Monday Forum: January 22, 2018

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1,677 Responses to Monday Forum: January 22, 2018

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  1. Rossini

    Just browsing …….Must have made the team.

  2. stackja

    Greens want Stalinism.

  3. The Moribund Barking Toad

    well, well top twenty

  4. pete m

    Turtle – who said SJWs didn’t know the truth?

  5. JC

    Turtle of WA
    #2616083, posted on January 22, 2018 at 9:46 am

    This is truly disgusting. (H/t Tim Blair)

    Why, she’s perfectly correct.

  6. Baldrick

    12th Battalion A.I.F

    Dadson, Leslie (1884–1961)
    On 9 April 1917 the battalion attacked in the village of Boursies, which screened the Hindenburg line. Dadson led forward two platoons under heavy fire and captured two machine-guns; his bravery and initiative won him the Military Cross. On 15 April the enemy counter-attacked at Lagnicourt where he commanded ‘B’ Company. He took a small party forward to form a defensive flank and, though hard pressed, refused to abandon his position, while narrowly escaping capture; he won a Bar to the M.C. for his fine example of tenacity and pluck.
    On 11 August 1918, the enemy line in the Lihons vicinity, near Auger and Crépey Woods, was heavily defended, but Dadson’s company, led with great dash and courage, captured fifteen machine-guns and three field-pieces. Commended for his conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, he was awarded the rare distinction of a second Bar to the M.C.

  7. VIC producing 30MW of Wind Power! (Demand 6,500 MW)

  8. Turtle of WA

    Turtle – who said SJWs didn’t know the truth?

    If her head’s anything to go by you might be right.

  9. stackja

    Turtle of WA
    #2616083, posted on January 22, 2018 at 9:46 am
    This is truly disgusting. (H/t Tim Blair)

    Typical womoan. I am shocked.

  10. JC

    It looks like these creatures are totally self unaware.

  11. Turtle of WA

    It looks like these creatures are totally unaware.

    FIFY.

  12. Leigh Lowe

    From the uvver fred …

    C.L.

    #2616065, posted on January 22, 2018 at 9:33 am

    Associated Press: FBI says it has lost five months of emails from Peter Strzok …

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department has turned over to Congress additional text messages involving an FBI agent who was removed from special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigative team following the discovery of derogatory comments about President Donald Trump.

    But the department also said in a letter to lawmakers that its record of messages sent to and from the agent, Peter Strzok, was incomplete because the FBI, for technical reasons, had been unable to preserve and retrieve about five months’ worth of communications.

    Just astounding, blatant criminality.

    What about the other parties to his e-mails?
    This is surely grounds for a “fishing expedition” warrant if there ever was.
    Draft a warrant with 50-60 of Strzok’s likely correspondents on it and see if their emails have also been lost.

  13. Turtle of WA

    Obama should be shootin’ hoops with all the bros on the inside.

  14. stackja

    Leigh Lowe
    #2616097, posted on January 22, 2018 at 9:56 am
    From the uvver fred …

    C.L.

    #2616065, posted on January 22, 2018 at 9:33 am

    Won’t happen. Too many usual suspects. We all know how Ted and Bill got away. The excuses and alibis would fill the Trump Tower.

  15. Farmer Gez

    Fanny Faine is back on 774 ABC.
    Dutton has a secret agenda.
    Oxfam bimbette gets free squawk.
    The rich are getting richer and all the profits are kept by billionaires to impoverish the poor.
    Tax the rich.

    “And the needle returns to the start of the song and we all sing along like before.”

  16. Habib

    Frydemburgers is either on a promise, or has gone full retard. Either way this government is determined to put the Greebns out of business, eating their gluten-free fair trade tofu lunch in public.

    Here’s a tip, imbeciles, a “free market” doesn’t mean giving smug, wealthy leftist virtue-signallers stuff for free. Here’s another, not all musk are lifesavers.

  17. Snoopy

    Let me try and understand the point of the pussy marchers.

    They’re railing against the patriarchy because society gave them the freedom to make life defining decisions which they now regret and this is all Trump’s fault?

  18. stackja

    Turtle of WA
    #2616099, posted on January 22, 2018 at 9:58 am
    Obama should be shootin’ hoops with all the bros on the inside.

    at Allenwood?

  19. H B Bear

    This could be any UN sponsored air head actress visiting a Phnom Penh underage brothel. It’s worse – a New York apartment.

  20. lotocoti

    This is truly disgusting.

    I didn’t think it was that bad.

  21. stackja

    Snoopy
    #2616105, posted on January 22, 2018 at 10:03 am

    And others are offended because they are missing certain nethers.

  22. Up The Workers!

    Virulent Leftardism is an epidemic form of ‘Munchausen Syndrome’, or even ‘Munchausen by Poxy!”

    A pox on ALL their houses!

    (And regarding that womyn fright-bat’s nightmare juvenile feline, perhaps she should do the right thing and cart it along to the nearest vet (or S.T.D. Clinic, as the case may be) and have it quietly and humanely euthanased.

  23. feelthebern

    GOD BLESS TOM BRADY

  24. H B Bear

    My diagnosis? A lot of those frightbats are projecting their Trump Derangement Syndrome onto their vaginas. Will not end well.

  25. JC

    I was always a little curious in a not so curious sort of way what Getty Pics or Getty images meant when you saw a pic either on the web or elsewhere, so I did an exhaustive investigation. I went straight to wiki.

    Getty pics/images is a business.

    Getty Images, Inc. is an American stock photo agency, with headquarters in Seattle, Washington, United States. It is a supplier of stock images for business and consumers with an archive of 80 million still images and illustrations and more than 50,000 hours of stock film footage. It targets three markets—creative professionals (advertising and graphic design), the media (print and online publishing), and corporate (in-house design, marketing and communication departments).

    Getty has distribution offices around the world and capitalizes on the Internet and CD-ROM collections for distribution. As Getty has acquired other older photo agencies and archives, it has digitized their collections, enabling online distribution. Getty Images now operates a large commercial website which allows clients to search and browse for images, purchase usage rights and download images. Costs of images vary according to the chosen resolution and type of rights associated with each image – though are typically very expensive on average (upwards of $100 – $500 per HD image.

    History

    In 1995, Mark Getty and Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Klein co-founded Getty Investments LLC. Mark Getty is the company’s chairman. In September 1997, Getty Communications, as it was called at the time, merged with PhotoDisc, Inc. to form Getty Images. In April 2003, Getty Images entered into a partnership with Agence France-Presse (AFP) to market each other’s images.[1]

    Getty Images acquired the Michael Ochs Archives in February 2007.[2] The Michael Ochs Archives were described by The New York Times as “the premier source of musician photography in the world”.[3]

    In 2008, the private equity firm Hellman & Friedman (H&F) acquired Getty Images. In 2012, H&F put Getty up for sale.[4] As of the ensuing sale to Carlyle Group, the company was said to have an archive that included 80 million stills and illustrations.[5]

    In 2015, Jonathan Klein became the company’s chairman and Dawn Airey was hired as Chief executive officer (CEO) of Getty Images.[6][7][8]

    I’m not sure if it buys the pics, or people send them in for prestige reasons, but Getty takes a vig every time they sell an image.

  26. stackja

    2GB Richmond NSW train crash.

  27. stackja

    H B Bear
    #2616116, posted on January 22, 2018 at 10:13 am
    My diagnosis? A lot of those frightbats are projecting their Trump Derangement Syndrome onto their vaginas. Will not end well.

    Hysteria an old-fashioned term for a psychological disorder characterized by conversion of psychological stress into physical symptoms (somatization) or a change in self-awareness (such as a fugue state or selective amnesia).

  28. Mak Siccar

    Also from the uvver fred. From Breitbart.

    The Labour Party is charging white people extra to attend a Jeremy Corbyn rally in Loughborough, Leicestershire, on February 17th.
    Labour activists and supporters attending the rally will be charged £40 if they are white and £30 if they are non-white, reports the Mail on Sunday.

    “The basic price of a conference pass is the same for all members but, at the request of our East Midlands Regional Board, the party will subsidise part of the cost of this year’s conference pass for BAME [Black and Minority Ethnic] members to encourage attendance and improve representation,” explained a Labour spokesman.

    Of course, this really means that the basic price of a conference pass is not the same for all members, with white people being singled out to pay more than any other ethnic group.

    “This is racism. In effect, Labour is levying a tax on the basis of the colour of a person’s skin. It shows their contempt for the white working class,” responded Andrew Bridgen, the Member of Parliament for North-West Leicestershire.

    The Tory pointed out the “insanity” of charging a poor white Labour activist more for a ticket than Leicester East MP Keith Vaz, a rich ex-lawyer born in the Middle East.

  29. Anne

    Today’s Q drop. They’re all going down.

    This is what Srr and I have been screeching about for years. The evil for humanity that was coming down the pike with Globalisation is not easily comprehended. Hillary would have been the last President.

    —–

    Will SESSIONS drop the hammer?
    1 of 22.
    #Memo shifts narrative.
    #Memo reinstates SESSIONS’ authority re: Russia/ALL.
    #Memo factually demonstrates collusion at highest levels.
    #Memo factually demonstrates HUSSEIN ADMIN weaponized INTEL community to ensure D victory [+insurance].
    #Memo factually demonstrates ‘knowingly false intel’ provided to FISA Judges to obtain warrant(s).
    THEY NEVER THOUGHT SHE WOULD LOSE.
    [The 16 Year Plan To Destroy America]
    Hussein [8]
    Install rogue_ops
    Leak C-intel/Mil assets
    Cut funding to Mil
    Command away from generals
    Launch ‘good guy’ takedown (internal remove) – Valerie Jarrett (sniffer)
    SAP sell-off
    Snowden open source Prism/Keyscore (catastrophic to US Mil v. bad actors (WW) +Clowns/-No Such Agency)
    Target/weaken conservative base (IRS/MSM)
    Open border (flood illegals: D win) ISIS/MS13 fund/install (fear, targeting/removal, domestic-assets etc.)
    Blind-eye NK [nuke build]
    [Clas-1, 2, 3]
    Blind-eye Iran [fund and supply]
    Blind-eye [CLAS 23-41]
    Stage SC [AS [187]]
    U1 fund/supply IRAN/NK [+reduce US capacity]
    KILL NASA (prevent space domination/allow bad actors to take down MIL SATs/WW secure comms/install WMDs) – RISK OF EMP SPACE ORIG (HELPLESS)
    [CLAS 1-99]
    HRC [8] WWIII [death & weapons real/WAR FAKE & CONTROLLED][population growth control/pocket billions]
    Eliminate final rogue_ops within Gov’t/MIL
    KILL economy [starve/need/enslave]
    Open borders
    Revise Constitution
    Ban sale of firearms (2nd amen removal)
    Install ‘on team’ SC justices> legal win(s) across spectrum of challengers (AS 187)
    Removal of electoral college [pop vote ^easier manipulation/illegal votes/Soros machines]
    Limit/remove funding of MIL
    Closure of US MIL installations WW [Germany 1st]
    Destruction of opposing MSM/other news outlets (censoring), CLAS 1-59
    []
    Pure EVIL.
    Narrative intercept [4am].
    Sessions/Nunes Russian OPS.
    Repub distortion of facts to remove Mueller.[POTUS free pass].
    Shutdown Primary Reasons.
    Distract.
    Weaken military assets.
    Inc illegal votes.
    Black voters abandoning.
    “Keep them starved”
    “Keep them blind”
    “Keep them stupid”
    HRC March 13, 2013 [intercept].
    The Great Awakening.
    Fight, Fight, Fight.
    Q

  30. H B Bear

    Dr Bear is in session. Next up Lord Waffleworth and the bedwetters.

  31. Leigh Lowe

    stackja

    #2616119, posted on January 22, 2018 at 10:17 am

    2GB train hit buffer.

    Was it an old buffer?
    Was it Bob Hawke?

  32. Bruce of Newcastle

    ROFL for the day:

    The government’s climate policy review released in December said while there were just 4000 electric cars on Australia’s roads now, there would likely be 12,000 by 2020 and one million by 2030.

    So from 2020 to 2030 we’re going to have an epic EV hockey stick!

    Electric cars set as next shock for MPs

  33. Oh come on

    Bloody hell Annie you don’t think anyone’s going to actually read that?

  34. Anne

    Bonus post.

    yye1fxo ‪01/22/18 (Mon) 06:25:40‬ No.48

    @Jack, MZ, ES, JB, EM, SH, MSM, etc.
    Do you know that we know?
    Do you know that we see all?
    Do you know that we hear all?
    FEAR the STORM.
    NOBODY PLAYING THE GAME GETS A FREE PASS.
    NOBODY.
    Q

    ▶Q !UW.yye1fxo ‪01/22/18 (Mon) 06:28:00‬ No.49

    THE SHOT HEARD AROUND THE WORLD.
    THE GREAT AWAKENING.
    A WEEK TO REMEMBER.
    Q

    ▶Q !UW.yye1fxo ‪01/22/18 (Mon) 06:54:33‬ No.50

    https://www.judicialwatch.org/blog/2015/06/communism-in-jarretts-family/
    Q

  35. lotocoti

    Speaking of the Womyn’s March, I suspect my favourite radfem blogger has been sectioned.
    Which is a shame, because her hot take on the Donald’s Amerikkka would’ve been epic.
    In a ‘shroom chewing, toad licking way.

  36. stackja

    Reports of injuries, three people trapped in Sydney train derailment
    Yahoo7 News / 15 minutes ago
    Emergency services are responding to reports of a train derailment near Richmond Station in NSW.

    Several people have been injured after the train reportedly hit a barricade shortly before 10am Monday morning.

    NSW Fire and Rescue said three people remain trapped at the scene.

    A NSW Police spokesperson told Yahoo7 News that police were at the scene helping passengers off the train.

    “Initial reports suggests 10 patients are being assessed for minor injuries and 2 patients for more severe injurie,” NSW Ambulance said in a statement.

    Multiple rescue helicopters have also been called to the scene.

    More to come.

  37. Bruce of Newcastle

    Poll

    I like the headline:

    Victorian government defends duck hunt changes despite shooters saying it will put protesters in the firing line

    How many points do I get if I pot a protester?

    I confess a conflict of interest so I won’t vote in the poll: conditions here have been very dry and for a couple weeks a bunch of young wood ducks have been coming by for a feed. They’re fun, but I have to hose the driveway afterwards.

  38. Anne

    Sadly no, OCO. They’re oblivious that they’ve been pulled from a burning wreck.

    As long as they’re safe in their beds with remote control and bloggy entertainment.

    Fluoride and food additives have a lot to do with it.

  39. stackja

    Fire & Rescue NSW
    Verified account
    @FRNSW
    15 minutes ago
    RICHMOND | #FRNSW assisting @NSWSES and @NSWAmbulance at train derailment. 3 ppl trapped and a number of injuries. 1 #FRNSW crew on scene and another 6 on their way.

  40. Leo G

    CNN reports that a 1 km long asteroid will lightly strike the earth on 4th February, but it won’t be reported by NASA because Donald Trump.
    Anti-Trumpism is nearing peak stupid.

  41. Leigh Lowe

    How many points do I get if I pot a protester?

    No points and the bag limit is four, with no breeding age females.

  42. Habib

    I think Frydemburgers has stuck his tongue in one too many light sockets. Unfortunately they were powered by renewables, so there would never be a lethal amount of amperage supplied. Takes a pretty good current to croak those lizard brain stems.

    I await with baited breath the arrival of a gazillion electric velocipedes, accompanied by matter transmitters, transporter rooms and a TARDIS in every garage, with a free chook. They’re starting to make Labor look like a better option, if I’m going to get cornholed in the shower I’d prefer it to be by a perpetrator with a hair trigger and little endurance, not some private school pervert whose brief just smuggled in a lifetime supply of viagra.

  43. ROFL for the day:

    Moving to Diesel and gas for electricity generation.
    Electricity for cars.

    We could, of course, just use the liquid fuels in motor vehicles.
    (And save some energy along the way.)

  44. Oh come on

    Anne, how much of your pension do you spend on raw water?

  45. stackja

    Leigh Lowe
    #2616129, posted on January 22, 2018 at 10:31 am
    stackja

    #2616119, posted on January 22, 2018 at 10:17 am

    2GB train hit buffer.

    Was it an old buffer?
    Was it Bob Hawke?

    Probably TA’s fault. Can’t blame DT?

  46. How many points do I get if I pot a protester?

    $270 on the spot fine and 6 points (you have to clean up the mess).

    12 points in 12 months and you get a white van with bull bar and satnav preprogrammed with school crossing locations.

  47. lotocoti

    CNN reports that a 1 km long asteroid …

    So SMOD is the puppet master, not Putin.

  48. Leigh Lowe

    Leo G

    #2616140, posted on January 22, 2018 at 10:43 am

    CNN reports that a 1 km long asteroid will lightly strike the earth on 4th February …

    Hopefully it hits a shithole.

  49. Vicki

    For those Cats interested – tickets now available for Jordan Peterson lecture on Sydney 12 March – available through Ticketek:

    premier.ticketek.com.au/shows/show.aspx?sh=DRJORDAN18

  50. Bruce of Newcastle

    Will SESSIONS drop the hammer?

    Anne – It may take a while. Via Lucianne:

    House Intelligence Committee Will Vote To Release FISA Corruption Memo…

    According to Representative Dave Joyce (R-OH14) the House Intelligence Committee will hold a vote on the release of the four-page Nunes memo that reveals systemic corruption within the DOJ and FBI; including the unlawful use of FISA-702(16)(17) data searches which were part of an elaborate DOJ-FBI surveillance program on the political campaign of Donald Trump.

    Few people have followed the entire story as it unfolded and that has led to large numbers of people mistakenly thinking the process for revealing the classified intelligence -at the heart of the issue- can be easily released. There are also multiple media voices taking advantage of people with limited understanding of the year-long process.

    I do hope Sessions nails these people. At the moment I’m uncertain whether he is playing a long game or is inhibited in some way. Signs suggest the former. However a special prosecutor has to have time to delve through the morass, and therefore would have to be appointed soon. The Dems will squelch any legal action if they get power.

  51. Nick

    CNN reports that a 1 km long asteroid will lightly strike the earth on 4th February …

    Surely they blamed Trump?

  52. Not sure an electric car makes sense at $14,000 per kwh (SA/VIC price)

    A mortgage required for the drive to beach.

  53. Joe

    There are also multiple media voices taking advantage of people with limited understanding of the year-long process.

    First vote to suspend normal rules and processes associated with de-classification. 30 mins. Second vote to declassify memo, 30 mins. Total 1 hour. Add 30 mins to vote to permanently suspend fillibusters.

  54. Joe

    Oh and get rid of the supermajority for procedural votes.

  55. JohnA

    Leigh Lowe #2616141, posted on January 22, 2018, at 10:43 am

    How many points do I get if I pot a protester?

    No points and the bag limit is four, with no breeding age females.

    I doubt if any female protesters would be attempting to breed anyway…

  56. Mater

    How many points do I get if I pot a protester?

    No points and the bag limit is four, with no breeding age females.

    Is it kosher to use a Rottweiler as a bird dog?

  57. No points and the bag limit is four, with no breeding age females.

    And throw back the undersized / oversized ones?

  58. JohnA

    Bruce of Newcastle #2616130, posted on January 22, 2018, at 10:34 am

    ROFL for the day:

    The government’s climate policy review released in December said while there were just 4000 electric cars on Australia’s roads now, there would likely be 12,000 by 2020 and one million by 2030.

    So from 2020 to 2030 we’re going to have an epic EV hockey stick!

    Electric cars set as next shock for MPs

    Am I right in thinking that represents a highly improbable 55% pa compound growth rate?

  59. Anne

    OCO, I would die before I’d ask my fellow citizens to support me.

    I drink distilled water.

    That’s why I’m smarter than you are. 😉

  60. Bruce of Newcastle

    CNN reports that a 1 km long asteroid will lightly strike the earth on 4th February

    Hehe…

    No, an Asteroid Is Not Going to Collide with Earth in February

    In recent days, a few media outlets have reported (in some cases, rather sensationally) that a “potentially hazardous” asteroid will fly close to Earth on Feb. 4. Are the reports correct? Absolutely! Is there any need to panic? Absolutely not!

    It’s true that the building-size asteroid 2002 AJ129 will pass by Earth within about 10 times the distance from Earth to the moon (about 2.6 million miles, or 4.2 million kilometers), according to NASA.

    How can I finish a comment about asteroids without this classic Der Spiegel cover?

  61. Infidel Tiger

    Add 30 mins to vote to permanently suspend fillibusters.

    An awful idea. What happens when the Dems hold the Senate and the Presidency?

  62. Rafe Champion

    SA and Victoria living on our power as usual. Just as well Tasmania has next to no heavy industry or where would they be!

    Can someone give an update on the Aluminium refineries we used to have compared with the present?

  63. Roger

    So from 2020 to 2030 we’re going to have an epic EV hockey stick!

    2030 is the QLD government’s finish line for 50% renewables, meaning QLD will have long since ceased to underwrite security of supply to the eastern grid.

    Just how are those 1000 000 cars going to be charged and who is going to pay the exorbitant cost for it?

  64. Leigh Lowe

    Fuck!
    The asteroid is going to miss Haiti by 4 million kms.
    I guess we’ll just have to let it slowly self-destruct all by itself.

  65. Shy Ted

    Not sure if Frank Elly has returned to RN this morning or they just repeating last year’ shows.

  66. Rafe –
    the gangrene web site http://reneweconomy.com.au/nem-watch/
    provides a graph of the value roonybells (and yes, it exaggerates the roonybell contribution)

    Always worth a look on windless summer night.*
     
     

    *I’m suspicious about the reported solar power provided at night.

  67. Anne

    CNN reports that a 1 km long asteroid will lightly strike the earth on 4th February …

    The news is fake. This would be a targeted Deep State strike. The weapons are real.

    Somehow Trump knows in advance and has already thwarted two live missile attacks so far.

    He keeps saying they’re REALLY STUPID so I hope he’s on it.

    Q
    HRC [8] WWIII [death & weapons real/WAR FAKE & CONTROLLED][population growth control/pocket billions]

  68. C.L.

    Bruce, good post on the FISA affair at the old thread.

    Interesting.

    But it’s only four pages. I’m sure the key points could be leaked without anyone being the wiser.

    And on that point, I find it disgraceful that duly elected congressmen in the United States of America have to sign a declaration that they will obey the secret police. Funny how there is no leftist agitation for an Ellsberg-style expose of the document’s contents.

  69. Mater

    No points and the bag limit is four, with no breeding age females.

    So the safe bet is to target only the male version of the protestors. The less numerous ‘shrunken-shouldered, hollow-chested, chicken legged cuck-atoo’.

  70. John Constantine

    Will top level vicpol hand fifty thousand dollar fines to the duck protestors this year?.

    If they did it to Milo, why not hysterical duck huggers?.

    Will anybody from their media ask vicpol a question about how suddenly police made law has not only erupted into existence but it targets the political enemies of the politicians that hand out promotions and pay rises to the right sort of top level coppers.

    How is this not bribery?.

  71. struth

    How many women voted for Trump again?
    It was 53% of white women, apparently.

    How many females, not counting their betas there with them, are actually in the protests?

  72. OldOzzie

    Australia Day debate: There are 364 other days to wear a black armband

    TONY ABBOTT – The Australian12:00AM January 22, 2018

    “All right, but apart from the sanitation, the medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, a fresh water system, and public health, what have the Romans ever done for us?” asks the John Cleese character in the classic film Life of Brian. It’s worth asking the same question of the British settlement of Australia at the same time as we acknowledge the dispossession of the original inhabitants.

    Sure, not everything’s perfect in contemporary Australia; and it’s possible that Aboriginal life could have continued for some time without modernity bursting upon it, had governor Arthur Phillip not raised the Union flag and toasted the king on January 26, 1788, but it’s hard to imagine a better Australia in the absence of the Western civilisation that began here from that date. The rule of law, equality of the sexes, scientific curiosity, technological progress, responsible government — plus the constant self-criticism and lust for improvement that makes us so self-conscious of our collective failings towards Aboriginal people — all date from then; and may not have been present to anything like the same extent had the settlers fanning out from Sydney Cove been other than British.

    We could all make a list of the things that should be better: trust in politicians, economic competitiveness, standards in schools, safety on our streets (especially in Melbourne), congested roads and inefficient public transport, and — yes — the wellbeing of the First Australians, but is anything to be gained by this annual cycle of agonising over the date of our national day? Besides, there are drawbacks to all the other contenders: too many people are the worse for wear on January 1, the anniversary of the foundation of the Commonwealth of Australia; and Anzac Day commemorates an unsuccessful military campaign (led, you guessed it, by the despised British). So let’s grow up and treat Australia Day as a good time to reflect on how far we’ve come as a country and, for those in public life, how far we’ve yet to go. It’s pretty obvious that the Greens and other far-Left councillors resolving not to have citizenship ceremonies on January 26 are really just telling voters that they’re uninterested or incompetent at the job they were elected to do — which was not to bay at the moon and pretend that facts aren’t facts.

    For his time, governor Phillip was a remarkably humane and enlightened man. There was no punitive expedition after he was speared at Manly. He declared “there shall be no slavery in a free land”. The British government had instructed the expedition to treat the native people “with amity and kindness”. And while many Aboriginal people were exploited and mistreated, seven white men were hanged after the Myall Creek massacre in 1838.

    In some ways, it’s hard to imagine a less auspicious beginning. The 800 convicts who arrived with the First Fleet were a pretty representative slice of Britain’s criminal class.

    Those were tougher times to be sure but few of them had merely stolen a loaf of bread to feed their families. The coming ashore of convicts after official proceedings to inaugurate the settlement was supposedly followed by a drunken orgy of relief after nine months at sea. Yet within a generation, a new society had emerged that was as law-abiding (if not, perhaps, quite as hardworking or God-fearing) as any other. Australia’s early settlement is probably history’s most successful exercise in penal reform.

    The Australia of those days had all that era’s faults: women were kept in their place; dissent was barely tolerated; different races were discriminated against; not everyone could vote; few had access to good education and health care. But the spirit that animated the society thus established has subsequently addressed all these issues, not perfectly, but as well as anywhere.

    The surest sign of our success (and of the decency and magnanimity that characterises our people) is that the vast majority of Aboriginal Australians are as proud of our country as they are of their indigenous heritage. How could any Australian’s heart not beat with pride?

    There are 364 other days of the year when we can wear a black armband and strive to overcome our national failures. For instance, I expect again to spend a week this year trying to come to grips with the challenges facing remote indigenous Australians, and spend another week cycling through regional areas for Soldier On to raise awareness of the problems facing veterans during the annual Pollie Pedal.

    Doubtless, you’ll hear a lot from me this year about ending the emissions obsession that’s sending power prices through the roof and killing industries. I’ll have more to say about scaling back immigration (even though migration is central to our national story) to keep wages up and housing prices down. And regrettably, there will be too many instances of political-correctness-gone-crazy to criticise and correct. But this Friday I will gladly join millions of my ­fellow Australians to declare my faith in what, to us, is surely the best country on earth.

  73. Bruce of Newcastle

    What happens when the Dems hold the Senate and the Presidency?

    We all wear rad suits?

    Why Harry Reid Went Nuclear

    Fed up with an unrelenting stream of blocked nominations, the Democratic leader makes a historic change to Senate filibuster rules.

    So now that the Democrats have bugged every GOP prez candidate and all their staffers using a FISA figleaf and have lied incessantly with help from their maaates in the MSM, what do you think will happen Infi? The gloves on the left side of politics are off.

    It only remains to be seen if they will be brought to account for their illegality.

  74. struth

    Voter demographics
    Voter demographic data for 2016 were collected by Edison Research for the National Election Pool, a consortium of ABC News, CBS News, MSNBC, CNN, Fox News and the Associated Press. The voter survey is based on exit polls completed by 24,537 voters leaving 350 voting places throughout the United States on Election Day, in addition to 4,398 telephone interviews with early and absentee voters.[467] Trump’s crucial victories in the Midwest were aided in large part by his strong margins among non-college whites – while Obama lost those voters by a margin of 10 points in 2012, Clinton lost this group by 20 percent. The election also represented the first time that Republicans performed better among lower-income whites than among affluent white voters.[468] To some analysts’ surprise, Trump narrowed Clinton’s margin compared to Obama by 7 points among blacks and African-Americans, 8 points among Latinos, and 11 points among Asian-Americans. Meanwhile, Trump increased his lead with non-Hispanic white voters through 1 percent over Mitt Romney’s performance, and American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Pacific Islanders shifted their support towards the Republican candidate using the same relative amount.[469] Additionally, although 74 percent of Muslim voters supported Clinton, Trump nearly doubled his support there compared to Mitt Romney, according to the New York Times exit poll.[470]

    So what are these silly moles on about again?

  75. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Says it all, really. Tony for PM.

  76. struth

    Says it all, really. Tony for PM.

    He talked well before he was elected.
    We found out his talk was cheap, and that’s being polite.

  77. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2616179, posted on January 22, 2018 at 11:24 am

    2GB

    Tony Abbott has launched a staunch defence of the First Fleet and Australia Day.

    In his first regular chat with Ray Hadley for 2018, the former Prime Minister discussed the ongoing Change The Date campaign, Malcolm Turnbull’s leadership and a nasty cycling crash he had over the summer break.

    “Australia Day is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate all of the things we’ve achieved.

    “I would also argue Ray that what happened on the 26th of January 1788 was on balance for everyone, Aboriginal people included, a good thing.

    “All of the things that we know and love about modern Australia are the lineal descendants of the attitudes that came ashore with the First Fleet on that day back in 1788.

    “We shouldn’t underestimate the contribution that the Aboriginal ethos has made to the wider Australian ethos.

    “That easy going, stoicism, that laconic style that so characterises Australians is typical of the spirit that pervades indigenous Australia.”

    The former PM also commented on Malcolm Turnbull edging closer to his record of 29 consecutive Newspoll losses, defending the man who knifed him.

    “It’s not the polls that count, it’s the quality of government that counts.”

  78. C.L.

    If Abbott was PM, the date would already be changed.

  79. stackja

    T1 Sydney Trains

    @T1SydneyTrains
    #WesternLine PARTIAL CLOSURE: Services have been suspended between Richmond and Clarendon in both directions due to a train hitting the buffers at Richmond. Buses will replace trains, first of 10 buses will arrive at Clarendon from 11:15

  80. twostix

    “We shouldn’t underestimate the contribution that the Aboriginal ethos has made to the wider Australian ethos.

    “That easy going, stoicism, that laconic style that so characterises Australians is typical of the spirit that pervades indigenous Australia.”

    Oh my god.

    Fucken jonny come lately poms.

  81. Delta A

    My pick for letter of the day from the $Oz:
    The Ahmadiyya Muslim community is holding weekend-long celebrations for Australia Day in all main cities which includes barbecues, dinners, flag ceremonies, community service awards, sports and fun for children

    We are celebrating our eternal optimism, where in a world of negativity we have “you’ll be right mate” attitude; where a stranger is called mate; where we recognise that our individual achievement rarely occurs without a helping hand from others.

    It’s where we unite to celebrate success and to battle adversity. It’s where we don’t shy away from hardships but bond together to tackle it. Where we have the freedom to pursue our dreams, and everyone has a fair chance. So, bring your mate, bring your neighbour, and let’s celebrate what makes an Aussie an Aussie

    Ata Ul Hadi, Berwick, Vic

  82. twostix

    also

    “That easy going, stoicism, that laconic style that so characterises Australians is typical of the spirit that pervades indigenous Australia.”

    is a fraud now.

    Australians, urban in particular, are more neurotic, uptight, judgemental, weak-at-the-knees and materialistic than anyone on the planet.

  83. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    This is what Srr and I have been screeching about for years.

    srr’s moved on, Annie. I guess there always has to be one of every sort left on here.
    One me, one Johanna, one you, one Calli, one Gab, one Delta – where do I stop?

    Hold on, they are all Kittehs. Moon phases people. Individualiteh rulz.
    Oh, and Stimpy of course. He’s a moon phase type also. Honorary Kit. 🙂

  84. Tel

    “We shouldn’t underestimate the contribution that the Aboriginal ethos has made to the wider Australian ethos.

    “That easy going, stoicism, that laconic style that so characterises Australians is typical of the spirit that pervades indigenous Australia.”

    The laconic style that has been mostly destroyed by Nanny State over-regulation of every aspect of citizen’s lives from cradle to grave… constantly henpecked over micro-infringements.

  85. Joe

    “That easy going, stoicism, that laconic style that so characterises Australians is typical of the spirit that pervades indigenous Australia.”

    All male characteristics.

    Australians, urban in particular, are more neurotic, uptight, judgemental, weak-at-the-knees and materialistic than anyone on the planet.

    All female characteristics.

    Females – the destroyer of civilisations

  86. stackja

    Mixed heritage Indigenous only here because of First Fleet: Jacinta Price
    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/…jacinta-price/…/950dcb09cfb4373de2466b3f53961a5f
    3 days ago – Indigenous leader Jacinta Price says she and many other mixed heritage indigenous Australians wouldn’t be here today were it not for the arrival of the First Fleet of British ships in 1788.

  87. struth

    It would have been called Team Australia Day.

    A message to you muzzies above.

    Our aboriginal people are in Mourning because you are here.
    On this national day of mourning could you please dress in bla………………….sorry, you beat me to it.

  88. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    He talked well before he was elected.
    We found out his talk was cheap, and that’s being polite.

    Absolutely, Struth. That is why we keep the Australian Conservatives in reserve.
    Abbot Redux should be given a go though, and he won’t do it with Bernardi, more’s the pity.

  89. OldOzzie

    EDITORIALS
    Public service sickies no joke

    Working conditions in Western countries have come a long way since Edwardian seamstresses fell ill from exhaustion and poor working conditions. Or so we thought. Australian Public Service Commissioner John Lloyd tried to paint a bleak picture yesterday, claiming private sector workplaces were too “tough” in granting sick leave and workers were too scared to take it. It was unrealistic, Mr Lloyd claimed, to expect public servants to take the same amount of days off as their private sector counterparts.

    It would be as ungracious as Mr Lloyd’s view of the private sector to suggest public servants were more … ahem … delicate … than those of us in the rest of the workforce. So we won’t suggest it. We’ll just agree with businessman Tony Shepherd who said Mr Lloyd’s claim was “rubbish’’. Mr Shepherd, who has run companies with 22,000 staff, had never heard of such an idea. To the contrary, many managers share the experience of Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry CEO James Pearson, who has often had to insist that staff who turn up sick go home and take their sick leave rather than soldiering on for the team.

    Mr Lloyd, who has a “toolkit’’ to advise managers on how to boost attendance, admits there’s a problem with sick leave in “some areas” of the bureaucracy after 30 agencies reported an increase in sick days taken last year. Staff in Human Services took an average of more than 15 days. Unscheduled leave overall in the public service was slightly down in the year to June 2017, to an average 11.4 days per worker, compared with 9.5 days in the private sector. Two fewer days off is hardly Brutopia, Mr Lloyd.

  90. C.L.

    The amazing thing is that “far right” Cory Bernardi believes exactly the same things that Paul Keating believes. That’s how far-left wacko Australian politics has become.

  91. Ez

    The former PM also commented on Malcolm Turnbull edging closer to his record of 29 consecutive Newspoll losses, defending the man who knifed him.

    “It’s not the polls that count, it’s the quality of government that counts.”

    That’s not a defence, it’s a backhanded-compliment.

  92. OldOzzie

    JENNIFER ORIEL – Elites beware, a populist tidal wave looms

    Populism is the great evil of the modern age. The word is so dangerous it has become a virtual synonym generator. For populism see: xenophobia, nationalism, right-wing and strongmen. If you believe much of the media, the personification of evil is US President Donald Trump. A year ago, the establishment feared the Trump effect would go global. Free-world citizens had begun to fight back against open borders, hatred of the West, selective racism against white people, Christ­ophobia and big government. However, European voters returned centrists to office in a series of key elections. Pro-Trump parties in Australia performed poorly in state elections. Political elites are celebrating the restoration of order. Yet the conditions historically associated with populist uprisings remain.

    The American Left filled the swamp to commemorate the one-year anniversary of Trump’s inauguration. Left politicians shut down the US government in a bid to prevent immigration reforms. Rather than holding obstructionist Democrats to account, the Left media played a fast hand of blame-shifting to declare Trump culpable. The ABC conceded the US government was shut down during Obama’s presidency too, but went the extra mile to damn Trump by highlighting his party’s control of both houses.

    Despite Trump’s numerous policy wins, anti-Trumpers are determined to damn him. A column for The Washington Post by Jennifer Rubin illustrates the popular media narrative: “President Trump’s ability to ride a global wave of right-wing populism — xenophobic, authoritarian, protectionist and (white) nationalistic — into office was a fluke … the entire ‘America First’ strategy has proven largely unworkable.” Ironically, Rubin’s evidence for the supposed failure of Trump’s America-first policy includes a Gallup poll on other countries’ approval of US leadership.

    The conflation of populism, nationalism, white skin and xenophobia has become increasingly common in left-wing literature since Trump took office. The UN frequently fuels a narrative of bigotry against pro-Western politicians by denigrating them as populists, nationalists and xenophobes. The angry rhetoric will reach fever pitch this year as the UN pressures Western states to compromise sovereignty for the global compact on migration.

    The Trump administration withdrew from the UN migration compact negotiations last month, citing defence of US sovereignty as a major concern. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said: “We simply cannot in good faith support a process that could undermine the sovereign right of the US to enforce our immigration law and secure our borders.”

    As I have written, the UN and other supranational organisations are pressuring Western nations to open borders to anyone who claims refugee status, despite copious evidence that many have lied to gain entry and access benefits. In the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants (which sets the frame of reference for the coming global migration compact), the UN vilifies dissenters as xenophobic. It is lazy and dishonest. A recent UN report shows about half of the world’s refugees are produced by three countries: Syria, Afghanistan and Somalia. Yet the UN will not tackle political Islam as a cause of asylum-seeking behaviour. Instead, it shifts the refugee burden on to states that do not create it while relieving Islamist regimes of their primary responsibility to take care of their own citizens. The Trump administration is smart enough to see the writing on the wall and has acted pre-emptively to protect its sovereignty against the UN and refugee-producing Islamist states.

    The gulf between political elites and the people on border policy continues to produce popular ­support for politicians prepared to defend national sovereignty against supranationalists.

    There is a historical relationship between poorly designed migration and the rise of populist movements. In an incisive analysis for The New Criterion, former British MP Douglas Carswell compared the common characteristics of three historical populist movements. He deduced that populist movements marked the end of ­exceptionalist eras in the Roman, Venetian and Dutch republics.

    The republics shared three central features. Each was an independent entity, meaning that they recognised and defended borders against foreign entities. Second, each established internal constraints by various constitutional arrangements to militate against the concentration of power. Finally, each embraced interdependence, defined as prosperity through trade.

    In Carswell’s account, the promise of prosperity was spoiled by the concentration of wealth and power. Rome’s use of mass slave labour from subjugated territories led to the development of big agrarian enterprises and decline of smaller freehold farm businesses. Power became concentrated as big farming enterprises gave cash to the Senate in exchange for future tax revenue. Populist revolt in Venice was preceded by the development of an elite class that ­acquired great wealth from resource-rich colonies and established rule by heredity. In the Dutch case also, a rapid rise in wealth from foreign regions preceded the decline of the republic. Carswell concludes: “A sudden ­inflow of wealth from overseas upset the internal equilibrium in each of these three republics.”

    While it is difficult to establish causation in the analysis of mass movements and revolution, it ­appears that when the loyalty of political elites shifts from their friends and countrymen to outsiders, the body politic breaks down.

    The combination of cultural and economic xenophilia accompanies the rise of populist revolts. Western governments are soothing the well-founded anger of citizens by economic measures, secure border policy, straight talk on the threat of jihad and clarifying non-negotiable Western values. Thus far, the measures have limited the threat posed to majoritarian democracy by populist parties of both the Left and Right. However, the coming economic downturn could change all that.

    Voters are losing patience with debt-creating immigration policy, big government, perks and pay rises for politicians, inflated staffer salaries, useless green schemes, the bloated public service, publicly funded activist networks in the media and academia, and supranational meddling in our nation’s internal affairs. The burden of debt created by all the useless layers of government and governance are becoming unmanageable. Beyond the beltway, people are struggling with high taxation, soaring living costs and the burden of unprecedented debt. The writing is on the wall.

  93. Roger

    Australians, urban in particular, are more neurotic, uptight, judgemental, weak-at-the-knees and materialistic than anyone on the planet.

    Ramped up urbanisation is a big part of many of the problems we face, from welfare dependency & violent crime to over regulation.

    Decades ago now Bob Santamaria had a vision of a decentralised Australian population clustered around regional cities of moderate size. Alas, no major political party shared that vision. Too late now.

  94. C.L.

    James Woods comments on the left-wing, pro-rapist women’s march …

    James [email protected]mesWoods

    There were like a billion cats in America who were neglected all day today… #WomansMarch2018

  95. Nick

    A good post, Delta. Being Australian has nothing to do with where you are a from, it’s all about accepting it as your home and all that represents.

  96. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Australians, urban in particular, are more neurotic, uptight, judgemental, weak-at-the-knees and materialistic than anyone on the planet.
    All female characteristics.

    Hmm. Let’s see now. Neurotic (how does my bum look in this?), uptight (I didn’t say that, why don’t you listen?), judgemental (don’t wear that tie with that suit), weak-at-the-knees (Colin Firth in the Pemberley Lake scene), and materialistic (diamonds!). Yep. I think I make the grade. 🙂

  97. C.L.

    James Woods comments on the left-wing, [email protected] women’s march …

    James [email protected]

    There were like a billion cats in America who were neglected all day today… #WomansMarch2018

  98. C.L.

    James Woods comments on the left-wing, pro-r-p1st women’s march …

    James [email protected]

    There were like a billion cats in America who were neglected all day today… #WomansMarch2018

  99. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Decades ago now Bob Santamaria had a vision of a decentralised Australian population clustered around regional cities of moderate size. Alas, no major political party shared that vision. Too late now.

    Wasn’t regional decentralization one of Whitlam’s dream policies?
    That worked out well, didn’t it?

  100. BrettW

    Bit of Facebooking.

    Noticed New Idea and Women’s Weekly in newsagent and both had front covers indicating Charles and Camilla have divorced. Both claimed as exclusives. Have they both reached the height of desperation to sell their mags or are the TV, radio and papers covering up the story ?

  101. twostix

    Staff in Human Services took an average of more than 15 days.

    DHS: two weeks ‘sick’, plus four weeks leave, plus a week or so of flex time, plus public holidays and they can also “buy” leave plus massive wage inflation $90-110k all day long.

    We are being absolutely robbed.

    We could wear it if it was only a dollar cost, but when a person or group of people takes advantage of a person or a group of people for long enough, they go from feeling a little guilty about it, to feeling contempt for the group they’re ripping off.

    It goes from massive mental self deception: “we deserve this because we, umm, work really, really hard – once I even worked until 5:30!…”
    to eventually:
    “We deserve this because you are all stupid by giving it to us”.
    That contempt flows into the culture of the organisation.

  102. Whalehunt fun

    Is it kosher to use a Rottweiler as a bird dog?

    Only if taught to target the crotch and to tear the piece out, not merely grip.

  103. Nick

    Voters are losing patience with debt-creating immigration policy, big government, perks and pay rises for politicians, inflated staffer salaries, useless green schemes, the bloated public service, publicly funded activist networks in the media and academia, and supranational meddling in our nation’s internal affairs. The burden of debt created by all the useless layers of government and governance are becoming unmanageable. Beyond the beltway, people are struggling with high taxation, soaring living costs and the burden of unprecedented debt. The writing is on the wall.

    I don’t agree. Middle class welfare, thanks Howard, is rampant. No matter who your average person votes for, whether a Labor, Liberal or PHON, it’s all about ‘how much cash can you give me for my childcare, etc, etc’.

  104. Joe

    You can’t force people to live where YOU want them to live.

    The best you can to is present them with as many choices as are practically possible and the freedom to move within the nation so that they can match their aspirations with their means.

  105. Anne

    Don’t worry, Lizzie. Everything, the full Satanic horror show, is going to be revealed, but gently.

    The QAnon bread crumbs are a genius move on Trump’s part. He could never have red-pilled the world from the Whitehouse.

    Through 8Chan and independent truther journalists he’s getting people to answer questions and join the dots for themselves.

    Soon we’ll have proof that the “Clowns In America” and other agency principals are criminals.

    Then the trafficking, SRA and NWO plan for global genicide.

  106. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    According to Bernard Sale, decentralization is coming to Oz via smashed avocado and feta on toast.

    I note the same phenomenon is this week seen as responsible for the rise in Hobart house prices.

  107. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    oops. Bernie Salt not Sale.

  108. Whalehunt fun

    Why is SBS allowed to run programmes lauding the racist filth Whitlam that wanted to reject all south vietnamese refugees. Why was this scum not buried in a public urinal.

  109. Up The Workers!

    To Bruce of Newcastle at 10.34am, I seriously doubt that they’ll ever have electric cars in the Mendicant State of Weatherdill’s Greater Snowtown. There just aren’t enough second-hand Evereadys and third-hand promises in Musk’s Great Big Carpet-Bag to run them all.

    They’ll more likely opt for the Fred Flintstone/Barney Rubble-mobile from Flim Flannery Motors.

  110. OldOzzie

    Stupidity of the Liberal Party continues

    Electric car plans spark showdown

    Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg has stared down opposition from the Coalition backbench over government support to the electric car industry, declaring the government would continue to support the “very exciting” sector.

    Mr Frydenberg restated his claim that electric cars could be to the transport sector “what the iPhone has been to the communication sector” despite claims from his colleagues they produce more carbon emissions than normal cars.

    “This is a very exciting space, we are living in the decade of disruption, there is global momentum around electric vehicles and I think they will be to the transport sector what the iPhone has been to the communication sector,” Mr Fyrdenberg told ABC radio.

    The Australian reported this morning Liberal MP Craig Kelly, backed by Nationals MPs Andrew Broad and John Williams, would raise government support for electric cars at the next partyroom meeting and argue there should be no further subsidies given to the sector.

    Mr Frydenberg this morning said the government would continue to support the industry.

    “But what we will need to see is some of the infrastructure issues solved because when people come to make a decision about the vehicle they purchase they want to make sure that if they do purchase an electric vehicle that they can plug it in when they go on a long road trip and the infrastructure is consistent throughout the country,” he said.

    “So there are some logistical issues that we will cooperate closely with state and local governments on to ensure more reliability and connectivity in the grid.”

    The Energy Minister is facing a partyroom showdown over his support for electric ­vehicles in Australia, amid industry calls for $7000 tax breaks and concerns the vehicles could have a bigger carbon footprint than ­internal combustion vehicles.

    Mr Frydenberg came under ­attack from conservative colleagues yesterday after predicting the number of electric vehicles would grow from 4000 to 230,000 within seven years, and to one million by 2030.

    He also foreshadowed more support for the electric vehicle ­industry, working towards “better co-ordination of existing and ­future activities to support low emissions vehicles”.

    Mr Frydenberg’s comments sparked a backlash from several Coalition backbenchers who warned against new tax breaks for electric cars, arguing that they were no greener than equivalent petrol or diesel vehicles.

    The issue now threatens to reignite last year’s debate within the government over clean ­energy targets and the role of coal in Australia’s energy future.

    Craig Kelly, who chairs the Coalition’s environment and energy committee, said he would raise the issue in the party­room after parliament resumed next month.

    Mr Kelly warned that the government would have to develop a ­policy on electric vehicles before the next election, and the ­Coalition should resist calls to support the industry.

    EDITORIAL: Heatwave tests grid to limit

    Electric cars made up less than 0.1 per cent of last year’s car sales, and can cost tens of thousands of dollars more than an equivalent internal combustion vehicle.

    Electric Vehicle Council chief executive Behyad Jafari called for a package of measures to reduce electric vehicle prices by up to $7000, including fringe benefits and luxury car tax exemptions, and the axing of stamp duty and registration charges by the states.

    “We need in Australia a ­nationally co-ordinated plan to support the transition from internal combustion vehicles to electric vehicles,” he said.

    Opponents say the environmental benefits of electric cars are overstated, given Australia’s energy mix.

    A study for the Department of Infrastructure and Regional ­Dev­elop­ment more than a year ago found the high reliance on coal-fired power in Victoria, NSW and Queensland meant electric vehicles charged on the grid in those states “have a higher CO2 output than those emitted from the tailpipes of comparative petrol cars”.

    “We need to be very careful that any subsidies or concessions we give to electric cars in Australia will not increase CO2 emissions rather than decrease them,’’ Mr Kelly said.

    “The risk here is you’ll have the rich person in Balmain buying a Tesla, subsidised by a bloke in Penrith who’s driving a Corolla.

    “And the Tesla will have more carbon emissions than the Corolla.”

    Support for electric vehicles is currently modest in Australia compared with nations such as France, Britain and Norway, where consumers can receive ­rebates of up to $15,000.

    Buyers in Australia benefit from a higher threshold before they pay the 33 per cent luxury car tax ($75,526 against $65,094 for other vehicles).

    Some states and territories offer discounts on stamp duty and registration.

    Owners of EVs also avoid the 40c/litre fuel excise, which pays for the nation’s roads, alarming transport planners.

    Mr Frydenberg indicated new concessions could be introduced in time to support what he says will be a transport “revolution”.

    “The Turnbull government looks forward to continuing to work with all state and territory governments, along with consumer groups and industry, on better co-ordination of existing and future activities to support low emissions vehicles,” he said.

    The minister said the carbon footprint of electric vehicles in Australia would improve as more renewable energy sources came on line.

    Australia committed at the Paris climate change conference to reducing its carbon emissions by 26 to 28 per cent on 2005 levels by 2030. The transport sector ­accounts for about 18 per of Australia’s emissions.

    The government is considering how to reduce the carbon intensity of passenger vehicles through the Ministerial Forum on Vehicle Emissions, but the forum, which was convened in 2015, is yet to release its recommendations.

    Mr Broad, who was a fierce ­opponent of the Clean Energy Target and moves away from ­reliable baseload energy, said the jury was still out on whether electric vehicles, hybrids, or some other technology — such as ­hydrogen — would emerge as the best way to lower transport ­emissions.

    “Historically, governments always get it wrong when they try to pick winners,” the Victorian ­Nationals MP said.

    Senator Williams said electric vehicles should have to “stand on their own two feet”.

    The NSW Nationals senator also cautioned against European-style measures to take petrol and diesel cars off the road.

    “What’s the farmer supposed to do? Stand around all day charging their vehicle?” he said.

    Labor energy and climate change spokesman Mark Butler said the government must “take their own advice and finally adopt vehicle emission standards for Australia”.

    “Vehicle emissions standards would boost the supply and ­demand for electric vehicles.

    “Australia is the only advanced country without such standards in place,” Mr Butler said.

    “The government has sat on advice about the need for vehicle emissions standards for over three years, and they still haven’t committed to implementing ­standards.”

    Flagging an election showdown on the issue, Mr Butler said Labor would soon announce a ­detailed policy to cut carbon pollution from transport.

    “Ultimately, to achieve the greatest pollution cuts from ­moving to (electric vehicle), we need to transition our energy system to low pollution sources like renewables.”

    Greens transport spokes­woman Janet Rice said the government should help make electric vehicles more affordable in the short term until they ­became competitive with petrol or diesel cars.

    But it was crucial that they ran on renewable power to ensure they reduced the transport sector’s carbon footprint, she said.

    “If Josh Frydenberg is as enthusiastic about electric vehicles as he claims to be, he should be maximising their potential by forcibly retiring coal-fired power stations and replacing them with clean, reliable and cheap renewable energy,” she said.

    Petrol and diesel SUVs overtook passenger vehicles last year as Australians’ cars of choice, hitting more than 465,000 in sales.

    The car industry said if the government wanted to counter this trend and increase the number of electric vehicles on the road, it would need to make them more attractive to consumers.

    “There is a cost differential at the moment that is quite considerable,” Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries chief executive Tony Weber said.

    Australian Automobile Association chief executive Michael Bradley said sales would be largely influenced by the rollout of charging infrastructure, improvement in battery technology and ­financial incentives to consumers.

  111. EvilElvis

    Am I right in thinking that represents a highly improbable 55% pa compound growth rate?

    Must be when the comcar fleet is up for renewal.

  112. H B Bear

    Bernie Salt

    The third most boring man in Australia.

  113. Roger

    NITV (SBS for indigenous Lefties) running a week of black armband docos in the lead up to “Invasion Day”.

    Your taxes at work, good people.

  114. C.L.

    The ALP has always had a special hatred for Asians.
    Absolutely hates them. Their familial traditions, conservatism, religiosity, respect for elders, modesty, industriousness, reverence for merit – hates them.

  115. Bruce of Newcastle

    During ads in the NBN Nine news I check the EPG. Kudos to SBS today for a couple of marvellous movies. Sadly they are a little late for me since I get up early.

    Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon 11:30pm SBS 1
    Altered States 10:30pm SBS 2 (Viceland)

    Seen the first many times, but it is worthwhile watching over and over. Screening Altered States though is notable. Not a movie that you’d see on a commercial channel. I’ve only seen it once, but it was Alien-level in adrenaline generation. Memorable. A really good ‘what if’ SF thriller.

    One of the marks of an iconic movie are the no-name stars who become mega as a result. Altered States made both William Hurt and Drew Barrymore. (And to stem the usual response…Gorky Park.)

  116. H B Bear

    Relax Roger. You could count the number of viewers on one hand.

    The SBS/abo equivalent of sending “Are you there” messages into outer space.

  117. stackja

    C.L.
    #2616205, posted on January 22, 2018 at 11:50 am

    Labels seem meaningless nowadays.

  118. C.L.

    NITV (SBS for indigenous Lefties) running a week of black armband docos in the lead up to “Invasion Day”.

    Isn’t it cultural appropriation for brown people to use a television network like this?

  119. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Don’t worry, Lizzie. Everything, the full Satanic horror show, is going to be revealed, but gently.

    Good-o. I don’t like rough revelations. Or untimely ones. I’ll give them three hundred years to make their play. In God’s good time, as they say. We’ll all be helots on Soma by then anyway.

  120. H B Bear

    The ALP has always had a special hatred for Asians.

    Unless they are branch stacking with Viets or Chinamen.

  121. thefrolickingmole

    Aging old harlot calls out young harlots for harlot-like behavior…
    Feminists squeal..

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jan/21/brigitte-bardot-me-too-harassment-hollywood

    In a new interview with Paris Match, the 83-year-old was asked what she thinks about the movement. She replied that many actresses flirt with producers to get roles and the vast majority of harassment claims are “hypocritical, ridiculous and without interest”.

  122. Roger

    Katie Hopkins: The exodus from W. European shithole countries like Britain proceeds apace.

    Destinations: US, NZ, Australia, Hong Kong, the Czech republic & even Hungary & Poland.

    Q. for Peter Dutton: Shouldn’t we be actively tapping into this stream?

  123. Joe

    Q. for Peter Dutton: Shouldn’t we be actively tapping into this stream?

    Immigration request denied. Why should we take people who actively voted to destroy themselves? What assurance do we have that they won’t do the same here?

  124. Chris

    Rae
    #2616212, posted on January 22, 2018 at 11:53 am
    Had I employed a woman

    In what capacity?

    Well, not as a skin suit.

  125. Jennifer O –

    European voters returned centrists to office in a series of key elections. Pro-Trump parties in Australia performed poorly in state elections. Political elites are celebrating the restoration of order. Yet the conditions historically associated with populist uprisings remain.

    Worthy observations.
    I would add that in my experience, perfectly reasonable, rational people become vicious, violent, revolutionaries when they find they can’t pay the mortgage, can’t afford (or get) food, fuel, electricity toilet paper …

    Never show a pit pony the light.

  126. OldOzzie

    Mother of all voyages
    PART 2: The fleet sets sail from England, a young child, would-be mutineers and a convict planning escape aboard.

    See it through the eye of a spyglass. Eleven British ships at full sail ­cutting across the Atlantic. Arthur Phillip’s majestic First Fleet flotilla en route to a place where a troubled bush kid named Ned Kelly will one day hammer a bulletproof breastplate and a golden girl named Betty Cuthbert will set fire to a running track and a bronzed larrikin named Paul Hogan will crack jokes atop the Sydney ­Harbour Bridge.

    Turn the spyglass a little to your left and zero in on the smallest convict transport ship in the fleet, Friendship. Hear the sound of a baby cry.

    Convict Susannah Holmes pulls her infant son, Henry Kable Jr, to her breast. The boy is the most famous child in the fleet, the central figure in a convict love story splashed across the papers of Fleet Street.

    Norwich Castle jail in the 1780s was an unlikely place for ­romance to bloom but it bloomed all the same for convicted thieves Henry Kable and Susannah Holmes. They conceived a child in prison, Henry Kable Jr. Shortly after the boy’s birth, Susannah was selected for transportation to Botany Bay. Boarding the prison hulk in ­Plymouth in which the young mother and child would wait to be transferred to the First Fleet, the prison hulk captain spotted Susannah with her five-month-old baby in her arms.

    “The Captain, finding that one of them had an infant, peremptorily refused to take it on board, saying that he had no orders to take children,” said a newspaper report at the time.

    Henry Kable Jr was promptly passed into the hands of Norwich prison jailer John Simpson, who had accompanied the transportees to Plymouth.

    “The frantic mother was led to her cell, execrating the cruelty of the man under whose care she was now placed, and vowing to put an end to her life as soon as she could obtain the means,” the newspaper reported. “Shocked at the non-paralleled brutality of the Captain, and his humanity not less affected by the agonies of the poor woman, and the situation of the helpless babe, Mr Simpson resolved still, if possible, to get it restored to her. No way was left but an immediate personal application to Lord Sydney (chief government architect of the Botany Bay experiment) … He therefore immediately went back to Plymouth, and set off in the first coach to London, carrying the child all the way on his knee, and feeding it at the different inns he arrived at as well as he could.”

    Heroic Simpson, so the newspapers said, was denied initial ­access to Lord Sydney’s office but refused to be turned away and chanced upon Lord Sydney as he was descending a set of stairs. Lord Sydney was reportedly puzzled by the jailer’s sweeping and tragic narrative, but sympathetic too. ­Inspired by Simpson’s spirited quest, his Lordship promised the child would be returned to his mother and, moreover, his father, Henry Kable, would be permitted to join his despairing lover aboard the Friendship. Simpson set off to Norwich to collect Henry Kable Sr and, “travelling three days and nights without sleep”, returned to Plymouth to see mother, father and child reunited just before the departure of the Friendship.

    “It is with utmost pleasure that I inform you of my safe arrival with my little charge at Plymouth,” Simpson wrote in a letter quoted by London’s newspapers. “But it would take an abler pen than mine to describe the joy that the mother received her infant and her intended husband with. Suffice it to say, that the tears that flowed from their eyes, with the innocent smiles of the babe, on the sight of the mother, who had saved her milk for it, drew tears likewise from my eyes. And it was with the utmost regret that I ­parted with the child, after having travelled with it on my lap for ­upwards of 700 miles backwards and forwards.”

    Henry Kable Jr only reminds seasick and miserable Lieutenant Ralph Clark, permanently ­unsatisfied royal marine on the Friendship, how much he misses his own wife and child back home.

    “Did nothing but dream all last night, about being with my most Sincere Betsey and Son,” he writes in his journal. “Oh my god, never did a man long so much after anything than I do to know how they both are, what would I give for a letter from her dear hand but why do I think of impossibilities because I love them tenderly with a sincere hart, as ever man loved woman.”

    Clark is cranky. He believes the Friendship’s contracted sailors are demanding increases in meat ­rations with the sole aim to trade the food for sex with convict women. Sailors have prised an ­access hole in the barrier wall ­separating the female prisoners.

    “The damned whores,” Lieu­tenant Clark writes.

    As the fleet pushes southward deep into the Atlantic, word reaches Arthur Phillip on the Sirius of a mutiny plot on one of the largest male convict transports.

    “I have received a report from the officers on board the Scarborough respecting the convicts, who, it is said, have formed a scheme for taking possession of the ship. I have ordered the ringleaders on board the Sirius … I have no time to enter into particulars.”

    The particulars are that convict chancers Phillip Farrell and Thomas Griffiths have been ­betrayed by one of their own ­potential mutineers. No honour among a ship full of thieves. ­Farrell and Griffiths planned to take moonlight control of the ship with the brute force of a gang of freed convicts. But they sought ­assistance from the wrong man, a traitor who told the Scarborough’s security of the mutiny plot before being promptly transferred to ­another ship for his own safety. Farrell and Griffiths, who steadfastly deny the supposed plot, are made merciless example of. Bound hand and foot and flogged aboard the Sirius, 24 lashes each that cut progressively deeper into the exposed back flesh that won’t necessarily be disinfected by subsequent buckets of saltwater that only serve to “rub salt into the wound”.

    Arthur Phillip instantly refocuses on the mission. He never loses sight of the grand goal of this bizarre social experiment.

    “The sanguine might form ­expectations of extraordinary consequences, and be justified, in some degree, by the reflection, that from smaller, and not more respectable beginnings, powerful empires have frequently arisen,” he’ll later write. “The phlegmatic and apprehensive might magnify to themselves the difficulties of the undertaking, and prognosticate, from various causes, the total failure of it. Both, perhaps, would be wrong.

    “To all it must appear a striking proof of the flourishing state of navigation in the present age, and a singular illustration of its vast progress since the early nautical efforts of mankind; that whereas the ancients coasted with timidity along the shores of the Mediterranean, and thought it a great effort to run across the narrow sea which separates Crete from Egypt, Great Britain, without hesitation, sends out a fleet to plant a settlement near the antipodes.”

    Amid Phillip’s ­increasingly loyal crew on the Sirius stands an ­adventurous American able seaman named Jacob Nagle. He’s a Pennsylvanian who fought for and met none other than George Washington in the American Revolutionary War. He knows a good leader when he sees one. He notes, approvingly, Phillip’s response to an act of brutality aboard the ­Sirius. The ship’s third lieutenant had two crewmen flogged for not being at their designated watch positions. This act of aggression has caused the other modestly paid crewmen to threaten revolt, saying they’d sooner jump overboard than suffer the lash for such relatively minor mistakes.

    “The governor ordered every officer on the ship into the cabin,” Nagle writes. “And told him if he knew any officer to strike a (crewman) on board he would brake him immediately. He said those men are all we have to depend upon and if we abuse these men that we have to trust, the convicts will rise and massacre us all. Those men are our support and if they are ill-treated they will all be dead ­before the voyage is half out and who is to bring us back again?”

    Early June 1787, and the fleet sails into the Canary Islands, 100km west of Morocco. Some 21 convicts have now died on the Alexander, the least hygienic of the ships, its passengers riddled with pneumonia and dysentery. Jacob Nagle is not the only man in the fleet who welcomes a ­supply stopover on the Spanish-­controlled island of Tenerife, where Phillip and his senior officers are treated to a lavish dinner with the local Spanish governor, the Marquis de Branciforte.

    “We all went up to a wine ship to get some wine during the time the governor was gone,” Nagle writes.

    In the cramped and motionless prison deck of the Alexander, ­convicts curse their officer captors for their abilities to freely enjoy themselves on land; they can only dream of the fresh fruits and meats the officers will indulge in and the island’s eye-pleasing Spanish women selling the fruits and meats. In a corner of the prison deck, the eyes of a ­resourceful ­convict named John Powers track and memorise the movements of the sentinels on watch as he ­considers the 30-plus crew members he’ll have to slip past unseen if he’s to carry out a bold and impossible plan forming in his tired mind.

    Meanwhile, buying his wine on land, seaman Jacob Nagle is ­pick-pocketed by a deceptively fast old female beggar.

    “I returned immediately to see after my pouch, having two guineas in it,” he writes. “The landlady took (the suspected thief) into her bedroom and searched her and found the pouch inside of her shift, at the back of her neck. If she had not stripped her naked she would not have found it.”

    Phillip orders heavy stocks of available fruit — figs and ­mul­berries mostly — to ward off the dreaded scurvy at sea. The eyes of the marines on board light up at the sight of fresh beef and bread stocks.

    “Captain Cook had very fully shown, how favourable such ­expeditions might be made to the health of those engaged in them,” Phillip writes. “If the ­ancients made these islands the ­region of fable, and their poets decorated them with imaginary charms to supply the want of real knowledge, the moderns cannot wholly be exempted from a ­similar imputation.”

    On a still night before the fleet is about to sail out of the waters off Tenerife, convict John Powers has had enough of the dank and disease-ridden abyss of the Alexander’s prison deck. Working temporarily above deck he spots an opportunity to scamper undetected to the edge of the Alexander, slides his body over the side and lowers himself down to a small rowboat attached to the mighty transport. He tucks himself low into the rowboat. In the black Tenerife waters he rows hurriedly to a Dutch East India Company vessel sharing sea space with the Alexander. He begs the Dutch East India crew to take him on board as a most-grateful crew member. He’s ­denied. He rows on, desperately searching for alternatives — anything but that hulking ship bound for Botany Bay. He rows into a nearby beach, frantically scrambles over slippery rocks fringing the shore, hides in the darkness of surrounding land cover. But it’s a fool’s quest. There’s no avoiding Botany Bay. There’s no ­escaping John Hunter, fierce commander of the fleet’s lead ship, HMS Sirius. Hunter is a stone-faced survivor of the bloody three-hour, close-range Battle of Dogger Bank in the North Sea during the American War of Independence.

    “A little westward of the town they discovered the boat beating on the rocks,” Hunter writes. “And rowing in to pick her up they discovered the fellow concealing himself in the cliff of a rock, not having been able to get up the precipice. The officer presented a musket at him and threatened if he did not come down and get into the boat he would shoot him.”

    On June 10 the fleet leaves ­Tenerife, heads south in the direction of the west coast of Africa. Five days later officer William Bradley, aboard the Sirius, notes a historic crossing that lifts the ­spirits of the younger sailors who have never journeyed this far south. “At noon crossed the Tropic of Cancer,” he writes. “Had the sun in the Zenith at nearly the same ­instant.”

    Arthur Bowes Smyth, surgeon on the Lady Penrhyn, notes that the ceremony of “ducking” was “performed on all who had not crossed the line”.

    It’s a ceremony that might stretch back as far the Vikings, dunking a fresh sailor’s head in the ocean in honour and appeasement of the gods. The First Fleet sailors dunk their heads in honour of Neptune, moody and fickle god of these treacherous and endless seas. Above deck, sailors and marines alike cheer and jeer the young sailors brave enough to submit to this rope-burning rite of passage. In the prison deck of the Alexander, failed convict escapee John Powers sits motionless in irons. He sits perfectly still because the slightest movement of his body stings his festering lash wounds. He pays no fealty to Neptune. The sea never did anything for him. He wouldn’t be the first English convict ­removed from his homeland to wish fatal peril on Phillip’s First Fleet. Neptune be damned.

    And for any convict who dreams of ending their role in the great experiment, Neptune is about to meet them beyond the equator in the cold unknown Southern Ocean, where the ocean god will try his level best to drag this vast and brutal fleet down to the ­bottom of the deep blue sea, pulling the very ­notion of Australia down with it.

    The First Fleet: A Graphic Journal continues tomorrow in The Australian

  127. Joe

    SA to lead the way with a massacre of the elites?

  128. Anne

    Decades ago now Bob Santamaria had a vision of a decentralised Australian population clustered around regional cities of moderate size. Alas, no major political party shared that vision. Too late now.

    Thank God!

    Sounds like he was a fan of the Globalists’ Agenda 21 vision of Smart Growth Cities. 👿

    Sustainable Development always means Communist control of property and every Council in Australia has adopted ICLEI programs.

    Do you get it yet? This is 1984, Brave New World!

    Short explanation. 👉

    https://youtu.be/VvDu9wC8UNI 4mins

  129. SA to lead the way with a massacre of the elites?

    Dunno. Any large quantity barrel orders from SA?

  130. Roger

    Immigration request denied. Why should we take people who actively voted to destroy themselves? What assurance do we have that they won’t do the same here?

    Because in very many instances they didn’t vote for the destruction of their home countries in the first place and in other cases they’ve woken up to the plan. They are easily assimilated and bring capital and skills with them. It’s a “no brainer” compared to 3rd world immigration, if you ask me.

  131. Joe

    Because in very many instances they didn’t vote for the destruction of their home countries in the first place and in other cases they’ve woken up to the plan.

    Ok. You can immigrate if you can provide evidence that you voted against the destruction of your own country – otherwise sod off.

  132. Des Deskperson

    “DHS: two weeks ‘sick’, plus four weeks leave, ‘

    They get more than that:

    Under the DHS enterprise agreement 2017, a full time employee actually accrues 23 days annual leave for each year of service.

    A full time employee accrues 18 days ‘personal/carer’s leave – encompassing sick leave but also including carer’s leave and leave for other unforeseen ’emergencies’.

    Although they have been increased slightly -used to be 20 and 15 days respectively – these basic arrangements were put in place in the first agency level agreements two decades ago.

    A colleague once suggested to me that the net outcome of agency enterprise bargaining in the APS was to give people more reasons not to come to work.

    Weak and incompetent management is largely to blame.

  133. Roger

    Sounds like he was a fan of the Globalists’ Agenda 21 vision of Smart Growth Cities.

    Good Lord, Anne, that couldn’t be further from the truth.

    Santamaria was a staunch anti-Communist who trusted neither the Liberal nor Labor political elites to deliver a prosperous and peaceful Australia. He probably did more to obstruct the Communist agenda than any other single Australian and he would have dissected neo/cultural Marxism with the same forensic analysis that he applied to the old Marxism.

  134. Anne

    We’ll all be helots on Soma by then anyway.

    We already are on Soma!

    That’s the job of the MSM and the Dopamine addiction at the end of your fingertips.

    Add vaccinations, fluoride, stratospheric aerial injection, smart dust in food and we are all compliant zombies. (Not me)

  135. KevFromCanberra

    This is a pretty mind-boggling article about the British spying on the Trump campaign with agreement from the likes of Boris Johnson and Theresa May. If true it will set the so-called special arrangement between the USA and Britain back for years. Apologies if already posted elsewhere on the site.

    http://yournewswire.com/fbi-leaks-explosive-memo/

  136. Anne

    He probably did more to obstruct the Communist agenda than any other single Australian and he would have dissected neo/cultural Marxism with the same forensic analysis that he applied to the old Marxism.

    What happened to him, Roger?

  137. H B Bear

    SA to lead the way with a massacre of the elites?

    When you are lead by a man like WeatherDildo you’d struggle to find one in Mainland Tasmania.

  138. Bruce of Newcastle

    Katie Hopkins: The exodus from W. European shithole countries like Britain proceeds apace. Destinations: US, NZ, Australia, Hong Kong, the Czech republic & even Hungary & Poland.

    Today:

    Tauranga least affordable city: survey

    Tauranga has out-ranked Auckland as New Zealand’s most unaffordable city, according to a major global study out today which showed Auckland’s improving affordability meant the city moved from the world’s fourth to the ninth most expensive city to buy a house out of 92 major city markets.

    In 2016, Auckland was the world’s fifth least affordable city but last year it slipped to fourth place, tailing only Hong Kong, Sydney and Vancouver as having the least accessible housing market.

    But the pressure appears to have eased markedly now because the latest survey shows Hong Kong, Sydney, Vancouver, San Jose, Melbourne, Los Angeles, Honolulu and San Francisco head off Auckland.

    Auckland had the 4th least affordable house prices in the world last year. Must be all those Hollywood actresses migrating there because Trump666.

    Which begs the question: if they’ve now dropped from 4th to 9th in the latest survey does a certain pregnant PM have anything to do with it? Flee, flee!

  139. Just Interested

    Tony Abbott – yet again proving he’s the greatest leader ever – when not in power.

    As for Craig Kelly, if he has the courage of his conditions, he’ll have simply bag out Minister Joshie in Parliament, good and hard.

    The only way the Executive will ever learn is if the backbench fully revolt.

    And don’t forget, next election, vote Delcon.

  140. Just Interested

    Courage of convictions……..

  141. Anne

    If true it will set the so-called special arrangement between the USA and Britain back for years.

    Kev, the United States of America is a Corporation owned by the City of London.

  142. Leigh Lowe

    Under the DHS enterprise agreement 2017, a full time employee actually accrues 23 days annual leave for each year of service.

    A full time employee accrues 18 days ‘personal/carer’s leave – encompassing sick leave but also including carer’s leave and leave for other unforeseen ’emergencies’.

    Although they have been increased slightly -used to be 20 and 15 days respectively – these basic arrangements were put in place in the first agency level agreements two decades ago.

    Correct me if I am wrong, Des, but wasn’t the increase from 20 to 23 days Annual Leave the result of some convoluted logic that forcing people to take leave between Christmas and New Year was unfair (even if there was no work on), so the best solution was to have an “enforced shutdown” but add the extra three days to entitlement.
    I’ll bet that, before the ink was dry on the EBA, many PS “managers” suddenly discovered that they needed to open between Christmas and New Year so that the indolent could come in between 10:00 and 3:00, take the phone off the hook and play office cricket, and preserve their extra three days leave.
    #draintheswamp

  143. H B Bear

    Tony Abbott – yet again proving he’s the greatest leader ever – when not in power.

    For a complete fraud, Abbott does have strong convictions. A true Lieboral.

  144. Thursday through Monday looks like the Dreadful Heat® is going to be baaaack!

    Given that the grid struggled with two days above 35, this could be interesting.
    We just need Dreadful Heat® to occur Monday through Friday for grid collapse.

    Methinks it is time for the betting agencies to run a book on the timing of total grid collapse.

  145. EvilElvis

    Ffs, enough of this ‘let’s get the best’ from other countries bullshit. Stop all immigration. Now.

    There’s enough Pommy fucking bus and train drivers here as it is. One countries brain drain is another countries public service. Enough!

  146. Chris

    Ok. You can immigrate if you can provide evidence that you voted against the destruction of your own country – otherwise sod off.

    The thing is that a worker or small businessman moving from a country about to spiral down the sh1ffhole to a slightly better business climate for work takes with him not his own vote, but chain migration of dependants. Joe or Jackie moves to get a job or build a business, but takes a wife who worked in the DoT and two daughters who have Facebook, and suddenly the rational voters are two votes in deficit.

    Same for us gweilo immigrants as for the Somalians – in a way.

  147. Habib

    What happened to Auckland was a buck-toothed marxist blatherskite was parachuted into office by a sleazy, bent kanaka over a government proven to be actually almost capable. Should be good buying by the time Peee-Emm Chad Morgan’s ugly, stupid rug money is hatched.

  148. Leigh Lowe

    Katie Hopkins: The exodus from W. European shithole countries like Britain proceeds apace. Destinations: US, NZ, Australia, Hong Kong, the Czech republic & even Hungary & Poland.

    I am carefully considering not so much where I live, but where I might go on holidays overseas.
    France and Italy are still on the agenda but very much skewed away from major cities to more rural and regional areas.
    Further east still appeals greatly … we went Hungary last Northern summer and I detected a real “take no shit” attitude (very few Africans or overt Moozleys mooching around on the streets). Have been to Croatia and ditto. Poland and Czech Republic are also possibles.

  149. mh

    I’m running out of superlatives:

  150. I now have two offspring working in the USA. Both hope to become US citizens.

  151. OldOzzie

    Bonfire Electricity Bills! Two day heat wave burns nearly $400m: $45 per head in Vic, $80 each in SA.

    Fergoodnesssake?! Why didn’t the SA government run those diesels — Could’ve saved millions?
    Businesses everywhere were running their diesels. Yonniestone reports that ” Fairfax press rural Victorian factory had two shipping container sized diesel powered generators running complete with black exhaust smoke.” (They were probably printing newspapers telling everyone of the evil of fossil fuels, and advising they turn their air conditioners down.)

    Can South Australia waste even more money? Yes. it. can.

    Meanwhile, the SA Energy Minister seems proud that the diesels “weren’t needed”. Reader Andrew writes: What if they’re right, and while BHP et al turned on the diesel, Weatherill didn’t, to preserve his “battery miracle” story?? That would mean he has spent $400m on diesel – diesel that is purely decorative and he never plans to use! Electricity at $14,000 a MW? Not an emergency. Load shedding? Not an emergency. Businesses like smelters closed? Not an emergency. Economically, the diesel should be on whenever the price reaches $300/MW.

    Stupid piled on stupid in the quest for virtue signaling. How much is too much to spend to “look green” and achieve nothing?

    Who wants to run a business in South Australia?
    Mark M writes about a story in the Advertiser:

    More than 800 properties in North Adelaide were blacked out just after 5pm on Friday. Businesses and pubs in North Adelaide were forced to close their doors on a night owners say would have been one of their busiest of the week.

    Co-owner of Lion Hotel Tim Gregg said it was hard to have to ask customers to leave after the lights went out. “It is disappointing when you have got people booked in for a meal and you can’t call them because their details are in a system which doesn’t work when the power is out,” Mr Gregg said, sitting in the darkened and empty restaurant area which would have been just starting to fill if the power was on. “We has to ask people to leave because of OH and S issues. It is lucky that it was between lunch and dinner service but the bar would be losing in the thousands of dollars. Mr Gregg said he had more than 40 staff who were at a loose end until the power comes back on.”

    Never forget the point of all this suffering. All these householders, spending up to two or three hundred on electricity for two days, are paying to make the weather nicer in 100 years, according to a theory that no official ever did due diligence on.

    Hands up, who thinks residents would pay this kind of money if the government knocked at their door and gave them a choice? Anyone?

    Jo

  152. Fat Tony

    Anne

    Have you ever been to Toowoomba (100+km west of Brisbane)?

    The population is around 100k+ in a compact city about 10 km across.
    We have everything that the bigger cities have without the traffic and other problems.

    Had Australia been developed with stacks of regional cities, this size and a bit bigger, I am pretty sure it would be better than the current mess.

  153. Farmer Gez

    According to the Andrews government and the inner suburban cognoscenti there is no concern over African gangs.

    My wife and daughter are planning a weekend and a concert in Melbourne soon and deliberately avoided accomodation that was not connected to very public and well lit thoroughfares.

    They are not big conservatives and would not know a site like this even exists but they have received the danger warning loud and clear from various media.

  154. EvilElvis

    Fat Tony, you still need the ‘shitho…’, sorry, world’s most livable cities for the scum to congregate, don’t want them tainting the regional vibe old salt.

  155. Baldrick

    C.L. is spot on. If the AbbottBeast were still P.M. Australia Day would already be changed, along with Constitutional recognition of aborigines, Homo-hoedowns, we’d be importing 14,000 Rohingya’s from Myanmar and Jacinda Ardern would have received an Australian Knighthood.

  156. Nick

    In 2016, Auckland was the world’s fifth least affordable city but last year it slipped to fourth place, tailing only Hong Kong, Sydney and Vancouver as having the least accessible housing market.

    The author has missed an obvious connection here.

  157. Des Deskperson

    “Correct me if I am wrong, Des, but wasn’t the increase from 20 to 23 days Annual Leave the result of some convoluted logic that forcing people to take leave between Christmas and New Year was unfair ”

    LL, In most of the agencies that have a Christmas shut-down, the ‘leave’ over the two or three days over the period is additional to and separate from annual leave and/or flextime. Instead, it is traded off against a short increase in the length of the working day during the year, usually from 7.21 hours to 7.30 hours.

    I’m assuming that DHS doesn’t have a Christmas shut down, I can’t find anything in the EA and the bulk of DHS employees staff Centrelink and Medicare offices which – I assume – have to be operating over the period.

  158. Bruce of Newcastle

    Heh, just went to check the ASX and found they’ve changed their website.
    The colours are a bit softer and now there’s no start line on the ASX graph.
    And the announcements list is one step down in font size…

    I wonder how much they paid their web consultants?

  159. EvilElvis

    7.30 hours Des? I don’t know how they do it! All these years I thought it was 11.30 start to 12.30 knock with an hour for lunch…

  160. DrBeauGan

    “That easy going, stoicism, that laconic style that so characterises Australians is typical of the spirit that pervades indigenous Australia.”

    And some of you want this dishonest arsehole who is claiming we learnt our laconic style from aborigines to return to being PM.

    No thanks.

  161. Mother Lode

    Obama should be shootin’ hoops with all the bros on the inside.

    I suspect that, if any investigation was to coast close to the yammering narcissistic flim-flam CNN would be there with a camera, while Bambi said:

    If if if if if if if I uh uhhh you uhh I knew that uhhh with my understanding of uhhh (some more stammering, umming and uhhing, some rambling anecdote about his life here) special directive uhhh executive order (another rambling anecdote, about climbing a mountain) uhh…you can see section 57 states…uhhh…51 states uhhh breathelyser…(something about his inventing powered flight) uhhh the document uh it pardons uhhhh ermmm uh uhhhhhh uh erm…me.

  162. Oh come on

    A couple of great tweets in response to the Jordan Peterson Channel 4 interview. The first is amusing but, more importantly, a genuinely interesting and original concept, by an incredibly interesting and original thinker who I’ve only become familiar with over the past few months, Eric Weinstein.

    The second is just funny. Here’s the link, but the tweet reads

    Cathy Newman.exe failed to launch. Please update your software.

    Nailed it.

  163. Anne

    Have you ever been to Toowoomba?

    Yes Tony, I agree. It’s plenty big enough.

    In fact I might move there. What’s the climate like?

    Agenda 21 wants to move people out of the rural areas into large walled cities where individuals need permission to travel to the country.

    This was the plan.

    Hopefully we have been given a reprieve.

  164. Rabz

    If if if if if if if I uh uhhh you uhh I knew that uhhh with my understanding of uhhh (some more stammering, umming and uhhing, some rambling anecdote about his life here) special directive uhhh executive order (another rambling anecdote, about climbing a mountain) uhh…you can see section 57 states…uhhh…51 states uhhh breathelyser…(something about his inventing powered flight) uhhh the document uh it pardons uhhhh ermmm uh uhhhhhh uh erm…me.

    Yep, I’ve really missed such “Soaring Oratory™”.

  165. C.L.

    Question to Catapedia …

    The Red Ensign: it used to be the everyday flag until about the 1950s when Menzies passed a law allowing the Blue Ensign to be used by everyone. Now, of course, the BE is the normal, everyday flag and the RE is associated with the Navy. Question: can the RE still be used as the regular Australian flag?

    IMO, the Red is more beautiful.

  166. Leigh Lowe

    LL, In most of the agencies that have a Christmas shut-down, the ‘leave’ over the two or three days over the period is additional to and separate from annual leave and/or flextime. Instead, it is traded off against a short increase in the length of the working day during the year, usually from 7.21 hours to 7.30 hours.

    Ah, thanks Des.
    I assume the figures you refer to are hours.minutes, as in 7 hours 21 minutes to 7 hours 30 minutes?
    Irrespective of the calcs, I will bet that many old PS hardliners simply work the same old hours and put the revised hours on their timesheet.

  167. thefrolickingmole

    They had a review in the weekend australian which shows the future of how all references to stone age Australia will be managed from now on.

    I cant get around the paywall but here is the writer.
    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/author/Geordie+Williamson

    Its the article on the alternative farmer, the article itself isnt that bad, talking about how different land management types can be tried and may be successful.

    But its prefaced by a few paragraphs extolling how wonderfully managed the land was pre-settlement by “fire sick farming creating a vast grain belt” and similar pure shit like that.

  168. Oh come on

    I drink distilled water.

    That’s why I’m smarter than you are. 😉

    Oh, Annie. You don’t know that They put ‘distilled water’ on the bottle, but it’s actually triple infused with gay frog serum? I’m terribly sorry.

    But you know I’m a fan of yours, Annester. You’re good value, I like your shade of crazy.

  169. areff

    I thought it funny that Savage Garden’s Darren Haynes doesn’t want his songs on Cory Bernardi’s playlist, as any third/fourth wave feminist worth her salt would go to town on these lyrics:

    Just a twist in time …and you could be mine
    Just a sip of wine …and you could be mine
    Just a kiss divine …and you could be mine

    Which rather suggests women are simple-minded creatures any suitor must first get drunk in order to kiss, which seals the deal on patriarchal dominance. Women also respond well to force, according to Mr Haynes

    Come stand a little bit closer
    Breath in and get a bit higher
    You’ll never know what hit you
    When I get to you

    Really, someone should notify Spotify and have these incitements to gendered violence removed from their playlists.

  170. Rabz

    Germs Greer really does seem to have been munching on the sensible pills of late:

    Australian writer and second-wave feminist Germaine Greer has hit out at the #MeToo movement, saying it’s “too late now to start whingeing” for many of the women making allegations against men with economic power.

    The 78-year-old also said engaging in sexual behaviour for a job in a movie was “tantamount to consent”.

    What makes it different is when the man has economic power, as Harvey Weinstein has. But if you spread your legs because he said ‘be nice to me and I’ll give you a job in a movie’ then I’m afraid that’s tantamount to consent, and it’s too late now to start whingeing about that.

    From the Oz.

  171. Habib

    The RE is the flag of the merchant navy, the ANF is the only acceptable banner for use outside RAN/RAAF facilities/bases/vessels, the ANF still has a higher standing than the ensigns of those forces.

  172. Oh come on

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #2616304, posted on January 22, 2018 at 1:03 pm
    Google CEO Sundar “tandoori legs” Pichai says he does not regret firing James Damore
    Get them whiteys the fuck out of here

    Don’t be a dickhead, Zippy. I realise the left have made the accusation of racism so cheap it is now virtually meaningless, but being an actual racist is still a bad look. Plus, you’ve chosen the most inept line of attack to use against Google.

    What’s more, your comment isn’t even funny – “tandoori legs”? Wtf is that shit? It fails on all fronts.

  173. cuckoo

    The amazing thing is that “far right” Cory Bernardi believes exactly the same things that Paul Keating believes. That’s how far-left wacko Australian politics has become.

    Absolutely. If you remember that interview series Kerry O’Brien did with Keating, during the Rudd-Gillard-Rudd era, Keating was still advocating real-world economic policies which, by that time, had become unspeakable anathema and heresy in the ALP. And if anyone but Keating had been articulating them, Red Kezza would have been in full 7.30 but-but-but mode.

  174. H B Bear

    But its prefaced by a few paragraphs extolling how wonderfully managed the land was pre-settlement by “fire sick farming creating a vast grain belt” and similar pure shit like that.

    All fire stick farming achieved was to created vast eucalypt near mono-cultures that, when combined with Green-Left land management practices, burn uncontrollably to the ground every ten to twenty years.

  175. Makka

    Great to see my slash-taxes-and-lump-Labor-with-the-deficit strategy is gaining steam!

    Corp taxes same as Singapore- 17%

    Income taxes scaled down to 25% in the top bracket. Not over 5 years. Immediately.

  176. cuckoo

    So now the NHS in Britain does not offer breast cancer screening to women who identify as men. I can remember a skit from Little Britain in which the ghastly drag queen (“I’m a LAY-deee!”) went in for some x-ray and the technician gave him a lead apron to protect his family jewels. The drag queen kept protesting that he didn’t need it because he was a “LAY-dee” and so on. Like the rest of Little Britain it wasn’t actually funny but it made a point.

  177. Nick

    Areff, a good pick up, though as Hayes bats for the other team, the person in the song could be 14 and he’d still get a leave pass.

    https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/pride/7834056/savage-garden-darren-hayes-coming-out-reactions-interview

  178. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Just a twist in time …and you could be mine
    Just a sip of wine …and you could be mine
    Just a kiss divine …and you could be mine

    Which rather suggests women are simple-minded creatures any suitor must first get drunk in order to kiss, which seals the deal on patriarchal dominance. Women also respond well to force, according to Mr Haynes

    Actually he’s a screaming fag, so what he is actually implying is that he gets his male conquests liquored up before making congress with them.

  179. Oh come on

    Germaine Greer is often rather sensible these days. I recall her going on Q&A a few times and raising eyebrows with her unPC views. Not quite in the same league as the irrepressible, unrepentant, brilliant Camille Paglia, though. There’s only one Camille. That woman is a force of nature. One of my favourite quotes of hers was spoken while she was slagging off her numerous feminist opponents, how pathetic and mediocre they were. It ran something like ‘after they are dead, the only thing they’ll be remembered for is what I said about them’.

  180. John Constantine

    If firetruck farming was so good for Australia, why do their left want a ban on using fire to burn off old pasture residue and chemical resistant weeds?.

  181. Fat Tony

    Anne
    #2616315, posted on January 22, 2018 at 1:20 pm
    Have you ever been to Toowoomba?

    Yes Tony, I agree. It’s plenty big enough.

    In fact I might move there. What’s the climate like?

    I find the climate of Toowoomba quite agreeable. Currently 27C, feels like 24C (BOM app).

    Winters can be a little cold – doesn’t warm up through the day too much tho.
    Summers are gnerally quite livable – usually only a week or 2 of hot weather.

    If you load up the BOM app, you can set up Toowoomba as well as your current location – then you can compare in realish time (updated every half hour).

  182. C.L.

    OK – this at Wiki:

    Blue or Red Ensign?

    The Red Ensign was the only flag private citizens could fly on land or have in their possession. By traditional British understanding, the Blue Ensign was reserved for Commonwealth Government use though the Australian Army always used the red ensign until after the 1953 changes, so Gallipoli, the first and Second world wars were fought under the red ensign. State and local governments, private organisations and individuals to use the Red Ensign. As an example, the explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins planted a Red Ensign in Antarctica All schools flew the red ensign until forced to change to the Blue ensign (AKA the Menzies Flag). The official painting of the opening of Australia’s new Parliament House in 1927 shows Red Ensigns and Union Flags being flown. However a lithograph by an unknown artist featuring only Blue Ensigns has since emerged. As the commissioned artist, Septimus Power may have chosen red for dramatic effect or because it was the colour the public used. There was a photograph taken that day which appears to show a blue ensign hanging behind a Union Jack at the easternmost end of the building. The correspondent for The West Australian newspaper would report that: “The sunlight streamed through the crimson of drooping flags”. Altogether this means there is a strong possibility that both ensigns were actually used on the day.

    Despite executive branch proclamations as to the respective roles of the two red, white and blue ensigns there remained confusion until the Flags Act 1953 declared the Blue Ensign to be the national flag as the Red ensign looked too much like a communist flag for the government of the day,the Red Ensign as the flag of the Australian mercantile marine. Red ensigns continued to be used in Anzac Day marches into the 1960s as it was the flag that the soldiers had fought under

    Bring back the red, I say.

  183. C.L.

    Never cheer Greer.
    She’s a contrarian attention addict who knows that in today’s lunatic-left culture a hard-boiled right-of-centre quip or commentary will get her name back in the newspapers. She doesn’t believe in anything.

  184. struth

    Am I hearing correctly?
    Did Teresa May actually agree to a request from Obama to Spy on Trump, with the man who knows no comb Boris up to his neck as well?
    There seems to be very good reasons why Trump wouldn’t go to London, and not for the reasons given.
    Why he’s been giving The PM of Britain a wide birth.

  185. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    incoherent rambler
    #2616294, posted on January 22, 2018 at 12:55 pm
    I now have two offspring working in the USA. Both hope to become US citizens.

    You lucky bugger.

    I hope they are not Californians though.

  186. Mother Lode

    I do wish they would stop referring to tax cuts as being unfunded.

    You don’t fund tax cuts. You cut funding everywhere else so you don’t spend more that you have.

    They make it sound like the current level is the ‘proper’ level and any tax cuts a pure extravagance.

    I swear much of this nonsense started with that shambling retard, Swan. I should love to be his diving instructor and, when he predictably got himself tangled in a metal anchor, got his head stuck up a dolphin’s arse, I would reassure him that I would get him some more oxygen – and promptly pierce one of his lungs, letting sea water in between the plurae. I could explain that since he can’t breath in as much then it is equivalent to him being given more oxygen.

  187. John Constantine

    Firestick, not auto-correct firetruck.

  188. Roger

    What happened to him, Roger?

    Er, well…he died, Anne, of old age. 😉

    Santamaria worked on the principle of subsidiarity (sometimes called a Catholic principle but also a feature of much Christian political common sense in the English & American traditions):

    Human beings flourish best when political authority and power are devolved to the most local level practically possible. Nothing should be done at a centralised level that can be done at a more local level. Thus, for example, the Aust. Const. sensibly limited Commonwealth powers basically to foreign affairs and defence and providing a framework for free trade between the states.

    In short, a concentrated, highly urban population facilitates centralised government in which power is concentrated in the hands of a few and easily corrupted, whilst a decentralised population makes decentralised political power more feasible.

  189. H B Bear

    When Germaine Greer and Paul Keating start making sense you know you really are down the rabbit hole. Time to put away the bong and go for a walk in the fresh air.

  190. Rae

    Chris #2616255, posted on January 22, 2018 at 12:19 pm

    Rae #2616212, posted on January 22, 2018 at 11:53 am
    Had I employed a woman

    In what capacity?

    Well, not as a skin suit.

    Well you are a dunce, Chris. Were you wearing calli’s skin to make that comment? It was her that I asked, not you.

    But, then again, as I’ve previously observed, she is trying to be one of the boys. So is nilk, going by her accusation on the OT that Adern somehow lied about her pregnancy.

  191. Leigh Lowe

    If firetruck farming was so good for Australia, why do their left want a ban on using fire to burn off old pasture residue and chemical resistant weeds?.

    Question.
    If it is a Total Fire Ban, why don’t firemen get the day off?
    I mean, if the government has decreed that there shall be no fire, surely the services of firepersons are not required.

  192. testpattern

    The Federal seat of McMillan, named after Scots mass murderer

    ‘massacres carried out in 1843. Aboriginal Language Group: Brataualang. Aboriginal people killed: sixty (at each of the five sites). Colonists killed: zero. Weapons used: Double-barrelled Purdey. Attacker details: twenty horsemen, known as the “Highland Brigade,” organized by Angus McMillan. In a box titled “Narrative,” these fragments form a horrific tale. McMillan, a local settler, and his group of armed horsemen, all Scots, had, for years, been attacking Aboriginal camps with impunity. In this instance, they attacked five campsites over five days. At one camp, people jumped into the waterhole but were shot as soon as they resurfaced to breathe. One of the survivors, a young boy who’d been shot in the eye, was captured by the Brigade and forced to lead them to other camps. “Human bones have been found at each of these sites on several occasions,” the text notes. “The rampage would fit the criteria of ‘genocidal massacre.’

    https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/mapping-massacres

    McMillan kept a bag of his victims’ human skulls. See McMillan and his infamous bag below, sculpture in Sale Vic.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DUGk9qkVQAAPfli.jpg

  193. H B Bear

    Thus, for example, the Aust. Const. sensibly limited Commonwealth powers basically to foreign affairs and defence and providing a framework for free trade between the states.

    A principle that has been undermined by the High Court, the Commonwealth government and every other political institution from the moment it was passed. Including, of course, by those self-declared protectors of small government the Lieboral Party. Thus rendering the main argument in favour of a federation, competition between the states, dead in the water.

  194. Leigh Lowe

    Why he’s been giving The PM of Britain a wide birth.

    I think that should read “berth” in the interests of restricting harmful mental images.

  195. Indolent

    Anne

    #2616125, posted on January 22, 2018 at 10:25 am

    Today’s Q drop. They’re all going down.

    This is what Srr and I have been screeching about for years. The evil for humanity that was coming down the pike with Globalisation is not easily comprehended. Hillary would have been the last President.

    If anyone has any doubts about the Q post above, I have a challenge for you. We have already lived through the first 8 years of the mooted plan. Can you name one single thing that Obama did which does not jibe with any of it.

    One act which particularly springs to my mind is making Muslim outreach the top priority for NASA. Never mind that boring space stuff.

    This to me is the whole script laid out in black and white and its enough to turn your stomach.

  196. Viva

    Cathy Newman.exe failed to launch.

    I suspect the dynamics of this exchange are repeated endless in domestic arguments across the world. The woman at some deep instinctive level knows she (and all other women) either because of nature or because how society is stitched up have received the shitty end of the stick in many areas. This knowledge leads to the shrill tone of frustration as she is confronted with the relentless logic of the male mind which for thousands of years has been applied to rationalise the aforementioned shitty stick.

  197. Leigh Lowe

    Today’s major Catch 22 conundrum.
    We have a chalkboard shopping list at home.
    We have run out of chalk.
    What to do?
    Catastrophic systems failure.

  198. Farmer Gez

    Fire stick farming destroyed the ice age pine, casuarina and conifer like forests that provided deep shade and leaf litter that broke down slowly to enrich the soil and help even heavy rainfall slowly perculate into the soil.
    These forests produced less run-off but with the benefit of streams that were far less turbid and ran for long periods. Water was less visible in lakes or rivers but held in the soil which produced abundant growth and transpiration leading to higher rainfall.
    Eucalypts impoverish the soil as their leaf litter is rapidly broken down and allelopathic. Our good soils washed and blew into the oceans thanks to fire sticks.

  199. 132andBush

    But, then again, as I’ve previously observed, she is trying to be one of the boys. So is nilk, going by her accusation on the OT that Adern somehow lied about her pregnancy.

    They don’t have to try at being anyone, no need.

    Unlike you, you freak.
    Ankles- lower than a c-$t.

  200. Leigh Lowe

    Our good soils washed and blew into the oceans thanks to fire sticks.

    … and destroyed the GB Reef, which used to extend around Tasmania and across to the Great Australian Bight, and out as far as New Zealand.
    Thanks aborigines!
    Thanks a lot!

  201. Farmer Gez

    You are correct about McMillan Testy.
    He was a right sanctimonious murdering Scottish grafter. The name of the federal seat should be changed and I believe it will be.

  202. Fat Tony

    Leigh Lowe
    #2616358, posted on January 22, 2018 at 2:03 pm
    Today’s major Catch 22 conundrum.
    We have a chalkboard shopping list at home.
    We have run out of chalk.
    What to do?
    Catastrophic systems failure.

    Maaate – you’re fucked.

  203. Zyconoclast

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/mexico-record-homicide-rate-1.4497466

    Mexico had over 29,000 murders in 2017, but homicide rate still lower than some Latin American nations
    The country’s homicide rate was 20.5 per 100,000 people, but still lower than Brazil, Colombia and Venezuela

    Can anyone remember who said they are not sending their best?

    (The USA rate is is about 5)

  204. Top Ender

    Really enjoyed your rants on the last thread Struth.

    About time you penned a book.

  205. Mother Lode

    Catastrophic systems failure.

    Pretty sure that is called a Market Failure.

    There are three steps to go:

    1) The Federal Government will provide you with an allowance for chalk. They can’t stop you from forgetting to buy it, so they will fund you cabcharges so you can go to the shop for when you run out.

    2) You will be forbidden from putting certain foods on your shopping list because bureaucrats do not approve of them. You will be forbidden alcohol, cordials, soft drinks, meat, cigarettes, butter and such. These foods are not illegal, but you are to be deprived of them in return for you allowance. You will have visits from social workers where you have to prove you are only shopping for approved products.

    3) They will keep cutting the remittance because of problems with the system – to wit, they are operated by public servants who viscerally would contest the word servant.

  206. Zyconoclast

    Supermarket jobs are safe as ‘Shopbot’ is given the boot
    London: Fears that robots could take the jobs of humans may be premature after Britain’s first “Shopbot” was sacked after a week of confusing customers.

    http://www.smh.com.au/world/supermarket-jobs-are-safe-as-shopbot-is-given-the-boot-20180122-p4yypv.html

  207. 132andBush

    Firestick warfare was no doubt quite effective.
    Tribes to the north and west having tactical advantage on Catastrophic (TM) fire danger days.

  208. struth

    Bullshit Testes.
    His Abo mate tried to kill him by clubbing him, other squatters were killed and as I said before, grow a fucking brain.
    If you aren’t smart enough to realise you shouldn’t go around killing the white man and his animals, in those days, you got taught a lesson.
    It’s wasn’t 21st century Victoriastan where you can invent new and exciting ways to kill white people (cars and bombs and bullets and removing heads) with no consequence.

    You always conveniently forget who started these things.

  209. Anne

    Oh, Annie. You don’t know that They put ‘distilled water’ on the bottle, but it’s actually triple infused with gay frog serum? I’m terribly sorry.

    OCO, unless the gay frogs are sneaking into my kitchen at night and playing leap frog in my Water Distilation machine I think I’m safe.

  210. areff

    We have everything [in Toowoomba] that the bigger cities have without the traffic and other problems.

    Except decent eateries, unless you include the Spotted Cow, which I most definitely don’t.

  211. 132andBush

    Leigh,
    Ros Kelly recommends a whiteboard.

  212. Fisky;

    Great to see my slash-taxes-and-lump-Labor-with-the-deficit strategy is gaining steam!

    Yep. I’ve been pushing that line for nearly three years on this forum, and in private.
    Made a few converts in pub discussions as well.

  213. Viva

    Western governments are soothing the well-founded anger of citizens by economic measures, secure border policy, straight talk on the threat of jihad and clarifying non-negotiable Western values.

    Que? Which western governments (apart from Trump)?

  214. Anne

    Winters can be a little cold – doesn’t warm up through the day too much tho.
    Summers are gnerally quite livable – usually only a week or 2 of hot weather.

    Sounds great, Tony. I love cold weather!

    I’ll look you up when I get there! 🙋

  215. struth

    Really enjoyed your rants on the last thread Struth.

    About time you penned a book.

    I started life as a baby…………………………………………………………………boom tish

    Thanks Top Ender, coming from you, that’s pretty cool.

  216. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    There are 170,000 fewer retail jobs in 2017—and 75,000 more Amazon robots

    Buggy whip manufacturing numbers are holding up though after a rough period.

  217. testpattern

    ‘who started these things’

    Oh. That’s right, the brit invaders. Now fuck off back to the Perry Saleam branch of your retirement village.

  218. OldOzzie

    Donald Trump inauguration: Supporters pay for Trump skywriting over Sydney

    The letters T-R-U-M-P appeared in the sky just as thousands of women took to the CBD streets to protest against the Trump presidency.

  219. Fat Tony

    areff
    #2616375, posted on January 22, 2018 at 2:16 pm
    We have everything [in Toowoomba] that the bigger cities have without the traffic and other problems.

    Except decent eateries, unless you include the Spotted Cow, which I most definitely don’t.

    Learn to cook 🙂

  220. stackja

    struth TP doesn’t think. Lost cause.

  221. struth

    Anne, I was wandering around the web and was reading that one of the pages of the memo has been leaked?

    What’s the story in conspiracyland?
    You know what I mean, I’m not trying to be funny.

  222. Mother Lode

    The letters T-R-U-M-P appeared in the sky just as thousands of women took to the CBD streets to protest against the Trump presidency.

    Ha!

    Just his name is a trigger.

  223. Fat Tony

    Anne
    #2616379, posted on January 22, 2018 at 2:19 pm
    Winters can be a little cold – doesn’t warm up through the day too much tho.
    Summers are gnerally quite livable – usually only a week or 2 of hot weather.

    Sounds great, Tony. I love cold weather!

    I’ll look you up when I get there! 🙋

    Feel free to use the Sinc Contact Agency

  224. thefrolickingmole

    Ahhh feminists, are there any who werent/arent insane?
    Which begs the question, why would insane people be allowed to police sexuality or have any rational idea how the world runs?

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jan/22/simone-de-beauvoirs-mad-passion-for-young-lover-revealed-in-letters

    The French feminist icon Simone de Beauvoir’s “mad passion” for a lover 18 years her junior has been revealed in a letter published for the first time.

    The letter also shows that she was never sexually satisfied by her partner, the existentialist philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre.

    The writer, who condemned marriage as an “obscene” institution that enslaved women in her classic book The Second Sex, wrote to the film-maker Claude Lanzmann in 1953 saying she would throw herself into his “arms and I will stay there forever. I am your wife forever.”

    In De Beauvoir’s letter from Amsterdam published by Le Monde, she wrote: “My darling child, you are my first absolute love, the one that only happens once (in life) or maybe never.

    “I thought I would never say the words that now come naturally to me when I see you – I adore you. I adore you with all my body and soul … You are my destiny, my eternity, my life.”

    The note is one of 112 love letters written to Lanzmann, the only man De Beauvoir ever lived with, which has been bought by Yale University.

    It reveals that Sartre – who had many other lovers and always kept a separate apartment – was never able to satisfy her physically in the same way.

    Mad as a box of frogs

  225. Makka

    Oh. That’s right, the brit invaders.

    The Brit civilisers you mean. The noble abos are still killing each other and brutalising their kids in droves over 200 years after civilisation arrived. How determined are they to remain cave dwellers?

  226. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Sean Davis

    Verified account

    @seanmdav
    3h3 hours ago
    More Sean Davis Retweeted Mac Forsyth
    Good questions. From the outside, it’s difficult to tell if Sessions is running DOJ, or if DOJ is running him. Regardless, the willful DOJ/FBI obstruction of Congress reflects poorly on him.

    https://twitter.com/seanmdav/status/955242541422727170

    Sessions only achievement since taking office as AG has been to make pot harder to get hold of legally.

    What a deadshit he has turned out to be.

  227. Rae

    They don’t have to try at being anyone, no need.

    So, you have verified that calli and nilk are already blokes. Izzat correct?

  228. Stimpson J. Cat

    Today’s major Catch 22 conundrum.
    We have a chalkboard shopping list at home.
    We have run out of chalk.
    What to do?

    Call Arky.
    He’s a teacher.

  229. Anne

    Er, well…he died, Anne, of old age. 😉

    Thanks Roger. I DuckDuckGo’d him in the interim. He seems okay. 😜

    Master’s thesis- Italy Changes Shirts: The Origins of Italian Fascism. 👍

  230. Top Ender

    Art as politics: France may be sending Britain a tapestry of lies

    BEN MACINTYREThe Times12:00AM January 22, 2018

    The beautiful Bayeux Tapestry, now heading to Britain for the first time, is fake news, French propaganda 1000 years old that gives a false account of the most important episode in 1066.

    Every schoolchild knows that King Harold II, the last Anglo-Saxon monarch, died on the battlefield at Hastings when an arrow struck him in the eye, ushering in the reign of William I. As Sellar and Yeatman wrote in 1066 and All That: “The Norman Conquest was a Good Thing, as from this time onwards England stopped being conquered and thus was able to become top nation.”

    That tale is not quite true. Harold was almost certainly hacked to ribbons by a group of Norman knights who had broken through the Anglo-Saxon lines. The arrow-in-the-eye story was cooked up afterwards to lend political and religious legitimacy to the precarious new dynasty, and then stitched into the great tapestry when it was heavily restored in the 19th century.

    Just about every aspect of the tapestry is open to historical debate, including when it was made, where and for whom. It was not just a work of art but a political tool intended to reinforce Norman rule: the scene of Harold swearing allegiance to William, for example, is depicted as a formal ceremony with holy relics and numerous witnesses.

    Even less subtly, a priapic figure preparing to copulate in the margins sends a message that the supposedly treacherous Harold is about to screw over the Norman pretender by reneging on his promise.

    The most significant element of Norman propaganda concerns Harold’s death. The earliest account of the battle, the Song of the Battle of Hastings (aka Carmen de Hastingae Proelio) written by Bishop Guy of Amiens a year or so after the battle, states Harold was killed by four knights, probably including Duke William himself, and then dismembered.

    The tapestry was created in the 1070s, but the claim Harold had died from a single arrow in the eye emerged only later.

    The Normans had strong political motives for covering up the true nature of Harold’s grisly death and replacing it with the arrow myth. A single, fateful missile, hurtling out of the sky to strike down the king could be presented as an act of God, divine punishment for breaking his oath to support William’s claim.

    The invading Norman duke needed all the support he could get from the Almighty. Harold had been anointed at his coronation, officially blessed by the Catholic Church and papacy. His death had to be seen as a thunderbolt from on high, not the brutal battlefield carve-up that it was.

    “The new king did not want to be implicated in Harold’s violent end,” writes historian Chris Dennis. “Nor could he afford to undermine the legitimacy of his own accession by admitting responsibility for an anointed king’s death.”

    The divinely directed arrow became the official version of events, and by the 12th century it was embedded in legend. The main supporting evidence for that account is the most famous panel in the Bayeux Tapestry, which appears to show the king gripping a golden arrow lodged in his eye, below the inscription Harold Rex interfectus est (“King Harold was killed”).

    But the arrow was almost certainly a later addition, and the apparently mortally wounded figure may not even depict Harold. The king is more likely to be the man lying to the right, being trampled by a charger and diced up by a Norman knight. Etchings of the tapestry made in the 1730s appear to show the man on the left holding a spear, not an arrow. The first sketch of the tapestry with a fletched arrow is dated 1819, suggesting that by that point the tapestry had been updated to bring the pictorial record into line with the accepted myth.

    The arrow itself is odd. It bends to fit under the inscription, in a way that indicates a later addition. Measured against the other arrows stuck in his shield, it does not even appear long enough to penetrate his head. The hand holding it is awkwardly bent.

    Strangest of all is the direction of the missile itself; in order for an arrow, fired high into the air, to enter his eye at that angle, the king would have to have been staring into the sky, or lying on his back.

    The supine figure on the right being hacked at by a horseman surely depicts Harold at the point of death. Indeed, one of the earliest accounts describes a Norman knight slashing the king in the thigh, precisely as in the image.

    Some historians argue that both figures represent the king’s death, in successive images, like a cartoon, being first wounded in the eye and then mutilated. This is unlikely, since the two men are wearing different stockings: plain on the left, striped on the right.

    The most plausible account of what really happened is Bishop Guy’s song, composed in the immediate aftermath.

    Unlike other chroniclers, Guy was independent of the ducal court and had no reason to peddle the official version: he described how William spotted his enemy on the battlefield, summoned three knights to his side and led the posse that then charged at King Harold and chopped him down.

    William’s personal role in the barbaric killing of an anointed king was airbrushed from history, either omitted from later accounts or replaced with the divinely ordained arrow. This became accepted fact after the 19th-century needleworkers embroidered the legend into history.

    Harold’s remains may lie in Bosham, West Sussex, where he was born, or Waltham Abbey in Essex. So far, all requests to exhume him have been rejected.

    The discovery of Richard III in a Leicester car park transformed our view of that king. Digging up Harold might prove, once and for all, that he did not die from a single arrow aimed by God, but under the swords of the French. That would be a long overdue revision of our national story, and one in the eye for William and his all-conquering propagandists.

    The Times

  231. struth

    Oh. That’s right, the brit invaders.

    They settled peacefully.
    That’s why the aboriginal activists call it settlement and not invasion.
    Are you claiming it as an invasion?
    Either way, let he who draws first blood, get some buckshot up their backsides.
    You’d have to be some sort of dumb to be throwing spears and killing peaceful people that have guns.

    If I was a chief of the spear chuckers I would have said, listen fellas, were fucked.

    We’ve been so superstitious we couldn’t get out our own way enough to boil water.
    You’ve all tasted white man’s food, and that’s awesome, some of you have been fixed up by their medicine.
    Their firing spears are far superior to anything we have, and quite frankly I’d like to learn how to ride one of their horses.
    Looks like fun.
    let’s face it, this shit we’re doing is hard and getting us nowhere.
    We’ve been doing the same thing and getting nowhere for years……..

    And many aboriginal people did just that, while a few wanted to chuck spears first, and ask questions later.

    Not bright.

  232. CNN reports that a 1 km long asteroid will lightly strike the earth on 4th February, but it won’t be reported by NASA because Donald Trump.
    Anti-Trumpism is nearing peak stupid.

    A 1 km long asteroid does not “lightly strike” anything. It’s actually going to pass about several moon-distances from Earth. So, close – but no extinction-event-causing strike, light or otherwise.

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