? Any data?

    At least the Senator did not mention the bikies.

  16. OneWorldGovernment

    Helen
    #2301914, posted on February 20, 2017 at 12:15 am

    It’s late, but I’ll jump in first with a couple of comments.

    “While they’re at it, they will probably hear about the arts festivals that make the wealthier suburbs such vibrant cultural centres.” I live in the NSW country near a vibrant cultural centre, Mildura.
    So you live in Wentworth

    On Saturday night I went to the Arts Centre to see the dance group Bangarra. Their next stop is Hobart. In Mildura I got a seat in the second front row for $35 ($30 c0ncession, and even cheaper, ca $22, for a group of four – cheaper than ciggies?), the equivalent seat in Hobart costs $80. That’s an example where poor people in country areas can be better off than in the city.
    Bangarra, started by an African-American and a South African SJW! How much money do they receive from Australian Tax Payers and why do folk think it is worth paying money to go and see?
    I’d suggest the fact they think they can charge $80 in Hobart would indicate the number of sanctimonious wankers

    “The public is locked out of national parks. ” As a member of the public I’ve never been locked out a national park (except when rain closed the roads) – but then I didn’t want to shoot anything there.
    You can’t go and get dead wood for your fireplace anymore, not even from the side of the road.
    And what is wrong with shooting a duck or a kangaroo for meat

    Smoking: having seen my step-mother die of emphysema due to smoking and myself suffering from asthma which if not caused, wasn’t helped by living and working in smoky conditions, I think poor people (in fact all people) need help to throw the habit. Yes, cigarettes are expensive and poor people smoke: so we lower the price and let them die sooner?
    Remove punitive excise taxes on alcohol, tobacco and fuel. Allow folk to grow their own tobacco and produce their own alcohol and fuel
    I am disappointed by this article, in that in muddles up problems that need resolution, with a rave about how trying to find solutions is cruel to the poor in that it will take away their pleasures, some of which are killing them prematurely.
    So what! So fucking what!
    I have a couple of suggestions, Mt Leyonhjelm, help the poor to give up smoking and gambling, then they’d have more money, they’d be less ill, more able to find work, and perhaps be less poor.;
    so you ‘know’ what is best!
    or give the poor some of the riches’ money.
    and here we come to your real socialist point of your argument. All peoples money belongs to you and your ilk so you can spend it as YOU decide.

  17. Bruce of Newcastle

    When we become the Venezuela of the East we’ll all be rich!
    Ask yourself, do you really need such bourgeoisie things as sugar? Electricity? Toilet paper?

  18. Entropy

    Helen, have you ever paused to consider if it is your right to impose your will on others? That it is your will that will force decision making on those others, and that they have no right to disagree with your will, or reject it?

    But it’s OK. They don’t have political power, they don’t have the money to campaign against your will, and you and your own ilk are busy making them have less of it.

  19. Hydra

    Helen – that was potentially one of the worst posts on tbe Cat not posted by grigory or monty.

  20. john constantine

    Good Senator Dave sees the lickspittle wannabes that flock to canberra,all earnestly clambering to be among the social justice aristocracy that lounge in their Dachas, swapping phantasies anong themselves about the ways they can better exploit their herds of serfs, while crushing any dissenters back into the cold, dark mud.

    When our Good Senator describes the utter Loathing and Contempt the inside economy leeches have for the outside classes they feed off, this is a primary source for our information.

  21. A Lurker

    How to help the poor (and this is coming from a rural household which operates on a very strict budget and has little disposable income for non-essential items).

    Create more jobs for the unskilled/semi-skilled – especially in the regions where there is higher income disparity. Create more jobs for the unskilled/semi-skilled – especially in the regions where there is higher income disparity. Create more jobs for the unskilled/semi-skilled – especially in the regions where there is higher income disparity. Create more jobs for the unskilled/semi-skilled – especially in the regions where there is higher income disparity. Create more jobs for the unskilled/semi-skilled – especially in the regions where there is higher income disparity. Create more jobs for the unskilled/semi-skilled – especially in the regions where there is higher income disparity.

    Got the hint yet?

  22. Senile Old Guy

    Leyonhjelm proves once again he is an out of touch elitist cockhead.

    Fact Check Status: True.

    David Leyonhjelm is a Senator for the Liberal Democrats

    How many LDP Senators are there? One. David L.

    Xenophon and Hanson have more influence than David L.

    Some may say I have not stated any arguments against what Leyonhjelm has written. No need: Xenophon and Hanson have more influence that David L.

  23. Gilas

    @ john constantine

    I enjoy your contributions on the Democratic People’s Socialist Collective Republic of Victoriastan, but..
    But.. please add punctuation to, and reduce the length of, your long sentences.
    Clarity and improved readability will be the result.

  24. Crossie

    According to DL there are three classes: the political class, the middle class and the poor with the politicians only looking after the middle class. I see it differently. There are in fact five classes: the political class the upper middle class, the lower middle class, the working class and the underclass.

    The political class only draws from the upper middle class and therefore has the highest affinity with it and the greatest inclination to look after its interests. The other three classes are unprotected and only looked upon as voteherd.

  25. dweezy2176

    I would prefer to be as poor as some of my “neighbours” .. I live in NSW HC in a street where I am the last Caucasian & English-as-a-first-language peasant .. surrounded by “boat-folk” from Vietnam ’70s to, “pre-Tones”, middle east “migrants” .. Yet, despite their numerous nationalities they have much in common .. none of the parents speak English, none have ever worked ( unless in the , usual, ME style drug-dealing is an occupation), none are poor, most chain-smoke though alcohol doesn’t seem to figure very high .. Late model cars abound, next door (70s Viet) always have at least 2 cars, never more than 2 years old and always up in the $50/70 000 price range. Most (entire family) also take a holiday to the “homeland” once a year, at least .. These “poor” folk wouldn’t swap with the inner-west-latte-sippers, it would mean a drop in lifestyle .. maybe David should get out more .. the “rarefied hot” air of Canberra seems to have got to him!

  26. stackja

    No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of Government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.” This is from a speech he gave to the House of Commons, November 11, 1947.

    Winston S. Churchill — ‘Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all the others.’

  27. Entropy

    The political class only draws from the upper middle class and therefore has the highest affinity with it and the greatest inclination to look after its interests. The other three classes are unprotected and only looked upon as voteherd.

    Yes. Joining the political class is now the easiest method to trade up from the middle class.

  28. Entropy

    Cross Chris diction all plans for a sugar tax are now well developed across health departments, I am told.

    While a ‘liberal’ party member is federal Minister. False advertising. Truth is, liberal party elected have more in common with the ALP elected than the people.

  29. Entropy

    Bloody iPad and bus don’t mix: cross jurisdictional.

  30. Rabz

    now they’re talking about a sugar tax

    Yep, there just aren’t enough sin taxes to clobber the non working classes with.

    As for the poor, if they along with moozleys (often the same thing) didn’t exist, I’d have no one to constantly complain about (apart from our beloved politicians, of course).

  31. Garry

    I really couldn’t care less about poor people. Instead of being a complete drain on the welfare system they should get off their lazy fat arses and earn their keep. Introduce food stamps instead of handing the budging class money to spend on booze and smokes and watch them squirm. Welfare would be a safety net not a lifestyle choice and if you don’t pay tax you should not be allowed to vote!

  32. Rabz

    Introduce food stamps instead of handing the budging class money to spend on booze and smokes and watch them squirm

    This is already being introduced through the use of a debit style card for welfare recipients that provides funds for food and other essentials. The intent is that welfare monies should not be spent on alcohol, tobacco and gambling.

    BTW, if you want to be poor in this country, develop a taste for the three things mentioned in the last sentence above. My weekly alcohol habit costs me about $100 and I only drink on weekends – and no smoking or gambling. That mortgage isn’t going to pay itself.

  33. candy

    Australia seems to be a low wage, casualised workforce and there is the “working poor”, who can never progress. Whoever dreamed up casual “flexible” workforce has done a great disservice to Australia.

    Not everyone can be a public servant and live the good life, or be suited to higher education and progress, we are all different.
    So the “working poor” exists. Perhaps it used to be called the “working class”.

  34. Tim Neilson

    Whoever dreamed up casual “flexible” workforce has done a great disservice to Australia.

    It is largely a product of government regulatory interference. If employers weren’t lumbered with more responsibilities for a full time employee than a parent has for a child, they might be willing to hire full time rather than stick to casual.

    The intent is that welfare monies should not be spent on alcohol, tobacco and gambling.

    Or on wacko or other illicit substances. That’s the intent but it doesn’t totally work. Round our area some of the druggos use the cards to buy soap and other toiletries at the supermarket and then sell it to housos at discounted prices. They suffer a nominal loss by the discounting but then have cash to spend on wacko.

    Create more jobs for the unskilled/semi-skilled – especially in the regions where there is higher income disparity.

    One minor correction Lurker. Governments can’t “create” real jobs. I think you mean “stop sabotaging the creation of jobs…”.

    Helen
    #2301914, posted on February 20, 2017 at 12:15 am

    If they ever put a tax on sanctimonious totalitarianism you’d instantly be bankrupted.

  35. .

    The best way to help the poor is to abolish excise tax, along with payroll tax and tariffs – but also to end wage regulation and occupational licensing.

    As for the idea that “no one in Australia plays soccer” – LOL. It is probably the only football code played everywhere save for remote Aboriginal areas.

    The fact is soccer fans are picked on because the NSW Police are too lazy to actually catch criminals and would prefer to punish a whole class of people, and now have dug their heels in.

    I remember horrendous crowd behaviour in State of Origin games, but the police didn’t start picking on league fans.

  36. B Shaw

    This is for Father T…..
    Repeating the words of a fine priest, now deceased
    who said in rueful tone, from the pulpit, more than 30 years ago –
    “the poor of today are not what was once known as ‘poor'”.

    And he would have looked askance at any woman or man talking Sanctimonious Totalitarianism.

  37. I have felt inclined to vote for the Liberal Democrats, but you scared me away when once wrote an article advocating open borders, which is a way to import poverty for all Australians.

    Jannie, I reckon you must have drunk too much of your home brew. I have never written an article advocating open borders. LDP policy, based on payment of a tariff to gain entry and a high bar for citizenship, is anything but open.

  38. Leo G

    Our governments are elected by the middle class to serve the middle class, so it’s hard to see how any of this is going to change.

    Our governments are not directly elected.
    Prospective parliamentarians are preselected by an upper stratum of various unrepresentative political classes. Geographically qualified electors of all classes select each parliamentarian from the preselections. The government is determined not by the majority of electors who prefer one of the two least unpopular political party groups but by majority of elected parliamentarians by Party group.
    Our governments then, tend to be elected by minorities of aspirant upper middle class political ideologues to serve their own interests.
    It’s not hard to see how this may change.
    Many want a directly elected Executive.
    But what is really changing, by contrast with ideological inspred republican dreaming, is the support for populist parties. Support by the under-represented for the traditional partisan ideologies is collapsing.

  39. King Koala

    Create more jobs for the unskilled/semi-skilled

    A waste of time unless you stop the massive influx of unskilled/semi-skilled workers entering Australia.

    Most (entire family) also take a holiday to the “homeland” once a year, at least ..

    Every single person who arrived on a refugee visa and finds it safe enough to have returned to their former country should be immediately sent back, along with any children or grandchildren.

  40. A Lurker

    Create more jobs for the unskilled/semi-skilled
    A waste of time unless you stop the massive influx of unskilled/semi-skilled workers entering Australia.

    Yes

  41. Fisky

    I think some people may be confusing David L with Chris Berg, who has called for open borders often and believes world GDP will double if we allow billions of people into the first world.

  42. duncanm

    Helen writes:

    That’s an example where poor people in country areas can be better off than in the city.

    der fred. The cost of living is much lower.

    “The public is locked out of national parks. ” As a member of the public I’ve never been locked out a national park (except when rain closed the roads) – but then I didn’t want to shoot anything there.

    National Parks is constantly closing areas that used to be open (particularly to vehicular traffic), was handed huge swathes of State Forests in NSW by layabout-I’m-the-smartest-in-the-room Carr, which have subsequently had access to them restricted, fees imposed and facilities reduced

    Smoking: having seen my step-mother die of emphysema due to smoking and myself suffering from asthma which if not caused, wasn’t helped by living and working in smoky conditions, I think poor people (in fact all people) need help to throw the habit. Yes, cigarettes are expensive and poor people smoke: so we lower the price and let them die sooner?

    up to them. They’re functioning adults, right?

    or give the poor some of the riches’ money.

    and here we find Helen’s truth.

  43. Rabz

    I remember horrendous crowd behaviour in State of Origin games, but the police didn’t start picking on league fans.

    Or the absolutely appalling behaviour over many years of Canterbury Bulldogs fans.

  44. Fisky

    Open borders would kill opportunity in this country. We can’t afford open borders. Time to slash immigration before automation really kicks in.

  45. Rabz

    They’re functioning adults, right?

    Evidently not.

  46. P

    Best article by David Leyonhjelm I’ve read (and I’ve read all here on Catallaxy).

    Made me think of King of the Road.

  47. Snoopy

    “The public is locked out of national parks. ”

    I take that to be a figure of speech. Compared to places like the US and South Africa, Australian National Parks cater for a very narrow range of visitors. Bushwalkers basically. US and South African parks provide easy access to the taxpayers who pay for them.

  48. Snoopy

    Tobacco tax good
    Sugar tax good
    Medicare co-payment bad (unfairly impacts on the poor)

  49. Jannie

    Jannie, I reckon you must have drunk too much of your home brew. I have never written an article advocating open borders. LDP policy, based on payment of a tariff to gain entry and a high bar for citizenship, is anything but open.

    David, if I have got it wrong I apologise sincerely. I do get things wrong sometimes but I don’t drink, just naturally scatterbrained maybe. In atonement I will try to read your policies more closely, and I will make a donation to your party. I am o/s stuck in a hotel room at the moment but can use a credit card, please indicate how best done.

  50. Fisky

    Jannie, David L wrote an article titled “Open the Front Door”, which implies open borders but isn’t really when you look at the detail. However, other LDP members do favour open borders and particularly more immigration from countries like Qatar.

    http://www.google.com.au/url?q=http://catallaxyfiles.com/2014/05/30/guest-post-david-leyonhjelm-open-the-front-door/comment-page-1/&sa=U&ved=0ahUKEwj56_fl953SAhXJHZQKHfw9DcMQFggLMAA&usg=AFQjCNFdx8A1W6mi0AGofF_s3vnw51Uw2A

  51. Empire GTHO Phase III

    Some may say I have not stated any arguments against what Leyonhjelm has written. No need: Xenophon and Hanson have more influence that David L.

    Insightful analysis. You can count. Give yourself an elephant stamp.

  52. struth

    I’m not sure which class I fit into.
    Is it unclassy of me to assume a class , and classy to down grade a class to be considered a classy class shifter to remain classy?
    In the class that I consider my classy self to be in, I am sure many others see me as a different class, and the class they see themselves in as the incorrect class in my classy judgement.
    Of course this leads to lower classes apparently being banned from voting.

    D.L. is a theories man.
    A pompous intellectual wannabe.
    There are so many holes in his theories based on the brain fart of the academic he is reading at the time, he is actually best described as a follower, and a man incapable of independent thought.
    Of course there are many worse than him in parliament, but his insane support of Fee for entry (which was not his idea anyway) statement is where you can best see his naivety.
    There are many rich people in Saudi Arabia, and there are many muslim extremists amongst them.
    The system would be rorted quicker than an Australian dole bludger claiming a bad back.
    Once these rich sheiks and corrupt sand monkeys had paid for their slaves to come in, they would set up businesses able to undercut Australian workers, as those who came in worked only for them as the deal would be, paying back their fee. etc etc.
    And who does the fee go to?
    The Australian Government, a socialist government seeing cash come in and able to just adjust immigration to get more, and will turn a complete blind eye to the goings on of these new Muslim businesses, their hiring and remuneration practices, to say the least.
    Once that policy was introduced you actually will get open borders and corruption at the highest levels.
    God, let me count the ways this would be a disaster for Australia.
    There are many more problems this creates.
    It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to work it out.
    It blatantly disregards the stated aims of Islam.
    In the fairy land that is the LDP’s uncorrupted , everyone is beautiful, kumbaya singing, economics can cure religious extremism world, you might come up with this sort of tripe.
    The real world is another world completely.

  53. .

    We can’t afford open borders. Time to slash immigration before automation really kicks in.

    What the hell are you talking about Fisk? Are you going to run your mouth of on A Current Affair and warn of the robot armageddon?

    D.L. is a theories man.
    A pompous intellectual wannabe.

    David runs a 2000 acre farm and another business. Do you?

  54. B Shaw

    This is for P
    As this article is on the poor, I’m responding to your words here
    about the Chinese shopkeeper’s good deeds during hard times. Similarly in the north, around the Atherton Tableland, a Chinese shopkeeper has been remembered with great affection for the reasons that you have mentioned.

  55. B Shaw

    Much of what David Leyonhjelm says is worth listening to.

  56. P

    Hi B Shaw.

    You can be sure I’ve seen your kind comment above comments.

    Cheers.

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