Open Forum: August 4, 2018

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1,217 Responses to Open Forum: August 4, 2018

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  1. zyconoclast

    A woman has filed a human rights complaint against a Toronto shelter for female recovering addicts, claiming staff forced her to share a small double room with a pre-operative male-to-female transgender person.

    The formal complaint against the Jean Tweed Centre, which runs Palmerston House, followed Kristi Hanna’s efforts to inquire about her own legal rights in this unusual situation, only to be told by Ontario’s Human Rights Legal Support Centre that, by describing her new roommate as a “man,” Hanna was the one engaged in illegal discrimination.

  2. zyconoclast

    Stange from WaPo

    FROM RICHES TO RAGS
    Venezuelans become Latin America’s new underclass.

    Venezuelan professionals are abandoning hospitals and universities to scrounge livings as street vendors in Peru and janitors in Ecuador. Here in Trinidad and Tobago — a petroleum-producing Caribbean nation off Venezuela’s northern coast — Venezuelan lawyers are working as day laborers and s3x workers. A former well-to-do bureaucrat who once spent a summer eating traditional shark sandwiches and drinking whisky on Trinidad’s Maracas Bay is now working as a maid.

  3. mh

    DELINGPOLE: Tommy Robinson was Abused and Tortured with the Complicity of the British State

    Unless Robinson is lying – which I doubt – this is the only logical conclusion to be drawn from the accounts he gave to Rebel Media’s Ezra Levant and Fox News’s Tucker Carlson.
    How else do you explain the perverse decision to move this outspoken critic of Islam into the Category C prison with the highest proportion of Muslim inmates in Britain?

    Why was he put in a ground floor cell, opposite the prison mosque, which enabled the inmates to spit and throw excrement through his window – to the point where his only option was to keep it shut and suffer in the stifling heat?

    And why was his food allowed to be prepared and served by Muslim prisoners when the authorities would undoubtedly have known that it would be deliberately contaminated with excrement and heaven knows what else?

    No one is suggesting that Tommy Robinson should have been given special treatment by the prison authorities. Just the same rights as any other prisoner serving a short sentence for a non-violent crime….

    https://www.breitbart.com/london/2018/08/03/delingpole-tommy-robinson-was-abused-and-tortured-with-the-complicity-of-the-british-state/

  4. zyconoclast

    A new law about to be voted this week in the French parliament is making harassing a woman illegal. The law is called “Law against sexual and sexist violence” and, if passed, will be incorporated into France’s laws.

    “Making commentary on physical appearances, making sexist remarks, staring, whistling at women or following a person who doesn’t respond” are behaviours that would be sanctioned by a 90 euros fine and could go to 750 euros or even 3000 euros for repeated offences.

    “The stakes are high; it’s about women’s liberty to walk around freely in public spaces. The political response has to be strong and it is”, said the state secretary in charge of equality between men and women.

    Isn’t it strange how a lot of countries suddenly need new laws against sexual harassment, rape or whistling at women?

  5. Steve trickler

    A late night flick.



  6. Bruce in WA

    Top 10? It’s a bewdiful thing.

  7. DrBeauGan

    zyconoclast
    #2780305, posted on August 4, 2018 at 12:04 am
    A woman has filed a human rights complaint against a Toronto shelter for female recovering addicts, claiming staff forced her to share a small double room with a pre-operative male-to-female transgender person.

    The formal complaint against the Jean Tweed Centre, which runs Palmerston House, followed Kristi Hanna’s efforts to inquire about her own legal rights in this unusual situation, only to be told by Ontario’s Human Rights Legal Support Centre that, by describing her new roommate as a “man,” Hanna was the one engaged in illegal discrimination.

    Oh what fun! The lunatics are having to live with the consequences of their lunacy. Oh what a tangled web we weave, when we agree to share each other’s delusions!

  8. zyconoclast

    The hunt is on for the brazen thieves who used a sewage truck to suck up gold-rich liquid from a Kalgoorlie mine site.

    The ABC understands the liquid waste truck, which was reported stolen last week, was backed up to a dam and filled with gold-bearing concentrate at the Kanowna Belle mine, 630km east of Perth.
    The value of the haul is unknown, and police are still searching for the truck which belongs to waste collection contractor Suez.

  9. zyconoclast

    Shouldn’t the previous headline read gilded thieves?

  10. zyconoclast

    Norway’s hidden scandal

    The UN rates Norway one of the best countries for a child to grow up in. And yet too many children, according to a large number of Norwegian experts, are taken into care without good reason. The conviction of a top psychiatrist in the child protection system for downloading child abuse images is now raising further serious questions.

    The experts’ report – based on information from many health and childcare professionals as well as their own observations – concluded that the little girl’s “development would be limited” if she remained with her mother.

    Fast forward to April this year, and one of those two experts – the male psychiatrist – reappeared in the same courthouse.

    This time, though, he wasn’t in the witness stand.

    He was in the dock.

    He was sentenced to 22 months in jail – after admitting he had downloaded nearly 200,000 images, and more than 12,000 videos, showing the s3xual abuse or s3xualisation of children.

    The court heard that some appeared to show infants being [email protected]

    Norwegian police were initially tipped off that the man was downloading illegal child abuse images in 2015.

    But it wasn’t until early 2017 – a year and a half later – that they investigated and then arrested him.

    He confessed that he had been viewing such material for 20 years.

    RTWT

  11. zyconoclast

    The BBC has withdrawn an educational film about immigration following complaints that it was biased.

    The film, aimed at GCSE pupils, contained claims that Britain was ‘multicultural long before curry and carnival’ and that debate over immigration had fuelled a ‘huge rise’ in support for far-Right politics.

    It was pulled from circulation and removed from YouTube after complaints that it broke impartiality rules.

    1 minute video

  12. Steve trickler

    The trial of Tommy Robinson. ( :



  13. Rossini

    Read the news, what little there was so now I am off, sorry Tom will catch you much later

  14. Steve trickler

    A great piece of film editing, reacting to a remarkable song.

    It’s been ditched today. Gypsy doesn’t get airplay on radio anymore. I wonder why?



  15. Makka

    Job gains for the manufacturing industry in the last 12 months are the most since 1995
    Over the past year through July, U.S. manufacturing added 327,000 jobs, the most of any 12-month period since April 1995, when the figure added a healthy 345,000 positions.
    U.S. manufacturers produced about $6 trillion in gross output in 2017, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.
    Still, the sector represented 11.6 percent of U.S. GDP in 2017, down from 12.3 percent in 2011 and 28.1 percent in 1953.

  16. Tom

    Cathy Wilcox is a humourless Fakefacts zombie, but she has a point.

  17. Tom

    Gerald Scarfe on Jeremy Corbyn and anti-semitism in UK Labour.

  18. Tom

    The return of American war dead after the Trump-Kim summit is a big deal in America. Michael Ramirez.

  19. Mindfree

    CO misfit
    Is Fogo island worth it?
    Lady at the b&b here reckons its overrated
    Anyway off to crow head and the auk island winery tomorrow

  20. Nerblnob

    I’ve got a coupla newfies working for me.
    Goofy? Yes.
    But good rig hands.

  21. Gary

    Open Borders Are Not Libertarian So Long As America Is A Welfare State

    What morality—and what electoral strategy—prioritizes the right of a Honduran to cross the border over the right of an American not to be forced to feed, house, and clothe her family?

  22. Mater

    Open Borders Are Not Libertarian So Long As America Is A Welfare State

    From Gary’s link:

    “Progressive” open borders advocates often quote the poem of socialist Emma Lazarus that was added to the Statue of Liberty: America accepts the tired , the poor, and the huddled masses.

    The same ‘progressives’ that claim that the Forefathers didn’t conceive the existence or consequences of assault rifles when they drafted the 2nd Amendment?
    I’m sure Emma didn’t conceive globalisation, the welfare state or the current international situation, when she drafted that verse.

  23. Leigh Lowe

    Keep it down.
    Some people are still trying to sleep.

  24. Mater

    Keep it down.
    Some people are still trying to sleep.

    You people have been spoilt since OWG got smote. Harden up!

  25. calli

    That deep focus clip of Gypsy is great, Steve. It has a haunting quality I just can’t put my finger on.

  26. DrBeauGan

    If Trump is living in fear that Manafort will be turned and testify against him, he’s doing a good job of hiding it. Trump gives every sign of a man at peace with his conscience. You can’t say the same of Mueller.

  27. mh

    Colby Covington
    Colby Covington
    @ColbyCovMMA
    Like @POTUS @realDonaldTrump always says: Promises made. Promises kept. Pleasure to finally meet you Mr. President. Thank you for always putting America first!

    https://mobile.twitter.com/ColbyCovMMA/status/1025064933736759298

  28. C.L.

    So yeah, the FBI missed that Dianne Feinstein’s top adviser was a Chinese spy – for 20 years.
    Total clown show.

  29. Treasurer Morrison really onto pressing matters, proposes to exclude tampons from the GST. Women on morning think this is a no-brainer and yet thsse are the sme people that say that taxes are the price of civilization. BTW, did any episode of the ABC’s War on Waste ever cover tampons and such? If not, why not.

  30. OldOzzie

    Coalition is sleepwalking towards a cliff – Chris Kenny Associate Editor

    Malcolm Turnbull and the ­Coalition have been so maladroit in their policy advocacy and political management that they are set to usher in a rarity in Australian politics — the election of an opposition with a demonstrably inferior agenda. This is extraordinary to watch; Labor is hamstrung by the promise of higher taxes, unsustainable spending, energy policy madness and a history of dysfunction in fiscal management and border protection, yet it is sailing towards victory.

    The frustration of Coalition supporters is evident in the ill-discipline of dissenting MPs and the bleeding of votes to minor parties — especially the 16 per cent primary vote for One Nation in the Longman by-election. Everyone has seen this movie before — it is Thelma & Louise — and government MPs are torn between enjoying the ride as they go over the cliff and mustering the courage to do something about it.

    It has all been unfolding in slow motion. The drifting away of the conservative flank, diminishing policy differentiation with Labor, recurring inability to sell policy strengths and confounding unwillingness to attack Labor’s weakness have all been on display from the early days of Turnbull’s prime ministership. Save for the very occasional exception serving to prove the rule, there has been no improvement. Not even the warning of almost losing in 2016 seems to have jolted this operation from its soporific trajectory.

    In a twist of self-harm difficult to believe given Turnbull’s history on the issue (in 2009 he lost the leadership over climate activism), the Coalition is shrinking from a potential contest with Labor over climate and energy; preferring to appease the gods of Paris rather than reclaiming the nation’s cheap energy mantle. Instead of championing the mainstream, the ­Coalition is joining the elites in a campaign against their interests.

    From Gough Whitlam to Malcolm Fraser, Bob Hawke, John Howard, Kevin Rudd and Tony Abbott, oppositions have won government with a promising agenda. They haven’t always delivered but at the swing elections they have heralded positive change — new programs, better policies and fresh priorities.

    Not Bill Shorten. He offers higher taxes on personal incomes, real estate investments, company profits and retirement incomes. He offers a tax on carbon and a doubling of renewable energy and emissions targets, which can only fuel the electricity price crisis. Labor promises tens of billions of dollars in additional spending — for no designated outcome — in education, health and foreign aid. It also admits it will reduce union accountability measures and overrule the independent umpire to increase weekend penalty rates.

    Shorten tries to put a positive spin on this suite of measures but it is transparently reckless, anti-growth and worrying. The Opposition Leader and his Treasury spokesman, Chris Bowen, seek to make a virtue out of their “tough decisions” and lack of appeal.

    Matching this unattractiveness is Labor’s vulnerability on border protection. The chaos and trauma it created a decade ago — 1200 deaths, 50,000 arrivals and detention centres built and filled in every state — would be the worst reprise Shorten could deliver. Apologists who claim this has been inoculated against through the adoption of boat turnbacks in official ALP policy must take voters for mugs. Rudd said he would turn boats back before he was elected; then he was insipid, triggering a tragic shambles, and claimed turnbacks were impossible. With many of its MPs agitating to weaken the policy, voters instinctively know Labor might lack the resolve to manage borders. Yet Shorten has one foot on the threshold of the Lodge. How can this be and what should be done?

    Most of Labor’s agenda was taken to the last election and Shorten managed to get through the entire election campaign without ducking a punch. Neither Turnbull, nor any Coalition attack dog, nor negative ads effectively targeted Shorten over power prices, border protection, union power or fiscal recklessness. It was excruciating to watch, day after day, as we waited for the rhetoric or commercials to turn up — like Godot they never came and Shorten ­almost arrived instead.

    It was as though the Coalition MPs expected to be anointed rather than sully themselves in a fight for re-election. They survived primarily because of the size of the majority they started with.

    Yet in the two years since we have seen only limited attempts to take up the battle with Labor. Last weekend’s by-elections provided a dress rehearsal for the general election campaign and we heard no coherent message from the government, either positive or negative, while Labor’s class warfare attack on company tax cuts combined with scares over schools and hospital funding was impossible to miss. This is politics 101 — have a message and convey it.

    Turnbull is not in the media often enough, and when he is he tends to be on the back foot. Rather than use the by-election results as a chance to warn of the impending risks of a Labor regime, he used his morning-after press conference to offer excuses.

    Then he wasn’t sighted until a doorstop interview yesterday. We learned he has again switched his chief of staff; a fourth in three years. Despite this upheaval, Clive Mathieson, who is whip-smart and was editor of The Australian less than two years ago, heads an office that is unusually light-on for political experience.

    The most immediate risk is learning the wrong lessons from the by-elections. Liberals who urge the dumping of company tax cuts are being silly, spineless or Machiavellian (surely Abbott falls into the third category). The tax reduction plan is all Turnbull has for an economic narrative and if he discards it he will suffer a fatal loss of authority. He must show conviction on something — other than climate change.

    If the plan must be modified to pass through the Senate (perhaps limited to companies with turnovers below $500 million), well and good; he should pocket that win and vow to fix the two-tiered system in the future. Voters understand the rationale for globally competitive tax rates and respect politicians who stand by unpalatable but sensible economic reform (think Howard and the GST).

    Climate and energy policy is the government’s most serious lost opportunity. Having been elected in a landslide promising to scrap the carbon tax, the Coalition has gradually veered to the green Left on this issue so that it is now trying to win Labor support for its national energy guarantee, which is driven by the Paris emissions reductions target and will result in the renewable share of our energy doubling over the coming decade. The NEG is better than the current policies that ignore reliability and better than Labor’s plan — but that is the best that can be said.

    Abandoning the Paris targets for now makes more sense, both because of their futility and the need to resolve our energy pricing and reliability crisis. Sadly, there has been so much intervention in the sector that government would again need to meddle to underwrite investment in new dispatchable power. But if Turnbull is prepared to spend up to $4.5 billion on a Snowy Hydro 2.0 project that provides only storage of energy, it is hard to argue against underwriting investments in reliable and cheap additional coal or gas-fired generation.

    Clearly, reliable and affordable energy would be good for the economy and deliver an immediate political boost — looking after mainstream concerns, strangely enough, just might conjure more votes from the mainstream. The Coalition should leave the post-material posturing to Labor and the Greens, safe in the knowledge — confirmed by none other than Chief Scientist Alan Finkel — that the planet will not suffer.

    The by-election defeats have robbed Turnbull of the early election option. With momentum it might have been ideal to go to the polls in October, ahead of Victoria’s state election. Now the Coalition appears locked into a predictable timetable for next year, with the NSW election on March 23 reducing options; the Coalition could go in late February or early March and risk overlap with the NSW campaign but is more likely to go for early May. That means it will be extending its term as far as possible (the election has to be held by May 18) and look as though it is hanging on for grim death.

    While Turnbull’s 2016 double dissolution strategy is often derided because it was so drawn out and he campaigned woefully, this misses a more important point. The strategy might have saved the Coalition, because when he outlined his union accountability ultimatum to force the poll it was the only time he seized the agenda. This gave at least a little shape and purpose to a campaign that otherwise, as it transpired, might have been a contest about nothing.

    Shorten is much underestimated. Time and again in federal and state politics we see that leadership popularity is a poor guide to voting intention. Shorten carries awful policy baggage and is uninspiring. Yet he is relentlessly hardworking and never fronts a microphone or camera without making a targeted political point, delivered from the front foot. He seems to live for the hand-to-hand combat that the Prime Minister eschews.

    Right now, with Abbott and Barnaby Joyce venting their frustration and drawing policy red lines, Coalition disunity and leadership instability cannot be ruled out. Yet the former prime minister and deputy prime minister are also demonstrating their capacity to cut through on hot-button issues. Turnbull has never found a way to harness their skills or appeal to their mutual best interests, and those of the nation.

    We should not expect any detente or partnership. If Turnbull folds on company tax cuts, sticks with his NEG and fails to aggressively expose the ALP risks on borders, taxes and electricity prices, next year’s election will be about next to nothing. As Abbott said this week, a party must give its people something to fight for and voters something to hope in. A government that trumpets stolid progress on unsteady convictions will be swept away by a hungry opposition with ominous intent.

    Chris Kenny was chief of staff to Malcolm Turnbull as opposition leader in 2009.

  31. Nine News readers editorials by proxy when she says that some argue that the inclusion of female sanitory products was sexist because condoms are excluded. Oh really? Do you pay GST on your Pill script every month or so, darling? No? Do you notice that condoms and the Pill also perform the same function? Yes? Can you see that this has nothing to do with gender? If not, STFU.

  32. Spider

    It’s 24 hour a day climate change on the ABC with the ongoing drought providing a platform for them to inject climate change into every conversation (not that they need an excuse).

    Imagine lying awake every night fretfully stressing about climate change? It must become exhausting, surely.

  33. egg_

    Tea leaves, anyone?

    While there is a short run tradeoff between unemployment and inflation, it has not been observed in the long run. In 1968, Milton Friedman asserted that the Phillips curve was only applicable in the short-run and that in the long-run, inflationary policies will not decrease unemployment. Friedman then correctly predicted that in the 1973–75 recession, both inflation and unemployment would increase. The long-run Phillips curve is now seen as a vertical line at the natural rate of unemployment, where the rate of inflation has no effect on unemployment. In recent years[when?] the slope of the Phillips curve appears to have declined and there has been significant questioning of the usefulness of the Phillips curve in predicting inflation. Nonetheless, the Phillips curve remains the primary framework for understanding and forecasting inflation used in central banks.

  34. Gab

    Best carton awarded to Peter Broelman.

  35. Spider

    Re: Dover Beach on GST on sanitary products.

    It should be reiterated again and again that all this hot air expended is about a GST of $6 a year. Remember when Labor poo poohed a saving of $5? It was only a cup of coffee they said! Bloody hypocrites.

  36. Cassie of Sydney

    Stefan Molyneux and Lauren Southern’s Auckland gig cancelled. Stefan and Lauren have uploaded a message as to why.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0pOONm-nW8

    Isn’t it fun living in a multicultural paradise? All those “exotic” foods to eat….yum, yum, yum.

  37. OldOzzie

    I usually don’t bother with PVO, but today I held my nose and plunged into the swamp

    The Coalition has lost its political radar – Peter Van Onselen Contributing Editor

    There is nothing wrong with a politician changing their mind. It was British economist John Maynard Keynes who once said: “When the facts change I change my mind. What do you do?”

    In politics, however, the facts don’t always need to change for a new political response to become necessary. John Howard was the master at reading the political play, never letting the perfect become the enemy of the good; not falling victim to hubris, which erodes a politician’s affinity with the public. Since Howard’s forced retirement, the Liberal Party has lacked a good political radar to back up a conviction-based approach to policy.

    Politically, the facts may not have changed courtesy of last weekend’s by-elections: the government, despite over-promising and under-delivering, was always pressing up against 100 years of history in the hope of taking a seat from the opposition.

    But managing expectations has been a constant failure of this Coalition government. Politically speaking, the ground is shifting once again, and Malcolm Turnbull needs to respond to that shift.

    The Prime Minister is seen as out of touch. Labor’s campaign is built on stoking a perception that the government is in the pocket of big business.

    The charge that Liberals are out of touch with community attitudes is more easily made when the finance team is advocating a tax cut for the organisations facing a royal commission.

    Like it or not, the only political play this government has at its disposal is to walk away from the remaining unlegislated company tax cuts for businesses with a turnover above $50 million.

    I don’t advocate this backdown with any joy. A two-tier corporate tax structure is suboptimal, and the benefits for economic growth that should flow from a more competitive company tax structure — in our region and globally — are obvious to me.

    But for a government charged with being out of touch, and having lost momentum last Saturday, change is needed. We’ve seen it amend the privacy protections for My Health Record. Relative to company taxes, however, the e-health policy is a micro political issue. More change must follow to show Team Turnbull is listening.

    A key reason a policy shift ­— orchestrated the right way — is worth considering is because the government is competitive and therefore it should be prepared to maximise its chances of winning the next election. Were the Coalition way behind in the polls, I could see the argument for simply sticking to its guns, come what may, and carrying with it the virtue of policy consistency.

    But such virtue signalling would be folly when an opportunity exists to reclaim political competitiveness against an unpopular opposition leader who now is safely entrenched in his job because of last Saturday’s results.

    Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton has belled the cat on a potential change in policy direction on company tax cuts. This isn’t important just because it’s a sign that change is coming; it also speaks to a split in the praetorian guard that long has protected Turnbull from his reactionary right flank.

    Dutton and Finance Minister Mathias Cormann have been the key players in such protection, but they seem to be split on how best to address the mix of political needs and economic best practice.

    Cormann is acutely aware of the benefits of company tax cuts for the economy, but Dutton holds a marginal seat in Queensland, making him highly focused on the government’s need to become more responsive to voters.

    There is little doubt that company cuts won’t be legislated because the Coalition doesn’t have the support on the crossbench it needs to pass the bills. So pressing on just to see them voted down in parliament is little more than virtue signalling. The issue, therefore, becomes: what is the best way to walk away from the plan?

    The finance team, with one eye on its own economic credibility, wants to see the bills voted down in the parliament so it can claim consistency in having fought for lower company taxes, only to have been thwarted by others. They can console themselves on this point as well as deliver that message to organisations such as the Business Council of Australia.

    The problem with this strategy, as Dutton is all too aware, is that it doesn’t exactly fill voters with confidence that the Coalition has learned anything from the by-election results. If it did take the message voters doled out last weekend, it would react by dumping the policy, not pressing ahead and trying to legislate it.

    Manoeuvring needs to be predicated on how best to walk away from a policy script that Labor has used effectively against the Coalition, maximising the govern­ment’s political competi­tiveness in the second half of the parliamentary year. Unfortunately, the ­finance team is thinking only about itself, not about the survival of the government or the risk of appearing unresponsive, a concern for marginal-seat MPs such as Dutton. It’s a schism that risks stability.

    During the week Scott Morrison tried to justify the decision to stay the course on company tax cuts, rejecting Dutton’s preference: “We’re not in the business of political expediency to jettison policies that we think are good for the Australian economy,” the Treasurer said.

    Actually that’s exactly what Morrison and co did early in the life cycle of the Turnbull government when they squibbed it on GST reform. Doing so then was wrong because Turnbull and the government had political capital in spades. What it needed to go with that was policy credibility.

    Now the government is unpopular and lacks political capital, internally when managing backbenchers and externally in the electorate. Turnbull suffers from the same drawbacks, although his unpopularity is masked by the comparative nature of major party politicking. Because Bill Shorten is so unpopular personally, Turnbull looks attractive in comparison — but not enough to turn around the government’s fortunes without improving how the Coalition and the Prime Minister relate to the electorate. Turnbull and his team can’t afford to be seen as out of touch, especially when Labor’s strategy is built on painting the Prime Minister that way.

    The government has no margin for error between now and the next election if it is going to maximise its chances of retaining office. Its majority is wafer thin; Labor is better at grassroots campaigning; and there is more money in the kitty for Labor and left-wing causes than the Coalition can draw on.

    The added baggage of not having listened to voters about big business tax cuts will overwhelm the government’s chances of turning around its political fortunes.

    Peter van Onselen is a professor at the University of Western Australia and Griffith University.

  38. egg_

    Job gains for the manufacturing industry in the last 12 months are the most since 1995

    Kraut and Jap cars assembled in the US are still ‘mercan jerbs.

  39. egg_

    Coalition is sleepwalking towards a cliff – Chris Kenny Associate Editor

    Malcolm Turnbull and the ­Coalition have been so maladroit

    Does Kenny read the Cat?

  40. cohenite

    Branco for me this morning Tom. Thanks.

  41. John Brumble

    New game. Count how many MSM articles on Feinstein you can read before there’s a single mention of her (American) political party.

  42. Baldrick

    58th Battalion A.I.F

    Moon, Rupert Theo Vance (Mick) (1892–1986)
    Promoted to lieutenant on 6 April 1917, Moon led his battalion in the successful breaching of the Hindenburg Line in the second battle of Bullecourt next month. Assisted by the British 7th Division, on 12 May it made the initial assault on a large dugout, a concrete machine-gun redoubt and a hostile trench. Moon personally led the assault during which he was wounded four times. Despite heavy enemy shelling his platoon achieved its objectives and trapped 186 Germans, including two officers. For this action he was awarded the Victoria Cross, the citation reading: ‘His bravery was magnificent and was largely instrumental in the successful issue against superior numbers, the safeguarding of the flank of the attack, and the capture of many prisoners and machine guns’.

  43. Gab

    It’s 24 hour a day climate change on the ABC with the ongoing drought providing a platform for them

    Yes they finally reaalised the drought they’ve known about all along could be useful for them. Took them a while though ti figure it could be linked to da climate fauxtastrophe.

  44. Cassie of Sydney

    “Morrison vows to axe tampon tax
    Federal Treasurer Scott Morrison addresses the Australian British Chamber of Commerce in Sydney, Friday, 3 August, 2018. (AAP Image/Jeremy Piper) NO ARCHIVING
    EMILY RITCHIE
    Scott Morrison says it is time to end a “source of frustration and angst” for women, vowing to scrap the tax on tampons.”

    source of frustration and angst” for women, vowing to scrap the tax on tampons.” I cannot believe that I am hearing this garbage from a Liberal Treasurer. These are Labor words. Am I in a parallel universe? Can somebody please confirm to me if this government is a Coalition government? All I am seeing and hearing is a Labor government….they are not even “Labor lite” anymore. Have I lost my mind? Help!

  45. mh

    Cassie of Sydney
    #2780378, posted on August 4, 2018 at 8:16 am
    Stefan Molyneux and Lauren Southern’s Auckland gig cancelled. Stefan and Lauren have uploaded a message as to why.

    Can you just tell us?

  46. Spider

    So Climate Scientist Dr Andrew King on the ABC being interviewed and states categorically no strong climate change signal in the drought in Eastern Australia.

    It’s complicated.

    Oops. Next guest please!!!!

  47. Gab

    LOL That’s the last time you’ll ever see Dr Andrew King on their ABC.

  48. cohenite

    Hawke 1989 157000 immigrants
    Keating 1995 80000
    Howard 2007 233000
    Rudd 2009 300000
    Gillard 2012 230000
    Abbott 2014 187000
    Turdball 2017 245000

    They’re official figures, no doubt 10s of thousands of misplaced buggars running around.

    So, it’s a uniparty affair, one as bad as the other.

  49. Elle

    This may get deleted. Understand if it does. I work within the criminal “justice” system. Have been told that the screwing screw wasn’t just screwing the cop killer, but other inmates as well and that she is pregnant. Revolting creature.

  50. cohenite

    Can you just tell us?

    The venue owner shat himself; no doubt the kiwi PM took time out from her breast feeding to put the weights on.

  51. Gab

    The venue owner shat himself; no doubt the kiwi PM took time out from her breast feeding to put the weights on.

    And no doubt his employees got hundreds of threatening phone calls from the ‘lovers of liberty’ leftard mob.

  52. Cassie of Sydney

    “Elle
    #2780392, posted on August 4, 2018 at 8:31 am
    This may get deleted. Understand if it does. I work within the criminal “justice” system. Have been told that the screwing screw wasn’t just screwing the cop killer, but other inmates as well and that she is pregnant. Revolting creature.”

    Thanks Elle, not surprised. If our society had any standards left, which of course it doesn’t, the child would be taken off the screwing screw when born. Won’t happen though.

  53. Cassie of Sydney

    “cohenite
    #2780393, posted on August 4, 2018 at 8:31 am
    Can you just tell us?

    The venue owner shat himself; no doubt the kiwi PM took time out from her breast feeding to put the weights on”

    Thanks Cohenite!

  54. calli

    So Morrison is dropping the tax on tampons.

    That’s a real vote winner, Scott.

  55. egg_

    Hawke 1989 157000 immigrants
    Keating 1995 80000
    Howard 2007 233000
    Rudd 2009 300000
    Gillard 2012 230000
    Abbott 2014 187000
    Turdball 2017 245000

    The peaks (will) coincide with a change in Govt.

  56. egg_

    Discussing same with Libertards is playing chess with pigeons.

  57. mh

    What about GST on feminine hygiene deodorant sprays? Morrison needs to clarify what is in and what is out.

  58. Death Giraffe

    Next week I will have a more substantial video completely Ford Model A unrelated.
    But in case you missed your dose of car renovation on the dead thread:


  59. calli

    Those items are one use only, too.

    Terrible for the environment.

    But great for plumbers.

  60. Top Ender

    Too good to leave on the old Fred…

    Right!

    Trebuchet planning done – one bottle of spirits consumed by the team.

    Just snatching a moment here while supposedly warming up the reds and port and cheese. (Cold here in the Top End)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qC6RJxFEMfY

    Consensus, plus a bit of biffo, says 90x90mm base and frame timber. (Steve is in the pool, involuntarily, for talking crap about this bit.)

    Argument about a) the sling, and b) the release of same, and c) the wheels – Bunnings may let us down here…

    Anyway, check out this archetype…

  61. Senile Old Guy

    But for a government charged with being out of touch, and having lost momentum last Saturday, change is needed. We’ve seen it amend the privacy protections for My Health Record. Relative to company taxes, however, the e-health policy is a micro political issue. More change must follow to show Team Turnbull is listening.

    That’s PVO. Only a moron thinks that the government having detailed records on everyone is “a micro political issue”.

    But Team Turnbull is deaf.

  62. H B Bear

    Copy of my comment from the Melbourne by the Maps post which was off topic over there:

    Speaking of trannies, ALPBC radio news reported the entire psycho tranny axe attack story referring to the attacker as “she” despite the freak’s transsexuality being both the motive for the attack and an argued defence. ALPBC – all the news that is fit to omit. Not a great effort by “Australia’s most trusted news source” but exactly what might be expected. Orwell would approve.

  63. DrBeauGan

    Deplatforming those you disagree with works. Conservatives are too civilised to do it. The left have no such compunction. Threatening violence works. Extracting protection money from those who want to hear dissident voices works. With the connivance of police and university authorities.

    When authority makes questioning that authority in a civilised manner impossible, particularly with force, it is inviting counter force. This ought to be obvious. Apparently not to our political class.

  64. H B Bear

    More change must follow to show Team Turnbull is listening.

    For van Wrongselen listening = rolling over to Liars demands from Opposition. Luckily the Lieborals are very comfortable implementing Liars policy and programs. Expect to see more of it.

  65. Top Ender

    Great Scarfe cartoon, Tom.

    For some reason, I thought he had died – but not.

  66. Up the Workers!

    Morrison is dropping the tax on tampons…
    But only periodically.

  67. Entropy

    The tax cut issue is confected outrage. Truth is we need them to stay competitive with other countries. End of story.
    The only reason it has any legs as an issue is the government is incapable of controlling the narrative. This is because they sit back and let the opposition create the narrative. Make something else the narrative. Like throwing out the NEG and using that to justify junking Paris Agreement and start the hard process of winding back electricity prices.
    Morrison gets the need to change the narrative, but the idiot picked miniscule issue that will have consequences for wrecking the GST even more than it is already.

    Why even bring it up? Because with three tampon users in the house it is a big expense. So I can tell you all three like it. But it will have consequences for good tax policy in the long run, and politically, Morrison will never outgun the ALP on feelz anyway. What an idiot.

  68. Geriatric Mayfly

    A group of up to seven men of African-appearance are wanted by Victoria Police after allegedly threatening a driver at gunpoint in a carjackin

    From The Oz on the old thread. Only a few days ago they were African-Australians. Way back then, they were a lot easier to identify. This “appearance” descriptor is just too vague.

  69. Baldrick

    So Morrison is dropping the tax on tampons.

    Swinging voter, 2019 Federal election (inside the ballet booth):
    Hmmm … the Liberals scrapped the GST on tampons saving me $20 a year I can put towards my $600 quarterly electricity bill.

    Definite vote winner.

  70. Zatara

    Trebuchet planning done – one bottle of spirits consumed by the team.

    Ah but did you consult the book of armaments? Chapter 2, versus 9-21. Or was that the Holy Grenade of Antioch?

    Optimising a Trebuchet – impressive research but then he probably hasn’t discovered wimmin yet.

  71. Elle

    Morrison is dropping the tax on tampons…
    But only periodically

    Boom tish! Very good.

  72. Up the Workers!

    What about GST on industrial-strength A.L.P.-brand blocks of “Soap-on-A-Rope”?

    With so many A.L.P. pollies, former pollies and their itinerant ‘Left Testicles’ in the exclusive “gated communities” around the nation favoured and frequented so heavily by members of the “wukkas Pardy” for their regular holidays, I trust their handy blocks of “Soap-On-A-Rope” are not subject to the G.S.T (Gaol Shower Tax)?

    Then again, considering the number of them already inside our luxury prison resorts at any one time, maybe we should double whatever tax is there already and we could have a G.S.T.-led recovery and pay off all our debts to Slimy Sam Dastyari’s Chinese money-lender bosses.

  73. Big expense? They are likely to save no more than $25 a year. The whole issue is confected feminist nonsense.

  74. candy

    I would think no tax on tampons should equate to no tax on razors for shaving for men, no tax on toilet paper, no tax on incontinence products, no tax on nappies and perhaps no tax on basic paracetamol type products.

    All necessary for hygiene and safety. We would be hard pressed to live without those items.

  75. zyconoclast

    “Morrison vows to axe tampon tax
    Federal Treasurer Scott Morrison addresses the Australian British Chamber of Commerce in Sydney, Friday, 3 August, 2018. (AAP Image/Jeremy Piper) NO ARCHIVING
    EMILY RITCHIE
    Scott Morrison says it is time to end a “source of frustration and angst” for women, vowing to scrap the tax on tampons.”

    SloMo tired of staining his panties?

  76. egg_

    So Morrison is dropping the tax on tampons.

    Morro has tunnel vision over a Vag Tax.

  77. Spider

    A perfect example of how the MSM can extract a Trump smear story out of thin air.

    Two people in a massive crowd at a Trump rally wearing some dodgy conspiracy shirt!!!

    Imagine if you analysed all the t shirts at a Clinton or Bernie rally?

    whats QAnon

  78. Up the Workers!

    Funny, I always thought that Scott Morrison was a ‘meat and two veg’ type of guy, but now it seems he’s a ‘vagitarian’, instead.

  79. Scott Morrison says it is time to end a “source of frustration and angst” for women, vowing to scrap the tax on tampons.”

    The Libs need to be destroyed.

  80. zyconoclast

    ‘S3x-for-rent’ adverts give vulnerable homeless women a stark choice

    Wanted, a female housemate who will pay her rent with “naughty s3xual favours”.

    Aged 18 to 50, she “doesn’t need to be the cleanest person”, though she’ll have to contend with the 34-year-old “descent” [sic] NSW man who placed the ad on classifieds website Craigslist.

    When a vulnerable person informally exchanges s3x for basic needs such as housing or food it’s known as “survival s3x”.

  81. calli

    So Morrison is dropping the tax on tampons.

    Symptom of the election cycle. The hope is that it will plug vote leakage.

    Net result – more base votes down the S bend.

  82. What about GST on feminine hygiene deodorant sprays?

    It will stay. Morro is total aerosol.

  83. zyconoclast

    Just finished reading Mines of the Spinifex The story of Mount Isa by Geoffrey Blainey

    Very well written.
    All I can say is those blokes were hard bastards.

  84. C.L.

    Symptom of the election cycle. The hope is that it will plug vote leakage.

    Net result – more base votes down the S bend.

    I think I see what you’ve done there.

  85. mh

    Morrison and Turnbull will be hoping that removing gst on tampons will show up in the next Newspoll.

  86. Up the Workers!

    “‘S3x-for-rent’ adverts give vulnerable homeless women a stark choice

    “Wanted, a female housemate who will pay her rent with “naughty s3xual favours”.

    Sounds to me like an advert placed either by Bonking Billy Short-One, or by his good friend, Emma Dogpile.

    The local Police Inspector will be onto that like a rat-up-a-drain!

  87. egg_

    So Morrison is dropping the tax on tampons.

    Does that include Bitchops’ Depends?

  88. 132andBush

    Spider

    #2780373, posted on August 4, 2018 at 8:09 am

    It’s 24 hour a day climate change on the ABC with the ongoing drought providing a platform for them to inject climate change into every conversation (not that they need an excuse).

    And yet only two years ago the eastern states were only one half decent rain event away from disastrous flooding.

  89. C.L.

    The FBI trolls democracy, Congress, America …

    Here is the document they just released re FBI payments to DNC/Russia pee-pee dossier intermediary Christopher Steele. They redacted everything.

  90. Death Giraffe

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    ·
    38m
    Almost 500,000 Manufacturing Jobs created since I won the Election. Remember when my opponents were saying that we couldn’t create this type of job anymore. Wrong, in fact these are among our best and most important jobs!

    ..
    For this statement alone, Trump is the best politician anywhere in the West in the last 30 years.

  91. None

    The Libs need to be destroyed.

    +1000
    When everybody was swioning over scomo as Immigration Minister I warned that that guy was a total and utter fake.

  92. Farmer Gez

    And yet only two years ago the eastern states were only one half decent rain event away from disastrous flooding.

    A nice rain of 5-10mm plus for SA and most of Vic. We’re still in with a chance if the fronts continue to drop showers till the end of Sept.
    NSW is basically buggered for most part. WA is having a cracker of s season.
    I’m relaxed as the multi peril insurance will cover our costs if the season goes pear shaped.

  93. zyconoclast

    Here is the document they just released re FBI payments to DNC/Russia pee-pee dossier intermediary Christopher Steele. They redacted everything.

    They even redacted your link.

  94. Baldrick

    Scott Morrison says it is time to end a “source of frustration and angst” for women, vowing to scrap the tax on tampons.”

    He obviously has one in his mouth.

  95. egg_

    Were tampons and pads inventions of the patriarchy?

    What’s next – etampons that incinerate the sh1te?

  96. Cassie of Sydney

    Isn’t Morrison’s proposed repeal of the GST on tampons “transphobic” and “gender specific” because it applies only to woman born with a uterus and ovaries and thus discriminates against trans women and men who simply identify as woman, both of whom have no ovaries and no uterus? Just wondering.

  97. None

    Hmmm … the Liberals scrapped the GST on tampons saving me $20 a year I can put towards my $600 quarterly electricity bill.

    Definite vote winner.

    hmm the tampon companies just kept the price is the same and pocketed the difference. Definitely a vote winner.

    Shorten is running the governmentn from the opposition.

  98. calli

    The issue is only worthy of stupid puns, C.L.

    By aping Labor on minutiae, the dopey Libs have assured their demise. It’s all they have left.

  99. .

    So it looks like men subsidise women through the tax system again.

    Why not remove Council rates for single women?

    I’m not giving anyone any ideas. It is gonna happen soon.

  100. calli

    I believe female sanitary items are used by the sterner sex too, None. For physical problems caused by “lifestyle”.

    So they’re actually intra-gender. But not in a good way, like boyfreind jeans.

  101. calli

    i before e except after c.

    Must profred bfr postng.

  102. Ode to Trumble (apologies to Dorothy):

    I totally pharqed a country,
    A land of brown shitstains,
    More turbines on the ranges,
    More rorts and untold pains.
    I love her global warming,
    I love her rising sea,
    Her beauty, I abolished –
    A gold crown just for me!

  103. Elle

    The talk about tampons has taken my mind back to the infamous tampon conversation between Prince Charles and Camilla. He wanting to be her tampon. Ewww!😝

  104. scrap the tax on tampons.

    Discriminates against older women.

  105. miltonf

    Shorten is running the governmentn from the opposition.

    The whole tampon tantrum seemed to come to fore when TA was PM- something confected to beat him over the head with. If it was such a critical issue, why didn’t TLS get rid of it? Best thing would be get rid of the GST an everything.

  106. 132andBush

    So Morrison is dropping the tax on tampons.

    Symptom of the election cycle. The hope is that it will plug vote leakage.

    Net result – more base votes down the S bend.

    There has to be a string attached in this somewhere.

  107. Tel

    I believe female sanitary items are used by the sterner sex too, None. For physical problems caused by “lifestyle”.

    That’s completely correct. Standard military issue tampons are very helpful for first aid in situations with low caliber bullet wounds in soft tissue. I’m surprised they aren’t being handed out in Melbourne by now.

  108. miltonf

    I think some journalism academic was sending Tony Abbott used tampons in the post.

  109. OldOzzie

    WSJ – ‘U.S. Workers Only’: Companies Hesitate to Hire Foreign M.B.A. Students

    The Trump administration’s tougher visa policies are narrowing job opportunities for international graduates, school officials say

    For years, coming to America for business school was a fairly reliable way for many international students to land prestigious, well-paying jobs at big U.S. companies. Tougher worker-visa rules imposed by the Trump administration are quickly changing those odds.

    Despite a booming economy and near full-employment, companies recruiting from top U.S. business schools are advertising more jobs that clearly note only U.S. citizens or legal residents need apply, university administrators say.

    In the first half of 2018, companies posted more than 877,000 jobs with the request that candidates have U.S. citizenship or work authorization from the federal government, a 19% jump from last year, according to an analysis of 25 million job advertisements on company websites and social-media platforms that research firm Gartner Inc. conducted for The Wall Street Journal.

    Less than half—47%—of U.S. companies plan to hire international graduates from U.S. business schools this year, down from 55% of in 2017, according to a survey of 1,100 employers by the Graduate Management Admission Council, which administers the GMAT entrance exam used by many M.B.A. programs.

    Discover Financial Services , Delta Air Lines Inc. and Intel Corp. are among the companies students and business-school administrators cite as having grown more reluctant to hire foreign nationals. The changes have come since the Trump administration stepped up its scrutiny of applications for the highly-skilled-worker visa program known as H-1B. In recent months, immigration officials have sent more H-1B applications back for further documentation, according to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services data, compared with the last year of the Obama administration. The administration is also requiring more information about wages and the kind of work being performed.

    This spring, the Department of Homeland Security also tightened the eligibility requirements for jobs employers can give international students participating in another commonly used program, called Optional Practical Training, which lets foreign students stay and work in the U.S. for a year after graduation with the prospect of receiving an H-1B visa afterward.

    Discover is still sponsoring visas for foreign nationals but now more heavily recruits prospective hires who don’t need them due to “uncertainty over the future of the H-1B program,” said spokesman Jon Drummond. He added the number of visas Discover sponsored for recent graduates hadn’t significantly changed over the past year.

    Of the 830 U.S. jobs currently posted on Intel’s career website, dozens were advertised to “U.S. workers only,” according to a Wall Street Journal analysis. Many of them were for roles such as software and firmware engineers and information-technology support—jobs that H-1B workers frequently filled across the tech industry in the past.

    Intel declined to comment on how many jobs are open to foreign nationals, but a spokeswoman said “we have not made any changes to our U.S. hiring and immigration sponsorship guidelines.”

    Dozens of other jobs for master’s-degree holders at Delta, Southwest Airlines Co. , Kimberly-Clark Corp. and other companies cited by students and school officials also explicitly required candidates have legal permission to work in the U.S. without a visa. Delta and Southwest said they continue to hire employees who require H-1B visas but declined to specify the number of foreign nationals recruited this year or in the past. A Kimberly-Clark spokesman said the company has hired fewer workers overall in entry-level roles recently, but “hiring practices and the language in our global job postings has remained consistent.”

    Many employers began scaling back hires of international graduates last year in anticipation of a tougher approval process for sponsorships of foreign workers, students and school administrators said. Initial H-1B visas for master’s-degree holders fell to 45,405 in the fiscal year ending September 2017, from 52,002 in fiscal 2016, according to government data. The total number of H-1B visas approved for new hires fell to 108,101 from 114,503 in the same period.

    Mohammad Salman Asif came to the U.S. from Pakistan two years ago to pursue an M.B.A. at the University of Georgia Terry College of Business. After graduating in May, he is to start a job next week as a senior financial analyst in San Jose, Calif., at Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. , which agreed to sponsor the H-1B visa petition he will file next spring. If he could do all over again, he said, he wouldn’t choose a school in the U.S.

    “It was really, really difficult,” said Mr. Asif, who sent out more than 1,000 job applications in recent months and said he repeatedly got the message in interviews with companies and from job postings that his lack of permanent work authorization was a hurdle. “If I could go back, I would choose another country which offers more stability.”

    The tougher hiring climate for foreign workers is having, in turn, a chilling effect on international applications to U.S. universities. For the first time in over a decade, foreign applications to two-year M.B.A. programs were down last year at the vast majority of U.S. schools, and fell 5.8% nationwide, according to GMAC.

    That decline is on track to continue this fall, after the nation’s business programs received 13% fewer GMAT score reports from foreign applicants for the coming academic years. Meanwhile, the data show business schools in Europe and Canada, such as Insead in France and the Rotman School of Management in Toronto, have seen an uptick in applications from international students.

    At Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School, international enrollment fell 40% last year, to just 24 students in the Class of 2019, the school said. At Columbia University and University of Georgia business schools, officials said international enrollment was down 14% and 32%, respectively.

    “These students are least likely to get scholarship opportunities, they’re paying full tuition,” GMAC president Sangeet Chowfla said. “If they are getting education loans in their home country and have to pay them back without getting employment in the United States, the economics often do not work out.”

    Staff at Pennsylvania State University’s Smeal College of Business have sought to lower the percentage of international students in light of the visa uncertainty, said Michael Waldhier, director of admissions for the M.B.A. program.

    “If recruiters are telling us they won’t be sponsoring as many people, the last thing I want to do is bring someone to the U.S. and have them spend two years here and then not find a job at the end of it,” he said.

    Anticipating more challenging job hunts for new international students than previous classes, Texas A&M’s business school is introducing a series of job-search forums specifically geared toward them, said Kimbrelyn Austin, director of the career management center at Mays.

    “If you start to hear a lot of nos or ’We’re not going to sponsor,’ it would be easy to kind of throw in the towel and become despondent and discouraged,” she said. “So we want to make sure that they stay focused on the search and persevere through the process.”

    Appeared in the August 2, 2018, print edition as ‘Fewer Jobs for Foreign M.B.A. Students.’

  110. Atoms for Peace

    Prince Charles can now come back as a box of Tampax, sans GST.

  111. Atoms for Peace

    What about those fake blood substitute tampons used by transitioning folk?

  112. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I’m relaxed as the multi peril insurance will cover our costs if the season goes pear shaped.

    What’s the premium on multi peril?

  113. Atoms for Peace

    The only chance the coalition has of winning an election is to get rid of compulsory voting.

  114. Mater

    Morrison and Turnbull will be hoping that removing gst on tampons will show up in the next Newspoll.

    A month’s a long time in politics.

  115. feelthebern

    What happened to OWG?
    Was he really smote?

  116. Bruce of Newcastle

    The Trump administration’s tougher visa policies are narrowing job opportunities for international graduates, school officials say

    Lots of jobs for MBAs in Minnesota.

    THE TRUMP ECONOMY IN THE HEARTLAND

    The little town of 6,000 souls I grew up in has more than doubled since I left, a fact that I sincerely hope is merely a happy coincidence. The downtown, which used to have dime stores and clothing stores, banks, hardware stores and four drugstores, one of which belonged to my father, is now mostly little tourist shops with antiques, knick-knacks and souvenirs. Everything else has spread out along the Highway, anchored on either side by Walmart and Target.

    I have been back here countless times during various Administrations, and I have never seen anything like this: EVERY SINGLE BUSINESS – from Walmart to Target to Fleet Farm to Menard’s to every fast food joint – no, really EVERY one – has HELP WANTED signs out! Construction projects abound, with robust young men in the same color shirts sharing my hotel, going out to sites early in the morning. Clearly, local labor cannot begin to fill all the slots. The parking lot has vehicles from Kentucky, Indiana, Tennessee, Illinois. Some, of course, could just be travelers like me, though leisure travelers do not tend to drive beat-up pickup trucks. I think there are many men who go where the work is.

    Go where the work is, kiddies.

  117. 132andBush

    Farmer Gez,
    Crops will hang on for a bit yet. Big difference around here between crops dry sown and those that waited for the first rain (which wasn’t huge, 10-14mm).
    Dry sown have made use of every drop and have excellent plant pops.
    Subsoil moisture is there from the big rain in December but we need a 25mm+ fall so secondary roots can really drive down into it.
    Just had a 4.5mm “sip” here in the northern Riverina.

  118. feelthebern

    Re the above post regarding the gold heist with the sewerage truck.
    Little coincidence that Diggers & Dealers take place this week.
    The thieves will blend in with all the other thieves.

  119. feelthebern

    Collection noun for thief?
    A Perth.

  120. Helen

    Jeez, why should I have to pay higher taxes so some gals can get cheaper tampons. Make your own you lazy slatterns.

  121. Mak Siccar

    Why Australia needs to stand firm and protect its borders

    By DOUGLAS MURRAY
    12:00AM AUGUST 4, 20187 COMMENTS
    The news that Australia is refusing to join the UN’s Global Compact for Migration will cause howls of complaint at home and abroad. “Don’t you know what you are doing?” these people will cry. “Do you see who you are allied with? The US and Hungary. Really?”

    The Australian government should ignore these howlers. For it is not the government of Malcolm Turnbull, or those in Hungary or the US, that is wrong. It is the UN, which keeps trying to push mass migration on to nation-states and whose officials imagine that the answer to the existence of some porous, poor and failed states is to make the world one great porous, poor and failed state. Nation-states have the right to resist this pressure, and they should.

    Yet one of the most startling facts about migration in recent years has been that the greatest plaudits continue to go to those who are most reckless in their policies, while the most abuse goes to those who are most prudent. Perhaps this is because grandstanding and virtue-signalling are cheap. You can almost always get other people to pay for them.

    Nobody in recent years has made so impulsive and catastrophic a decision as German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Her 2015 decision to open the borders of Europe to anyone who made it there is having consequences that will roll out for years to come. Yet even as the German public turns against her and her party, she continues to be lauded across the international opinion-forming classes. Despite unleashing social and security problems across an entire continent, organs of international elite opinion and Merkel’s fellow world leaders continue to give her an easy ride. At worst she was “well-intentioned” and “naive”, they say. By contrast, the leaders of countries that refuse to accept open-borders, mandatory migrant quotas and the like are the ones that come in for execration and attack.

    Nevertheless, the rule of law and the protection of the social stability and security situation in countries such as Australia are worth defending, whatever the pushback. The Australian delegation at the UN in New York was right to state that the UN had “failed to make clear distinctions between regular and irregular migrants and between refugees and migrants”. These distinctions matter. Indeed they are vital. For they are not only a defence of the law but also a prudent response to a challenge that is only going to grow. For countries that fail to secure their borders in the end cannot secure their people either.

    Take my own country, Britain. More than a year has passed since it was rocked by three Islamist terror attacks. The first attack, on Westminster Bridge, claimed the lives of five innocent people including a police officer who was stabbed to death by the attacker inside the gates of Parliament. The second attack, at the Manchester Arena, killed 22 mainly young people and maimed and injured hundreds more. They were victims of a young suicide bomber who waited for them in the lobby as they streamed out of an Ariana Grande concert. In the third attack, a fortnight later, three men rampaged across London Bridge in a van and then ran through Borough Market slashing at the throats of passers-by, targeting women. While doing this they were heard to shout “This is for Allah”. Their attack injured 48 and stole the lives of eight people.

    The dead that night included two Australians. Sara Zelenak, 21, was stabbed through the neck. Kirsty Boden, 28, a nurse, was stabbed through the chest as she ran to help other victims of the attack. After the third attack British Prime Minister Theresa May announced that “enough is enough”. But the truth is that she is incapable of acting because like the rest of us she is a hostage of the asylum and migration policies of her predecessors.

    One year on from those attacks and that statement, the government’s only initiative has been the appointment of an “extremism commissioner”. After half a year that appointee (anti-extremism activist Sara Khan) has announced that her first priority is to gather evidence about “all forms of extremism in the UK”. So “enough is enough” turns out to mean: “We will appoint a commissioner who will appoint a board to look into unrelated issues.”

    Of course one wishes Khan well. But here is one bitter truth that I bet Khan’s commission will not look into. Among last year’s attackers, most should never have been in Britain in the first place.

    The Westminster Bridge attacker, a convert to Islam, was indeed born in Britain. But the Manchester Arena bomber should never have been there. His father was a member of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, an al-Qa’ida affiliate. Back in the 1990s the LIFG was opposed to Libyan ruler Muammar Gaddafi, and he returned the favour. So when the situation in Libya got too hot for Ramadan Abedi and his wife they decamped to Britain, where they were given asylum. Weeks later their son Salman was born in Manchester.

    Twenty-two years later he would repay the country that gave his parents sanctuary by detonating an explosive packed with nuts and bolts to cause maximum damage to the young skulls and spines into which they ripped.

    Just this past week a British newspaper revealed that in 2014 the Royal Navy saved Salman Abedi along with other British nationals from the civil war in Libya. HMS Enterprise rescued him and 100 other British nationals when the security situation in that country deteriorated. What was he doing there? Why were he and his family ever in Britain? And why did Britain keep paying the family’s travel expenses whenever they felt like visiting the country they allegedly had fled?

    An even clearer story emerges from the London Bridge attackers. And it has been even less dis­cussed. The three perpetrators that night were Youssef Zaghba, 22; Khuram Butt, 27; and Rachid Redouane, 30. Zaghba and Redou­ane were born in Morocco, an entirely peaceful and pleasant country. An inquest after the attack found that Redouane had entered Britain using a false name, claiming to be Libyan, and he was five years older than he had pretended. He had been refused asylum under his false Libyan iden­tity, exhausted his further appeals, absconded and lived under his Moroccan identity instead. So again, why was he in Britain? What was he doing for us? What did Britain get out of this deal?

    The case of Butt is even more shameful. He had been born in Pakistan and was described as having arrived in Britain as a “child refugee” in 1998, his family having moved to the UK to claim asylum based on “political oppression”. What nobody has been able to explain since is why, other than saving al-Qa’ida fighters from Libya, Britain’s immigration services in the 190s were still giving “asylum” to people from Pakistan.

    Pakistan in the 90s was not in a state of war. The country is — for good or ill — an ally of Britain and about as stable a country as you get in that region. His family does not appear to be among the numerous religious minorities so eagerly persecuted by the Muslim majority in Pakistan. So why was Butt in Britain? What exactly did he bring to Britain in the years that followed?

    After the London Bridge attack May and London mayor Sadiq Khan eagerly launched into a debate about the role that internet companies had in tackling terror.

    It is an interesting debate. But it had nothing to do with that attack. So far as is known there was no subterranean online jihadist activity going on. In fact the attackers and their associates could hardly have been more out in the open. The year before the London Bridge attack Butt was even on British television as was one of the stars of a Channel 4 show: The Jihadis Next Door. So he wasn’t exactly hiding. He was starring on prime time. May and Khan didn’t need to sit on the tech companies to avert an atrocity such as London Bridge. They just needed to turn on their televisions.

    When something is staring you in the face and you ignore it, there is always a reason. One conclusion that I have come to over the years I have been covering the story of extremism and terrorism in Europe is that the one connection nobody in power wants is between anything negative and anything to do with migration. There is a reason: which is that this is a problem they have brought us.

    Of course every religion and ideology can produce nutters. But it still does not make any sense — indeed, it could be said to be a form of madness — to import forms of extremism we used not to have. And this — for politicians in Britain and Europe — is the toxic underbelly of this debate. We have had, on continental Europe even more than in Britain, plenty of violent ideologies and creeds of our own. But Islamic extremism is an imported problem. A problem our politicians imported in the post-war period right up to the present.

    Obviously that isn’t to say that all those people who have come from Pakistan and other Muslim countries are terrorists. Clearly not. But they have too many people among them who profess an ideology that countries such as ours are not just slow but reluctant to recognise. And if those people who have come to our countries legally show the mess of our system, what hope do we have with illegal migration at the level that supranational organisations such as the EU and UN think is perfectly fine?

    A great problem for the pro-mass migration panjandrums is that the public can make all the obvious connection with our own eyes. But our politicians are incapable of providing answers. And it is not as though the answers are easy. For instance, what do you do with citizens who hate the state they are in? For most Europeans this is an unanswerable question. But because a question cannot be answered or is hard to answer, it does not follow that the question must not be asked. Yet there, for the time being Britain, like the rest of western Europe, uncom­fort­ably sits.

    I am often asked by Australian friends what differences exist between Europe and Australia in these matters. And on my tour of Australia this month I look forward to hearing and learning more about this. But, broadly speaking, from the outside it looks to me like there are two clear differences.

    The first is in your immigration policies. To the fury of many campaigners in Australia and abroad, a generation of Australian politicians, from John Howard onwards, made the most important realisation of all. They realised that you have a country or you don’t. And if you have a country you have to have borders and rules. Unlike Merkel and European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker, John Howard and Tony Abbott in particular knew the difference between “legal” and “illegal” immigration is not some tiny technicality to be got around by a phalanx of human rights lawyers. The difference between legal and illegal immigration is the law. The law that Australia’s representatives at the UN have once again necessarily and heroically upheld. Because if you don’t have the law then you don’t have much of a state either.

    The second difference is that Australia seems to still have (though this may be on the wane) some residual common sense of a kind that appears to be almost absent in my country. There seems to remain in Australia a strain of perfectly legitimate opinion that still finds it acceptable to say: “If you don’t like it here then why don’t you hop it?” In Britain and most of western Europe anybody who uttered such a statement would be too sensible to survive.

    And perhaps that’s where we are more generally. A country that imports jihadists who are down on their luck and a continent that welcomes anyone who makes it there is a continent with a deeply troubled future. The best piece of advice any Brit or European can give to an Australian today is the saddest advice of all: don’t do what we did. The happier piece of advice — and one this Brit is happy to give to our Australian friends — is: keep doing what you are doing. You are right. And don’t let anyone, not even the UN, try to tell you otherwise.

  122. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    ‘Breaking point’: allegations against SAS troops in report

    Andrew Burrell
    WA Chief Reporter
    @AndrewBurrell7
    12:00AM August 4, 2018
    123 Comments

    Members of the elite Special Air Service Regiment have been linked to an armed robbery, the theft of weapons, missing classified documents, unpaid speeding fines and drinking on duty, in an internal report that also found the unit’s leadership was at “breaking point”.

    The confidential briefing by then special operations commander Jeff Sengelman reported a litany of failings of leadership and accountability “across the full span of command responsibilities”.

    Major General Sengelman sent the briefing to army chief Angus Campbell in October 2015 to outline the case for urgent reform, ­including a plea for support from the army and Defence.

    The briefing was written soon after General Sengelman invited Perth-based SAS members to write letters to him detailing instances of unprofessional conduct.

    These letters are understood to have reinforced concerns in the senior ranks of the army that the secretive culture of the special forces had contributed to a serious breakdown of standards.

    The briefing led to a formal ­inquiry by the Inspector-General of Defence, led by NSW Supreme Court judge Paul Brereton, which is due to report within months and is believed to have uncovered allegations of war crimes by SAS members in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2016.

    In his 2015 briefing note, which has been seen by The Weekend Australian, General Sengelman cited “three notifiable incidents that occurred at SASR in quick succession”. One of these involved the arrest by West Australian police of an SAS member for “involvement in an armed robbery”.

    In response to questions, ­Defence said last night the soldier arrested for armed robbery was later convicted and sentenced, and he left the Defence Force in March 2015.

    From the Oz. “Unpaid speeding fines” is hardly My Lai, FFS.

  123. Atoms for Peace

    Well done Mater at 1015.

  124. Atoms for Peace

    Since when were the SAS warrior monks? Another case of the locusts of the left whiteanting another institution that they haven’t Borged yet.

  125. .

    unpaid speeding fines

    In response to questions, ­Defence said last night the soldier arrested for armed robbery was later convicted and sentenced, and he left the Defence Force in March 2015.

    So a non-issue and something that nothing more can be done about.

    So the only real accusation is drinking on duty; what this actually constitutes might be a nothing burger.

  126. Tel

    The briefing led to a formal ­inquiry by the Inspector-General of Defence, led by NSW Supreme Court judge Paul Brereton, which is due to report within months and is believed to have uncovered allegations of war crimes by SAS members in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2016.

    Any discussion of the war crimes by the people who sent those guys to invade another country? The false intelligence that Bin-Laden was in Afghanistan when he was really in “friendly” Pakistan?

    This seems a lot like blaming the grunt at the bottom of the chain of command, while the fish is rotting from the head down.

  127. Was he really smote?

    Yep.
    He first ignored a burning bush and then ignored a tablet handed from on high.
    Had to happen.

  128. Bruce in WA

    “Soap-on-A-Rope”

    Or as my late father insisted on calling it, “Dicky soap”.

  129. md

    DELINGPOLE: Tommy Robinson was Abused and Tortured with the Complicity of the British State
    Unless Robinson is lying – which I doubt – this is the only logical conclusion to be drawn from the accounts he gave to Rebel Media’s Ezra Levant and Fox News’s Tucker Carlson.
    How else do you explain the perverse decision to move this outspoken critic of Islam into the Category C prison with the highest proportion of Muslim inmates in Britain?
    Why was he put in a ground floor cell, opposite the prison mosque, which enabled the inmates to spit and throw excrement through his window – to the point where his only option was to keep it shut and suffer in the stifling heat?
    And why was his food allowed to be prepared and served by Muslim prisoners when the authorities would undoubtedly have known that it would be deliberately contaminated with excrement and heaven knows what else?

    Read on: https://www.breitbart.com/london/2018/08/03/delingpole-tommy-robinson-was-abused-and-tortured-with-the-complicity-of-the-british-state/

  130. md

    Apologies. I doubled up on mh’s post.

  131. .

    Come on Tel, don’t be so wry.

    Defeating the Taliban required military action in both countries. They were a Pakistani extremist mob that had taken over Afghanistan after all.

  132. Confused Old Misfit

    Mindfree
    #2780351, posted on August 4, 2018 at 5:13 am

    I have never been to Nfld. Never wanted to go there. Had enough of granite and twisted spruce trees in NS.
    Is Fogo island worth it? I would take the local advice.
    Treasure the winery. As global cooling intensifies it may only have a decade left.

    Have you tried screech yet?
    Warning! Get off the island before winter!

  133. Elle

    First world problems, but I was peeved 2GB cut their weekend gardening show from three hours to two hours. I don’t do gardening – succulents, yes, as they don’t die on me – but I like gardening shows. It was to accommodate ‘George and Paul’, who I think use to be at 2UE. They’ve been around for donkeys years. Anyhoo, I’m protesting – bring back the three hour gardening show! 🌷🌻

  134. Roger

    Garma Festival to call for indigenous sovereignty: “Two laws, two people, one country”.

    I guess they need us to remain “one country” to claim welfare.

    And all this is being facilitated by the Liberals:

    “On Friday Indigenous Affairs minister, Nigel Scullion, told the crowd Garma was “a time for engagement, for discussions, for truth telling … for recommitting to good ideas, or putting aside bad ones”.

    Scullion said he’d represented federal cabinet at a meeting with Yolngu leadership in the Dilak council, on Thursday and the two “governments” had discussed how to work together.

    Scullion suggested working with the Gumatj people was easier because of their “strong governance” and leader in Galarrwuy Yunupingu, but also said they represented hope.

    “If we can do it at a level of nation to nation then it’s possible for every Aboriginal nation across the country to be able to have a crack.”

    Guardian report here.

  135. Tom

    What happened to OWG?
    Was he really smote?

    Yes, Bern — sadly. Poor fellah couldn’t sleep and was out of his mind with PTSD, paranoia the inevitable result.

    I hope he’s getting some sleep and recovering.

  136. Tel

    Defeating the Taliban required military action in both countries. They were a Pakistani extremist mob that had taken over Afghanistan after all.

    What do you mean “were” ? You strangely appear to be suggesting that the Taliban got defeated at some stage. Why they are sitting at the negotiating table with the USA right now.

    https://www.stripes.com/news/officials-in-policy-shift-us-open-to-meeting-with-taliban-1.538004

    As usual, everything comes from unknown sources and can conveniently be denied at any future stage.

  137. .

    Miscegenation might keep the country together.

    Cultural nationalism is more appealing than ethnic nationalism.

  138. Mak Siccar

    At Quadrant Online

    ANTHONY DILLON

    Selective Offence, It’s the Fashion

    When the purported comedian Trevor Noah made a vulgar and stupid joke about the sex appeal Aboriginal women, the grievance mongers went ballistic and their disciples bleated on cue. What a pity the energy of that outrage wasn’t poured into protesting the rape of Tennant Creek toddlers

    broken pram IIThe past week has seen some interesting news that concerns Aboriginal people. There was this story about comedian Trevor Noah and this one about the court case for the Tennant Creek man accused of raping a two-year-old. On Aboriginal-specific social media pages, perhaps you can guess which one has attracted the most attention and ‘outrage.’ Let’s look at each:

    Noah: The South African-born comedian thought he was making a genuinely funny joke about Aboriginal women. I didn’t find it funny, but nor did I take offence. If he wishes to attract more fans, I would advise him, that’s not the way to do it. And yes, any offence is always taken, never given. So why do some people choose to take offence? I’ll answer that at the end of this article. But first, let me give you some insight into what his ‘joke’ means to me. You may ask: “Well what if he aimed that joke at female members in your family?” (some of my aunties would laugh it off and give back even more). My response would be “I don’t care.” You may ask: “Well what if he told you that you were ugly?” Again, I wouldn’t care. It is, after all, just his opinion (and hypothetically his audience’s opinion). If I valued his opinion about me more than I value my opinion about me, then I might be upset. But why would I do that?

    Not surprisingly, there was no shortage of ‘warriors’ rushing to express their disgust and, of course, their ‘hurt’ at Noah’s joke (which, by the way, was was dug out of the internet’s archive from a few years ago). Consider what Summer May Finlay had to say in an open letter to Noah:

    “I’d like to take the time to explain to you how inappropriate, but also how hurtful, your comments are to my sisters and me. … When I watched this clip where you make fun of Aboriginal women such as me, I was speechless and dumbfounded.” And for good measure she had to throw in “…this was and always will be Aboriginal Land.”

    Also weighing in was Aussie sportsman Joe Williams. You might recall that Joe doesn’t like the national anthem (just between you and I, I’m not a fan of it myself, but I’m not upset by it). Williams was also reported as saying that Australia Day was a day of great heartache for Aboriginal people. Well not for me and many other Aboriginal Australians. He has called on Noah to apologise. Why? Would it make you feel better, Joe? As I have written before, offering forgiveness is far more empowering, while insisting on an apology immediate casts oneself as a put-upon victim.

    And then there is Amy McQuire, who never misses the opportunity to promote the ‘white men are evil’ myth:

    For all the white and non-Indigenous POC making excuses for Trevor Noah, telling us to concentrate on the ‘real issues’, I look forward to seeing you at next protest because I bet you weren’t there for Don Dale, Ms Dhu, Ms Maher, Elijah, Bowraville, David Dungay & so many others.

    Amy, the real issue is preventing people from getting into trouble in the first place. We look forward to seeing you at the next protest for the mistreatment of Aboriginal people by Aboriginal people in their homes and communities.

    Noah may have delivered a sad joke (though I respect your right to see it as funny if you wish), but what I find to be a sadder joke is that this comedian’s act (from five years ago) raises far more hackles than the real tragedies confronting Aboriginal Australians — violence and child abuse most of all.

    Now let’s look at that other story.

    Tennant Creek: Tragically, there’s really nothing new about this story; it’s been happening for so long. The Northern Territory Children’s Commissioner, Colleen Gwynne, was reported in The Australian as saying: “A lot of what would shock people who come into the Territory has become very much normalised.” This is very sad. For those planning to boycott Noah’s Australian tour, I ask you to think about those Aboriginal people who are truly being savagely hurt.

    Now let’s return to Noah and the associated outrage. What do Aboriginal people think of Aboriginal women? Many Aboriginal people are of mixed heritage (like myself). Some look distinctly Aboriginal like my dear sister, Bess Price, and for some it’s the non-Aboriginal features that stand out. Regardless of the mix, I think all are beautiful. But I find it very interesting when I look the Miss NAIDOC finalists. Very often, the majority of finalists are not recognisable as being Aboriginal. Now some will immediately trot out the dog-eared arguments of the ‘cup of coffee’ analogy, that “being Aboriginal is not in the colour of your skin …. but in your heart and connection with country….” I’m not going to get into a discussion on identity politics, but are those women who are distinctly and immediately recognisable as Aboriginal any less beautiful or any less Aboriginal in their hearts? This simply tells me that many people identifying as Aboriginal seem to value the non-Aboriginal features (fair skin, etc.), at least when it comes to Miss NAIDOC contests.

    There was a time when Aboriginal people were able to joke around. These people still exist, but they are being drowned out by the whinja ninjas who are keen to take offence whenever they can. Consider this skit from Ernie Dingo.

    Why take offense? Because to feel offended is to feel important. I have written much about this before. Here is one extract from an article I wrote about Australia Day. It explains how offence, anger, or other emotions are not caused by others or jokes, or cartoons, etc., but is actually learnt behaviour. And if it is learnt behaviour, then it can be unlearnt, but for those who thrive on feeling important, they will be reluctant to let go of feeling offended.

    People claiming to feel offended believe their offence is always caused, thereby freeing them of personal responsibility. They believe this for their emotions generally. Consider the man who claimed to be angry because his girlfriend didn’t wash the dishes. He believes her failure to wash the dishes caused him to be angry (it did not). Again, we have an assumed cause-and-effect relation. Here, the assumed effect was his anger and the assumed cause was her not doing the dishes. He further believes he has no choice but to feel angry as he believes his anger is caused by her. In other words, she’s responsible for his anger (and happiness) and he is not responsible.

    He believes he is powerless to feel anything other than angry. And it’s not too difficult to see that in order for him to have control over his happiness, he has to have control over what he believes is the source (or cause) of his happiness – her. Yes, the anger is real, just like the offence is real for people who claim to be offended because Australia Day is celebrated on 26 January. But the cause is not in some other person or date, or other event – it resides within us.

    There will always be comedians who say things that aren’t funny, up to and including the disgusting and offensive. If you want to take offence and hand control of your emotions to someone else, well go for it. But while you are fuming and blaming others, know also that you can be better than that. Moving on, as they say, is far more empowering than allowing yourself to become the pawn agitators want you to be. It’s a big step in the right direction not to reward them.

    Anthony Dillon identifies as a part-Aboriginal Australian who is proud of both his Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal ancestries. Originally from Queensland, he now lives in Sydney and is a researcher at the Australian Catholic University.

  139. None

    Unpaid speeding fines and drinking on duty

    Every parliamentarian and public servant right there. SAS are hard men, rough as guts. It is not a profession for wimps.

  140. stackja

    Australia’s involvement in the First World War began when Britain and Germany went to war on 4 August 1914, and both Prime Minister Joseph Cook and Opposition Leader Andrew Fisher, who were in the midst of an election campaign, pledged full support for Britain. The outbreak of war was greeted in Australia, as in many other places, with great enthusiasm.

    And the GB telegram was in code. The decoding meant a delay.

  141. None

    Anthony Dillon is a national treasure calling out both the Miss Naidoc hypocrites and the failure to address the real crisis in Aboriginal Australia. The loathsome left and Aboriginal left have insured that nothing has changed two years after the Leak cartoon.

  142. stackja

    Elle
    #2780500, posted on August 4, 2018 at 10:41 am
    First world problems, but I was peeved 2GB cut their weekend gardening show from three hours to two hours. I don’t do gardening – succulents, yes, as they don’t die on me – but I like gardening shows. It was to accommodate ‘George and Paul’, who I think use to be at 2UE. They’ve been around for donkeys years. Anyhoo, I’m protesting – bring back the three hour gardening show!

    2UE needed to change. Went sport. 2GB only has so much time. I assume gardening doesn’t rate like G&P.

  143. None

    Tommy Robinson’s treatment in prison should be enough to bring down a few ministers, a few police, a few judges, a few prison wardens and their governors if not the government itself.

  144. stackja

    None
    #2780518, posted on August 4, 2018 at 11:01 am

    Follow the money.

  145. None

    OWG was ok when he wasn’t on a bender. I hope he has people at home looking out for him.

  146. stackja

    None
    #2780529, posted on August 4, 2018 at 11:11 am
    Indeed stackja.

    And the waste!

  147. .

    2GB needs to be 24 hour, 7 days a week nonstop Ray Hadley musing about the Bombala local court, Coonamble greyhounds and how Andrew Voss is a very bad man; to wit, it takes more talent to call games on radio than TV.

  148. DrBeauGan

    Anthony Dillon is a good bloke. He asks why should he care more about another’s opinion of him above his own? Yet it’s obvious a great many do, particularly lefties.

    I think it comes down to self-respect. Lefties don’t have much. They suspect they are despicable, and they are right. And people who do have self-respect are a permanent reproach to them, and get hated for that reason.

  149. .

    I’m really shocked that Channel NEIN! sided with useless Hadley over loved and respected Andrew Voss.

    Since they’re merging with Fairfax, I’m not really.

    Can’t wait for Ray to write a column in Daily Life and for Elizabeth Farrelly to commentate on the State of Origin. She’ll babble some crap about the triumph of Soviet-era architecture if games return to the SFS.

  150. Tom

    Tommy Robinson’s treatment in prison should be enough to bring down a few ministers, a few police, a few judges, a few prison wardens and their governors if not the government itself.

    … which ensures there will be no consequences.

    The British public already voted once for Brexit and the ruling class has decided they will have to keep voting until they get it right.

    The ruling class strategy — in the UK and Australia — is that all major parties will tell voters to get fucked in perpetuity so people have no alternative. Let’s call it the Mark Textor-John McTernan Sellout.

    The only thing keeping Trumble’s Traitors in office is the lie that the Liars would be worse.

  151. None

    Elle

    #2780392, posted on August 4, 2018 at 8:31 am

    I’m wondering how the hell she got a job in that place in the first instance much less one which also had her living on site. Something stinks to high heaven.

  152. None

    Let’s call it the Mark Textor-John McTernan Sellout.

    A very good way to describe it, Tom. We are so screwed.

  153. Leo G

    The only chance the coalition has of winning an election is to get rid of compulsory voting.

    Leave the compulsive-progressive voters fight it out at the ballot box?
    How would non-participation of disillusioned voters improve the Coalition’s prospects?

  154. .

    Tommy Robinson is why we should have a strict and absolute rule against double jeopardy.

    I don’t care about hypothetical what-ifs.

    Tommy Robinson IS that what-if.

  155. stackja

    Ray Hadley’s cop son charged with possession of cocaine
    MIRANDA WOOD and AVA BENNY-MORRISON, Exclusive, The Sunday Telegraph
    4 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    THE police constable son of radio broadcaster Ray Hadley has allegedly been caught buying cocaine from a dealer in the carpark of a north west Sydney pub.

    On Friday, Daniel Hadley was at the Australian Hotel and Brewery, at Rouse Hill, when the off-duty officer was arrested and charged with possession of the drug.

  156. Up the Workers!

    What sort of G.S.T. does Bonking Billy Short-One pay on his gynecomastic “G”-Cup Sports bra?
    How much G.S.T. is charged on the pink-pinkie camouflage paint that leftard Senior Naval-gazers wear in our A.L.P. Diversity Armed Farces?
    How much G.S.T. is charged on the lippy, make-up, eye-shadow, fishnet stockings, rubber boobs, wig, high heels and gladioli, that the A.L.P.’s former Chief of the Army wears as part of his Diversity camouflage uniform?

  157. pete m

    The reason for the tampon tax removal was the LNP were bleeding votes.

    sorry egg.

  158. stackja

    Officer charged with drug possession – North West Metropolitan Region
    NSW Police News

    Saturday, 04 August 2018 09:24:07 AM

    An off-duty serving police officer has been charged over the alleged possession of prohibited drugs.

    Officers from the Professional Standards Command have been investigating allegations a senior constable had been involved with prohibited drugs.

    Last night (Friday 3 August 2018) the 28-year-old officer was arrested at a Rouse Hill licensed premises and charged with the possession of a prohibited drug.

    He was granted conditional bail prior to his appearance at Parramatta Local Court on 12 September 2018.

    The senior constable, who is attached to the North West Metropolitan Region, is not on operational duties and his employment status is being reviewed.

    Soon after the officer’s arrest, a man was arrested in a nearby vehicle. He was charged with the supply and possession of a prohibited drug and goods in custody. He was granted conditional bail and will face Blacktown Local Court on 10 September 2018.

  159. Cassie of Sydney

    “First world problems, but I was peeved 2GB cut their weekend gardening show from three hours to two hours. I don’t do gardening – succulents, yes, as they don’t die on me – but I like gardening shows. It was to accommodate ‘George and Paul’, who I think use to be at 2UE. They’ve been around for donkeys years. Anyhoo, I’m protesting – bring back the three hour gardening show! “

    Try listening to ABC classical! I have been an ABC classical stalwart for the last 15 years and last year, under Guthrie the Goof, they have changed the format and the presenters. The presenters are now adolescent, marxist, SJW, female mediocrities who can barely string a sentence together let alone pronounce the names of the composers…..maybe that’s deliberate because 98% of the world’s greatest composers have been white European men. In fact, the ABC should probably shut down the station altogether as it clearly doesn’t fit their gender and minority agendas. Anyway, I digress, they got rid of most of the decent presenters…probably because they were white men too. Whilst Mark Scott was bad, Guthrie is far, far worse……and of course she was appointed under a Coalition government!

  160. calli

    Tom
    #2780538, posted on August 4, 2018 at 11:20 am

    Yes.

    Are we a post-democratic society, but just don’t realise it yet. What we view as “government” is just the thinnest of veneers over yet another despotic, money grubbing, nepostic ruling class.

  161. stackja

    Legendary Sydney defamation barrister Clive Evatt has died aged 87
    jack houghton, The Daily Telegraph
    August 4, 2018 7:48am
    Subscriber only

    LEGENDARY Sydney defamation barrister Clive Evatt has died aged 87.

    The eccentric lawyer represented many prominent Australian identities — including bookmaker Rob Waterhouse, underworld figure Abe Saffron and actor-dancer Emilia Caruana, who was wrongly portrayed by the Truth newspaper as Bob Dylan’s sex slave.

    Called to the bar in 1956, he gained a reputation as an astute and persistent advocate.

    In 2012, he secured a $176,000 damages payout for Australian former Guantánamo Bay detainee Mamdouh Habib over defamatory comments made by broadcasters John Laws, Steve Price and Ray Hadley on radio stations 2UE and 2GB.

    One legal colleague, Sydney lawyer Mark O’Brien, told The Australian that Evatt’s passing meant defamation law “won’t be fun any more”.

  162. Top Ender

    Thanks Zatara. As you say good research.

    Not the sort you’d want in your arty troop though.

  163. stackja

    GST compromise with Meg Lees forgotten?

  164. Atoms for Peace

    Leo. Every seat becomes marginal if the major parties can’t count on the rusted on elements to carry the day. If voting was not compulsory, the ALP would be screwed

  165. .

    “Show me where it hurts, Scotty”

    *Oh I see, you brought your own…*

  166. .

    Atoms for Peace
    #2780568, posted on August 4, 2018 at 11:43 am
    Leo. Every seat becomes marginal if the major parties can’t count on the rusted on elements to carry the day. If voting was not compulsory, the ALP would be screwed

    I’m more for it to shaft the Greens.

    I think we’ve assumed the better parts of the Libs and the minor righties would benefit, but lately, I’m thinking there is no guarantee of this.

    Have a good hard look at where your votes come from.

    We should scrap compulsory voting anyway, it is incompatible with freedom.

  167. Elle

    I’m a subscriber to the Telegraph, stackja. Just read it. Will have to tune into the footy show on 2GB this afternoon to see if Raaaay says anything. Ray is a tool, in my opinion. Loves the sound of his own voice. He’s the only 2GB commentator I don’t like. He is the definition of a ‘shock jock’. He’s popular though and he goes after child abuses.

  168. cohenite

    In 2012, he secured a $176,000 damages payout for Australian former Guantánamo Bay detainee Mamdouh Habib over defamatory comments made by broadcasters John Laws, Steve Price and Ray Hadley on radio stations 2UE and 2GB.

    Rot and hell come to mind.

    Model citizen habib today.

  169. .

    Hopefully, Ray Hadley comes out hardcore against drug prohibition, big government and the surveillance state.

    A shame if he were to choose that over his flesh and blood.

  170. C.L.

    Cop son of Ray Hadley arrested in cocaine bust.
    Apple, tree etc.

  171. .

    The decline of western civilisation pt. 32482.

    https://thoughtcatalog.com/nicole-mullen/2014/05/every-girl-should-cheat-at-least-once/

    I’m fucking literally gagging reading this:

    “Steve, I didn’t cheat on you.”

    “Nicole, there’s cum all over your face. Your face is literally covered in semen. It’s like you didn’t even try to cover it up! How stupid do you think I am?”

    “Steve, honey. It’s not cum, it’s Jello!” I laughed. “We were doing Jello shots all night and I missed my mouth like six or seven times. And then again a couple hours later. And once more this morning before I left his house.”

    “It doesn’t taste like Jello!” cried Dave, kissing my cheek.

    “What, you’re fucking Bill Cosby now? You’re the expert on Jello? Why won’t you just trust me? This is why we’re having problems.”

    Something in Dave changed. He swallowed his pride and his reasoning. In that moment, I saw Dave take a chance on love. He swallowed his mistrust, he swallowed all the evidence contrary to my assertions, and he believed me.

    “Okay,” he said, feigning a smile and wiping his eyes and lips.

    “It’s okay, Steve,” I said to the giant baby. “I forgive you.”

    Surely this is just feminist fantasy “porn”?

    Um?

    Bill Burr was right about marriage now:

    We eventually broke up. But to this day, Dave still doesn’t know the real story. A woman’s pussy is filled with secrets, and with those secrets we craft a narrative of our lives. A girl should never limit her horizons. A girl should never rob herself of experience. And for these reasons, every girl should cheat. Cheat out of love. Cheat out of hate. Cheat because if you don’t cheat, you’re still cheating, but you’re cheating yourself – you’re cheating yourself out of life.

    My god. Dear lord.

  172. Elle

    Ray Hadley often belittles some of his callers. He even has a song he plays, which refers to certain callers as dopey drug users. He may change his attitude towards drug users now.

  173. Eyrie

    Calli: “Are we a post-democratic society, but just don’t realise it yet. What we view as “government” is just the thinnest of veneers over yet another despotic, money grubbing, nepostic ruling class.”
    A criminal gang running a protection racket actually, no better than any other organised crime syndicate.

  174. mh

    The recent outrage from the liberal media and Dems like Maxine Waters over Kanye West’s remarks on supporting Trump, you would think that he was the only black entertainer supporting him. Yet there were a lot of high profile blacks in entertainment and business supporting Trump even in 2016.

  175. cohenite

    Cheat because if you don’t cheat, you’re still cheating, but you’re cheating yourself – you’re cheating yourself out of life.

    It’s called cheating for a reason. From my FL experience women and men cheat for 2 reasons: firstly a personality defect or weakness when there is nothing wrong with their marriage, they just want to root someone else; and secondly from a personality defect or weakness when there is something wrong with their marriage and they can’t guts out doing the breakup cold without someone else in their corner.

    If you go into a relationship on a monogamous basis and don’t honour that you’re a low bastard period.

  176. That’s completely correct. Standard military issue tampons are very helpful for first aid in situations with low caliber bullet wounds in soft tissue. I’m surprised they aren’t being handed out in Melbourne by now.

    This was the original use of the product.
    The now widespread alternative use for female hygiene is a serendipitous result of the military use.
    The name for the product, though in French language, is most appropriate to the original use.

  177. .

    Awesome. It’s like the foam in the car in Demolition Man.

  178. candy

    A distressing situation for Rad Hadley.

  179. Myrddin Seren

    A distressing situation for Rad Hadley.

    No doubt – no Colombian marching powder for the weekend !

  180. Infidel Tiger

    Oh my. Is Ray still gung Ho to lock all drug users up? Or have we found an exception to his rants?

  181. cuckoo

    Reports of a mass brawl between up to 30 ‘youths’ in the Melbourne CBD overnight. No word on any news service as to whether those involved might have any, er, noticeable distinguishing characteristics.

  182. Reports of a mass brawl between up to 30 ‘youths’ in the Melbourne CBD overnight. No word on any news service as to whether those involved might have any, er, noticeable distinguishing characteristics.

    It is not possible to report distinguishing characteristics when the combatants cannot be seen because of the darkness.

  183. Tintarella di Luna

    No word on any news service as to whether those involved might have any, er, noticeable distinguishing characteristics.

    Australians?

  184. Reports of a mass brawl between up to 30 ‘youths’ in the Melbourne CBD overnight.

    Is the nuke armed yet?

    Federation square 5km radius.

  185. Tintarella di Luna

    Colourless Australians?

  186. candy

    Maybe his son has struggled with drug addiction in the past and Ray Hadley is totally fed up with drugs and drug addicts.
    Since the son is 28 it can’t be out of the blue.

  187. Reports of a mass brawl between up to 30 ‘youths’ in the Melbourne CBD overnight.

    This is what happens anytime you don’t pay Vicpol $68,000 to provide security.

  188. Geriatric Mayfly

    It is not possible to report distinguishing characteristics when the combatants cannot be seen because of the darkness.

    Oh yes you can. You often get a good profile of the teeth and the whites of their eyes.

  189. Geriatric Mayfly

    Reports of a mass brawl between up to 30 ‘youths’ in the Melbourne CBD overnight.

    The Hunchback will be ordering a brace of water canon this very day.

  190. Oh yes you can. You often get a good profile of the teeth and the whites of their eyes.

    Average height of an Australian youth = 5′ 8″
    Eyes & teeth of the combatants were 6′ 7″ above ground level.
    Quite obviously the witnesses are unreliable – so nothing to report.

  191. Steve trickler

    Paul Weston, well done.

    He sticks the boot into the British Home Secretary, Sajid Javid.

    Good and hard.

    Tommy’s treatment in prison? Who made the decisions.?



    So many questions need answers.

  192. Des Deskperson

    Here’s the rather depressing programme for the third Canberra Writers’ Festival later this month:

    http://canberrawritersfestival.com.au/program

    Apart from – or perhaps including – the usual suspects Alberici, Murphy, Sheridan, Mark Kenny, Ann Aly -,there is a lot of mediocrity and obscurity on show here.

    Third rate minds like Bonge, Hugh Riminton, Paul Daly – what is Tim Shaw doing here? – and antediluvian figures like Evans, Chubby, Angus Houston and Reynolds. Even Kathy Lette – the Festival’s signature ‘literary intellectual’ for the second year running – peaked c. 1979. And while they have tried to add a bit of Canberra local colour, the best they can seem to do is one Julian Cribb, a chronic writer of letters to the Canberra Times. A lot of the less obscure participants seem to have been recycled relentlessly through the the programme while some items – ‘Pathways to Publishing’ and ‘Do Oysters get Bored’ (how twee) are repeated, presumably to pad things out.

    The Director is one Alan Behm, who some cats who worked in Russell offices in the eighties might remember.
    He was formerly Combet’s Chief and staff and dyed in the wool ALP.

  193. .

    ‘Do Oysters get Bored’

    So, Peter Slipper was in attendance?

  194. rickw

    Members of the elite Special Air Service Regiment have been linked to an armed robbery, the theft of weapons, missing classified documents, unpaid speeding fines and drinking on duty, in an internal report that also found the unit’s leadership was at “breaking point”.

    Dismembering Old Australia one piece at a time.

  195. rickw

    The Hunchback will be ordering a brace of water canon this very day.

    Only for the purpose of herding the Useful Africans towards the right targets.

  196. Elle

    It would be distressing for any parent I guess, Candy. However, have you heard how Ray goes on about people who break the law? Here we have his son, a law enforcement officer, allegedly breaking the law. It’s kinda sweet because Ray has been down right nasty to some who call into his show, as I mentioned above.

  197. mh

    He sticks the boot into the British Home Secretary, Sajid Javid.

    That is the Home Secretary who swore his oath of office on the Koran. I except that the Muhammedan Home Secretary made sure patriot Tommy Robinson was placed in a prison with one of the highest Muslim populations in Britain.

  198. JC

    Anyone seen this? Now big Fat Harvey is a swine, so lets get this out of the way.

    Look at this: It’s correspondence with one of three women accusing him of sexual assault and r.pe in the current proceedings in Manhattan.

    Lawyers for Harvey Weinstein are asking a US judge to toss criminal sex-crime charges, citing an extensive and affectionate email correspondence between the onetime powerful Hollywood producer and his alleged rape victim.

    The request to dismiss the indictment, filed on Friday US time, is a routine one that judges typically deny. But the filings offer the most detailed look yet at how Mr Weinstein may defend himself at trial.

    “These communications irrefutably reflect the true nature of this consensual intimate friendship, which never at any time included a forcible rape,” Ben Brafman, a lawyer for Mr Weinstein, said in a statement. Mr Brafman argues prosecutors “intentionally kept” these emails from the grand jury.

    Okay, she reckons he raped her in a Manhattan hotel. Sounds plausible, right?

    According to prosecutors’ criminal complaint, on the morning of March 18, 2013, Mr Weinstein forced the woman to have sex with him at an address that matches that of a Manhattan hotel. The complaint said that at the time of the incident, the woman “had clearly expressed her lack of consent to the act”.

    He’s facing a long stretch for this alone.

    For this incident, Mr Weinstein was charged with first-degree rape.

    And then after this horrendous event in her life… there’s this:

    In dozens of emails included in the filings, Mr Weinstein and the anonymous woman correspond in the manner of two busy — and flirty — people whose schedules keep getting in the way of meetups for lunch, dinner and drinks.

    “I appreciate all you do for me, it shows,” she wrote in April 2013. “It would be great to see you again, and catch up!” she wrote a few days later. And later that month, “It would mean a lot of if we could catch up over a drink then?”

    “Miss you big guy,” she wrote in September of that year. In another she calls him “Harv.”

    Mr Weinstein’s responses are brief, kind and often logistical. They are signed “All my best.” Replying to one email, in which she said he crossed her mind, he writes, “Love to cross your mind it’s my favourite exercise.”

    In another, Mr Weinstein suggests she can stop by with her mother.

    The correspondence is largely devoid of anything overtly sexual, with one notable exception. “I love you, always do,” the woman wrote in an email in February 2017. “But I hate feeling like a booty call. :)”

    In the filing, Mr Weinstein’s lawyers suggest the “booty call” remark signals a desire for a “fuller and more emotionally connected relationship”.

    This #Metoo sounds more and more like a mass hysteria.

  199. .

    That’s pretty convincing JC.

  200. mh

    Re Paul Weston video,

    The Australian’s Janet Albrechtsen should hang her head in shame.

  201. testpattern

    ‘decline of western civilisation’

    There is no such thing as western civilisation. There were multiple western civilisations. Now they are cultural nodes within the central civilisation. See Wilkinson. A primer –

    ‘As recently as the beginning of the nineteenth century several independent civilizations
    still existed (i.e. those centered on China, Japan, India and the West); now there remains
    but one. The single global civilization is the current manifestation of a civilization,
    multicultural like its components, that emerged about 1500 B.C. in the Middle East when
    the growing Egyptian and Mesopotamian civilizations collided (most notably in Syria),
    became inextricably linked to one another, and fused into a single civilization. This new
    fusional entity has since then expanded over the entire planet and absorbed, on unequal
    terms, all other previously independent civilizations. Since it was not initially of global
    scale, this entity needs a name. Its earliest incarnation has increasingly been called “NearEastern”;
    but this will not do for its later, much larger geographic range. Herein it is styled
    “Central” civilization” ‘

    http://www.eolss.net/sample-chapters/c04/e6-97-11.pdf

  202. .

    I don’t know if they sound like crap or not, but I want one:

    https://www.musicradar.com/news/guitars/gibson-reverse-flying-v-130778

    Not many reviews, very limited, but still cheap.

  203. testpattern

    ‘Members of the elite Special Air Service Regiment have been linked to..’

    In 1999 we gave a headsup to Toohey about an Australian who’d just been flown in to Darwin after having fought with Falintil. He was claiming some Timorese veterans and ADF were smuggling narcotics. I asked a mate to take him to a prominent feral’s house where the guy was staying. Toohey went but squibbed the hard questions.

  204. Elle

    To your post, JC. I once worked with a woman who told me about a sexual encounter she had. She relayed it to me as an enjoyable experience. Within the week I learned she had gone to police alleging he raped her. I was flabbergasted! Why the change? What happened within the week? Apparently he said to her it was an enjoyable one night stand. That upset her because she wanted more. I had no choice but go to the police and tell them what she had told me. Poor guy. It could have destroyed his life. Not saying Harvey is innocent of all charges. Just there are some women out there who do cry rape.

  205. JC

    Not saying Harvey is innocent of all charges.

    Agree. He’s a total pig.

    Just there are some women out there who do cry rape.

    Yep

  206. .

    One review I found said they play clearly but they are tuned a little high. Their supply was very limited, but they sell for around/a little higher than a genuine strat price.

    Better than the mad bastard I know who owns five PRS guitars.

  207. .

    Elle, you did the right thing. You should be proud of yourself. It is shocking that this can happen.

    …and people wonder why young lads film their sexual encounters now?

    Apparently he said to her it was an enjoyable one night stand. That upset her because she wanted more.

    Insane.

    BTW, did you read the rather graphic article I posted earlier, encouraging women to cheat on their men?

  208. Elle

    Thanks Dot.
    Re the article – no, will go back and have a look.
    Cheers.

  209. JC

    Elle

    The thing regards to this …..

    Not saying Harvey is innocent of all charges.

    …is that of all the 90 odd women accusing big fat Harvey pertaining to investigations conducted by the NYPD the above one is the most serious of them all.

    This is very disconcerting. An again let there be no ambiguity here, Big Fat Harvey is a pig.

  210. Oh come on

    Ergh. Pesty is pushing his embarrassingly undergraduate philosophy again. Nobody reads your sources, Pesty. Nobody cares.

  211. .

    Have to repost.

    Progress on LENR; whilst Australia invests in solar energy that is miserably unreliable:

    https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180313005600/en/SRI-Report-Independently-Verifies-Brillouin-LENR-Reactions

    “Brillouin Energy has made real progress in defining the engineering pathway forward, and in demonstrating increased potential to scale total power production in its reactors. This is reflected in SRI’s 2017 Report as compared to SRI’s 2016 Report. Their growing list of technical achievements are leading to a number of results that we have not seen before. Increased COP’s, increased repeatable excess power outputs, increased LENR heat, better calorimetry, and transportability of multiple reactor systems performing independently – it’s continuing to point to a potential breakthrough,” said Dr. Tanzella, Manager of the Low Energy Nuclear Reactions Program, Energy & Environment Center, SRI International.

  212. mh

    New York Times – Best Sellers

    1. THE RUSSIA HOAX
    by Gregg Jarrett
    The Fox News analyst makes his case for why the F.B.I. investigation into collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia is without legal merit

    2. LIARS, LEAKERS AND LIBERALS
    by Jeanine Pirro
    The legal analyst and Fox News host argues in favor of President Trump.

    https://www.nytimes.com/books/best-sellers/hardcover-nonfiction/

  213. Steve trickler

    That Weston video will not trend.

    I’d be funny if a website called Shadow Banned was set up. All people who are subjected to it, post their links ( twitter/ facebook ) on the site. Visitors get to choose if they want to click and go find out what the fuss is all about.

    It bypasses the algorithms.

    That will fuck twitter and facebook in one foul swoop.

  214. Oh come on

    Yes. I think calling him Testes is too complimentary.

  215. JC

    One thing I didn’t realize until now coming out of the Trump tax reform package is that, according to Mario Cabelli – big time fund manager- you can now fully depreciate asset purchases in the first year… 100%! Fuck!

    We’re just left for dead.

    http://www.barrons.com/video/mario-gabelli-what-ahead-for-stocks/F7113548-1BCC-4064-8A6B-672899F6D01A.html

  216. Oh come on

    Of the 70 women accusing Weinstein, some are bound to be attention/fame whores trying their luck, or vengeance-seekers. That is very sad for the actual victims because the liars could very conceivably deprive them of justice.

  217. JC

    Reading further it does appear there is 100% Deductibility for depreciation, but there may be a few curve balls. In any event this looks fucking marvelous.

    100% Bonus Depreciation

    While previously, business owners were able to deduct up to 50% of the cost of assets that they purchased for their business in one year, this amount has now increased to 100%. Starting in 2023, however, the amount of bonus depreciation that you can claim will be reduced by 20% every year.

  218. Gary

    JC
    #2780641, posted on August 4, 2018 at 2:19 pm

    I doubt monty will note of your honourable opposition to his anything goes but good for you.

  219. Oh come on

    There are certain factors that make allegations of ‘historic’ sex crimes more credible. One is if the accusers told others about the crime at the time it was committed. I believe this is the case for at least some of the women accusing Weinstein. Seems to me he is facing several credible charges, probably with some bullshit ones in the mix, as well.

  220. JC

    Lol

    Charlie Kirk

    Democrats rigged the primary for Hillary against Bernie, gave her debate questions, wiretapped and spied on Trump’s campaign, spent twice as much as Trump did, got every single celebrity and newspaper endorsement, had the entire media against Trump, and…. they still lost
    891 replies 6,346 retweets 15,953 likes

  221. .

    It would make political science great again! if they did a follow up study to the most recent elections:

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261379414000973

    Electoral Studies
    Volume 36, December 2014, Pages 149-157
    Electoral Studies
    Do non-citizens vote in U.S. elections?

    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.electstud.2014.09.001

    Highlights

    • First use of representative sample to measure non-citizen voting in USA.

    • Some non-citizens cast votes in U.S. elections despite legal bans.

    • Non-citizens favor Democratic candidates over Republican candidates.

    • Non-citizen voting likely changed 2008 outcomes including Electoral College votes and the composition of Congress.

    • Voter photo-identification rules have limited effect on non-citizen participation.

    Abstract
    In spite of substantial public controversy, very little reliable data exists concerning the frequency with which non-citizen immigrants participate in United States elections. Although such participation is a violation of election laws in most parts of the United States, enforcement depends principally on disclosure of citizenship status at the time of voter registration. This study examines participation rates by non-citizens using a nationally representative sample that includes non-citizen immigrants. We find that some non-citizens participate in U.S. elections, and that this participation has been large enough to change meaningful election outcomes including Electoral College votes, and Congressional elections. Non-citizen votes likely gave Senate Democrats the pivotal 60th vote needed to overcome filibusters in order to pass health care reform and other Obama administration priorities in the 111th Congress.

  222. Mak Siccar

    A new page imminent.

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