Monday Forum: April 9, 2018

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1,522 Responses to Monday Forum: April 9, 2018

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  1. Leigh Lowe

    Number twos.
    Where do I donate?

  2. Bruce of Newcastle

    Global warming news.

    48,000 Brits dead after worst winter in 42 years

    After a brief mild spell, temperatures are set to dip again in April after the chilliest March in 21 years.

    It is estimated that 20,275 Brits more than average died between December 1 and March

    An additional 2,000 deaths more than average were expected due to cold conditions between March 23 and 31, this winter’s average death rates show.

    Campaigners have called the deaths a “national tragedy” as cold weather victims fatalities could be prevented – especially in the elderly.

    Funny how I seem to have completely missed the Greens and the ABC reporting this in howls of outrage.

  3. Some History

    The #metoo movement catches up with an obnoxious wanker a “hero” of Tobacco Control (prohibitionism).

    UCSF professor faces second sexual harassment lawsuit

    http://www.sfexaminer.com/ucsf-professor-faces-second-sexual-harassment-lawsuit/

  4. Some History

    Background:

    Glantz has been with the current antismoking crusade from the very beginning in the late-1960s. In the early-1970s he created the antismoking organization Americans for Non-Smokers Rights which he headed until only recently. Glantz is a long-time rabid antismoking activist.

    He is promoted as a “professor of medicine” or a “professor of cardiology”. Yet he’s never done any formal medical training. He makes all manner of economics pronouncements. Yet he has no post-graduate qualifications in economics.

    For those not familiar, Glantz is no “professor of medicine”. He is a mechanical engineer that was given a professorship of medicine by UCSF to lend “medical weight” to his bigoted antismoking ranting and raving. He’s a fraud promoting the logical fallacy of “appeal to authority” along with many of his buddies in Public Health and Tobacco Control.

    According to his online biography, Glantz was awarded a Ph.D. in 1973 from Stanford University in Applied Mechanics and Engineering Economic Systems. From this mechanical background, Glantz undertook a postdoctoral year at Stanford University in Cardiology (1975), and another postdoctoral year at the University of California (San Francisco) in cardiovascular research (1977). It appears that the connection to cardiology is in “applied mechanical” terms; he has no formal training in medicine. In 1977, Glantz was given the academic posting of assistant professor in Cardiology at UCSF; this was upgraded to a full professorship in 1987. Glantz is currently a Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research & Education at the University of California (San Francisco). It appears that the “medical” status serves essentially to “legitimize” the antitobacco status and exploit Glantz’s high profile in this area.
    http://tobacco.ucsf.edu/users/sglantz
    http://www.nycclash.com/CaseAgainstBans/Appendix.html

    Glantz is a glorified mechanic. Astounding is that this extremist, neurotic buffoon that travels the world pontificating on the “benefits” of extreme antismoking measures has been allowed to present himself for the last few decades as a professor of medicine or professor of cardiology. There doesn’t appear to be even one instance where a journalist has asked fundamental questions of Glantz – have you had any clinical training in medicine, where did you complete your internship, with which medical board are you certified to practice medicine. The fraud should have been exposed years ago in the MSM along with the academic system in California that bestowed upon him the “professorship”.

  5. Some History

    Stanton Glantz, public health advocate and long promoted as a “hero” of Tobacco Control.
    https://imgur.com/tym6L7q
    https://imgur.com/7R9Mpbd

    When it comes to fanaticism, zealotry, bigotry, there is none bigger – in more ways than one – than Glantz. He is a rabid antismoker/prohibitionist: He hates [tobacco] smoke/smoking/smokers (misocapnist/capnophobe). He’s devoted a career to it and a sick system has allowed him to. He’s also a narcissist and pathological liar for the [deranged] “cause” and for the “moolah”. In Stan’s fantasy world everything can be defined, re-defined, re-re-defined, interpreted, over-interpreted, and tortured to fit this fixed, hateful position.

    This gold-plated twonk has been involved in hundreds of published “research” papers, all of them, quite incredibly, arriving at an antismoking conclusion. In wiser times this fraudster….. this liar extraordinaire would have…. could have…. no place in academia. He would probably be running a used-car lot – Honest Stan’s – where he could give his penchant for shenanigans a good work out.

    But, alas, these are not wiser times. This is the time of tossers, of fools, posing as the wise. This is the time of the jackasses, of massive egos, stumbling over each other trying to “fix” the world. This is the time that brings the [pressing] need for wiser times. But not before much, much havoc is wreaked.

  6. Confused Old Misfit

    The cat came back!

  7. Tom

    Welcome to the troll swamp. The Cat’s advice on trolls is currently being rewritten to welcome them as untouchables.

  8. Motelier

    Good morning from the Gold Coast.

  9. Tom

    Patrick Reed, the unpopular 2018 Masters champion who had the Augusta gallery cheering Ricky Fowler’s late charge, is estranged from his parents. In fact, he had them thrown out of the 2015 US Open. He was also accused of cheating and theft as a college golfer. Whatever — he’s one mentally tough mother I’d want on my team.

  10. H B Bear

    Good morning from the Gold Coast

    Sympathies.

  11. H B Bear

    At least there is plenty of parking though.

  12. Leigh Lowe

    Has Googlery reported back on how he enjoyed his Magnum of Chateau Defeat 2018 (provided free of charge by the Cat contributors)?

  13. C.L.

    Glantz is a glorified mechanic. Astounding is that this extremist, neurotic buffoon that travels the world pontificating on the “benefits” of extreme antismoking measures …

    Sad. He obviously could have done something useful with his life but decided the anti-tobacco Temperance Union answered some deep religious need within.

  14. Gary

    30+ years ago you had some chance of moving up from trolley pusher to at least section manager in a major supermarket chain. Now year twelve minimum.
    In mining as others have said before you could go from driving trucks to site manager I bet that has changed since I left.
    To get forklift licence you do a two day course with a large part is about the “history of forklifts”. How is this productive taking twenty people from the workforce compered to on the job training.

    Most CEO’s and board members are interchangeable with no attachment to the product and little drive to challenge large competitors since they may work for them one day. This is why virtue signalling has become the ‘innovation’ of today. Subsidies, government partnerships guaranty to big to fail bail outs. The lack of enthusiasm in tax cuts and welcoming regulation shields them from smaller competitors that don’t have the capital to cover cost. This also allows then to buy up ideas that would disrupt there place in the market.

    ATO and the post office make job adverts of people doing busy work in sparsely occupied palaces.

    Academic institutions trading intellectual inquiry and reputation for bulk numbers of students.

    Education departments allowing teachers to prey on the captured classrooms of kids to turning then into ideological drones.

    Are these concerns the ramblings of an uneducated dope?

  15. H B Bear

    Turnbull’s only redeeming feature is his incompetence.

    Don’t forget the dithering. I guess that comes easily when you are in the wrong branch of the UniParty.

  16. stackja

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2682057, posted on April 9, 2018 at 10:04 am

    Assisted suicide of the ‘useless’.

  17. Some History

    Here’s Glantz making an appearance in London in 2001 pontificating on the wonders of antismoking. The English were somewhat wary of Glantz but within a few years had signed up to the prohibitionist WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    http://articles.latimes.com/2001/jul/27/news/mn-27179

  18. Turnip

    I just turned down a job interview at the Clean Energy Regulator. Told them I was busy.

  19. Peter Castieau

    Hey Tom,

    Any clue why Reed is estranged from his parents? Great win BTW!

  20. stackja

    2GB

    Tony Abbott has again challenged Malcolm Turnbull to explain why he should remain leader, after hitting 30 Newspoll losses.

    It’s the same benchmark the Prime Minister cited as his reason for knifing Mr Abbott back in 2015.

    Ray Hadley asks the former PM why there shouldn’t be an immediate leadership spill.

    “If it’s a trigger to get rid of one Prime minister, why can’t it be a trigger to get rid of a second Prime Minister?”

    Mr Abbott admits that’s a fair point.

    “That’s a question that really should be posed to the person who made polls the metric. I never did make polls the metric.

    “I thought the important thing was winning elections and in two elections I took 25 seats off the Labor Party and that is what really counts not opinion polls.

    “It really is something for Malcolm to explain, why it applied for me but shouldn’t apply now.

    “The other issues that he sometimes cites, let me just deal with them Ray.

    “He sometimes says it was necessary to get rid of the democratically elected Prime Minister to restore cabinet government, well I ran a perfectly orthodox cabinet government.

    “The other point sometimes made is there was no clear economic narrative, well I completely reject that.”

    Click PLAY below for the full interview

    MP3 linky

  21. Roger.

    This is why virtue signalling has become the ‘innovation’ of today.

    It’s bigger than that: the ‘long march’ has reached the boardroom.

  22. Tom

    No idea, Custard. I guess it’s part of why he’s an angry, driven man, like many of the best are.

  23. Roger.

    “He sometimes says it was necessary to get rid of the democratically elected Prime Minister to restore cabinet government…”

    Maladroit’s cabinet consists of Lucy and Tom.

  24. I must express my naivety in not realising quite how big a sanctimonious hypocrite is Karl Stefanovic.

    Wanted to see NRL highlights from yesterday, and instead got Stefanobitch insisting, nay, demanding, that the government stop ships mid-sail from reaching their destination based on, I kid you not, a 60 Minutes episode. Never mind an investigation will take place, no, not good enough according to Karl.

    No need for due process, you dim sanctimonious fuck, just outrage as though Europe had just been nuclear bombed into the stone age.

    The idiot minister missed the golden opportunity to state that the government would not destroy an entire industry based on flimsy doctored evidence like the previous government did.

    Still, Karl is a dick.

  25. H B Bear

    Karl should stick to stuff he knows something about – dicking bimbos and hanging around with douchebags.

  26. stackja

    Tom
    #2682094, posted on April 9, 2018 at 10:49 am

    Noticeably absent are Patrick’s parents, Bill and Jeannette, and his younger sister, Hannah, who reside in Augusta. They were not invited to his wedding in December 2012, which Jeannette believes is because she and Bill had suggested that Patrick was too young to get married. When Patrick made his Masters debut a few months later, they were not inside the gates of Augusta National. They’ve had no contact with their son since he got married, despite repeatedly emailing him and reaching out through intermediaries. A friend of Bill and Jeannette’s had extra tickets to the 2014 U.S. Open, so with some trepidation, they went to Pinehurst No. 2 and followed Patrick throughout the second round. Justine was also in the gallery, but no words were exchanged. Walking up the 18th hole, Bill, Jeannette and Hannah were surrounded by police officers. They ultimately were escorted off the grounds and had their tournament badges confiscated by a USGA official who, according to Jeannette, said he was acting on Justine’s wishes. (Patrick and Justine declined to comment on any aspect of their relationship with his parents.)

  27. Some History

    Sad. He obviously could have done something useful with his life but decided the anti-tobacco Temperance Union answered some deep religious need within.

    I think the “moolah” has been a primary motivation. Being a high-profile activist, over the years he’s been in charge of hundreds of millions of dollars in “research” funds. Here’s the latest – Glantz’s (UCSF) receiving a $20million grant.

    “Our results will not just provide information that the FDA can use to improve its regulatory decision making,” Glantz said. “They will also help the public and public health authorities around the country and to world to develop better policies to curb the global tobacco epidemic.”

    http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2013/09/108946/ucsf-awarded-20m-federal-grant-tobacco-regulatory-sciences

    Being a narcissist, Glantz loves the limelight. Anti-tobacco has allowed him to appear on TV where he’s been allowed to rant and rave without question. And it’s allowed him to rub shoulders with the self-installed “elites”.

  28. John Constantine

    Will the honourable member for Cox please rise.

    The dribbling orcs occupying their electoral commission for Stalin, not just earnestly redistributing Australia into godless communist gulags, they are having their little renaming jokes as well, going about purging racist settler colonialist history from electorate names.

  29. Roger.

    Bear on the OT:

    Hewson lost “the unlosable election” in 1993, over 25 years ago, and yet the ALPBC still have him as No 1 on the speed dial as a “former Lieboral” commentator.

    He’s also one of their go to commentators on renewables but his interests in that sector are rarely mentioned.

    The ABC: “No bias. No agenda.” Your taxes at work subsidising the Narxist revolution.

  30. Arky

    Are these concerns the ramblings of an uneducated dope?

    ..
    No.
    The slide towards national socialism has gone largely unnoticed by our drooling media whores.

  31. Leigh Lowe

    Hewson lost “the unlosable election” in 1993, over 25 years ago, and yet the ALPBC still have him as No 1 on the speed dial as a “former Lieboral” commentator.

    He was #2 until Fraser bought the farm.

  32. stackja

    Arky
    #2682105, posted on April 9, 2018 at 11:05 am

    MSM are getting what they want.

  33. littledozer

    Probably on the other thread but the AC Vic MP who was sick for the Fire Services bill turned up at a lecture in Washington days after.

    Looks like a deal was struck with Labor to get the bill through while giving the appearance that of supporting it.

  34. Arky

    National socialism doesn’t quite describe it.
    Maybe international crony socialism.
    If we had an investigative media capable of tracking down the global network of corrupt payments, pay for play, fake charitys, foriegn aid, appointments and interferrence we would find a real spider’s web with one or two very large nodes controling everything.

  35. littledozer

    Not supporting it

  36. Will the honourable member for Cox please rise.

    Will the honourable member for Cox please resume his/her position.

    I will tolerate no more outbursts from honourable member for Cox.

    A flaccid argument from the honourable member for Cox.

    I could go on …

  37. Some History

    National socialism doesn’t quite describe it.
    Maybe international crony socialism.
    If we had an investigative media capable of tracking down the global network of corrupt payments, pay for play, fake charitys, foriegn aid, appointments and interferrence we would find a real spider’s web with one or two very large nodes controling everything.

    +1

  38. Arky

    I’m putting this on here too, because I didn’t notice the new thread.
    ..

    They need both, OSC. ‘Sight’ words are useful as English is not a phonetic language in all of its aspects. Try ‘through’ and ‘eight’ for a start. However, rely simply on spatial word recognition (rather as in Asian pictograms) is no way to teach reading and the richness of our language. Do the sight words but also teach him the phonetics of the alphabet, especially if the school is remiss in this, and help him to ‘sound out’ simple words.

    ..
    It isn’t hard.
    Just sit down with your offspring each morning and night and read a book together.
    When you read, insist they look at the words. To do this, just tell them you will stop at random places and ask them to read the next word. If they can’t because they weren’t paying attention you will tickle them until they spew.
    Eventually they can read paragraphs.
    Then whole pages.
    Choose books YOU like. Treasure Island. Wind in the Willows. The Pure Theory of Capital.
    My six year old is currently reading The Wind in the Willows to me, and some book in mandarin about rabbits.
    You have to be able to use a carrot and stick approach.
    If they don’t perform sometimes you beat them with a large carrot.
    Sounding things out is for homos.

  39. Anthony

    Malcolm Turnbull accepts blame for 30 Newspoll losses, says the election is there to be won, but warns the main threat is a perception of disunity

    Today’s Australian

    Wrong, wrong, wrong Malcolm.
    The main threat today is not a perception – it’s a fact. The conservatives of Australia don’t want you. They despise you. They want you to disappear, preferably up your own a—hole!

  40. stackja

    littledozer
    #2682108, posted on April 9, 2018 at 11:16 am
    Probably on the other thread but the AC Vic MP who was sick for the Fire Services bill turned up at a lecture in Washington days after.

    Looks like a deal was struck with Labor to get the bill through while giving the appearance that of supporting it.

    MP ­Rachel Carling-Jenkins too ill for CFA vote, jetted to Washington days later
    Lachlan Cartwright, Herald Sun
    April 9, 2018 9:10am
    Subscriber only

    Last night Dr Carling-Jenkins said she was medically cleared to fly last Monday, after being too sick to attend Parliament the week before.

    She said her airfares were partly taxpayer funded, through the use of her electorate office budget.

    But Dr Carling-Jenkins said much of her pre-planned trip to the US was privately paid for.

    She denied suggestions she had done a deal with the government to be absent during the crucial Fire Services Reform Bill.

    “I have no deal with the government — this is simply not true,” she said.

    “I was genuinely ill.”

    Dr Carling-Jenkins said her opposition to the government’s fire restructure reform plan had not changed.

    She said she was told by the Labor government as an independent she could not get a ‘pair’. Dr Carling-Jenkins also denied that she told Labor Whip Jaclyn Symes, at the start of the Parliamentary sitting week, she would not seek a pair for future absence that week.

    She said the conference’s topic was an issue she was passionate about.

    “The issues around exploitation of women and children through prostitution and pornography is something I have stood up against for a long time. It was even mentioned in my inaugural speech,” Dr Carling-Jenkins said.

    But one senior MP said: “I think most people would consider if you are too sick for parliament, too sick to arrange a ‘pair’, and too sick to explain yourself, you should be too sick to drink wine and party on a taxpayer-funded junket around the world.”

    Shortly after approaching Dr Carling-Jenkins at the summit, the Herald Sun was ejected by event security.

    Her absence had appeared to give the government the numbers to pass its Bill, leading to speculation she had done a deal to stay away.

    But the Bill was defeated.

  41. They want you to disappear, preferably up your own a—hole!

    The current cabinet makes that a crowded space.

  42. Myrddin Seren

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2682057, posted on April 9, 2018 at 10:04 am

    Campaigners have called the deaths a “national tragedy ” as cold weather victims fatalities could be prevented – especially in the elderly.

    Stackja

    Assisted suicide of the ‘useless’.

    The older folk largely voted for Brexit. There will be barely disguised glee in Remainer strongholds – like every newsroom in Britain, every university, every government department – over this culling of Leave voters. I would bet some careful Twitter searching would already turn up Remoaners celebrating the cull of the Leave demographic.

  43. OldOzzie

    The Australian sums it up perfectly


    Liberals in terminal decline leave their dead in charge – Jennifer Oriel

    It’s D-Day in Canberra as that familiar cry echoes through the corridors of Parliament House: “Bring out your dead!” Malcolm Turnbull has cheated political death by making ministers out of the MPs who helped him oust Tony Abbott. But all the PM’s men haven’t been able to reverse the Liberal Coalition’s terminal decline in popularity. Today, Turnbull meets his maker: Newspoll No 30. He will survive, but his government is bleeding out in no-man’s land.

    When Abbott finally succumbed to Newspoll at the 30th blow, he remarked on the folly of running politics by poll popularity. Policy and principle, not polls, were the mark of good government. Turnbull responded with a scorched-earth offensive. After winning the partyroom ballot for leadership of the Liberal Party, Turnbull held a press conference that sealed his fate, saying: “The one thing that is clear about our current situation is the trajectory. We have lost 30 Newspolls in a row. It is clear that the people have made up their mind about Mr ­Abbott’s leadership.”

    Today we learned that the people have made up their mind about Turnbull’s leadership.

    The Liberal left won the battle for prime ministership, but it’s losing the war for good government. Last year, I warned the Liberals were on a road to nowhere. Turnbull rejected ideology as a framework for governing. He attacked Labor for using it as a guiding principle for policy. From London, he mounted an extraordinary attack on conservatives by rejecting the conservative foundations of Liberal Party philosophy. He was above such petty things as ideology and philosophy. Instead, he was going to be a pragmatic prime minister.

    It is easy to preach pragmatism, but very difficult to transform the idea into a workable policy framework. Turnbull’s hubris fell off with his L-plates. Like many lawyers, he excels at fault-finding, but his lack of policy nous shows. He has failed to create a coherent policy agenda to give the government clear direction and unity of purpose. His promise of consultative leadership now looks like an exercise in big government. His vow to restore economic leadership benefits from record high jobs growth. However, unprecedented national debt and big government spending threaten to overwhelm the positive jobs message.

    The PM has created a bloated ministry and overseen a boost to political staffers’ salaries while the nation suffers wage stagnation, record high energy costs and looming rate rises.

    This newspaper’s economic correspondent, Adam Creighton, calculated that it costs taxpayers $45 million a year to fund senior political advisers for federal politicians. Turnbull ­appears to be a rather extravagant PM; Howard had 345 advisers in 2000 while the current government has 442. Turnbull’s 50 ministerial staff spend $5840 a day on travel expenses, which is 87 per cent higher than similar expenditure by Abbott’s staff.

    One of the Liberal Party’s traditional strengths is reducing the size of government by slashing expenditure. But some of Turnbull’s closest allies defend a big spending agenda when it benefits them. Last year, Education Minister Simon Birmingham backed the process that delivered politicians a 2 per cent pay rise on top of the $199,040 base salary. At a time when wages are stagnating, Birmingham welcomed more taxpayer funding for politicians, saying their salaries were “well and truly in check”.

    The government has crafted big spender policies in education and energy without an evidence base to justify it. The billion-dollar Gonski reforms were passed with the support of the Greens, the party of big government and hard left ideology. There is sustained criticism about the Coalition’s energy policy given the cost of electricity to consumers and the inefficiency of renewable technology compared to coal. And there is a lack of policy coherence as infighting continues to derail unity of purpose within the government.

    Despite clear evidence that it is spending beyond its means, the government has a positive economic message to sell in respect of employment. Turnbull has delivered on his promise of economic leadership in regard to jobs growth. Last year, the government delivered 403,000 jobs.

    However, the Abbott government delivered about 450,000. It begs the question of whether the leadership change was worth it.

    Today’s Newspoll result is more than a performance metric. Turnbull made losing 30 consecutive Newspolls grounds for the dismissal of a Liberal Party leader. But whatever the state of factional wars in the Liberal Party, there is little desire in the government or the electorate for another mutiny on Parliament Hill. Turnbull commands the confidence of the party room and he has guided the government through some turbulent waters. He managed the same-sex marriage plebiscite with care. Although he has yet to uphold his commitment to protect religious freedom, he defended democracy and freedom of speech in very hostile and aggressive forums.

    The Turnbull government secured the passage of industrial relations reforms that had been blocked by the Senate and triggered the double-dissolution election. While the ROC and ABCC bills were watered down, they are political credit that can be used during the next election campaign.

    The government continues to master border security and immigration thanks the success of ­Abbott-era policies and Peter Dutton’s expert handling of relevant portfolios. There also are significant achievements for the government in welfare. The cashless welfare card program is yielding excellent results in trials. If subsequent trials prove successful, the model could be a game-changer for the government and challenge the welfarist approach to health.

    While the Turnbull government has achieved some good results, the Liberal coalition remains divided. The revolving-door leadership that marked Australia’s dismal decade has proven fruitless for both major parties. It has damaged the public faith in government required to make democracies stable. As a free world nation in a world of totalitarian states, Australia is a political minority. Our freedom depends on politicians committed to liberal principles, not the cheap statecraft of Machiavelli’s minions.

  44. C.L.

    Career geisha girl Julie Bishop was on morning television describing Tony Abbott as a “backbencher.”
    She was also in a sleeveless dress, which made it doubly nauseating.

  45. Arky

    She was also in a sleeveless dress, which made it doubly nauseating

    ..
    Like a couple of skinned rabbits hanging from a scarecrow?

  46. mh

    Government Ministers are telling us that they have a great economic story to tell. So why has the RBA still got interest rates at emergency levels?

  47. Arky

    Or a weasel with shaved legs.

  48. Myrddin Seren

    Arky

    If we had an investigative media capable of tracking down the global network of corrupt payments, pay for play, fake charitys, foriegn aid, appointments and interferrence we would find a real spider’s web with one or two very large nodes controling everything.

    Seek and Ye Shall Find:

    Why did the Clinton Foundation send a $37 million grant for the Clinton-Bush Haiti Fund in 2010 to a Baltimore post office box when the CBHF told federal tax authorities that its only office that year was in Washington, D.C.?

    The image of G.W. Bush in the linked video spruiking alongside Bubba Clinton for more donations to the Clinton Crime Family has done more than anything else I have ever seen to cast a serious doubt on his faculties.

  49. OldOzzie

    Liberals in terminal decline leave their dead in charge – Jennifer Oriel

    From the Comments

    – best commentary today

    = This lot is paving the way to posts with the UN. That’s why Juile Bishop is throwing our money away with gifts to Rihanna, et al.

    – Malcolm Turnbull is done like a dinner, the trajectory is clear and he must be dumped. Tony Abbott is the man to take over which must include a full policy reset that centres around the dumping of the Paris treaty and all climate/energy policies that have destroyed our energy free market!!

    – Good article Jennifer. Spot on. Mr MT is literally running on empty. He thinks he is doing such a great job and “having so much fun” at same time. He doesn’t have the decency to do what is right for Australia resign and return the position to Tony Abbott. Second time around I’m 100% sure Abbott would do what needs to be done. Dump the RETS and Paris agreement to start with. Polls will then sky rocket…

    – It becomes clearer each day that a secret deal has been done in which Turnbull refuses to go after Bill Shorten and, in return, the newly elected Labor party will go straight to a cleverly worded referendum on the Republic. And guess who will be elected (or appointed) as the first president? Wins all around for the elite but disaster for the rest of the citizenry.

    – So the Coalition should be discussing who they want to replace Turnbull after losing the next election. It might be okay for him to slink off to Point Piper, but the rest of the party still has to carry on. So why not just do it now then?

    – The only bad thing about the long, slow, public, painful political demise of Mr Turnbull and his cabal of poseurs is that it may lead to a government led by Mr Shorten, which will probably be worse for the country.

    “Our freedom depends on politicians committed to liberal principles”…….something the Liberal party has totally forgotten as they drag themselves further and further to the Labor/Greens side of the political spectrum.

  50. Baldrick

    55th Battalion A.I.F

    Ryan, Edward John Francis (1890–1941)
    John Ryan won the Victoria Cross for conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty during the allied assault on the Hindenburg defences on 30 September 1918. During the 55th Battalion’s attack near Bellicourt Ryan, despite heavy fire, was one of the first to reach the enemy trench. A fierce counter-attack drove the Australians back to the Le Catelet line trenches where a bombing party at their rear placed them in a critical position. Ryan quickly organized and led a party to attack the Germans with bomb and bayonet. Reaching the position with only three men, Ryan and his party killed three Germans on the flank and then Ryan alone rushed the remainder with bombs and drove them back across no man’s land. He fell wounded but his action saved a highly dangerous situation and enabled the trench to be retaken.
    The years after the war were not kind to John Ryan who, like so many returned servicemen, found it hard to adjust to civilian life and to keep a job. His circumstances worsened during the Depression when he was on the road for four years. Destitute, in August 1935 he walked from Balranald, New South Wales, to Mildura, Victoria, where he was given temporary work by the local council and shortly after found employment in a Melbourne insurance office where he remained for several years.
    By May 1941, in poor health, he was again tramping the streets looking for work and was taken to hospital the day he was to have started yet another job. He died of pneumonia in Royal Melbourne Hospital on 3 June 1941.

  51. H B Bear

    Disappointing to hear Jennifer Oriel say that the Waffleworth government has delivered 403,000 jobs. Outside the bloated public sector, every job created occurs in spite of government, irrespective of which branch of the UniParty is on the government benches.

    There is a strong case for backing out health and education spending from the National Accounts and any other economic statistic reported.

  52. Roger.

    Sounding things out is for homos.

    My mother taught me the alphabet and the sounds. I then taught myself to read. I could read a newspaper before going to school, asking asking for help if I wasn’t sure how to pronounce a word or wasn’t sure of its meaning. By doing so I navigated the oddities of English spelling, pronunciation and grammar. I was streets ahead of my peers in school, all thanks to phonetics.

    And I’m no homo.

  53. littledozer

    Thanks for that Stackja…..at least the Q has been put to her, should any evidence to the contrary come out

  54. Roger.

    There is a strong case for backing out health and education spending from the National Accounts and any other economic statistic reported.

    Doing so would undermine the narrative that we are now an advanced “service economy”.

  55. Leigh Lowe

    Arky

    #2682123, posted on April 9, 2018 at 11:36 am

    Or a weasel with shaved legs.

    If she developed a Russian accent she could sell insurance.

  56. EvilElvis

    No Gary, you’re not the only ‘uneducated’ bum to see this. If only we’d all kept on at school and had the evergiving ego boost of a degree or higher to continually fawn over despite never actually having produced anything in our lives. At least we’ll always be a ‘professional’ (clutches cert IV closer…).

    Note, some professions are handy, just none related to Gary’s post. Written and authorised by Wayne Kerr of the Severely Headonistic Ideological Team (SHIT).

  57. John Constantine

    Now that their turnfailure is captaining the Battleship Winning Machine on its final desperate suicide run, surely he doesn’t need to wear his good boots to go down with the ship?.

    A good, flash, hardly worn pair of R.M. Williams boots could be a real friend to a pensioner with the power cut off in a bitter winter.

    We must mug the bastard for his worldly goods before he sails off into the sunset.

  58. Roger.

    Turnbull ­appears to be a rather extravagant PM; Howard had 345 advisers in 2000 while the current government has 442.

    Faceless men and women who appear incapable of thinking outside of the box of the current political orthodoxies and bear no public responsibility for the decisions they advise ministers to take.

    Drain the fetid billabong!

  59. Robber Baron

    Jennifer Oriel states: “But whatever the state of factional wars in the Liberal Party, there is little desire in the government or the electorate for another mutiny on Parliament Hill.”

    I’m not so sure about that. I think this is a meme trotted out to protect Turnbull from a challenge.

    Everyone I speak with wants Turnbull out and replaced with anyone, including Abbott.

  60. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Turnbull ­appears to be a rather extravagant PM; Howard had 345 advisers in 2000 while the current government has 442.

    How could you possibly need more than 3 at most?

  61. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Jennifer Oriel states: “But whatever the state of factional wars in the Liberal Party, there is little desire in the government or the electorate for another mutiny on Parliament Hill.”

    We are preparing for PM Shorten.

    We couldn’t give a shit what that rotting carcass known as the Liberal Party does.

  62. Leigh Lowe

    Turnbull ­appears to be a rather extravagant PM; Howard had 345 advisers in 2000 while the current government has 442.

    444 if you include Lucy and her Daddy.

  63. Baldrick

    All said with a straight face by TheirABC –

    Hungary’s re-elected Prime Minister has declared victory after his campaign focused nearly exclusively on demonising migration and a conspiracy theory.
    Viktor Orban said his “decisive” re-election to a third consecutive term and his Fidesz party’s super-majority in parliament was “an opportunity to defend Hungary”.
    During his campaign, Mr Orban focused on a conspiracy theory that the European Union, the United Nations and wealthy philanthropist George Soros wanted to turn Hungary into an “immigrant country”, which struck a nerve, especially with rural voters, in Sunday’s election.

  64. John Constantine

    The Shortfilth is on ABC bully pulpit, talking about being above politics, offering to work alongside the doddering turnbull regime to reform the livestock jndustry.

    How can a once great country produce such rancid and contemptuous chancers to loot our carcass?.

  65. Hungary’s re-elected Prime Minister has declared victory after his campaign focused nearly exclusively on demonising migration …

    Take note SFL.

  66. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    which struck a nerve, especially with rural voters

    Rural voters are the sworn enemy of the media.

    First Brexit, then Trump and now this!

  67. Leigh Lowe

    Hungary’s re-elected Prime Minister has declared victory after his campaign focused nearly exclusively on demonising migration and a conspiracy theory.
    Viktor Orban said his “decisive” re-election to a third consecutive term and his Fidesz party’s super-majority in parliament was “an opportunity to defend Hungary”.
    During his campaign, Mr Orban focused on a conspiracy theory that the European Union, the United Nations and wealthy philanthropist George Soros wanted to turn Hungary into an “immigrant country”, which struck a nerve, especially with rural voters, in Sunday’s election.

    Was in Budapest briefly last June.
    A couple of things were apparent:-
    They hate commo-lefties with a passion (can’t imagine why) and there was a dearth of the adherents of the Religion of Peace loitering around the streets, as we commonly see in cities further west.

  68. C.L.

    During his campaign, Mr Orban focused on a conspiracy theory that the European Union, the United Nations and wealthy philanthropist George Soros wanted to turn Hungary into an “immigrant country”, which struck a nerve, especially with rural voters, in Sunday’s election.

    Ahahahahahaha. A “conspiracy theory,” hey?

  69. Leigh Lowe

    Rural voters are the sworn enemy of the media.

  70. Rural voters are the sworn enemy of the media.

    +1

    They wear check shirts and hate commies.

  71. mh

    The worth of a rural vote is diminishing every day as a result of our immigration program.

    An immigration program designed by the elites.

  72. Snoopy

    BOM and the ABC seem very coy about which records are being broken.

  73. stackja

    The Associated Press
    ‏Verified account
    @AP
    10 minutes ago
    BREAKING: U.S. officials: The United States is not carrying out airstrikes in Syria

    The Associated Press
    Verified account
    @AP
    13 minutes ago
    BREAKING: Syrian news agency: Air defenses confronted missile attack on air base in central Syria, shot down 8 missiles.

  74. Extreme heat predicted for Melbourne this week –

    23, 29, 23, 20, 23, 19, 22

    Wow. Will we survive?

  75. Roger.

    During his campaign, Mr Orban focused on a conspiracy theory that the European Union, the United Nations and wealthy philanthropist George Soros wanted to turn Hungary into an “immigrant country”…

    That was no conspiracy theory.

    Meanwhile, Germans who feel like strangers in their own country are moving to Hungary:

    “Birgit, a 53-year-old cashier and her husband, Udo, a truck driver, are from Frankfurt. It did not take them long to confide that they too are “sick of a country they can barely recognise anymore”.

    “My colleagues and I are afraid when we leave the supermarket late at night, with all the rape stories you hear …” says Birgit, a petite blonde. Her husband, a big man with tattooed arms, asks how much Merkel’s refugee policy “will cost, in terms of attacks and also financially … We’re worried for our children’s future and our pensions.”

    Udo’s father, Johann, an 81-year-old former miner, says what he likes about Hungary, compared to Germany: “We’re in a Christian country here: No mosques or kebabs at every corner.”

    Since late August 2015, when Merkel declared Germany would “make it work” with refugees, the Hungarian realtor says that “it’s been all profits for us. Even if she has recognised her mistake, it carries on … people feel betrayed. They are afraid of bomb attacks, muggings, everything that is happening, but especially everything that could happen later.”’

  76. H B Bear

    Rural voters = non-urban bugmen

  77. C.L.

    SMH says Isarel Folau is “doubling down.”

    Folau doubles down on social media: ‘the persecuted are righteous’.

    The Wallabies superstar has tweeted a Bible verse seemingly alluding to being persecuted for his Christian views…

    A devout Christian, Folau a posted to Twitter late on Sunday the Matthew 5 verse stating, “blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

    “Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.”

    Fairfax reporter editorialises:

    It’s unlikely either side will easily give up their positions but Rugby Australia and the Waratahs will certainly hope Folau can be persuaded not to continue expressing such a controversial stance publicly.

    They hope a Christian can be banned from expressing Christianity in public.
    Folau’s biblical reference nailed precisely.

  78. H B Bear

    err … non-urban non-bugmen

  79. John Constantine

    Watch the coming south Australia redistribution.

    Killing off the rural vote is a prime directive of mass importation of clients for the vote plantations industry.

    Comrades.

  80. OldOzzie

    South African farmers: industrious, English-speaking migrants fit in best – Adam Creighton

    Forget South Africans, more ­Croatians please?

    Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton was spot on that South ­African farmers, terrorised by their own government and ­marauding compatriots, would likely make a strong economic contribution to Australia were they given refugee visas.

    Of course, Australia can’t take all the world’s 23 million refugees, so why not prioritise those who are most likely to fit in economically? That saves taxpayers money in welfare, and minimises social discord.

    It turns out skilled South African and English immigrants have unemployment rates of about 2 per cent, compared to a 5.6 per cent rate nationally, according to a 2014 study by the Immigration Department of arrivals between 2001 and 2011.

    Dutton’s argument applies as validly to the whole immigration program — skilled, family reunion and refugee.

    If we want immigrants with the greatest likelihood of integrating, look no further than southern and eastern Europe, it seems. Of the 31,000 immigrants from there since 2006, none is unemployed, according to estimates in the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ most recent analysis of the country’s ­migrant population. By contrast, of the 70,000 migrants from the Middle East and North Africa, 44,000 were either unemployed or not looking for work.

    Of course, a bigger share of the latter had humanitarian visas. But Croatian refugees had an unemployment rate of 4 per cent, ­according to the 2014 department study, even lower than Chinese immigrants who hold skilled visas (6 per cent). The unemployment rates for Afghan, Iraqi and Sudanese refugees ranged between 19 and 22 per cent.

    Without proper statistical analysis we don’t know to what extent language, education, culture, religion or particular circumstances explain the differences; but they are large. And the burden for taxpayers from those who don’t find work is the same.

    From July our annual refugee quota jumps to 18,750 from 13,750 two years ago.

    If the share of the additional ­intake that becomes dependent on welfare is the same as the share for our existing refugees — 59 per cent — taxpayers will be up for ­another $70m a year, before ­factoring in any health, housing and education benefits. And that excludes the cost of the special ­intake of 12,000 Syrians and Iraqis last year.

    By contrast, only 2 per cent of immigrants holding skilled visas were dependent on government for their income (alongside 12 per cent or 25,000 of those with family reunion visas, which make up about 30 per cent of the 190,000 permanent visas offered each year).

    “The single most important measure of successful settlement in Australia is the ability to communicate in English,” states that 2014 analysis, written by David Smith and Therese Smith.

    So, notwithstanding worker-bee Croatians, why not prioritise refugees, such as South African farmers, who can speak English?

    The government funds more than 500 hours of free English-language training to migrants from non-English speaking backgrounds. But after 10 years in ­Australia, more than a third of refugees still can’t speak English. Even more than 15 per cent of those on “family reunion” visas can’t, according to the department study. Dutton was right to tighten up English-language criteria for new citizens last year; perhaps tighter standards for family reunion visas would make sense.

    Indeed, a quarter, or 186,000 immigrants, from non-English speaking countries since 2006 haven’t had a job since they ­arrived, and three fifths of those hadn’t looked for one. For those from English-speaking countries the figures were 8 per cent, and a quarter. Overall, the unemployment rate for migrants from non-English speaking countries was 7.7 per cent in 2016 compared to and 2.1 per cent for those from the main English speaking countries.

    Australians, along with Canadians, are the most welcoming people in the world. More than 60 per cent of English, French and Italians say they want to cut immigration in their own countries, yet here only 37 per cent believe our intake is too high, according to last year’s Scanlon Foundation’s survey of social attitudes.

    But the share of voters who ­reject the statement “accepting migrants from many different countries makes Australia stronger” has increased from 26 per cent to 30 per cent since 2013 — the share that “strongly disagree” has increased from 7.8 per to 13.4 per cent since 2007. Today’s immigrants are more culturally foreign than they used to be.

    The big Greek, German and Italian populations are dwindling, at the same time as the Indian and Chinese-born populations have grown to 469,000 and 526,000, ­respectively. Immigration from Muslim countries, in particular, has surged. In the past five years the Australian-born population has increased 6 per cent, while immigrants from Pakistan, Nigeria, Syria and Iraq, and Afghanistan have increased by 86, 75, 52 and 38 per cent, respectively, according to ABS data.

    Whether we like it or not, Australians don’t have the same attitude to all immigrants. More than 60 per cent surveyed have a positive attitude to English-speaking migrants and Europeans, double the share well-disposed toward Muslims, according to the Scanlon survey.

    A separate Life in Australia survey taken in 2016 found more than 41 per cent of voters had a “very negative” or “somewhat negative” attitude towards Muslim immigrants, with only 6 per cent offering the same view of Buddhists.

    The government has dismissed calls to slash Australia’s migrant intake. Yet it will struggle to maintain public support for today’s ­levels if too many don’t like the make-up.

    There’s evidence in Europe that greater levels of Muslim ­immigration have produced less than harmonious outcomes, and undermined support for immigration overall. Immigrants who are able to get jobs, support themselves, and integrate socially are more likely to be more widely ­supported.

    Targeting our immigration and refugee quotas towards groups such as South African farmers, who, based on past experience, are more likely to integrate economically, might cause offence to some. But it would bring greater economic benefits, and underpin social cohesion, qualities any pragmatic nation should seek.

  81. Baldrick

    BOM and the ABC seem very coy about which records are being broken.

    More fake news from TheirABC – ‘Record-breaking temperatures …’
    .
    But then this, ‘Extreme heat in early April is not abnormal, but with 34 degrees Celsius in Adelaide on Sunday, 35C forecast for today and 33C on Tuesday, a significant record is in danger. ‘

  82. 132andBush

    Observe the continued redefinition of extreme heat.

  83. DrBeauGan

    How could you possibly need more than 3 at most?

    Three might all disagree with Lucy. Out of 442, the odds that at least one would tell Malcolm what he wants to hear are much better.

  84. H B Bear

    The way the BOM and the ALPBC get excited about certain weather events reminds me of a certain onanistic footwear item furiously polishing a one and half wood. Only to be followed by the inevitable disappointment of reality a couple of days later.

  85. C.L.

    In surprising news …

    Truth about child refugees: Two-thirds quizzed about their age are found to be ADULTS, official report reveals.

    In one year, 65 per cent of asylum seekers assessed after claiming to be juveniles were judged to be over 18.

    It is a Muslim invasion.

  86. Dr Fred Lenin

    Be a lot of soul searching at the turnbull residence today as he is torn between doing the right thing by the party he loves or shelving his mbition for Australia to become one of the worlds many peoples decromatic republics led by elite socialists on behalf of the u,n,communist aparatchiki. No doubt his fellow travelling comrades are in anguish awaiting his decision . That stick insect will be trembling in anticipation of finally achieving her ambition Of making her boyfriend first bloke, like that dysfunctional muppet that was shagging giliard . God! There are some Ultra Wankers in politicsthese days ,you wouldn’t speak to them on a desert island

  87. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Let us pray that Trump is able to ward of the crazed nutters demanding he invade Syria.

  88. mizaris

    WOOT…TOP 100. I identify as top 10.

  89. Leigh Lowe

    Florida Man takes a holiday in Perth.

  90. Lysander

    I’m being kind to Malcolm today. BUT, he is surrounded by like-minded advisers, he wakes up watching the ABC and reading Fairfax. He doesn’t have time for The Australian because it is too big to read and gets in the way of his breakfast waffles. He really wants to watch Bolt but knows Tony and Bolt are mates so he can’t bring himself to do it.

    Every day he goes for his morning walk to the Wentworth cafe where he, as per usual, orders his soy latte and talks to ordinary voters about the plight of their $150,000 kitchen renovations. Later he goes to party room meetings where he and Bishop confirm their wonder and awe in each other. In Question Time, later in the day, he hears all of his colleagues shouting at the ALP (he thinks they’re shouting in his support).

    In the evening he joins The Project (like-minds) for a talk about how talkative he is. Everyone has a gay old time and Mal retires to Kirribilli where he checks his stocks’ trading for the day and Luce(fer) affirms all that Mal has self-affirmed: That is, everyone loves me and if they don’t; they’re idiots.

    Caligula.

  91. Chris

    WOOT…TOP 100. I identify as top 10.

    Your enthusiastic participation is noted on the blockchain record of your life choices and associations.

  92. mizaris

    Off contract at the end of the year, three-times John Eales Medallist Folau has seemingly contravened RA’s inclusion policy.

    Obviously that “INCLUSION” policy does not include Christians…surprise, surprise.

  93. Leigh Lowe

    132andBush

    #2682166, posted on April 9, 2018 at 12:35 pm

    Observe the continued redefinition of extreme heat.

    Ha, ha.
    Was listening to their ABC Garden segment on Saturday morning and their guest said that it was possible to grow warm climate plants in parts of Melbourne because of the “heat island” effect caused by lots of concrete and asphalt.
    Silence from the ABC presenter.
    Bzzzzt.
    Wrong answer.
    The correct answer was “global warmening”, not the very thing which enables dodging up records through weather stations on former rural land being subsumed by suburbia.
    He won’t be back.

  94. thefrollickingmole

    Warning, I read this and now my penis has ovaries.

    Tim “unreadable crap” Winton on why men suck…

    Boys need help. And, yes, men need fixing – I’m mindful of that. Males arrive in our community on the coattails of an almost endless chain of unexamined privilege.
    ..
    Yes, boys need their unexamined privilege curtailed.

    Can we wean boys off machismo and misogyny? Will they ever relinquish the race, the game, the fight, and join the dance? I hope so.

    Too many men are blunt instruments. Otherwise known, I guess, as tools. Because of poor training, they’re simply not fit for purpose. Because life is not a race, it’s not a game, and it’s not a fight.

    All that weeping mangina juice is from the bottom 1/3 of the article.

  95. H B Bear

    One might argue that Rugby Australia should concentrate on running its now non-national competition but I’m not sure it would make any difference.

  96. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Florida Man takes a holiday in Perth.

    Say what you will about that commuter, but that took balls.

  97. Chris

    I’m being kind to Malcolm today. BUT

    Love your work Lysander.

  98. Chris

    Tim “unreadable crap” Winton on why men suck…

    A literary tugger, unworthy of the effort of paying to read his work, with a track record of denigrating his past neighbours to make himself look cool, writes stupid sludge in the Guardian.

    I am shocked.

  99. Leigh Lowe

    Say what you will about that commuter, but that took balls.

    Which he very nearly left on the bridge pylon.

  100. Comment in Breitbart about proposed London knife control –

    There is no end to this silly game until they outlaw pointy sticks and rocks

  101. Leigh Lowe

    A literary tugger, unworthy of the effort of paying to read his work, with a track record of denigrating his past neighbours to make himself look cool, writes more stupid sludge.
    This time in the Guardian.

  102. Snoopy

    Because life is not a race, it’s not a game, and it’s not a fight.

    It’s not just an opportunity to read turgid tosh either.

  103. Snoopy

    Tim Winton is the very model of a modern West Australian.

    Sad.

  104. Bad Samaritan

    OK, so now it’s 30 poll losses in a row for the LNP under MT, or 60 in a row combined under Tony and then MT. That means Labor has won every poll since May 2013. Hmmm….

    Of course, we could pay some exagerrated attention to this, or else ask how come, with nought but gloom and doom, there’ve been two actual elections during this period, with one being a massive slaughter for Labor in September 2013 and the other another, much narrower, defeat too.

    Sure Malcolm’s a tosser, and a loser, and just bad in general, but polls should always be taken with a few grains of salt. Keep an eye on the betting. Cheers.

  105. H B Bear

    Tim Winton is the very model of a modern West Australian.

    Oi. Maybe if he went FI-FO. I’d be happy if he just FOed.

  106. Trader Perth

    As a West. Aussie, the best I can say about Tim Winton is that he’s a ‘rare’ individual who happens to have a West. Aust. address.

  107. Peter Campion

    TheirABC

    Quarterly reports of complaints data http://about.abc.net.au/talk-to-the-abc/feedback-and-enquiries/reports-and-reviews/

    From 2017

    Total complaints:
    Q1 – 7998; Q2 – 8680; Q3 – 5313; Q4 – 4968
    2017 grand total complaints – 26,959

    Complaints upheld:
    Q1 – 11; Q2 – 46; Q3 – 59; Q4 – 14
    2017 total complaints upheld – 130

    Proles are wrong to complain 99.5 percent of the time.

    Comrades

  108. Leigh Lowe

    Snoopy

    #2682189, posted on April 9, 2018 at 1:20 pm

    Tim Winton is the very model of a modern West Australian.

    Tim Winton.
    Tim Minchin.
    Should I go on …

  109. feelthebern

    Florida Man takes a holiday in Perth.

    How long did you practice for that IT?

  110. feelthebern

    Tim Minchin.

    Surely he is next in line for AOTY?
    Because if it wasn’t for his ditty, Pell would never have been convicted in the court of public opinion.

  111. Chris

    he’s a ‘rare’ individual who happens to have a West. Aust. address.

    His brother Andrew Winton, is a most enjoyable musician and was a very effective chaplain of the school my kids went to.
    Considering the extreme limitations placed on workers in the school chaplain program , that was a very impressive contribution to our lives.

  112. Muddy

    Have I missed it? Have I missed it?

    Military.com |4 Apr 2018 |By Amy Bushatz

    If you’re an Ellen DeGeneres Show fan like us, you should plan to tune in on April 9.

    That’s because male military spouse and the newest Armed Forces Insurance Navy Spouse of the Year, Brian Alvarado, and his husband Matthew are being featured as guests, and we just know it’s going to be amazing.

    Brian was first contacted about the potential appearance about a month ago, shortly after he found out that he’d been selected as the 2018 Navy Spouse of the Year.

    “That was a surreal moment in my life,” he said.

    Over the next several weeks Brian and Matthew had conversations with a series of Ellen producers to make sure the couple was a good fit for the show. And this week they traveled from San Diego to Ellen’s Burbank studio for the filming.

    Like any good sons, Brian and Matthew took their moms to be guests in the audience. And when it came time for them to go out for their segment, he thought he would be fine.

    “I’m like ‘I’ve totally got this’ — and the music started to play and the stage manager said go … and then there was Ellen and she was so beautiful and she smiled so big and I just lost everything I planned to say,” he said. “Overall it was one of the absolutely coolest experiences.”

    Brian said the highlight of appearing on the show was being able to share on a national stage some of the positive aspects of the military family experience.

    “We hear all too often in the military community a sad story and we don’t often hear the great stories, and the success and the uplifting and positive experiences that happen in the military family,” he said. “And it was awesome to be able to share a positive experience with Ellen.”

    He said appearing on the show was also surreal as a gay male spouse. A handful of years ago, he said, they weren’t even permitted to be married in the military. But this week he not only was able to be a military family member openly with his husband, he was able to talk about it on a truly national stage.

    He said experiencing those rights and the military community has given him a sense of responsibility to give back — and he takes it seriously.

    “I believe with all of my heart with those rights come the responsibility to engage, to give back and to participate in the military community as a whole,” he said.

    Check your local TV schedule and make sure to catch Brian and Matthew on Ellen April 9!

  113. John Constantine

    Life is not a competition for their left, it is a trial and you must self critique. To those in favour goes the loot, their gulags fill with the unsound and the gravepits fill with those that fight the framed agenda.

  114. Leigh Lowe

    I was told by a hard-faced bint on SkyNews over the weekend (might have been David Speers) that Twump’s Twade Armageddon was going to decimate the ASX on Monday morning.
    Even at the time, the futures were only down about 33 points, so not great, but not the end of the world.
    What has the market actually done?
    Well, started a bit erratically and is nor forging along, up by a bit over 20 points.
    Most tripe emanating from TV newsrooms, particularly on weekends, is no more than the wet-dreams of Gen Y activists spayed onto an autocue and licked off by presenters like Speers.

  115. DrBeauGan

    If you’re an Ellen DeGeneres Show fan like us, you should plan to tune in on April 9.

    Oh gawd.

  116. Leigh Lowe

    sprayed.
    but maybe “spayed” works.

  117. thefrollickingmole

    Tim Winton isnt from WA.
    Hes from Fremantle.

    Thats a whole separate universe from WA.

  118. Muddy

    Trump to Congress: Fund my promised Wall Around Australia (WAA) or I’ll release the Trumble.

    *No link, but you can trust me on this one.

  119. feelthebern

    Geez Leigh.
    Some decorum.
    The Cat isn’t that kind of blog…not until after 10pm, when the night shift turns up.

  120. Leigh Lowe

    “I’m like ‘I’ve totally got this’ — and the music started to play and the stage manager said go … and then there was Ellen and she was so beautiful and she smiled so big and I just lost everything I planned to say,” he said

    Can’t wait to see this cream-puff in a fire-fight.

  121. feelthebern

    The bloke on Ellen is in the Navy.
    What do you expect from a seaman.

  122. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    How long did you practice for that IT?

    I hit the pylon the first two times.

  123. Leigh Lowe

    feelthebern

    #2682208, posted on April 9, 2018 at 1:42 pm

    Geez Leigh.
    Some decorum.

    That is the cleaned up version.
    But, FFS, news used to be facts.
    Now it is just a stream of shit always advancing the ’causes’ of the ‘researchers’ and producers.
    Example 1:- Moderately warm Autumn day = non-stop global warmening bullshit from their speed-dial climate ‘scientists’.
    Example 2:- Every ‘business’ report will eventually find it’s way back to the themes of evil corporates ripping consumers off, or not paying tax on revenue, or drowning puppies, or whatever.

  124. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    #2682211, posted on April 9, 2018 at 1:47 pm

    How long did you practice for that IT?

    I hit the pylon the first two times.

    Tough but slow on the uptake.
    Still, those royalty cheques from “The Science of Stupid” will be handy.

  125. Arky

    And I’m no homo.

    ..
    You might not be, but your learning to read advice is.
    Literacy levels are shocking.
    Parents are not putting in the time required to get children reading.
    I don’t care what methods stupid teachers are using. Whole word, phonics, whatever.
    There is no substitute for spending regular, large amounts of time with young children reading with them.
    I have spent a lot of money over the last two years sending my kid to chinese school on weekends to learn mandarin, using their eqiuvalent to phonics: the “pobomofo” system.
    Zero results.
    Also poor results when my missus began spending time reading with her.
    But when I sat with her regularly she was quickly able to begin reading whole books to her maternal grandmother, I mean within two weeks, despite my mandarin being pretty fucking awful.
    I do not make her sound words out.
    If she gets stuck I tell her the word, or if it is mandarin send her to mum to get correct pronounciation.
    Then I get her read the word to me.
    Then the sentence.
    Then the paragraph.
    Repitition.
    Reading with them.
    Not sitting there fluffing about waiting for a child to sound out a word, which is painful, slow and stupid and ruins the flow of meaning.
    Not that they should not learn the various phonetic systems for the language.
    They should.
    BUT. You have to put in the time reading with them.
    Do not expect teachers to teach your children to read.

  126. feelthebern

    At the risk of discussing booze again…
    I found this show on fox last year.
    They crap on a bit, but it’s described as being the top gear of wine shows.

    https://thewineshow.com/uk/

    Series two is on the way to fox this year.

  127. Leigh Lowe

    feelthebern

    #2682210, posted on April 9, 2018 at 1:43 pm

    The bloke on Ellen is in the Navy.
    What do you expect from a seaman.

    Steady on ftb.
    This is not that sort of blog etc, etc, etc.

  128. 132andBush

    Dr Fred Lenin

    #2682170, posted on April 9, 2018 at 12:44 pm

    Be a lot of soul searching at the turnbull residence today as he is torn between doing the right thing by the party he loves…

    That party being the ALP.

  129. Atoms for Peace

    My beagle is so pissed that it didn’t get an invite to the Ellen show

  130. Confused Old Misfit

    You have to put in the time reading with them.
    Do not expect teachers to teach your children to read.

    Absolutely correct.

  131. Leigh Lowe

    At the risk of discussing booze again…
    I found this show on fox last year.
    They crap on a bit, but it’s described as being the top gear of wine shows.

    How much is a case of Chateau Defeat 2018?
    Asking for Googlery.

  132. EvilElvis

    All that weeping mangina juice is from the bottom 1/3 of the article.

    Brilliant summation. I’d almost replace weeping with spraying, mole…

  133. Dr Faustus

    Bill Shorten says he’s not focused on Newspoll results

    Opposition Leader Bill Shorten says he doesn’t look at Newspoll as a measure of success for prime ministers.

    Smart move by Tits, nervously waiting for the Trumble Election Success Team to fall off the gibbet.
    The other main takeaway from the Newspoll time series is that the punters have marked down both Turnbull and Shorten as utter flogs.

    Hopefully Albo, or Plibbers don’t notice…

  134. feelthebern

    You’re right LL.
    I try make out that the Cat is a classy place like the Spearmint Rhino.
    When in actual fact, it’s like a biker bar with someones tattooed, saggy old lady up on stage.

  135. Leigh Lowe

    When in actual fact, it’s like a biker bar with someones tattooed, saggy old lady up on stage.

    Let’s not talk about saggy old ladies.
    Right on cue, one of them is bound to turn up if we do.

  136. Muddy

    Atoms for Peace
    #2682218, posted on April 9, 2018 at 1:52 pm
    My beagle is so pissed that it didn’t get an invite to the Ellen show

    So 2017.
    This year it’s about inclusion for intestinal worms.
    Please keep up.

  137. Leigh Lowe

    Be a lot of soul searching at the turnbull residence today as he is torn between doing the right thing by the party he loves…

    Ah soul searching.
    Found him, Lucy.
    He’s asleep on the couch.

  138. The Barking Toad

    There is no end to this silly game until they outlaw pointy sticks and rocks

    We’ve done pointed sticks – what about bananas?

  139. The Barking Toad

    Brian Alvarado, and his husband Matthew

    That drivel makes my brain hurt

  140. notafan

    There is no substitute for spending regular, large amounts of time with young children reading with them.

    I agree Arky

    I dragged a couple of strugglers along with relentless reading out loud together-all the way to sixth grade with one. Two copies of the book if I could.

    Working out the missing work from the context works for me too when I try and read something ( in a romance language.

  141. Muddy

    The Barking Toad
    #2682227, posted on April 9, 2018 at 2:02 pm
    There is no end to this silly game until they outlaw pointy sticks and rocks
    We’ve done pointed sticks – what about bananas?

    Tis all fun n’ games until someone gets their stick broken by a pointy banana.
    OK, anyone else have some Liberal Party election slogans?

  142. Muddy

    Rock, paper, scissors, Liberal…

  143. Chris

    When in actual fact, it’s like a biker bar with someones tattooed, saggy old lady up on stage.

    That’s no lady, that’s Grigs – staging a blockbuster synchronized-losing show with a cast of one, two, three… plentyfella.

  144. Leigh Lowe

    The Barking Toad

    #2682228, posted on April 9, 2018 at 2:05 pm

    Brian Alvarado, and his husband Matthew

    That drivel makes my brain hurt

    In the navy
    Yes, you can sail the seven seas
    In the navy
    Yes, you can catch a bad disease

    In the navy
    Come on and join your fellow man
    In the navy
    Come on Brian, use the other hand
    In the navy

  145. Muddy

    It’s about time they replaced that patriarchal, colonialist, homofauxbic ‘Navy’ too.
    Maybe change it to ‘The Cruise Crew?’

  146. Muddy

    Hulloooo thweety! Are you new to the Cruise Crew?

    Oh dear. This throat infection has funky symptoms.

  147. The Barking Toad

    In the navy

    You can have a reach around

  148. Leigh Lowe

    Muddy

    #2682234, posted on April 9, 2018 at 2:18 pm

    It’s about time they replaced that patriarchal, colonialist, homofauxbic ‘Navy’ too.
    Maybe change it to ‘The Cruise Crew?’

    Migrant Escort Fleet.

  149. Muddy

    In the Cruise Crew
    we can always find a use for you
    in the Cruise Crew
    there’s never just one but two for you.

    In the…

    OK, medication time.

  150. Chris

    OK, anyone else have some Liberal Party election slogans?
    Rock, paper, scissors, Liberal…

    Eeny, meeny, miney, moe
    Catch a… leftist by the toe
    Then give them everything they want
    And make Liberal voters pay for it.

  151. The Barking Toad

    Reach around time in memory of Defence…..

    Cate, David & Marise

    Gawd, the last reach around would be a stretch.

  152. Chris

    Gawd, the last reach around would be a stretch.

    There was no getting around Queen Agatha, or at least it was a long walk.

  153. Jo Smyth

    I see in Hungary, Orban and his anti immigration, pro Christian Party have just overwhelmingly won their 3rd term in office. If I was 25 years younger, emigration would be on the cards.

  154. wivenhoe

    If I was 25 years younger, emigration would be on the cards.

    If I was 25 years younger, I would join you.

  155. Boambee John

    Barking Toad at 1402

    We’ve done pointed sticks – what about bananas?

    Bugger bananas, dread the sharpened slice of pawpaw. Remember the Battle of Umboto Gorge!

  156. H B Bear

    ALPBC radio Green-Left Weekly Radio now Half Hour (formerly known as The World Today) bell the cat on the success of the Commonwealth Games for the Gold Coast. Smiling bullshit artist Peter Beattie continues his modus operandi of public life just lies and says it is a huge success and contrary to everything to date now says drive down, plenty of parking.

    As I said to a mate who made the misfortune of moving there, the Gold Coast is just a cash black hole. The only people who make money there are bikies and the Russian mafia.

  157. Leigh Lowe

    If I was 25 years younger, emigration would be on the cards.

    If I was 25 years younger, I would join you.

    If I was 25 years younger my mummy wouldn’t let me go until I finished school.

  158. Boambee John

    Muddy
    #2682238, posted on April 9, 2018 at 2:22 pm
    In the Cruise Crew
    we can always find a use for you

    Please send another midshipman, the last one’s split.

  159. Boambee John

    Whose turn in the barrel?

  160. stackja

    I remember Gold Coast Chevron development. Some made money. Others didn’t.

  161. Myrddin Seren

    [BREAKING] Syrian State TV: T4 airbase in central Syria was attacked by several rockets that seem to be fired by American forces.

    Well somebody is dishing it out to one of Assad’s airbases.

    Reports on a couple of threads suggest aircraft and/or missiles came from out of the Med, flew over Lebanon and then in to Syria.

  162. H B Bear

    Lord Waffleworth’s media water carriers out in force today maintaining the illusion of Potential Greatness. Unfortunately for Waffles the consensus is the only reason there isn’t a potential leadership challenge is that there is no viable alternative among the Lieboral dross.

    Ask Emperor Barney and the WA Lieborals how that works out the next time mug voters are allowed near a ballot box.

  163. Boambee John

    I remember when Lennons Broadbeach was built, nothing else but paperbark swamp in sight. Everyone thought they were crazy.

    Took a few years, then OK. How many years are the Stolen (from taxpayers) wealth games going for?

  164. Boambee John

    Can someone please post the Andrew Clennel story on Trumble referred to by Bolt.

  165. RobK

    Tim Winton.
    Tim Minchin.
    Should I go on …

    But then we also have Kevin bloody Wilson .

  166. Leigh Lowe

    Reports on a couple of threads suggest aircraft and/or missiles came from out of the Med, flew over Lebanon and then in to Syria.

    Wouldn’t mind if the dug a couple in short.

  167. Dr Fred Lenin

    Stack. First time I saw chevron it stood out like a dunny in the desert ,the word dunny suited its surroundings ,mind you that was 58 years ago ,bugger all between the border and Southport but swamp ,the “Gold Coast was the chevron hotel and a heap of jerry built asbestos loaded shops and “motels” ,a real boom town ,suppose they even had tent dwellers ther too. It certainly looks better now thanks to Melbourne and Sydney money and migrants . Back then if you had nuked it you would babe done a couple of thousand bucks worth of damage .

  168. wivenhoe

    I remember when Lennons Broadbeach was built, nothing else but paperbark swamp in sight.

    Yeah, back in the days that I used to spend Easter weekend at Broadbeach caravan park, the only thing between me and the beach, was the Chevron.

  169. feelthebern

    Headbutt Tony Abbott, get 6 months in the clink.
    Knife him in the back, you get to be the PM.

  170. Leigh Lowe

    Lord Waffleworth’s media water carriers out in force today maintaining the illusion of Potential Greatness.

    So much of the Emperor’s bath-water to drink.
    So little time.

  171. Bruce of Newcastle

    [BREAKING] Syrian State TV: T4 airbase in central Syria was attacked by several rockets that seem to be fired by American forces.

    Well somebody is dishing it out to one of Assad’s airbases.

    Airstrikes hit Assad air base after deadly chemical attack, state TV reports

    It was not immediately clear which country launched the strikes. The report on SANA said the attack on the T4 military airbase “is likely to be an American aggression.” However, U.S. officials denied that it had launched airstrikes on Syria.

    Wasn’t me!

  172. Chris

    Can someone please post the Andrew Clennel story on Trumble referred to by Bolt.

    Sorry for the wall of text

    ‘Don’t play with the big boys’
    In the PM’s office, you’re either “compliant or an enemy’’. One tirade by his right-hand woman sums up the siege mentality.

    By ANDREW CLENNELL
    April 9th, 201826 min read

    Mark Connell came back to his desk to find three missed calls from an unfamiliar number. Then came the fourth call.

    Shouting down the line at a million miles an hour was the principal private secretary to the Prime Minister, Sally Cray, as she tore into Connell, who is the chief of staff to NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro. It was shock-and-awe stuff.

    “I’m so f..king angry,” came the tirade from Malcolm Turnbull’s senior staffer, who Connell had never met.

    “Your boss will cease (talking about Turnbull) and he will step down from this talk about Turnbull and the leadership.

    “You guys are on the second rung; don’t play with the big boys.

    READ MORE
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    PM’s empty locker the real worryJUDITH SLOAN

    “I don’t give a f..k if I have to quit my job in order to sit down in front of (The Daily Telegraph editor) Chris Dore and tell him all about your boss and what he has been up to!

    “I know you’re high-fiving in there; you’ve got plans to keep going with the story and do press conferences.

    “If I’m not allowed to leak about your boss and tell people what’s … going on (with him) I will quit (so I can do so).”

    Cray listed some unsubstantiated slurs against Barilaro she claimed she could present to the media as she continued to swear and threaten.

    The call came an hour after Barilaro had given an interview to 2GB broadcaster Alan Jones on 2GB on December 1 calling on Turnbull to resign.

    Connell, a former staffer for John Fahey when he was federal finance minister, had warned his boss not to do the interview — to no avail. You can hear in the interview Jones pushing Barilaro to the edge as the Deputy Premier proffers up private criticisms he has made to Jones about Turnbull on air and then finally the NSW ­Nationals leader proclaims: “My view is Turnbull should give Australians a Christmas gift and go ­before Christmas.”

    And this: “Turnbull is the problem, the Prime Minister is the problem. He should step down and allow for a clean-out of what the leadership looks like federally.”

    Now Connell was copping it from the PM’s office in a roasting the likes of which he had never ­experienced before.

    Connell insisted to Cray that there were no more press appearances planned. That was it. (Later in the day, Barilaro tried to avoid cameras at a funeral in Canberra).

    But Barilaro’s spray came at the worst possible time imaginable for Turnbull — about two weeks out from the Bennelong by-election which the PM desperately needed to win to keep his majority and to preserve his leadership.

    The Barilaro comments ran on the front page of The Weekend Australian and ran strongly through evening news bulletins.

    By the time Connell went into the NSW Premier’s office to discuss how the Premier was going to react to Barilaro’s comments, Gladys Berejiklian’s office already knew all about the Cray call.

    Separately, a senior government figure had been deployed by the Turnbull office and contacted the NSW Nationals’ deputy leader, Niall Blair. The operative told him that if Barilaro had any skeletons in his cupboard, he had better watch out.

    The incident gives an insight into the workings of Team Malcolm; an insight into what some ministers say has become a kind of “siege mentality” which is gripping the Turnbull office as the Prime Minister and his closest ally, Cray, become distrustful of people within their own ranks. This siege mentality extends to journalists and media outlets who do not toe the line constantly with favourable coverage for the PM.

    The Turnbull team plays for keeps.

    Cray is known to regularly send messages on WhatsApp or send texts to journalists complaining they are not doing enough for Turnbull and letting his opponent off the hook.

    Cray is known in Canberra as the Prime Minister’s de facto chief of staff — a kind of “new Peta Credlin”.

    There are disagreements over whether or not Cray operates in the same fashion as Peta Credlin did when she was chief of staff to Tony Abbott. Some say that Cray is kinder to MPs and staff; to be summoned to Credlin meant very bad news back in the Abbott days.

    There is also an argument that while Credlin was more involved in the policy formulation with Abbott, Cray is more involved with giving Turnbull confirmation and reassurance and her defenders say she is “more collegiate”. And there seems little doubt Turnbull consults his ministers and his leadership group more than Abbott did.

    But there seems no doubt that Cray is a central figure in the Turnbull regime, just as Credlin was in the Abbott team; and she therefore bears some responsibility for the flawed political strategy of the government.

    Sally Cray with Malcolm Turnbull at the G20 meeting in Germany in July 2017.
    Sally Cray with Malcolm Turnbull at the G20 meeting in Germany in July 2017.
    One source described Ms Cray’s spray at Mr Barilaro as “uncharacteristic” and it came at a time of high pressure in the government when the Bennelong by-election was on and LNP MP George Christensen was threatening to quit the Coalition.

    Government for the PM seems to be something of a “family affair”. Cray and Turnbull’s indigenous affairs adviser, Kerry Pinkstone, are personal friends of Turnbull’s daughter, Daisy.

    Both rent Lucy Turnbull’s $2 million apartment on the Kingston foreshore in Canberra during sitting weeks.

    Even though bureaucrat after bureaucrat has served as Malcolm’s chief of staff; from Drew Clarke to Greg Moriarty to current incumbent Peter Woolcott — it is Cray who carries the political cards.

    But how competent has she been in guiding the Prime Minister on the political course he needed to go on?

    There’s a common whinge that Turnbull’s office is loaded with Liberals who live in the eastern suburbs of Sydney — people of Turnbull stock; not the types to know what hits people in the mortgage-belt suburbs.

    “We have sucked up to the public schools — given them a whole lot more money — they’re not going to vote for us,” one minister says.

    “We’re trying to suck up to … the renewable energy community — no one in pro-renewables is going to vote for us.

    “We can’t win with these positions politically.”

    The expression used around Turnbull is that he gets “played on the politics” at every turn.

    One minister warned The Australian of the pitfalls of this piece: “Sally sits there and she will try to attribute every off-the-record comment,” the minister said.

    “Have you ever written a story about the Turnbull prime ministership before? Watch out.

    “Malcolm’s office is very Sydney eastern suburbs … so of course they hear different things from what we’re concerned about — which is energy prices and immigration.

    “The biggest mistake he could make now — which Abbott made — would be for his office to become paranoid.

    “For a long time I thought the right thing is that he’s got to listen to people (then he can improve) but then his instincts have to change. That doesn’t happen easily or quickly.

    “If you changed Sally out, how much difference would it make?

    “For the PMO, either you’re on their side and compliant or you’re one of the enemy. You’re either an insider or an outsider.

    “Malcolm makes a snide remark about someone … Sally takes it and says ‘I better implement that’.”

    Another minister says: “The underlying flaw is he (Turnbull) just doesn’t have political judgment.”

    Malcolm Turnbull’s Newspoll fortunes have fallen since 2016.
    Malcolm Turnbull’s Newspoll fortunes have fallen since 2016.
    The minister laments the departure of former deputy chief of staff Brad Burke in November 2016 from the office. Burke went to work in the private sector.

    “I think Brad Burke was a big loss (in the office),” says one minister. “It was the Brad and Sally show for a while. They were the yin and the yang in terms of their views.

    “The office is supposed to resemble Howard’s office but in fact it resembles Rudd’s.

    “They have got small-L liberals running around.”

    Burke was known by fellow staff as a “Malcolm whisperer”.

    Cray has also been described as “Malcolm’s mood manager”. It seems careful tactics are employed to work with a prime minister who can be difficult.

    “He listens to f..k-all people but he listens to her (Cray),” one former staffer says.

    Cray’s reputation as the enforcer and gatekeeper was confirmed again when Tasmanian senator Jonno Duniam brought Tasmanian Premier Will Hodgman to see the PM at a time when the state government was lobbying Canberra for funding for the Mersey Hospital, one parliamentary sitting day.

    Cray barred Duniam and Tasmanian Health Minister Michael Ferguson from the meeting and gave Duniam a talking to on “following proper processes”, accusing him of seeking to ambush the PM.

    But one former staffer says: “I don’t think it’s a problem with Sal, I really don’t. Yeah, she’s tough, she’s the enforcer and all that sort of stuff. You can’t read through that how the Newspoll is the way that it is.

    “People had a perception (when Turnbull came to power) that they saw him as about the republic, same-sex marriage, the environment … those things weren’t the right thing for him to pursue … it would have blown up the partyroom.

    “In the absence of that, it was like ‘what’s the next big thing?’ And there was no next big thing.”

    But a senior Liberal source is more brutal: “The real problem is there isn’t a political strategist in his office.”

    Cray had become the strategist by default.

    Policy adviser David Bold has become a central person in the office — the person who negotiates with the crossbenchers. A few years ago he was a press secretary to former NSW education minister Adrian Piccoli.

    Then there is an able, honest group of press secretaries — former ABC Tokyo correspondent Mark Simkin, former Daily Telegraph gallery journalist Daniel Meers, former ABC journalist Hayden Cooper.

    But these are all types who would hardly be part of a robust debate in the office on the way to proceed. They are efficient, intelligent but mild-mannered characters.

    The energy adviser, Sid Marris, is a former Canberra bureau chief for The Australian. Foreign affairs is Phillippa King, a former DFAT official who worked for Mike Baird.

    Clive Mathieson, the former editor of The Australian, joined late last year as deputy chief of staff from Gladys Berejiklian’s office.

    Sally Cray and Malcolm Turnbull. Insiders say she has become his political strategist by default. Picture: Facebook
    Sally Cray and Malcolm Turnbull. Insiders say she has become his political strategist by default. Picture: Facebook
    The office is known to have a “flat structure”. It’s Cray and the rest. That means junior staffers can get access to the Prime Minister but it ensures Cray is the dominant figure.

    Others argue that Cray is not as forceful or full-on as Tony Abbott’s former chief of staff, Credlin, who, of course, came under such fire for being so dominant and for allowing herself to be portrayed as the real power behind the throne.

    But, then, says one staffer: “What’s the message from the government press office?

    “What is our message? I couldn’t even tell you.

    “At least when Abbott was PM we had an (idea) of what we stand for. Malcolm derides these three-word slogans, but they work.

    “You have a discussion with any long-term Coalition staffer and we don’t know what we’re fighting for.”

    One vigorous defender of Turnbull and Cray is Workplace Minister Craig Laundy.

    Laundy told The Australian that Turnbull and Cray simply had not had enough credit for the difficult policy areas they had been able to tackle at the end of last year — such as same-sex marriage and the National Energy Guarantee — through a divided partyroom.

    “I don’t think he gets the credit he deserves in steering issues through a partyroom with a variety of extremely strongly held views,” Laundy says.

    “Sally has been integral in facilitating these outcomes.

    “Where she and Malcolm have been unfairly criticised is there have been a variety of things that have hit them from left field … most notably citizenship.”

    Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg, a former Abbott supporter and a right-winger, also defended Turnbull’s ability to achieve outcomes.

    “It is no secret energy policy has been a tricky area for the Coalition and Malcolm Turnbull over many years,” he says. “But now we have a real breakthrough with the National Energy Guarantee due in no small part to the Prime Minister’s ability to lead, actively listen and constructively engage with his colleagues and stakeholders to deliver an important reform in that national interest.”

    ■ ■ ■ ■

    Some around the political traps jokingly refer to Malcolm and Lucy Turnbull as “Frank and Claire” after the characters in the US TV series House of Cards.

    Visitors to Turnbull’s house were certainly left laughing to themselves after discovering the PM has a rowing machine downstairs, a bit like president Frank Underwood in House of Cards.

    There is no question that Lucy Turnbull does play a role in some of the key decisions the Prime Minister makes.

    There is no greater example of that than the bonking ban — the ban deployed on ministers not to sleep with their staff as Turnbull decided to get royally stuck into Barnaby Joyce and his morals after a tough question time following revelations Joyce was expecting a child with a former staffer.

    Turnbull himself has said on the record that he came to his decision after a discussion with his wife.

    The “Praetorian Guard” of the right wing that Malcolm Turnbull relies upon for his survival, Mathias Cormann and Peter Dutton, had argued vehemently to Turnbull that he should not introduce the bonk ban. Cormann and Dutton also advised Turnbull against antagonising Joyce in the press conference where it was announced.

    But Turnbull came to his own “captain’s call” after discussions with Lucy.

    It had been a difficult parliamentary week but the issue had been done and dusted.

    “He stands up there at five minutes to five … with a policy about what should be morals around marriages,” one staffer says incredulously.

    There seems little doubt the concept of a cities minister and “cities deals” came from Lucy Turnbull’s time as chairwoman of the Committee for Sydney and she was present at early meetings on the subject; although lately Malcolm has been at pains to distance Lucy, the Greater Sydney Commission chairwoman, from these sorts of discussions.

    Other signs of Lucy Turnbull’s influence include when the Prime Minister called a royal commission into juvenile detention in the Northern Territory after watching ABC’s Four Corners with his wife.

    Malcolm and Lucy Turnbull are referred to in Canberra as ‘Frank and Claire’, after the Underwoods in
    House of Cards. Picture: David Geraghty
    Malcolm and Lucy Turnbull are referred to in Canberra as ‘Frank and Claire’, after the Underwoods in House of Cards. Picture: David Geraghty
    There were also suspicions in government when Turnbull got up in the house and gave his foolhardy pronouncement that Barnaby Joyce was “qualified to sit in this house and the High Court will so hold” that former barrister Tom Hughes QC (Lucy’s father) might have given Turnbull such advice.

    After all, Mr Hughes’s legal advice was sought — and given in short phrases in writing — to Turnbull while he was opposition leader.

    A surreal moment came last August, when Malcolm and Lucy Turnbull met Barnaby Joyce on the weekend in parliament house after the then deputy prime minister got the NZ high commission advice on the previous Thursday suggesting he had dual citizenship.

    As the Prime Minister typed away on his computer, quoting various parts of the Constitution, he assured Joyce it would be OK and the High Court would find in his favour. Lucy Turnbull was finishing Turnbull’s sentences for him.

    The Solicitor-General had cautiously advised Turnbull that it was “likely” the High Court would find in favour of the government — not that it was a lay-down misere.

    Turnbull’s treatment of the issue in the parliament was another example of an overreach by the Prime Minister and poor political judgment.

    Overreaching is a common trait — like when he went to moralise on Australia’s cheating cricketers a week ago and ended up criticising sledging when that is all politicians do every day.

    The stories of the volcanic temper of Turnbull are many.

    One former minister, who did not want to be named, recalls Turnbull ringing him abusively, unimpressed by his alleged behaviour and calling him the “C” word before saying both he and Lucy were very disappointed in him.

    Another story emerges of a staffer who was asked by Turnbull whether his question time performance was any good.

    After offering a couple of small critiques, Turnbull got stuck into her.

    “Why is it that you’re f..king telling me this and my senior advisers aren’t telling me this?” the Prime Minister is said to have said.

    “Why is it I’m being told by the press secretary how we should answer a question?”

    When a staffer issued a press release about the US resettlement of refugees with a couple of mistakes in it, Turnbull is said to have walked out and said: “Get this f..king staff member in front of me right now. This f..king thing’s got to be right.”

    He is known to tell other staffers: “I’m not listening to your f..king advice.”

    Some of that behaviour is described as “Ruddesque”.

    Tony Abbott confirmed to The Australian the veracity of a reported incident in 2014 when Abbott was PM where on a plane flight back from The Australian’s 50th anniversary celebrations Turnbull told Abbott he was the most “disloyal c…” he had ever met.

    “The reports I read about that particular flight were accurate,” Abbott says.

    But another former staffer says Malcolm has “mellowed” incredibly since his early days as a minister in 2006 and ’07 and even his period as opposition leader; and this seems to be acknowledged by others.

    Abbott also accuses Turnbull of leaking against him in the lead-up to the leadership coup in September 2015.

    “There was a lot of leaking out of the Abbott cabinet and it was designed to damage the government and, in particular, me,” Abbott says.

    “I suppose there might have been more than one leaker but there’s no doubt that information did not always stay confidential if it was in Malcolm’s interests for it to become public.”

    In June last year, after the PM heard that Liberal member for Canning Andrew Hastie was planning an event with a Liberal Party branch in WA involving Peta Credlin, the Prime Minister saw fit to phone the MP.

    Credlin recalls Hastie telling her later it was a “difficult conversation”. But Hastie, after discussing the matter with the PM last week, told The Australian he recalled it had been a “cordial conversation” last year. “The PM received the flyer for (the) event before I had approved it, which was the substance of the conversation.”

    One minister says of the PM and his office: “I think there is a bit of a siege mentality.”

    ■ ■ ■ ■

    To examine Turnbull and the reason for his 30 consecutive Newspoll losses, the focus really comes on the man — not his staff or the influence of his wife. And how he is outplayed at politics constantly by Labor.

    After all, he could have better advice — but what is the point when you tend not to take advice you are given in any case.

    The true killer for the PM was a period of three months — between February and April 2016 — when he faffed around with what he was going to do on tax reform.

    In this time, the primary vote of the Coalition in the Newspoll went from 46 per cent to 41 per cent. It has never really recovered.

    The opportunity to reform was lost; it was gone. But the indecisiveness was there. There for all to see.

    When it came to election time in July 2016, the primary vote got to 42 — enough, Liberal HQ hoped, to snare 78-80 seats.

    The vote famously got the Coalition 76 seats — a lousy one-seat majority which means it is dealing with the potential threat of the LNP’s Christensen crossing the floor all the time.

    The rot began when former NSW premier Mike Baird, who had already come out in September 2015 urging a 15 per cent GST to help pay for rising health costs, was encouraged by the Turnbull camp to come out again and push for tax reform in February 2016. Baird had conversations with Turnbull where the PM made it clear he was willing to push ahead.

    The federal Treasury modelling came back and it showed that it was all too hard and it was a lot of reform pain for no real benefit to the budget bottom line — particularly when the “no one can be worse off” political rule was followed.

    Then Turnbull switched to a proposal for the states to collect their own income tax and tax reform was abandoned.

    This after months of statements about “innovation” which amounted to not much.

    “He had a plan to become PM but no plan to govern,” one minister says.

    So Turnbull and his campaign team came up with the best economic/political narrative they could come up with: “Jobs and Growth” to take to the election.

    “It worked but it wasn’t enough,” laments a former staffer.

    A defender of Turnbull says: “Around tax reform, it’s not 2001 (when Howard introduced the GST) where (you have a) surplus” and gimmes could be handed out to compensate so no one was “worse off”.

    “A lot of people underestimated the extent to which he’s had to try to take the party with him,” the supporter, a respected MP, says.

    “You can’t as leader just say ‘I’m heading in this direction; same-sex marriage, a republic.

    “He had promised cabinet government. You can’t criticise him for captain’s picks and then say he consults too much.

    “At the end of the day the numbers are what they are. We have got 12 months to turn that around.”

    Malcolm Turnbull ‘had a plan to become PM but no plan to govern,’ one minister says. Picture: Jenny Evans
    Malcolm Turnbull ‘had a plan to become PM but no plan to govern,’ one minister says. Picture: Jenny Evans
    There is some feeling that last year there has been improvement in a policy sense but the political handling of issues has been abysmal.

    “His fundamental problem is political management. Basically a lot of Malcolm’s policies … are sound,” one senior Liberal says.

    “They had a look at the substance of funding for schools.

    “He rolled out Gonski 2.0.

    “But the politics of it are you have now got a whole bunch of pissed-off Catholics. If you look at the substance of what they have done in education … Gonski 2.0 now based on need … you can mount a very significant case as a policy reason for that being (in place).”

    But then comes the mismanagement with Turnbull’s ally, Education Minister Simon Birm­ingham, accusing the Catholics of being bought by Labor for a “few pieces of silver”.

    “More than a million Catholic school parents’ noses out of joint,” the Liberal said.

    One minister says: “For someone who had been so successful in business … the decision-making capacity is just not there.”

    Nor is the ability to stick to a line. One week it’s national security; the next week it’s energy, the next week it’s the economy.

    Failure to stick to a theme and create a narrative has been the ­political failure of the government under the Turnbull leadership.

    When Bill Shorten announced he was going to end dividend imputation cash refunds for superannuants, Turnbull was slow to go on the attack and stay there; just as he was when it came to attacking Labor on Adani.

    One Liberal describes a meeting at campaign headquarters in the last election campaign where Turnbull told senior party officials that he was not an attack-dog ­politician and could not be expected to act as such.

    Another sign of Turnbull’s ­indecisiveness mentioned to The Australian was the suggested ­endorsement by the government of Kevin Rudd as nominee to be UN secretary-general.

    The suspicion among senior ministers was that Turnbull had made some sort of guarantee to Rudd. Cabinet was “50-50” on it.

    Eventually it was dumped but the issue went on for months.

    “Malcolm came into politics at 50. He came into politics as a clearly successful businessman,” one Liberal says.

    “It’s not an American system, people like Keating and Howard and co had refined their parliamentary skills under the parliamentary system.”

    There has been great staff turnover in the office of Malcolm Turnbull. Not one of the media team was there for the last election. Burke left because he had a young family.

    The corporate memory lies only with Cray who, apart from a couple of years at the ABC, has always been with Turnbull after moving to him in 2007 from backbencher Russell Broadbent’s office.

    ■ ■ ■ ■

    One clear criticism — or piece of praise depending on who you talk to — reflected on Turnbull is his incredible attention to detail (or micro-managing).

    The Snowy 2.0 idea came from Snowy Hydro chief executive Paul Broad. Broad rang Turnbull’s then chief of staff, Drew Clarke, and suggested that the Prime Minister, who had been talking about hydro power, proceed with the project as a way to help with the energy issue.

    Within a month, Turnbull was announcing the policy — having “grabbed it with both hands”, according to sources.

    But what struck Broad was that, unlike other politicians, Turnbull was all over the detail. He would not leave questions on the project to staff but would ring the CEO ­directly for lengthy discussions.

    A similar experience was had when energy company executives went to see Turnbull in the lead-up to the announcement of the ­National Energy Guarantee. They found him with Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg and Barnaby Joyce in a room — no officials.

    One observer commented that it was like “everything was in ­Malcolm’s head”.

    Turnbull sat there tapping away at a prime ministerial press release on his iPad.

    Another example is the Prime Minister’s dealings with Sydney haematologist Professor Stephen Mulligan, who launched a cancer drug being introduced to the PBS with Turnbull and Health Minister Greg Hunt at Royal North Shore Hospital.

    Professor Mulligan confirmed to The Australian that Turnbull personally rang him before the announcement to find out more about the drug.

    The announcement last October at Royal North Shore was to launch the drug to treat leukaemia and lymphoma, Imbruvica.

    The drug typically costs $187,000 and now costs patients $38.80 per script after the announcement. It’s the type of phone call a staffer would make and then brief his boss. But Turnbull took it upon himself to make the call.

    “He was asking a couple of ­details about how the drug is used — what’s the treatment; how big a difference it’s made to patients,” the professor recalls.

    Mulligan was impressed by how much Turnbull already knew before he made the call. But it shows a desire by Turnbull to do it all himself; to be the barrister on top of his brief.

    To “have it all in his head” as the observer in the energy meeting put it. The trouble is when all the detail is in your head, it can become harder to deliver a clear message.

    Turnbull’s love of renewables and the ETS killed him the first time as leader and Barnaby Joyce was growing frustrated.

    All Joyce wanted last year was $5 million for a feasibility study into another coal-fired power ­station. Turnbull made sure that the lousy $5m had to go through a set of hoops, including a cabinet committee or a full cabinet before it got approved.

    It never got there.

    ■ ■ ■ ■

    It was last November when Today show host Karl Stefanovic pushed Turnbull on his waffle.

    Finally, Turnbull retaliated. “Karl, you have got a job. If you are looking for a job and you need a job and you have got one because of the strong economic leadership we provided, you may think it is waffling but if you have been unemployed and you are getting a chance to get ahead, you would say you are being very patronising saying young people getting jobs is waffle,” he said.

    Stefanovic cheered on the PM’s taunts, saying this was the side of Mr Turnbull the public wanted to see.

    “This is the real you! This is what we want!” he said.

    Only it isn’t the real Malcolm. It’s the talking points.

    Those talking points, according to those close to Turnbull, are what he struggles to drive home and stay “on message” with.

    Turnbull’s people were urging him to hammer the jobs message all through January.

    Turnbull’s team thought it worked.

    Play VideoPlay
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    Karl Stefanovic and Malcolm Turnbull clash over PM’s “waffling”

    On February 4, the Turnbull government was closing — at 48-52 in the Newspoll. Then the Joyce scandal erupted.

    But the problem many feel occurs with Turnbull and his team is there is always something or someone to blame other than themselves for the government’s flagging fortunes.

    It’s Tony Abbott’s fault or it’s Barnaby’s fault or it’s the citizenship crisis’s fault or even The Australian’s fault for not doing enough to back the government.

    Tough things happen to governments; the test is how you deal with them.

    When the Barnaby Joyce-Vikki Campion scandal blew up, Turnbull agonised to Joyce on how much “pain” the affair had caused.

    “Can’t you see how much pain I’m in; this is killing me,” he is said to have said to Joyce.

    The way Turnbull came into the job, the fact he could only fall over the line by one seat; the fact he had to keep the conservatives happy against his own principles on occasion meant Turnbull had tied his hands to some extent.

    He promised to be agile when he came to office but he has been far from it.

    At least, some say, Malcolm is a deal-maker.

    His biggest achievement as PM, other than getting same-sex marriage through, appears to have been his ability to survive by keeping Cormann and Dutton sweet on the conservative side.

    What has kept Turnbull in the job is that Praetorian Guard of Corman and Dutton.

    Both got their rewards: Cormann is now the Senate leader and Dutton got his super Home Affairs Ministry.

    But should Dutton, who has just a 2 per cent margin in his seat of Dickson, decide that to survive there needs to be leadership change, the dynamics would fundamentally alter.

    And Turnbull’s deal-making efforts failed a fortnight ago when the company tax cuts were blocked in the Senate — although the government still holds hope it can win over one more Senate vote to deliver what would be a major victory.

    As he awakes today to his 30th losing Newspoll in a row — a benchmark he himself set — the Prime Minister and his family may well hear the clock ticking.

    Bill Shorten is not trusted or liked by the public but still Labor leads, every time.

    The voters have switched off.

    Political party research ­obtained by The Australian lays out the challenge Turnbull faces to remake himself into anything vaguely like being in front in the polls.

    The focus group polling was taken in the marginal Sydney seats of Lindsay and Reid in February and produced such comments about Turnbull as: “He’s pretty ineffective.” “No real changes have been made by him; nothing new.

    “He is pretty slack, doesn’t seem to be pushing anything; he’s hollow, got no substance.

    “I expected much more than I got. I thought a millionaire businessman could do a good job running the country.

    “He’s got no balls. I think it jumps from point to point. He says he’ll do something but he won’t stick to his guns.”

    Then, with regard to him being “out of touch”, the research says: “He’s an elitist. He is out of touch with average voters, especially people like me. He can’t engage with the average person.

    “Rich businessman, he has no idea about ordinary people.

    “He has people behind him telling him what he can do and can’t do.

    “He hasn’t shown true leadership yet.

    “Looking over his shoulder at Tony Abbott.”

    Should things continue as they are, a leadership challenge could be in the offing.

    Perhaps there will be a repeat of 2009 when there was a three-way contest for the top job between Tony Abbott, Joe Hockey and the incumbent Turnbull — when ­Abbott surprised everyone and won the top job.

    It seems clear Tony Abbott and Julie Bishop are interested in the job and Dutton could be drafted if things continue to go badly.

    Millionaire businessman Geoffrey Cousins, who lives in the same street as Turnbull in Point Piper, gave the most scathing picture of Turnbull when he responded to journalist Annabel Crabb’s essay on Turnbull in 2009 — in comments that are seen by Turnbull’s critics as holding true today.

    “Are Australians this gullible? They are not. They see a man whose vision is of him, not of them. Surely the Coalition can produce someone of more substance. And even if that proves difficult, someone of better judgment.”

  173. Chris

    SORRY SORRY TOOOO MUCH

  174. nilk

    The slide towards national socialism has gone largely unnoticed by our drooling media whores.

    Unnoticed? Hardly, Arky! The mongrels have pushed us down the hill towards it.

  175. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Please send another midshipman, the last one’s split.

    Bring me my brass bound b#ggery box, these midshipmen split too easily.

  176. Snoopy

    50 minutes until Gavin struts his stuff in the women’s weight lifting. I hope it’s on the teev.

  177. feelthebern

    Seeing ScoMo & Turd in the stands on Fri night at the sharkies/chooks game was the fakest thing I’ve seen since Rudd called off campaigning during the 2013 election to deal with the “Syria situation”.

  178. stackja
    #2682249, posted on April 9, 2018 at 2:49 pm
    I remember Gold Coast Chevron development.

    I remember the sale of land that was underwater, the fly-in-fly-out of gullible Sydney and Melbourne investors, the use of developers’ solicitors by purchasers, and shonky lending practices.

    Ah, the good old days.

  179. Top Ender

    Cuban-heel confidence of Aboriginal men smothered by help

    JOHN ELFERINK

    The Australian12:00AM April 9, 2018

    If we love Aboriginal people any more in the Northern Territory we risk achieving cultural ­genocide.

    Every week the federal ­government spends millions in welfare payments in the NT only to see the Territory government spend millions of dollars cleaning up the mess in its health clinics, court systems and gaols.

    No reasonable person wants to see Aboriginal people fail. Every conceivable assistance has been offered and every time there is another child rape, crime, death in custody, hooded prisoner or other calamity — the inevitable inquest, inquiry, review or royal commission says that more must be done. More assistance must be offered. More spent.

    This pattern has been played out for 50 years with successive answers to various failures to be more and better services.

    It doesn’t work.

    As a child growing up in Darwin in the 1970s one knew that if you got into a fight with an ­Aboriginal person then you got into a fight with his family.\

    What I observed over those years was that when there was an issue with someone within the family the family dealt with it.

    I didn’t realise it then, but this was one of the last vestiges of ­Aboriginal freedom. For more than 50 years every action taken by various governments has been aimed at improving Aboriginal outcomes. The 1976 Land Rights Act in the NT was promised to be a wellspring of economic growth. But it was structured to protect Aboriginal interests in such a way it protected them from such ­malignancies as investment and jobs. Consequently, Aboriginal people in the NT are land rich and dirt poor.

    Once one of the regular visions on the streets of Alice Springs were Aboriginal men resplendent in cowboy hats, Cuban-heeled boots and belt buckles that could have doubled up as dinner plates. It was the outward expression of people with purpose and pride. They were employed and on their country, even before legally it was theirs as it was owned by the Crown. Now the land is in their name, which is a good thing, but those land owners are too often alienated from the jobs that used to be there because the “ownership” granted under the Land Right Act isn’t real ownership and there is no real reflection of ­cultural tradition in that law. If there were the Territory would look very different today.

    If there is a housing problem, the cry goes out we need to give “them” more houses. If there is a health problem we need to build more health clinics. If there is an education problem the answer is more schools. Problem is the houses are trashed, health clinics can only react, the schools are often empty and the outcomes do not improve. The answer? “We need to do more for them.”

    The state has become the ultimate suffocating helicopter mum. If a child in Tennant Creek is at risk the family no longer intervenes as it used to, now its work is over when someone calls child protection services because we have convinced ourselves and Aboriginal people that government will do a better job than family. The few people that do kinship work can only do so through the filter of approvals and assessments by government workers.

    There have been a few glimmers along the way. When an NT government took a position on bilingual education a school’s response in Arnhem Land was to effectively say “get stuffed we’re doing it anyway”. Suddenly parents were involved with Aboriginal teachers in their kid’s education and classrooms were full. When prisoners in the NT were encouraged to get jobs in the community and then pay rent for their cells many took it up with gusto. Work meant improved privileges in the system. The projected recidivism rate dropped sharply, not because of the fear of having to pay rent but because of the dignity that grew from paid work. Like anybody, when more is demanded of them they rise to the occasion. The time has come to stop helping and start expecting from Aboriginal people standards we would expect from anyone else. Helicopter mums are important for babes, toddlers and young children. For adults it represents an erosion of dignity and if we sell the “you need our help” pitch well enough it becomes an embraced truth of decay.

    This truth has been known for many years. The oft-chanted mantra that the state needs to “provide a hand-up not a hand out”, has rarely found its way into delivered policy.

    The result will be a disenfranchised, disengaged class of person that has already been robbed of the belief that they themselves are by far the best determiners of their own salvation from the ­awfulness that has become so manifest at the hands of a benevolent caring system. With friends like us who needs enemies.

    -o-o-O-o-o-

    John Elferink is a former Northern Territory attorney-general and former minister for justice, health, mental health services, correctional services and disability services.

    Full article – link with comments open

  180. Boambee John

    Principal private secretary to the Prime Minister, Sally Cray, sounds like Peta Credlin on an overdose of steroids, yet, for some strange reason she seems almost unknown to the MSM.

  181. Some History

    50 minutes until Gavin struts his stuff in the women’s weight lifting. I hope it’s on the teev.

    On now. Seven 2.

    “A man is a man and a woman is a woman and I know a lot of changes have gone through, but in the past Laurel Hubbard used to be a male champion weightlifter,” he said.
    Secretary-general of the Oceania Weightlifting Institute Paul Coffa takes a much more conciliatory line.
    “She’s a lovely girl, she spent a few weeks with us at the institute,” he said.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-08/laurel-hubbard-split-in-ranks-over-transgender-weightlifter/9626242

    She’s a lovely girl. WHAT?!!?!

  182. Snoopy

    Free the Salamaca Place One. Now!

  183. Muddy;

    That’s because male military spouse and the newest Armed Forces Insurance Navy Spouse of the Year, Brian Alvarado, and his husband Matthew are being featured as guests, and we just know it’s going to be amazing.

    I just want to vomit.
    How the fuck did we end up here?

  184. Leigh Lowe

    Chris

    #2682263, posted on April 9, 2018 at 3:06 pm

    Can someone please post the Andrew Clennel story on Trumble referred to by Bolt.

    Sorry for the wall of text

    Just read it in the dead tree version.
    Probable sources … Abbott, Bananaby, Dutton and various members of the LNP in NSW.
    Of course, “LNP Insider” will be along any time now to tell me the source was Derryn Hinch’s Uber driver.
    What was bizarre was that the organ grinder’s monkey in the PMO saw fit to get up a state leader of another party (the Nats) and threaten that they had dirt on Barilaro.
    Simultaneously someone else in the PMO was ringing one of Gladys’ offsiders telling her that “Barilaro better not have any skeletons in the closet’.
    These people can’t even threaten and lie properly.
    Put Davey and Cam Bancroft in charge.

  185. The Barking Toad

    She’s a lovely girl

    Hope he was referring to its personality.

    Even bull dykes would shudder.

  186. Gab

    Is Malcom still parading around as PM or has he been ousted?

  187. H B Bear

    Not much point looking for Potential Greatness there. Looks exactly like the piece Teh Australian wrote (can’t remember who) on the dysfunction within KRudd’s office. He was gone within months.

    Reading between the lines it sounds like the bed-wetters are content to sleep in damp sheets until they are thrown out of a job at the next election.

  188. Snoopy

    Thank you, Some History. Wikipedia lied!

  189. Leigh Lowe

    “A man is a man and a woman is a woman and I know a lot of changes have gone through, but in the past Laurel Hubbard used to be a male champion weightlifter,” he said.
    Secretary-general of the Oceania Weightlifting Institute Paul Coffa takes a much more conciliatory line.
    “She’s a lovely girl, she spent a few weeks with us at the institute,” he said.

    Paul is no fool.
    He knows that weight-lifting can’t pull commercial sponsorship and their carriage will be de-coupled from the Gummint Sports Budget gravy-train if he says one word out of line.

  190. Cactus

    I know this may cue eye rolling and first world problem thoughts….

    But – I am flying with missus on the once every couple of year holidays to nice far flung destinations. In this case Europe. I am a cheap scumbag – so we are flying in economy and I was hoping for an upgrade to Business on points. Anyway – I deliberately thought flying to Europe on a Wednesday would mean likelihood was enhanced. After all – what sort of a business person fly’s to Europe leaving on a Wednesday to land on Thursday? Well apparently lots. A whole A380 worth of business class and premium economy is full. I bet I have screwed up in planning and didn’t realise there is a climate change or UN conference on the following week.

    I know if I really wanted business then I should have bought a business ticket. Yeah I get that. Its seems I never get to use my points. I always apply, never get the upgrade and they just keep building.

    Sorry for the rant.

  191. Chris

    Bring me my brass bound b#ggery box, these midshipmen split too easily.

    ‘Quite the most well-constructed wanking machine I have ever seen.’

    (from The Odd Angry Shot, I think)

  192. Leigh Lowe

    Some History

    #2682273, posted on April 9, 2018 at 3:21 pm

    50 minutes until Gavin struts his stuff in the women’s weight lifting. I hope it’s on the teev.

    Let me know if he adjusts his tackle before the snatch.

  193. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    (from The Odd Angry Shot, I think)

    It was.

    “Harry, what could you set your watch by?

    This fvcking rain!” was another of those classic lines from “The Odd Angry Shot.”

  194. Some History

    Let me know if he adjusts his tackle before the snatch.

    It’s the snatch wot dunne it. Hubbard has hyper-extended an elbow.

  195. feelthebern

    What do female weightlifters go on to be?
    There can’t be much future for them, can there?

  196. I saw a headline ‘Commonwealth games walkout”
    Assuming the female weightlifters had decided to run their own competition between themselves at a local gym, boycotting the male lifter, I read further.
    Unfortunately it was all about security guards not turning up for duty without notification.
    In the past five weeks, almost 400 Commonwealth Games security guards have walked off the job — nine per cent of the total hired for the event.

    The great Peter Beattie may have damaged his reputation further with stories like this coming out:
    the overwhelming majority appear to have left because of bare bones accommodation and widespread disorganisation.

  197. Top Ender;

    John Elferink is a former Northern Territory attorney-general and former minister for justice, health, mental health services, correctional services and disability services.

    The exgovernment ministers/workers/hangers on who come out with answers to the problems they refused to deal with when they had the opportunity, it’s a bloody long list.
    Just so long as their super is OK, who gives a damn, right?
    It’s so bloody easy to virtue signal after the event.

  198. Myrddin Seren

    Is Malcom still parading around as PM or has he been ousted?

    Judging by that article from Andrew Clennell, he is waiting for Steiner’s Army to arrive.

  199. Snoopy

    Did Gavin get a medal in the snatch?

  200. Some History

    It’s the snatch wot dunne it. Hubbard has hyper-extended an elbow.

    Hubbard out. Injured elbow.

  201. Snoopy

    Oh, I see it’s a combined event.

  202. Deplorable

    Astro Labe has been sentenced to six months’ jail for headbutting former Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Picture: AAP.
    The Hobart DJ who headbutted Tony Abbott has been sentenced to six months jail, with conditional release after two months.

    So now how much time should that bastard turn ball be given for what he also did to Abbott.
    5 years hard labor in Golbourne supermax wouldn’t be excessive.

  203. Snoopy

    Hubbard out. Injured elbow.

    I call bullshit. He’s a big girl.

  204. Delta A

    An interesting theory. It might explain why food allergies were almost non existent years ago. From The $Oz:

    Baby wipes may promote childhood food allergies, study finds
    Infant cleansing wipes that leave soap on the skin may be part of the recipe for developing food allergies.

    The use of baby wipes may promote childhood food allergies by disrupting the skin’s natural protective barrier, US researchers say.

    However the infant must already carry certain genetic mutations that affect the skin.

    A study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, suggests a mix of environmental and genetic factors must coexist to trigger a food allergy.

    The factors include the use of infant cleansing wipes that leave soap on the skin, skin exposure to dust and food and genetics that alter skin absorbency. “This is a recipe for developing food allergy,” said the lead author of the study, Joan Cook-Mills, a professor of allergy-immunology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

    “It’s a major advance in our understanding of how food allergy starts early in life,” Professor Cook-Mills said.

  205. Snoopy

    What do female weightlifters go on to be?
    There can’t be much future for them, can there?

    Synchronised swimming.

  206. Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    Guys, if you miss the weightlifting you can just Google “tranny clean and jerk” for the highlights.

    Trust me on this.

  207. Top Ender

    The Hobart DJ who headbutted Tony Abbott has been sentenced to six months jail, with conditional release after two months.

    Astro Labe, 38, was handed the sentence in the Hobart Magistrate’s Court earlier today, after pleading guilty to a charge of causing harm to a commonwealth public official.

    Deputy chief magistrate Michael Daly said Labe’s attack on the former Prime Minister, on Hobart’s waterfront on September 21 last year during the height of the same-sex marriage debate, was cowardly and premeditated.

    Mr Daly said the sentence needed to deter attacks on politicians of “all political stripes”.

    “Politicians must be free to undertake their work without fear of being assaulted,” he said.

    Labe was wearing a ‘Yes’ lapel badge at the time of the attack, but insisted it had nothing to do with the same-sex marriage debate, rather a “personal hatred” of the former Prime Minister.

    “All it was is I saw Tony Abbott and I’d had half a skinful and I wanted to nut the c… … That’s just my personal hatred,” he told News Corp Australia.

    “Coincidentally, some friend had put a (Yes) sticker on me. It had absolutely nothing to do with that.”

    Link with comments open

  208. The Barking Toad

    What do female weightlifters go on to be?
    There can’t be much future for them, can there?

    Synchronised swimming.

    Dwarf throwing

  209. Pickles

    Trannies are hard to clean but easy to jerk (Rude, R circa 1985).

  210. The Barking Toad

    But where’s Squidgee? Has Tampon Charlie given her the arse?

    Prince Charles has been given a traditional indigenous welcome to the Northern Territory.

    Arriving in Gove, Charles was handed a woomera — a traditional spear-throwing device — as he was greeted by aboriginal leader Galarrwuy Yunupingu. He was then presented with a feather-stringed headdress and string basket before a colourful welcome ceremony featuring singing and dancing.

  211. feelthebern

    Camilla is at Randwick preparing for day two of the championships.
    She’ll be wearing a hood in the stalls for the first time.
    That’s for the benefit of the other horses.

  212. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger 2.0 (Premium Content Subscribers Only)

    #2682298, posted on April 9, 2018 at 3:45 pm

    Guys, if you miss the weightlifting you can just Google “tranny clean and jerk” for the highlights.

    Totally, absolutely, NSFW.
    Further details when I come back from HR.
    It is even worse if you google “Tranny, snatch, clean and kerk”.

  213. Top Ender

    And apparently what is needed in Canberra is an indigenous-only prison.

    Be very interesting to see how long such a facility – constructed at vast expense by the long-suffering taxpayer – would be labelled as atrocious etc etc BECAUSE it housed only indigenous…..

    Link

  214. The support from NZ officials for Gavin Hubbard is equivalent to Greg Chappell’s instruction to his brother to bowl underarm.

  215. Leigh Lowe

    Top Ender

    #2682299, posted on April 9, 2018 at 3:50 pm

    The Hobart DJ who headbutted Tony Abbott has been sentenced to six months jail, with conditional release after two months.

    Astro Labe, 38, was handed the sentence in the Hobart Magistrate’s Court earlier today, after pleading guilty to a charge of causing harm to a commonwealth public official.

    The magistrate was kind of fucked on this one.
    If he lets him off on a $200 bond or Communidy Order, he opens the door for anyone to take a swipe at a judge or magistrate, and it is not a good look if hitting a pollie draws a bond and hitting a judge draws time in the slot.

  216. notafan

    I thought Canberra already had indigenous only prisons.

  217. Tom

    Sorry for the rant.

    Pro tip, Cactus: Tuesday is the hardest day of the week to sell airline tickets. Always fly on a Tuesday if you want an empty seat beside you or an upgrade.

  218. thefrollickingmole

    One of the Manus country shoppers gets assaulted/robbed, the fucktard media spring into action…

    “This refugee was beaten up by someone in Lorengau town yesterday. This is what the Australian government is doing on Manus Island,” Boochani said. “Keeping 600 men in a small town makes many problems.

    “These are problems created by Australia and PNG. The situation in Manus is very complicated. It creates many problems for refugees and locals. The Australian government is causing harm and knows it.”

    Abbott hasnt overthrown Turdbull because hes busy stabbing people with screwdrivers.

  219. stackja

    Separate development now seen as all right and correct. Why not use the word, then?

  220. OldOzzie

    Newspoll: a miserable Coalition mob with little hope of sunlight= Simon Benson

    The Coalition partyroom is a divided cabal torn between hope and despair and rendered immobile as it convulses over its future.

    This is a condition that now crosses factional lines. The myth of a conservative mutiny has been broken. The Prime Minister’s broader support base among moderate MPs is also fracturing.

    There are those who are still willing Turnbull to succeed, clinging to a cogent belief that Bill Shorten is disliked, distrusted and therefore beatable. But a larger number are now resigned to a ­defeat, having lost confidence in Turnbull’s ability to be the one to do it. No sensible Liberal will be doing cartwheels over a one-point gain in the two-party-preferred vote to 48/52 when the primary vote is stuck at 38 per cent.

    Rarely has the Coalition primary vote dipped to the levels they are at now.

    In 2007, on a primary vote of 42 per cent, the Howard government was turfed out of office in the Ruddslide. In 2010, Tony Abbott had to concede a hung parliament to Julia Gillard with a Coalition primary vote of 43 per cent.

    It took a primary vote of 45 per cent in 2013 to finally return the Coalition to government.

    The exception, which is hardly cause for sanguinity, was 1998 when John Howard and a formidable Coalition campaign team managed to retain government on a primary vote of 39 per cent by sandbagging enough marginal seats. In that election, One Nation polled upward of 8 per cent. The Coalition limited its losses to 14 seats and won by eight seats.

    With One Nation now back in the frame, and with its declaration last week that it would preference Labor last as punishment for what it did in the Queensland election, the dynamics have changed.

    This would be all well and good if the Coalition under Turnbull could also afford to lose 14 seats — which, coincidentally, is the exact number it stands to lose on a 2PP of 48-52.

    But the Coalition does not have that luxury because the Howard-sized buffer delivered by Abbott in 2013 was squandered in 2016.

    Thanks to the electoral redistributions in Victoria, the ACT and one coming in South Australia, the Coalition will now notionally get to the election starting blocks potentially up to three seats behind.

    The point is that serious political strategists will tell you that a Turnbull-led Coalition cannot win an election unless it moves its primary vote back up into the low- to mid-40s. This would require clawing back the five to six points it has lost since the last election.

    The polls, all 30 of them, suggest this is not going to be an easy task. Clearly, whatever it is that the Turnbull government is selling, no one is buying it.

    Having lost 30 Newspolls on the trot, many may rightly ask what it means. All one can say is that it means less than 31, to be sure, which Turnbull is also likely to achieve.

    So, for the meantime, the Prime Minister will remain where he is and the Coalition will remain where it is — in trouble.

  221. stackja

    mole – why doesn’t B go back to Iran?

  222. Deplorable

    Astro Labe has been sentenced to six months’ jail for headbutting former Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Picture: AAP.
    The Hobart DJ who headbutted Tony Abbott has been sentenced to six months jail, with conditional release after two months.

    So now how much time should that bastard turdball be given for what he also did to Abbott.
    5 years hard labor in Golbourne supermax wouldn’t be excessive.

  223. Top Ender

    Cats are needed to put the boot into Greg Barns – one of Tasmania’s leading leftie loons – here.

  224. Top Ender

    I thought Canberra already had indigenous only prisons.

    According to a bloke I know who works in an associated area, if all of the indigenous chaps were released from the ACT jail there would be less than 20 prisoners left.

  225. stackja

    OO – August shaping up as decision time.

  226. ian3029

    I suggested in the Oz that “hurting her elbow” should read hurting his elbow. Didn’t last long before they booted my comment.

  227. thefrollickingmole

    Pom government decides it will punish employers into hiring more apprentices by reducing their profit margins with a levy.
    How do you think imposing more cost on employers has gone?
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/apr/09/young-people-cheated-skills-jobs-brexit-education

    This week marks a year since the launch of an apprenticeship levy on large employers – a good plan to urge them to claim the money back for training. But the sorry result so far has been a catastrophic drop in apprentice numbers in England, with 59% fewer starting in the quarter to November. The Open University found that businesses paid £1.39bn into the levy but drew down just £108m for training, because they wrote off the levy as just another tax.

    The article is titled
    Young people are being cheated of the skills needed to get good jobs

    Which is exactly arse about, young people need jobs to develop good skills.

    Your average callow youth isnt going to become a turbocharged engine of productivity if you keep training them in skills that are seldom used in work.

    It demonstrates the intellectual poverty of the “education, education, education” loons. For a substantial cohort of the population its essential they learn “on the job” at a reduced rate to the employer until they are skilled enough to draw a full wage or enter an apprenticeship.

    They had a perfect plan all mapped out in their heads, then reality has given them a turbo-wedgie of truth, and the lesson learnt seems to be “more credentialism”…

    Idiots.

  228. jupes

    Florida Man takes a holiday in Perth.

    Good effort by the young bloke, however too bad he didn’t nail the bombie. If his dad had attempted that stunt back in the day he would have got the splash up much higher.

    That’s because there used to be a diving pool at every public pool that was open whenever the pool was. Kids learnt to do bombies and somersaults as part of growing up.

  229. jupes

    Madeleine Albright goes full on Trump Derangement Syndrome:

    This is how she starts the article:

    Italians hung the corpse of their former dictator Benito Mussolini upside down next to a gas station in Milan. Two days later, Adolf Hitler committed suicide in his bunker beneath the streets of war-ravaged Berlin. Fascism, it appeared, was dead.

    Good grief!

  230. Dr Fred Lenin

    Mole. The people who dreamed up that idea probably never worked a productive day in their lives ,probably a bunch of taxsucking academics and unionists who went into the union to ave their jobs and take every chance they get to stick it up the “bosses” . Open technical schools to prepare kids for apprentiship like we had before the polliemuppets decided eb[veryone should go to University to become unemployable dickheads like them .

  231. stackja

    jupes – MA achieved what as SS?

  232. herodotus

    Blair’s blog seems to be disappearing behind the paywall at DT.

  233. H B Bear

    Does Mark “they don’t matter” Textor have anything to say about a 38% primary vote?

    Waffles hasn’t dropped marginal Lieboral voters. He has massacred the base. PHON, Liars and the rats and mice have taken the marginal voters.

  234. thefrollickingmole

    Dr Fred Lenin

    I cant understand the thinking.
    Apprenticeships used to be quite honestly about dual exploitation.
    The apprentice initially exploited the boss to learn skills at his expense and was probably a loss maker for at least the first year of their apprenticeship.
    In return the boss got a break even 2nd year and made a profit on his apprentice in the 3&4th years.
    You read old (60/70’s) apprenticeship papers and they are quite explicit the apprentice is a resource.

    Now they effectively price apprenticeships out of many smaller employers reach by ensuring at least 1/5th of the time they are in class being “taught” what their boss would have them doing.

    And dont get me started on bullshit credentialism, courses and qualifications designed to prevent people from starting jobs.

    They have been hollowing out apprenticeships for decades, yet no-one appears to have the balls to say stop.

  235. Cactus

    Thanks Tom. Thought Wednesday was fine. Will do Tuesday next time.

  236. Lysander

    Thanks HB; I “borrowed” your question for twitter and Textor…

  237. Motelier

    The Slovenien Hag goes all weepy about sheep on boats after last nights Sixty Seconds report on Channel Nein!

    If we have any farmers here on the cat, they should be sorting out new contracts with penalty clauses judging by the comments on her twitter feed.

    All about the feelz.

  238. wivenhoe

    Waffles hasn’t dropped marginal Lieboral voters. He has massacred the base. PHON, Liars and the rats and mice have taken the marginal voters.

    Yeah, it is sad. Once upon a time, not that long ago, I would turn up to the sausage sizzle stuff, the handing out how to vote cards, and many other fundraising stuff.

    These days, I will no longer do that stuff so long as MT, CP, JB, The current clown treasurer, and several others, remain in the Government,

  239. Myrddin Seren

    This

    Thanks to the electoral redistributions in Victoria, the ACT and one coming in South Australia, the Coalition will now notionally get to the election starting blocks potentially up to three seats behind.

    Anyone who doesn’t think that Shorten and Labor will parachute the cream of the South Australian Electoral Commission crack Gerrymander Squad in to the AEC and look to cement in a permanent ACTU-Caliphate is kidding themselves.

    ‘One or two terms of Shorten Labor at the most and both the voters and the Coalition parties will come to their senses…’ dream on.

  240. stackja

    Man accused of bashing baby was out on bail
    Ian Paterson, The Daily Telegraph
    an hour ago
    Subscriber only
    A YOUNG man accused of brutally bashing a baby and leaving the child fighting for its life in hospital was out on bail for unrelated charges.

    Kelsey Rhodes, 20, is also currently on a 18-month good behaviour bond for common assault and was previously convicted of indecently assaulting a person under the age of 16.

    The shocking revelations were contained in documents tendered to court outlining police reasons for refusing Rhodes bail after they arrested him on the weekend.

    Rhodes, who appeared before Bankstown Local Court unshaven wearing a blue Lacoste T-shirt and shorts, did not apply for bail and it was formally refused today.

    The police also claim they have a strong case against the 20-year-old.

    “The accused was the only person with the child when the injuries occurred and those injuries had not been seen out in public when the child was out and about several hours earlier,” the documents said.

    The tradie, who works for Winnings Appliances installing kitchen devices and machines, was arrested on the weekend after he allegedly left an 18-month-old baby boy with a fractured skull in three places, bleeding on the brain, extensive bruising around his face and ribs, fractured ribs, bleeding from both ears and dislocated spinal discs.

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