Open Forum: October 27, 2018

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1,104 Responses to Open Forum: October 27, 2018

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  1. zyconoclast

    2
    i waited. give someone a chance at silver.

  2. Hay Stockard

    Come forth. And won a lollipop.

  3. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Podium? New fred, all bright and shiny.

    I claim this thread, in the name of the Scottish squatters, of the late 1850’s, in the Riverina district. They introduced Scotch whisky into Australia, and it’s long been my contention that they never achieved the recognition they deserve.

  4. Infidel Tiger

    Heat is on Fox.

    Best shootout in movie history.

  5. Pedro the Ignorant

    Gold hit $A1760 per ounce today. Up from $A1640 three weeks ago.

    Goldbugs happy.

  6. zyconoclast

    sorry. It appears to be a malfunction.

    I will quit while I am behind.

  7. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Gold hit $A1760 per ounce today. Up from $A1640 three weeks ago.

    Goldbugs happy.

    I’m pouring a large Scotch, and resisting the temptation of watching the film of the Mickleberg brothers, and the great Perth mint swindle. I didn’t realize that one Donald Hancock owned a gold mine outside Kalgoorlie…

  8. Oh come on

    OCO my involvement with that establishment was preventing drunken Irish (a tautology I know) Earth Scientists getting beaten up by coons on the way back to camp.

    This seems very far removed from the goings on at the Como.

  9. Mark Bolton

    ZKTA Ora Banda hotel?

  10. Mark Bolton

    OCO a world away brother.

  11. Crossie

    50 Shades of Grey Soundtrack? I’m afraid to go and have a look in case they ruined some of my favourote music.

  12. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    ZKTA Ora Banda hotel?

    The same. Hopped into his car, after a day at the races, turned in the ignition and discovered that some thoughtful soul had wired a bomb into the ignition system.

  13. Oh come on

    Zyco, the fact you’re posting *anything* related to Fifty Shades Of Grey is an embarrassment. Definitionally, the preserve of bored housewives cannot be gentrified. Your enthusiasm is noted.

  14. jupes

    Heat is on Fox.

    Great movie from the time when De Nero made great movies.

    “Don’t let yourself get attached to anything you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you feel the heat around the corner.”

  15. zyconoclast

    50 Shades of Grey Soundtrack? I’m afraid to go and have a look in case they ruined some of my favourote music.

    It is by the Tallis Scholars.
    Did not know this as I have not read the book or watched the movie.

    Excellent

  16. Mark Bolton

    ZTKA I fucking love that pub. I pulled up there and on a “wouldn’t be dead for quids” afternoon the sun was shining through my beer. A beautiful young lass pitched up beside me wearing semi vis. Then another one was plucked from heaven , carrying a metal detector joined her. Then another… i was convinced it was my time to go. The Grim Reaper is in fact a dozen beautiful girls wearing hi vis carrying metal detectors.

  17. Mark Bolton

    ZTKA in the present environment it is unwise to express an opinion on those that presume to rule over us. That said i grew up in Tasmania and we needed no keys to the powder magazine.

  18. Pedro the Ignorant

    One of WA’s great mysteries is what happened to the Mickleburg gold.

    The stuff left at TV station Channel 7’s gate was not the Mint swindle gold and that has apparently disappeared from the evidence room.

    Avon Lovell wrote a book about the whole thing, The Mickleburg Stitch, and it was censored from very high above in the .gov and eventually banned.

    Of course, this was in the era of WA Inc, when anything goes, and a number of high order people are living overseas in countries without extradition treaties.

  19. Mark Bolton

    Pedro WA is tiger country.

  20. Pedro the Ignorant

    Don Hancock owned the battery at Ora Banda and processed a lot gold from small miners and prospectors.

    No better way to hide illegal gold finds than putting it through a commercial battery.

    Not that I am pointing a finger at anyone of course . . . . . . .

  21. RobK

    Mark,
    ZTKA I fucking love that pub. 
    When were you there? I have spent quite a lot of time there in the eighties and early 90s.

  22. Crossie

    Of course, this was in the era of WA Inc, when anything goes, and a number of high order people are living overseas in countries without extradition treaties.

    And let’s not forget that others accompaniment to the easy life abroad, the Swiss bank account. Or is it Cayman Islands bank account these days? I’m sure Malcolm and Lucy would know the ins and outs.

  23. Mark Bolton

    Pedro the HBO movie series Deadwood made me feel right at home.

  24. Mark Bolton

    Rob would have been 2011. When i had my near death experience.

  25. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Pedro the Ignorant
    #2849963, posted on October 27, 2018 at 12:15 am

    Back in the day, when I had the farm, Kalgoorlie was a good spot for some R and R. Good meal, a loud and raucous night out, and restocking the bar before going home.

    In a Kalgoorlie bottleshop “Right, that’s two bottles of single malt, a bottle of gin for the memsahib, and half a dozen good reds.”

    The sanctimonious child behind the counter – in a bottleshop, FFS, looked at me “You’re spending all that money on alcohol? You live your life like that?”

    “Right, put all the bottles back on the shelves, give me back my credit card, and cancel the sale..”

    The manager was there ten seconds later, offering grovelling apologies…

  26. Pedro the Ignorant

    Pedro WA is tiger country.

    It certainly was back in those days, Mark.

    Hancock had a run in with bikies at his Ora Banda pub, and shortly after a bikie was shot dead at their campsite. No one was ever charged over that murder.

    Not long after, Hancock and an innocent man were blown up in their car in Lathlain (Perth suburb).

    A bikie was charged, but later acquitted of the double murder.

  27. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Of course, this was in the era of WA Inc, when anything goes, and a number of high order people are living overseas in countries without extradition treaties.

    And two former Western Australian State Premiers finished up in gaol…

  28. Mark Bolton

    Pedro some justice but not nearly enough.

  29. RobK

    Mark, right. I Haven’t been back this century. Ill have to make some time to so, though things will have changed a lot.

  30. Mark Bolton

    ZTKA Kalgoorlie is what God was aiming for when he gave men free will.

  31. Oh come on

    In a Kalgoorlie bottleshop “Right, that’s two bottles of single malt, a bottle of gin for the memsahib, and half a dozen good reds.”

    The sanctimonious child behind the counter – in a bottleshop, FFS, looked at me “You’re spending all that money on alcohol? You live your life like that?”

    “Right, put all the bottles back on the shelves, give me back my credit card, and cancel the sale..”

    The manager was there ten seconds later, offering grovelling apologies…

    This never actually happened, did it.

  32. Mark Bolton

    RobK make it so brother , life is short and glorious and you are a long time dead.

  33. Pedro the Ignorant

    Geez, Zulu.

    Your grog order was minuscule compare to some I have seen loaded onto trucks headed out to some exploration or remote minesites.

    Bimbo must have been new in town.

  34. Oh come on

    Three bottles of spirits (even expensive ones) and a half-dozen bottles of wine is not an unusual sale.

    That’s a really stupid story, Zulu.

  35. Mark Bolton

    OCO never heard of Robert Service? There are strange things done under the midnight sun…

  36. RobK

    Mark,
    Yes, i dont know the people who own it now. Still occasionally catch up with some of the locals but they are getting thinner on the ground too.

  37. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Pedro WA is tiger country.

    It certainly was back in those days, Mark.

    Laurie Connel, Alan Bond, Rothwell’s Merchant Bank and Bell Group. Tiger country, indeed.

  38. Mark Bolton

    RobK when i go back it will be as a grey nomad not an Earth Scientist. Gold is a horrible commodity. Like Meth. It is blood money.

  39. Pedro the Ignorant

    I have the dubious honour of being refused a business loan by Laurie Connell’s Rothwells Bank. (Praise the Lord, I think it was 17% interest rate).

    “Last Resort Laurie” 🙂

  40. RobK

    Mark yes, i weaned myself off it and bought a farm in ’95. Have never worked harder for less. Its about time to sell the farm. Family has moved to Perth. The boys wont be farmers.😊

  41. Mark Bolton

    ZKTA.. I have off gridded myself so dont know for sure.. but suspect WA is falling head over heals for the latest NPC fad. Swinging like a twig in the breeze.

  42. Pedro the Ignorant

    Gold is a horrible commodity. Like Meth. It is blood money.

    You speak untruth, Barbarian!

    The most noble metal.

  43. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Geez, Zulu.

    Your grog order was minuscule compare to some I have seen loaded onto trucks headed out to some exploration or remote minesites.

    Bimbo must have been new in town.

    It was for medicinal purposes only – coughs, colds and pimples on the pen#s – and the bottleshop was that at the Gtar and Sarter, you would know the place.

  44. Mark Bolton

    Pedro you must know the meme of two men and one shovel. It wouldnt happen if it was just numbers on a ledger. Men could remain rational. When they get that flash they turn into monsters.

  45. Mark Bolton

    ZTKA Gar and Starters. Fucking ex. Six million likes.

  46. RobK

    The most noble metal.
    Its a lot of fun. I did have a little weekend gold show not far from the pub. Eventually got hold of the state battery. By this time we’d restored the pub, built a carvan park and motel rooms. Then it was school age for the kids so we sold the lot to Don.

  47. Mark Bolton

    Pedro , upon reflection I actually like what people become when infected by the gold mind virus. Only interesting people I ever met. Fuck the urban bugman.

  48. Damienski

    and the bottleshop was that at the Gtar and Sarter, you would know the place.

    I seem to recall that the Star and Garter was owned by Doug Shave – former Member for Melville in Richard Court’s government?

  49. Mark Bolton

    Rob I have a few ideas about finding gold. They are completely bonkers so there fore it shouldn’t be difficult to find those willing to back me financially.

  50. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Pedro the Ignorant
    #2850004, posted on October 27, 2018 at 12:59 am

    Pedro, give us a shout when you are retired, we may murder a few good reds over dinner at the Rose and Crown.

  51. calli

    Top o’ the mornin’ Cats!

    Watching this “bomb” story closely on a variety of US MSM services. Still to be told if any of them are “live”.

    Anything different from the Australian media?

  52. Mark Bolton

    RobK and yes I am not immune to the magic of chemistry. Gold is indeed a noble element. It’s solubility. It’s coexistence with so many sunrises and sunsets. The millions of cubic metres of water that soaked across the peneplains of the western goldfields.

  53. Pedro the Ignorant

    I have been around gold miners and dealers for over thirty years now, and retirement is on the horizon.

    Gold has brought immense amounts of wealth to this country. I doubt Australia would be as prosperous as we are if it were not for the fabulous amount of mineral wealth with which we are blessed.

    There is a mystique that goes back through the ages over gold, and Mark, you are right on the money when you say men can turn into monsters over it. “Gold fever” is very real.

    Hundreds, if not thousands of men have been robbed, bashed and murdered over their claims, and in modern times the white collar crooks are just as predatory.

    The mining game and the surrounding support industries have been very kind to me over the years. I have had the privilege of working with real “Salt of the Earth” Aussies in harsh environments, adding to the country’s wealth, and would not swap it for quids.

    Not for everyone, and I guess I will be nostalgic for the life when I pull the pin and sell up.

  54. Mark Bolton

    Best offsider I ever had was a bloke who was barking mad. Told me tales about how in a previous life he murdered South American savages to steal thier gold. Him and his Dog could never be allowed to go in Town. Guy was without flaw. I felt completely safe working with him in the bush.

  55. Mark Bolton

    Pedro, you won the Internet with that reflection. Hats off to you Sir.

  56. RobK

    Mark,
    I may well get back to it after i have sold the farm. A few nibbling but no takers yet.
    My bedtime now. ,’nite all.

  57. calli

    After watching the idiocy on the West Rim, this does not surprise me.

    The worst skylarkers were Chinese tourists and young couples. In the end, you just had to look away.

  58. Pedro the Ignorant

    Thank you Mark.

    I am feeling pretty mellow after a day in town on the turps with lovely ladies pouring my beers.

    From the perspective of the far flung WA Goldfields, the rest of the world sometimes looks like shit, and I am happy to far away as possible.

  59. Mark Bolton

    Pedro you make a great case for continuing to be Pedro. Perhaps one day we can learn to hate each other over differing opinions as to how to find GOLD. 😉

  60. “Right, that’s two bottles of single malt, a bottle of gin for the memsahib, and half a dozen good reds.”

    Huh? This is a restock?
    I carry more grog in the cupboard under my sink, & I’m just upstairs from truckloads of the stuff.

    Do we need any further evidence that farmers are skint?

  61. Pedro the Ignorant

    I have no idea how to find gold , Mark.

    Prospectors are bigger liars than fishermen. 🙂

    Long may it be so.

    The Gummint does not need to know everything.

  62. Mark Bolton

    @ Pedro “Call me Ishmael.”

  63. The sanctimonious child behind the counter – in a bottleshop, FFS, looked at me “You’re spending all that money on alcohol? You live your life like that?”

    I struggle with this.
    Jealousy is the only emotion I’ve ever seen exhibited by bottleshop staff when someone buys a lot of the stuff.

    (NB: Nine bottles – regardless of quality, is not a large sale in a bottleshop – it’d be so unremarkable as to be forgotten by shift’s end.)

  64. calli

    CBS is reporting that the FBI has arrested someone in relation to the mail bombs. South Florida.

    Florida Man strikes again!

  65. Mark Bolton

    Calli the Americans need to be sent to bed with a spanked bottom. Since they gave up on glugging the “glurge” they have become the nastiest dry drunks that ever hovered over a red button.

  66. calli

    This is cute:

    Speaking on CNN on Friday, Mr. Clapper said he was not surprised that a device had been sent to him. He has been a frequent critic of President Trump, a similarity shared with everyone whose names have appeared on the packages discovered so far.

    The other similarity, you twerp, is that you were all highly unlikely to ever open your own mail.

  67. calli

    I don’t do bottom spanking, Mark.

    A clip over the ears, maybe. 😄

  68. Mark Bolton

    The other similarity involves rats and xyz axis.
    G

  69. Mark Bolton

    Calli ,ever the pragmatic one.

    Yes a spank on the bottom for every American would bear fruit in Boltonworld.
    The practical implementation might be difficult to achieve. Thank you for dragging me back down to Earth.

  70. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    The most noble metal.

    I love gold. But ‘white gold’ is an abomination.

    How amazing it is to look at objects three thousand years old in a museum and see them shining still in exactly the same way that my rings and bracelets shine.

    It builds a kinship with those people, back into time.

  71. John Constantine

    In their injustice league shorten Australia, gold miners will still have a value.

    Getting capital for small explorers in shorten Australia will be tough.

    Watching North American capital carpetbagger little Aussie goldies for third world bargain basement prices will be a sign of the times.

    Happening right now on a small scale.

  72. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Gold – earliest known metal. Very malleable. Once a glowing gift from the sun god. Magic. Rare.

    Now it’s morning after an early evening out on the turps with a few fellow Cats from 6pm till 10pm. Good to catch up again. Hairy and I kept on carousing over another bottle when we arrived home, got to bed far too late, conversing in such a manner as happens between long-term lovers when the fine wine stirs the veritas and you shamble around the kitchen together talking in shared memories and dreams, and still I am waking after only six hours sleep. He, of course, is nowhere near surfacing yet.

    On my desk is the September Issue of Quadrant, which I am now reading for material other than my own. Keith Windschuttle has an interesting review of a new book about Captain Cook – called ‘Lying for the Admiralty’, not as he notes another piece of leftie Cook destruction, but an historical analysis of the political tensions surrounding the mapping of the Australian coastline and eventual British settlement of this new territory.

    As a sceptical soul from the start, even in primary school, I have always somewhat doubted the story of how Cook ‘missed’ Port Jackson in his maps, because it seemed to me that Philip was mighty quick in deciding Botany Bay was poor and waterless ground (was Mr. Banks really that dim to not note the facts? I recall my nine year old self thinking, sure that I would have done a better job, my head being filled with the struggles of Australian explorers by then). How come Captain Philip was lucky enough to find Sydney’s big harbour without much looking for it? I once asked the teacher, and why didn’t Captain Cook see it? (Obnoxious child).

    Thinking it over as an adult, Philip’s three days anchored just inside Botany Bay also seemed an extraordinarily short time to arrive at a suggested destination and declare it useless. They could surely have given it a week or too, I’ve always mused. And La Perouse turning up so soon? On the other side of the world, so conveniently?

    And now the truth comes out. This new book by Margaret Cameron-Ash shows how Cook deliberately omitted Bass Straight and NZ’s Foveaux Strait to avoid the French strategically settling on ‘islands’ as they had done elsewhere in newly discovered territories. His published maps were at times quite usefully vague, although the Admiralty got better versions. This follows on recent revelations Cats may recall in the press, showing that the French mapped Sydney harbour during a visit, doing depth soundings around Manly. Now we have further developments in this tale: it is most likely that Cook had already reported on this great harbour and that this place was the intended settlement site all along, with the Parramatta River and some decent land at its head. So the harbour’s capacity to hold four hundred ships of the line, as Philip saw it, was simply confirming an Admiralty strategic understanding brought to them by Cook.

    Tourists often comment that Australia has no history to speak of, except as someone noted here, they can falsely speak of ‘aboriginal genocide’, an incorrect meme for which we have to thank the wittering left. But there is a wonderful history to this land that begins with Cook, which is not to discount its earlier settlement, which is a fine tale of human drifts out of Africa. Australian European settlement and exploration is sadly neglected for primary school children today, who are fed on a diet of shame about aboriginal ‘ownership’. I’m glad I got what I did when I did. Even if my doubts about Philip have now been confirmed; for that is a lesson in how history builds and changes in increments and when the time is ripe.

    Which I hope my own piece in this issue also shows about Britain’s most noble legend. 🙂

  73. Bruce of Newcastle

    I love gold. But ‘white gold’ is an abomination.

    Good to see you have a keyboard again Lizzie! Your thumbs had a lot of work.

    Have to take you to task on that statement. White gold is traditionally platinum. Platinum is one of the most marvellous of metals. It is a massively useful catalyst for lots of chemistry (eg fuel cells), it cures cancer (cisplatin chemotherapy), makes crowns for heads and jaws and is as corrosion resistant as the yellow stuff – while being so hard that my platinum crown has survived well over 30 years of chomping so far.

    If it was a choice between the two I’d keep platinum, although gold is quite useful in electronics.

  74. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    It becomes obvious now that the ‘Botany Bay’ name became a widespread meme exactly because that was what the Admiralty put out into the news of the day as a smokescreen. It became embedded as ‘Botany Bay’, in song indeed, for all of the early years of settlement in the minds of the British people; the destination that never was. Eventually, Sydney Cove took over, becoming quickly downgraded by the stories coming out of the rather perilously sounding Van Diemen’s Land.

  75. OldOzzie

    MIT Technology Review

    Wide-scale US wind power could cause significant warming

    A Harvard study raises questions about just how much wind should be part of a climate solution.

  76. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    White gold is traditionally platinum

    Well, there you go. I thought it was chemists messing around with real gold.
    Why not just call it platinum? Otherwise it comes across as a bowdlerised gold.

    My new Tanzanite ring is in real gold but it has a little strip of ‘white gold’ dug in near the stone, to bring out the sparkle, said the j3wellers at the mine site. Many people prefer ‘white gold’ for diamonds for the same reason. But you don’t see much platinum in museums..

    Chemists have a very pragmatic take on the world, wouldn’t you say?
    Benthamite utilitarians, just like Dr. BG. * 😀

    * *ducks*

  77. OldOzzie

    calli
    #2850020, posted on October 27, 2018 at 1:27 am

    After watching the idiocy on the West Rim, this does not surprise me.

    The worst skylarkers were Chinese tourists and young couples. In the end, you just had to look away.

    Calli,

    did you do the Eurocopter over the Grand Canyon?

    My elder Daughter and I did when there was snow all over the Grand Canyon and had superb sunlight with a Snow Strom coming in just as we landed and we then slip-slided our way through the snow back to the main interstate and snow ploughs

  78. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Americans still drink a lot of hard spirits. Produces morose not expansive drunks.
    And off-the-planet parenoid ones, who misbehave when in groups.

  79. John Constantine

    Not a tip, but an example of the challenges of getting funding for the small end gold prospector.

    https://www.miningnews.net/capital-markets/news/1342334/yandal-to-explore-in-the-shadow-of-giants

    In shorten’s Australia, gold exploration in brownfields established mining districts will be easier than in emotionally stirring places protestors can reach in a hour or two in a bongo bus.

    Historic sunk capital by past drillers has a value. Not greedy price put on ‘Sweat equity’. You can see that

    Downside is that your capital is tied up at least until Christmas until the floated company is listed, and months after that before newsflow can provide a profitable exit opportunity. Lot can happen in the world before Autumn. This tightens up capital access for explorers even before the green shorten looting cartel takes over.

    Probably just sell some existing gold hopes to take a small bit of this up, no fresh capital for the sector.

  80. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    ooops. Zulu’s single malt, taken thoughtfully, excepted from the above generalisation.

    I rather like Bolt’s new ‘whisky sessions’ with his interviewees. Rita Panahi’s was a hoot.
    Have to watch my man with that one, he is seriously tele-attracted to her. So cute, he murmurs.

  81. I am bespoke

    Get ready for a deluge of Pollyanna equivalences from the MSM.

  82. Bruce of Newcastle

    Lizzie – A quick look on line and white gold is indeed a gold alloy, so you are right. Ghastly.

    Platinum certainly was known as white gold when I started in the industry, but it became more expensive than gold as its uses became more extensive. So I suspect what happened is that jewellers developed a cheaper platinum replacement alloy which is the white gold we know of these days.

    There you go, I wuz wrong!

  83. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    After watching the idiocy on the West Rim, this does not surprise me.

    Some of the amazing cliff edges on the more accessible of the Norwegian fjords suffer from the same issues and the same culprits, Calli.

    Those same fjords as properly featured in The Hitchhiker’s Guide.
    A bit Eurocentric there though.
    The Grand Canyon (been there) and Yosemite (not been yet) deserve an honourable mention too. 🙂

  84. Bruce of Newcastle

    Lizzie – A quick look on line and white gold is indeed a gold alloy, so you are right. Ghastly.

    Platinum certainly was known as white gold when I started in the industry, but it became more expensive than gold as its uses became more extensive. So I suspect what happened is that j_wellers developed a cheaper platinum replacement alloy which is the white gold we know of these days.

    There you go, I wuz wrong!

    (And I got birdworded too, to boot. Oh the ignominy.)

  85. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    It’s great to be able to quickly cut and paste again. And to link. I know you can do it all on the phone but I’ve never been game enough to try it.

    Those slidey pinchy swipey tappy pads are no match for a decent keyboard.

  86. OldOzzie

    At the White House As Trump Addresses the Bomber

    I am in Washington to attend Turning Point USA’s first-ever Young Black Leadership Summit. Today’s highlight was a visit to the White House, where President Trump addressed the group in the East Room.

    I should note that as a person who is neither young nor black, I was invited as a supporter of Turning Point. It was fun for my wife and me to be almost the only white people in the crowd, other than the press.

    The crowd at the Turning Point summit is the Left’s worst nightmare–hundreds of young, articulate, thoughtful African-American conservatives. We chatted with some of them, mostly students from colleges across the country–a math major from Stanford, a filmmaker from Columbia, a political science major from DePaul. They sounded like pretty much any group of conservatives at a Trump rally: “USA! USA!” “Build that wall!” “Trump! Trump!” In short, it was fun.

    This is the first couple of minutes when Trump emerges to shouts of “USA!” and begins his speech by talking about the bomber:

  87. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Thanks, Bruce. My ignorance can be legion in many fields, especially when I was away and unable to consult Dr. Google in the middle of phoning in a piece. Hence I didn’t check ‘white gold’ for myself. I am only just getting used to being back in full internet mode. Hooray!

  88. OldOzzie

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.
    #2850089, posted on October 27, 2018 at 7:29 am

    After watching the idiocy on the West Rim, this does not surprise me.

    The Grand Canyon (been there) and Yosemite (not been yet) deserve an honourable mention too.

    Yosemite is worth seeing – We continued on from Snow Covered Grand Canyon to Frozen Waterfalls at Yosemite – spectacular and at least we were able to get accommodation in the Majestic Yosemite Hotel – when we had previously gone with our kids in summer we could not find accommodation and slept in the car just outside Park Boundary – kids were not impressed

  89. Dan Dare

    Mark A, mine won’t be (I hope)

  90. I am bespoke

    OldOzzie

    The reaction after Trumps announcement was terrific.

  91. OldOzzie

    CONTINUOUS UPDATES ON THE “PIPE BOMBER” at the PJM Live Blog.

    First look at the suspect in custody:

    First look at bombing suspect Cesar Sayoc as he was escorted out of FBI headquarters in Miramar just minutes ago. https://t.co/J6ebRGkR47 pic.twitter.com/7NSkw3X1WT
    — WPLG Local 10 News (@WPLGLocal10) October 26, 2018

    ABC affiliate Local 10 has details about Cesar Sayoc’s arrest:

    Several law enforcement officials from various agencies, including the FBI and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, gathered in the parking lot of an Auto Zone in Plantation earlier in the day, where investigators were focused on a white van with pro-Trump political stickers covering the windows.

    A man who operates a property management office near the Auto Zone store says Sayoc didn’t resist when armed police officers swarmed and arrested him.

    Thomas Fiori is a former federal law enforcement officer. He says he saw an undercover police officer in a nearby SUV looking at the store with binoculars Friday.

    Fiori says within minutes he heard a small explosion, probably a device police use to distract people. He says 50 officers swarmed the van with their firearms drawn.

    Fiori says the Sayoc did not resist and “had that look of, `I’m done, I surrender.”‘

    Authorities could be seen covering the van, believed to belong to Sayoc, with a blue tarp. The van was then placed the back of a flatbed truck and driven to the FBI’s South Florida headquarters in Miramar

  92. Armadillo

    The bomber was a Native American Indian nutter, so definitely no relation to Elizabeth Warren.

    The Democrats are in the clear on this. Trump is at fault.

  93. OldOzzie

    Here’s How The FBI Caught Attempted Mail Bomber

    Alleged attempted mail bombing suspect Cesar Sayoc left a fingerprint and DNA samples on packages bound for his intended victims, FBI Director Christopher Wray said in a Friday press conference.

    Wray told reporters Sayoc constructed and mailed 13 known improvised explosive devices to Democratic officials, former public officials and CNN.

    The FBI Director continued that Sayoc allegedly left a latent fingerprint on a package bound for Congresswoman Maxine Waters along with two DNA samples on other IEDs intercepted by federal authorities.

  94. John Constantine

    SVY Stavely is poking around under deep cover in Victoria.

    https://www.asx.com.au/asxpdf/20180719/pdf/43wmrkcrqjgft3.pdf

    Funded for a bit, but the sort of huge low grade deposits it is searching for would need a billion dollars to turn into a mine, but it would be a mine big enough to have an impact on the economics of the entire west of the state.

    Even their godless commo hippy yarragrad nazgul state government is making funding available to encourage this style of exploration.

    I have sold down on this latest SVY run, simply because it has historically been tradeable for sell runs and re-enter dips.

    It only needs the one magic drill result to prove that maybe Bass Strait isn’t a cut-off, but merely wet pasture and that the mineralisation seen in Tasmania extends into western Victoria, just buried under cover.
    [ or that western Victoria is an analogue of the Andes mineralisation, just eroded over time and buried deeper.]

    Money spent on drilling these mineral models actually has a chance of economically underpinning the state for generations, much higher return on investment than dumping mass imported welfare clients from helicopters into dole gulags in the outback, or spending billions covering every rural hind in alex turnbull windtowers.

    Comrades.

  95. Eyrie

    calli
    #2850020, posted on October 27, 2018 at 1:27 am

    After watching the idiocy on the West Rim, this does not surprise me.

    When BASE jumping, remember to wear parachute.

  96. OldOzzie

    Polling puts Victorian Labor on track to win state election

    Victorian Labor would win an election held this weekend but could still be forced into minority government as voters focus on the cost of living, according to private polling by both major parties.

    Labor is leading the Coalition with between 51 per cent and 52 per cent of the two-party-­preferred vote, but remains vulnerable if out-campaigned by Liberal leader Matthew Guy in the run-up to November 24.

    The Coalition’s disastrous performance nationally looms as a major threat, with strategists concerned the damage to the Liberal brand will have a negative impact on the opposition’s campaign.

    The Liberal Party late yesterday had a financial victory when an intervention from former prime minister John Howard helped it resolve its battle with its chief donor, the Cormack Foundation, opening the way for it to receive $8.5 million for campaigning at this state election and the next two federal campaigns.

    Under the deal, Mr Guy will ­receive a much-needed $2.5m from Cormack from next month for the state campaign.

    The Weekend Australian understands that Labor’s primary vote dipped at the start of the year but has picked up and is at an ­election-winning 52 per cent to 48 per cent — the exact result of the 2014 election.

    Liberal polling has the gap at 51 per cent to 49 per cent and strategists are confident there are enough seats that can swing during the next month to force a change of government.

    Both sides of politics privately believe that an election held this weekend would return the ­Andrews government to office but the ALP is not likely to make gains, aside possibly from the outer southeastern-rural Liberal seat of Bass (4.5 per cent) and South Barwon (2.9 per cent), which includes Geelong.

    Labor has nine seats on less than 3 per cent, making it highly vulnerable to local swings, but the Coalition must win seven seats for an absolute majority, assuming it gets the support of whoever wins the seat of Morwell, held by conservative independent Russell Northe.

    Unions are committing millions of dollars to try to get the ALP re-elected, deploying hundreds of activists across seven marginal seats in a bid to convince voters to back the Labor Party and “put the Liberals last”.

    For nine months, union activists have been campaigning in four Labor held marginals in Melbourne’s sand belt — Frankston, Mordialloc, Carrum and Bentleigh — and the two Liberal marginals of Ripon and Bass as well as Morwell in regional Victoria.

    Victorian Trades Hall Council secretary Luke Hilakari said he believed the Andrews government would be re-elected based on the views expressed by thousands of voters when they were “door-knocked” and telephoned by union activists.

    Unions are running “phone banks” calling thousands of voters in marginal seats. They aim to campaign at every train station in Melbourne. Unions will spend about $2m and make a significant financial donation to the ALP and individual candidates.

    Mr Hilakari said Mr Andrews was getting substantial credit from the electorate for Labor’s multi-billion-dollar public works program, with voters comparing him to the “can-do” approach of the Kennett government.

    “You can tell when the swing is on,’’ he said. “With Wentworth, people knew it was on. We knew at the last state election it was on. It ain’t on.

    “We are just not having those conversations that are hard for us at the doors (of households).

    “No one is saying that Daniel Andrews has been a terrible government. They are running a surplus and are building stuff. They have done enough.

    “The Liberals federally have hurt (the Victorian Liberals) big time. Imagine door-knocking as a Liberal right now? Putting on your blue shirt, door-knocking, and saying ‘I’m from the Liberal Party’. The door would be shut.’’

    On Mr Guy, Mr Hilakari said: “People don’t know him. My focus groups have told me they don’t know him. They cannot name him. He doesn’t have any crowning achievement. He’s a little ­aggressive. He’s a little short. He doesn’t have presence or the charisma bit, the energy bit. He seems a bit down all the time.’’

    On the Red Shirts affair, which has dogged the Andrews government, Mr Hilakari said: “There is no concern about red shirts at doors. It’s like inside baseball. No one understands it.’’

    Mr Guy told The Weekend Australian that voters were still ­focused on crime, congestion, cost of living and population.

    “Polling is not fact … it’s research and you’ve got to track it, you’ve got to do it, you’ve got to look at it, and any statewide two-party figure is an assumed figure for a start, it’s not a polled figure, it’s an assumed figure and primary vote is what’s important,’’ he said.

    “I know we can win this election and I’m looking at data every day to say it’s there, it’s winnable and I’m not consumed about people who aren’t from politics telling whether I’m ahead or not because I know we can win it.’’

    Labor has 46 seats in the 88-seat parliament.

  97. Eyrie

    All this talk of Western Australia is making me feel nostalgic and looking forward to beach holiday in Perth.
    I’ve always thought that Guilford/Middle/Upper Swan was a nice part of the world, also.

  98. OldOzzie

    The Australian Editorial – By-election done, now PM must implement his plan

    Scott Morrison is not short of advice or demands. Surrounded by emboldened independent crossbenchers, embittered Coalition MPs, former party leaders in and out of parliament, interest groups pleading cases and an ALP ascendant in the polls, the Prime Minister must be wary of the cacophony. Every player attempts to invoke the Wentworth by-election result as an endorsement of their view. Fittingly, the Wentworth result is a bit like a private jet, everyone wants to use it but no one can afford to own it. The damage it did in pushing the Coalition into minority government and denying the Liberals a rare talent cannot be undone till the election, so Mr Morrison and his party should put it behind them and concentrate on what they need to do to win the support of the public at a general election due within seven months.

    Around the world these are not easy times in which to govern; economic instability, financial volatility, strategic insecurity and voter disenchantment are fuelled by an instant and fractious digital media age. But Mr Morrison has to accept the Coalition has made this task infinitely harder for itself through its disunity and lack of consistency. He must understand that after broken promises and failed expectations, mere words will never do; the Coalition must demonstrate it has changed course and is working to improve the prospects for mainstream Australians.

    Last week’s employment figures for September showed the national rate had fallen to its lowest level for seven years, reaching the 5 per cent that many economists equate to full employment. The final budget outcome showed the federal budget is tantalisingly close to returning to surplus after a decade of diving further into debt. Despite the volatility of global markets, economic growth is stronger than was expected. In these circumstances a federal government normally would be in a strong position — especially when the Labor opposition is promising a raft of higher taxes on personal incomes, company profits, retirement savings, housing investments and, effectively, electricity bills. The Coalition needs to accentuate this contrast, as well as highlight the risk that a change of government will lead to weaker border protection and stronger union power. For reasons still not explained the Coalition did not attack Labor during the 2016 contest, preferring a positive and presidential campaign. We don’t expect they will be that silly again.

    Yet messaging and campaigning are not the answer to their woes. If there is one real message out of Wentworth it is that voters are tired of a cynical game where major parties horse-trade in voter concerns rather than address them. Mr Morrison must ensure that within a short period his government is actually listening to voters and taking action on issues that matter. Voters are entitled to expect instant attention and timely responses. Power prices top the list when it comes to cost-of-living pressure, but flatlining wages might not be far behind. The nation is muddling along reasonably well despite a decade without secure political leadership; imagine what might be done with a sustained and unified sense of purpose.

  99. Win

    Well yes Mark Bolton I know first hand the strange things done under a midnight sun.I made the aqaintence of Robert Service s poems when working at an asbestos mine across the river and up the road a few miles from the bank in which he was employed .
    But what is he doing in a gold mining camp in Australia.

  100. None

    Some opponents of broad religious freedom protections have spent over $500,000 on advocacy and public relations campaigns related to the Masterpiece Cakeshop Supreme Court decision, a CNA analysis of recent foundation grantmaking has found.

    The spending is among at least $2.4 million in new anti-religious freedom grants since October 2017, according to CNA’s analysis. Since 2014 at least $9.9 million in grants from multiple sources have been earmarked to oppose religious freedom protections. The grants generally come from backers of LGBT political causes, legal abortion and mandatory contraception coverage.

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/amp/news/masterpiece-cakeshop-case-drew-500k-in-grants-from-religious-freedom-foes-81744

    I’d say that if someone did an analysis of who funds the tribunal and court cases against religious freedom here in Australia, you’d find more or less the same. The Gaystapo and the Femin azis.

  101. Eyrie

    The Slomo government is reminding me of 1972 and the decay of the Billy MacMahon government. We all know what happened after that.

  102. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Wray: “We’re still trying to determine if the devices were functional… They did contain energetic material, which, if subjected to the right combination of heat or shock or friction could be dangerous to the public. “

    in other words a hoax

  103. OldOzzie

    No end in sight to electricity consumers paying for poor policy – Judith Sloan

    We were staying in a Queensland country town a few weeks ago. I got talking to the owner of the local bakery. He was looking at his latest ­financial statement that the ­accountant had sent through. And there it was in black and white. His annual power bill last financial year was $114,000. It had been a tad over $30,000 two years before.

    He employs 30 people, some on a part-time basis. Business seemed to be brisk but it’s hard to put up the price of pies and buns too much without demand dropping.

    It’s easy to concentrate on the impact of rising electricity prices on households. And let’s be clear on that score. In real terms, the ­average retail price of electricity over the 10 years ending in 2017-18 rose by 51 per cent and the average retail bill rose by 35 per cent (people have used less electricity, in part because of the higher prices).

    But for many small and med­ium-sized businesses, the increase in their electricity bills has been higher again. Many are exposed to the full variations in wholesale ­prices, which have risen from less than $40 a megawatt hour to more than $100/MWh before settling around the $70 to $80/MWh mark. This threatens the viability of a number of businesses.

    It’s hardly surprising the federal government has decided to focus on getting electricity bills down. Let’s be clear about reduced emissions and the commitment the government has made to the Paris climate agreement — the target in respect of electricity will be met by the early 2020s. Every participant in the industry ­acknowledges this.

    It’s one of the reasons why the emissions reduction target that was part and parcel of the now ­defunct national energy guarantee was superfluous. Note also there was considerable manipulation going on of the precise details of this target to suit the activist ambitions of those promoting the NEG. The only part of the NEG now worth saving relates to the ­reliability obligation, which is ­likely to become binding much sooner than generally expected.

    For those who complain about a decade of energy policy paralysis, the truth is there has been a constant and active government policy position over that time. Renewable energy sources have been massively promoted, favoured and subsidised.

    The renewable energy target, which remains in force until 2030, has spun off subsidies to renewable energy generators to the tune of about $80/MWh (the value has been higher in the past) through large-scale generation certificates. The value of these LGCs is expected to drop but not for several years.

    In addition, there have been the interventions of reverse auctions run by state governments and the ACT that provide guaranteed cash flow for renewable energy projects. There are also the rules in the National Energy Market that give preferential dispatch to renewable energy generators. And there are the mountains of subsidies available through bodies such as the Clean Energy Finance Corporation and the Australian Renewable Energy Agency.

    Estimates put the value of the subsidies paid to the renewable ­energy sector at between $2 billion and $3bn a year, paid by consumers and taxpayers. That’s not policy paralysis; that’s policy promotion of a particular sector. If we ignore the decimation of the business models of dispatchable power generators and the much higher electricity prices we have had to pay, arguably the policy has worked. It is estimated that $2bn was invested last year in renewable energy generation — a record amount. And this year the boom has been even bigger.

    The Clean Energy Regulator has released information that 34 renewable energy power stations with a combined capacity of 667MW were accredited last month, which was the largest single month of solar and wind ­capacity since April 2001. Nearly 2800MW has been accredited so far this year, compared with the previous annual record set last year of 1088MW.

    The CER also notes about 1600MW of rooftop solar will be installed this year — the six panels every minute scenario mentioned by Audrey Zibelman of the Australian Energy Market Operator — which is up 44 per cent on last year. There are now more than three million small-scale installations. Note there are also about 40,000 commercial solar systems.

    Now, if renewable energy could provide reliable electricity at ­affordable prices, these trends would be great. But even on the most optimistic estimates of the boosters of renewable energy, wind can produce at most 50 per cent of the time and solar at 30 per cent. This produces a very large shortfall that has to be covered by firming capacity. Batteries and pumped hydro don’t come close to filling the gap and are unlikely to do so for many years.

    And here’s another thing that needs to be considered when ­observing the boom in renewable energy investment: 10 coal-fired power stations with a total ­capacity of more than 5000MW have left the grid since 2012. None of these stations has been replaced.

    What is beginning to emerge is a crisis affecting the grid that makes up the National Electricity Market, which covers South Australia, Victoria, NSW, Queensland, Tasmania and the ACT. This is being recognised by AEMO, which worries about the reliability of the grid in general and the possible shortfall of power in South Australia and Victoria at certain times during the coming summer.

    The NEM electricity grid has always been long and skinny. It is now longer and skinnier, with far too much unreliable renewable energy and far too little firming ­capacity. This is the principal reason why federal Energy Minister Angus Taylor is so focused on getting more firming capacity into the system to back up the runaway ­investment in renewable energy.

    It is also why he has decided to take a resolute line with the large “gentailers” — think AGL, Origin and Energy Australia — whose ­behaviour has contributed to the growing fragility of the system as well as to rising prices. The companies are quite capable of manipulating the market while promising to invest in firming ­capacity but never quite following through with their plans.

    Of course, in a normal competitive market government should always refrain from intervening to force down prices. But the electricity market is not a normal market. Apart from the fact electricity is an essential service, the high ­degree of market concentration almost certainly means prices are higher than they should be. The egregious behaviour of the retail divisions of the gentailers, by dudding loyal customers in particular, indicates they cannot be trusted. Just ignore their howls of complaints about the downsides of regulation. By setting a reference price for standing offers, this will force down prices more generally, and the companies know it.

    By bringing more dispatchable power into the system as quickly as possible — another focus of Taylor — wholesale prices will hopefully fall, bringing further price relief for customers. The truth is the gentailers have been feasting on high wholesale prices. Surely no one will complain if the government offers the same cost of capital to new dispatchable power plants that is available to ­intermittent ­renewable energy plants?

    With all this new renewable ­energy coming into the market, there is a real question mark over the commercial viability of some of the projects. When the wind is blowing and the sun is shining, wholesale prices can be driven to low levels. Clearly, the backers of these projects are basically betting on the election of a Labor government to impose a higher emissions reduction target and a reinstituted RET. In this scenario, we would expect electricity prices to resume their upward trajectory.

    The NEM is in disarray, but let’s not kid ourselves that this is because of policy paralysis. This is because of incredibly poor policy where the consequences in terms of price and reliability were completely foreseeable. The challenge for the federal government is how to pull us back from this abyss.

  104. None

    Matthew Guy and the Victorian liberals don’t deserve to win government but then, Dan Andrews deserves to lose. The fact that once again Victorians are totally apathetic towards the corruption in their government just shows how comatose they are.

  105. Bushkid

    He says 50 officers swarmed the van with their firearms drawn.

    That’s an awful lot of crossfire!

  106. Bushkid

    ….potential crossfire…..

  107. Mother Lode

    50 Shades of Grey Soundtrack? I’m afraid to go and have a look in case they ruined some of my favourote music.

    It is by the Tallis Scholars.
    Did not know this as I have not read the book or watched the movie.

    Would they by chance have taken their name from Thomas Tallis?

    There is a brilliant piece called ‘Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis’ by Ralph Vaughan Williams. He was a student of Ravel, who said Vaughan Williams was the only student he ever had who did not try to write his (Ravel’s) music.

    The Fantasia was used in the movie Master and Commander. In fact that movie used a lot of good music from such as Boccherini to Mozart.

    It worked there because it was not being ‘pressed into service’ to be part of the story like the script, but to set scenes’ atmosphere in a world the composers would have been familiar with. The Fantasia we used for a shot of a sailing ship on the vast ocean, while Mozart’s violin concerto was a piece played by the captain and the doctor as a diversionary amusement – which was commonplace at the time.

    The music never lost its dignity through the director discovering his direction was lacking and needed to shoehorn in something far richer to give it volume.

  108. OldOzzie

    Tasmanian plan for gender-neutral birth certificates is crazy – Angela Shanahan

    What is it about Tasmania that the state with only slightly more people than the ACT is becoming a social laboratory for every crazy social experiment? This is the place where a “human rights” board challenged a Catholic archbishop’s right to exercise his freedom of religion by disseminating the Catholic doctrine on marriage.

    Now, as if in some surreal reinterpretation of The Emperor’s New Clothes, the fairytale isle is set to degenderise birth certificates. Officially no one will be born male or female in Tasmania. It might come as a surprise to new mums and dads that their child’s sex will not be recorded on the certificate, even though it has to be recorded on one’s passport — for which one needs a birth certificate.

    Don’t think the gender activists haven’t thought about that catch. Despite a lack of consensus on this issue in Australia, I have no doubt we will all soon be deprived of any true biological identification in any sphere of life. Our sexual identity will depend on how we “self-identify”. In Britain recently, there was a movement to allow trans people to identify as the opposite sex without any surgery or hormone treatment, which of course would eventually paid for by the National Health Service. The absurd consequences of self-identification should be obvious — but the gender commissars can’t see them.

    The degenderising movement is one of the most puzzling results of identity politics, at least puzzling to the average person who regards their sex or gender, as even the transgender movement insists, as fundamental to identity. So we should be asking ourselves: How far can self-identification go? Can people switch back and forth? What are the legal, medical, social and emotional consequences of all this gender fluidity?

    These questions are partly answered in Patrick Byrne’s new book, Transgender: One shade of Grey. Byrne points to the multitude of consequences that have not been thought through. For example, the indeterminate sex of athletes has already become a problem in sport, even at Olympic level, as it has in the use of facilities such as toilets. This might seem trivial, but we should be asking ourselves whether the law is moving into the wrong sphere. Should the law be regulating matters that are purely personal, based on feelings, emotions and preferences?

    Byrne’s view is that law should stay out of these areas, but where it needs to intervene, and if a definition is rarely required, it should be derived not from emotion or preference but from strictly objective biological criteria.

    However, on a social and emotional level perhaps the most compelling reason for thinking twice about bowing to the gender-neutral notion is the confusing consequences for children, especially boys. There is no doubting the statistics that point to a huge rise in the emotional and cognitive problems that beset boys. It is boys who suffer most from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It is boys who overwhelmingly suffer Asperger’s, and it is in the main boys who account for the rise in diagnosis of autism. Psychologists also point to boys’ normal behaviour being pathologised. In education and beyond, boys lack male role models and suffer father absence. The potential for even more confusion in “gender neutral” times movement seems obvious.

    The medical and legal consequences of gender reassignment in relation to children are already a huge area of controversy. Despite their immaturity, children, under Gillick competence — which is used to decide whether a child under 16 is able to consent to their medical treatment — are allowed agency to change their gender at a very young age, when they are not considered legally rationally competent for any other life choice. So how far, and into what other areas of life, will this go?

    Another important question about degenderising us is one women and girls should be asking. What are the consequences for women’s rights? Male to female transgender people, who make up the majority of activists, have decided to identify with feminism, much to the ire of notable feminists including Julie Burchill and Germaine Greer. Those two have (shock horror) pointed to the truth: trans women are not women, they are transsexuals. Because they don’t have female chromosomes, nor the same biological and life experiences, they lack the mental and emotional foundation to be women.

    Sometimes the feminist response to the transsexual dilemma, which is a terrible burden, can be too cruel. The feminist movement was only too happy to ally itself with the LGBTI lobby in the past, but now this has come back to bite them. If only the feminists hadn’t been such harsh, unceasing megaphones of complaint about the ordinary business of womanhood in our rich and privileged society, we might take more notice of their objections to the degenderising movement.

    Burchill has been particularly vehement in her refusal to acknowledge transsexuals as victims, which they often were. She was bitterly criticised for her “privileged stance”.

    Enraged, she replied: “The idea that a person can chose their gender — in a world where millions of people, especially ‘cis-gendered’ women, are not free to choose who they marry, what they eat or whether or not their genitals are cut off and sewn up with barbed wire when they are still babies — and have their major beautification operations paid for by the National Health Service seems the ultimate privilege, so don’t tell me to check mine.”

    True, Julie. Strangely, though, many feminists weren’t talking much about those women before the ideological problem of transgenderism raised their ire, and I doubt we will hear the feminists’ voice insisting that Tasmania’s latest foray into gender neutrality is nothing more than foolishly naked identity politics.

  109. OldOzzie

    Tasmanian plan for gender-neutral birth certificates is crazy – Angela Shanahan

    What is it about Tasmania that the state with only slightly more people than the ACT is becoming a social laboratory for every crazy social experiment? This is the place where a “human rights” board challenged a Catholic archbishop’s right to exercise his freedom of religion by disseminating the Catholic doctrine on marriage.

    Now, as if in some surreal reinterpretation of The Emperor’s New Clothes, the fairytale isle is set to degenderise birth certificates. Officially no one will be born male or female in Tasmania. It might come as a surprise to new mums and dads that their child’s sex will not be recorded on the certificate, even though it has to be recorded on one’s passport — for which one needs a birth certificate.

    Don’t think the gender activists haven’t thought about that catch. Despite a lack of consensus on this issue in Australia, I have no doubt we will all soon be deprived of any true biological identification in any sphere of life. Our sexual identity will depend on how we “self-identify”. In Britain recently, there was a movement to allow trans people to identify as the opposite sex without any surgery or hormone treatment, which of course would eventually paid for by the National Health Service. The absurd consequences of self-identification should be obvious — but the gender commissars can’t see them.

    The degenderising movement is one of the most puzzling results of identity politics, at least puzzling to the average person who regards their sex or gender, as even the transgender movement insists, as fundamental to identity. So we should be asking ourselves: How far can self-identification go? Can people switch back and forth? What are the legal, medical, social and emotional consequences of all this gender fluidity?

    These questions are partly answered in Patrick Byrne’s new book, Transgender: One shade of Grey. Byrne points to the multitude of consequences that have not been thought through. For example, the indeterminate sex of athletes has already become a problem in sport, even at Olympic level, as it has in the use of facilities such as toilets. This might seem trivial, but we should be asking ourselves whether the law is moving into the wrong sphere. Should the law be regulating matters that are purely personal, based on feelings, emotions and preferences?

    Byrne’s view is that law should stay out of these areas, but where it needs to intervene, and if a definition is rarely required, it should be derived not from emotion or preference but from strictly objective biological criteria.

    However, on a social and emotional level perhaps the most compelling reason for thinking twice about bowing to the gender-neutral notion is the confusing consequences for children, especially boys. There is no doubting the statistics that point to a huge rise in the emotional and cognitive problems that beset boys. It is boys who suffer most from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It is boys who overwhelmingly suffer Asperger’s, and it is in the main boys who account for the rise in diagnosis of autism. Psychologists also point to boys’ normal behaviour being pathologised. In education and beyond, boys lack male role models and suffer father absence. The potential for even more confusion in “gender neutral” times movement seems obvious.

    The medical and legal consequences of gender reassignment in relation to children are already a huge area of controversy. Despite their immaturity, children, under Gillick competence — which is used to decide whether a child under 16 is able to consent to their medical treatment — are allowed agency to change their gender at a very young age, when they are not considered legally rationally competent for any other life choice. So how far, and into what other areas of life, will this go?

    Another important question about degenderising us is one women and girls should be asking. What are the consequences for women’s rights? Male to female transgender people, who make up the majority of activists, have decided to identify with feminism, much to the ire of notable feminists including Julie Burchill and Germaine Greer. Those two have (shock horror) pointed to the truth: trans women are not women, they are transsexuals. Because they don’t have female chromosomes, nor the same biological and life experiences, they lack the mental and emotional foundation to be women.

    Sometimes the feminist response to the transsexual dilemma, which is a terrible burden, can be too cruel. The feminist movement was only too happy to ally itself with the LGBTI lobby in the past, but now this has come back to bite them. If only the feminists hadn’t been such harsh, unceasing megaphones of complaint about the ordinary business of womanhood in our rich and privileged society, we might take more notice of their objections to the degenderising movement.

    Burchill has been particularly vehement in her refusal to acknowledge transsexuals as victims, which they often were. She was bitterly criticised for her “privileged stance”.

    Enraged, she replied: “The idea that a person can chose their gender — in a world where millions of people, especially ‘cis-gendered’ women, are not free to choose who they marry, what they eat or whether or not their g#nitals are cut off and sewn up with barbed wire when they are still babies — and have their major beautification operations paid for by the National Health Service seems the ultimate privilege, so don’t tell me to check mine.”

    True, Julie. Strangely, though, many feminists weren’t talking much about those women before the ideological problem of transgenderism raised their ire, and I doubt we will hear the feminists’ voice insisting that Tasmania’s latest foray into gender neutrality is nothing more than foolishly naked identity politics.

  110. calli

    Greetings from Sedona.

    Arty-crafty central, but…I’m here for the night skies. They deliberately have minimal streetlights so you can view the heavenly host in all its glory.

    Drove down the canyon full of Autumn colour and magnificent iron stained limestone.

    Bucket list, Cats.

  111. OldOzzie

    Tasmanian plan for gender-neutral birth certificates is crazy – Angela Shanahan

    What is it about Tasmania that the state with only slightly more people than the ACT is becoming a social laboratory for every crazy social experiment? This is the place where a “human rights” board challenged a Catholic archbishop’s right to exercise his freedom of religion by disseminating the Catholic doctrine on marriage.

    Now, as if in some surreal reinterpretation of The Emperor’s New Clothes, the fairytale isle is set to degenderise birth certificates. Officially no one will be born male or female in Tasmania. It might come as a surprise to new mums and dads that their child’s sex will not be recorded on the certificate, even though it has to be recorded on one’s passport — for which one needs a birth certificate.

    Don’t think the gender activists haven’t thought about that catch. Despite a lack of consensus on this issue in Australia, I have no doubt we will all soon be deprived of any true biological identification in any sphere of life. Our sexual identity will depend on how we “self-identify”. In Britain recently, there was a movement to allow trans people to identify as the opposite sex without any surgery or hormone treatment, which of course would eventually paid for by the National Health Service. The absurd consequences of self-identification should be obvious — but the gender commissars can’t see them.

    The degenderising movement is one of the most puzzling results of identity politics, at least puzzling to the average person who regards their sex or gender, as even the transgender movement insists, as fundamental to identity. So we should be asking ourselves: How far can self-identification go? Can people switch back and forth? What are the legal, medical, social and emotional consequences of all this gender fluidity?

    These questions are partly answered in Patrick Byrne’s new book, Transgender: One shade of Grey. Byrne points to the multitude of consequences that have not been thought through. For example, the indeterminate sex of athletes has already become a problem in sport, even at Olympic level, as it has in the use of facilities such as toilets. This might seem trivial, but we should be asking ourselves whether the law is moving into the wrong sphere. Should the law be regulating matters that are purely personal, based on feelings, emotions and preferences?

    Byrne’s view is that law should stay out of these areas, but where it needs to intervene, and if a definition is rarely required, it should be derived not from emotion or preference but from strictly objective biological criteria.

    However, on a social and emotional level perhaps the most compelling reason for thinking twice about bowing to the gender-neutral notion is the confusing consequences for children, especially boys. There is no doubting the statistics that point to a huge rise in the emotional and cognitive problems that beset boys. It is boys who suffer most from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It is boys who overwhelmingly suffer Asperger’s, and it is in the main boys who account for the rise in diagnosis of autism. Psychologists also point to boys’ normal behaviour being pathologised. In education and beyond, boys lack male role models and suffer father absence. The potential for even more confusion in “gender neutral” times movement seems obvious.

    The medical and legal consequences of gender reassignment in relation to children are already a huge area of controversy. Despite their immaturity, children, under Gillick competence — which is used to decide whether a child under 16 is able to consent to their medical treatment — are allowed agency to change their gender at a very young age, when they are not considered legally rationally competent for any other life choice. So how far, and into what other areas of life, will this go?

    Another important question about degenderising us is one women and girls should be asking. What are the consequences for women’s rights? Male to female transgender people, who make up the majority of activists, have decided to identify with feminism, much to the ire of notable feminists including Julie Burchill and Germaine Greer. Those two have (shock horror) pointed to the truth: trans women are not women, they are transsexuals. Because they don’t have female chromosomes, nor the same biological and life experiences, they lack the mental and emotional foundation to be women.

    Sometimes the feminist response to the transsexual dilemma, which is a terrible burden, can be too cruel. The feminist movement was only too happy to ally itself with the LGBTI lobby in the past, but now this has come back to bite them. If only the feminists hadn’t been such harsh, unceasing megaphones of complaint about the ordinary business of womanhood in our rich and privileged society, we might take more notice of their objections to the degenderising movement.

    Burchill has been particularly vehement in her refusal to acknowledge transsexuals as victims, which they often were. She was bitterly criticised for her “privileged stance”.

    Enraged, she replied: “The idea that a person can chose their gender — in a world where millions of people, especially ‘cis-gendered’ women, are not free to choose who they marry, what they eat or whether or not their g#nitals are cut off and sewn up with barbed wire when they are still babies — and have their major beautification operations paid for by the National Health Service seems the ultimate privilege, so don’t tell me to check mine.”

    True, Julie. Strangely, though, many feminists weren’t talking much about those women before the ideological problem of transgenderism raised their ire, and I doubt we will hear the feminists’ voice insisting that Tasmania’s latest foray into gender neutrality is nothing more than foolishly naked identity politics.

  112. Gab

    Greetings from Sedona.

    Home of the mega-rich ‘New Age’ charlatans.

    Safe travels, Calli.

  113. Senile Old Guy

    ABC:

    At the unveiling of her official portrait on Wednesday, Julia Gillard said she’d wanted it to reflect that “I was different to every other prime minister who came before me”, and she hoped it would send some messages to the schoolchildren who saw it in future years.

    Yes, she was different. Most others were vaguely competent.

  114. C.L.

    He says 50 officers swarmed the van with their firearms drawn.

    That’s almost as much firepower as Democrat James Hodgkinson brought to bear on Republican congressmen at the 2017 baseball shooting.

  115. Bela Bartok

    Hey Mother Lode, they Tallis Scholars are indeed named after Thomas Tallis.
    Excellent English composer of early mid-16C polyphonic music.
    Spem in Alium is his most celebrated work, 40-part motet.

  116. John Constantine

    What we see in their State regulated electricity market is simply legalised corruption, where a small number of elite cronies get to grasp massive and rapid wealth for no risk, grasp it from the poorest people, and be protected by the State as they do the looting.

    We can expect their shorten looting cartel to completely legally make the laws that enable crony orcs to loot every sectorof the economy.

    Legally.

    It isn’t a corrupt demand for a bribe, if your extortion blackmailer is government licenced to enter your property and demand your compliance with regulations, for a fee.

    Safe Trucks.

    Safe Farms.

    Safe Mines.

    The broken electricity market isn’t a debacle to be fixed, it is an open example of what the entire Australian economy will be like under the looters of the left.

    Comrades.

  117. woolfe

    The Paywallian now has a My Profile folder in the comments section where you can see comments pending plus those rejected and published. I’m on 14% rejection so far.

  118. Baldrick

    And just like that TheirABC finally connected a crazed terrorist to an organisation:

    According to the records, he (Cesar Sayocis) is a registered Republican …

    And found a motive connecting him to a third party:

    … with a history of posting inflammatory broadsides on social media against Mr Trump’s political foes.

  119. Myrddin Seren

    Woo Hoo !

    You CAN drink away your troubles, study says: Alcohol affects a gene making your brain forget the bad times and only remember the good ones

    Skoll, everybody !!

    Get back to me if the article says anything else interesting 🙂

    ( via Kludge, Grudge – whatevs )

  120. calli

    Home of the mega-rich ‘New Age’ charlatans.

    Lol. I saw on a billboard that I can have my aura photographed.

    Sounded a bit too personal for my taste.

  121. Geriatric Mayfly

    My new Tanzanite ring is in real gold but it has a little strip of ‘white gold’ dug in near the stone,

    A stunning journey through the blue spectrum with this mineral. Take care though Lizzie. It lacks the hardness of other gemstones and can chip if given to violence. No gardening, washing up, vacuuming or vehicle maintenance whilst it adorns your person.

  122. Geriatric Mayfly

    Bela Bartok

    So there you are in the flesh. I find your compositions very difficult to deal with. Some say you took off where Beethoven finished. I fail to see the connection.

  123. calli

    I can have my aura photographed.

    I was told several years ago by some new-agey person from this part of the world that I gave off “really high positive energy”. I said I wasn’t surprised as I was a Christian.

    That shut her up, much to the Beloved’s mirth.

  124. Percy Popinjay

    now PM must implement his plan

    What frigging plan?? Continuing to implement labor’s and the greenfilth’s policies for them?

    That’s not a plan, it’s an unnecessarily lengthy political suicide note.

  125. Cassie of Sydney

    Two days ago I posted the following comment on the Oz website….

    “Apparently Khashoggi is in pieces now.”

    I actually knew it would be rejected…I was curious to see how long it would take……it was rejected within about 10 seconds.

  126. Percy Popinjay

    I’m on 14% rejection so far.

    Mine’s closer to 20%. One of the moderators there is evidently a huge fan of Teats Peanuthead and Post Turtle Bowen. I also think that Perfesser von Wrongsolen personally wiped one of my comments during the week on some stream of unconsciousness he’d penned about everything being the fault of Waffles Turnbuckle. The comment had garnered three likes and a reply before being memory holed. He’s a sensitive sole, it seems.

  127. Bushkid

    woolfe
    #2850148, posted on October 27, 2018 at 9:17 am
    The Paywallian now has a My Profile folder in the comments section where you can see comments pending plus those rejected and published. I’m on 14% rejection so far.

    Interesting, woolfe. I rarely bother to follow up on what I’ve posted anywhere, including here or the Paywallian. I state my case or opinion, but usually need to get out and go about making my living. It’s like that when you’re self-employed. If there’s a need to respond to someone who’s raised a question about my post, then sure, a follow up is warranted, but otherwise I haven’t the time to engage. Especially when I see the tit-for-tat drivel that occurs here between a certain few “regulars”.

  128. areff

    “Apparently Khashoggi is in pieces now.”

    Yes, indeed. A man of many parts.

  129. Geriatric Mayfly

    He’s a sensitive sole, it seems.

    A known bottom feeder.

  130. Percy Popinjay

    I rarely bother to follow up on what I’ve posted

    The new profile comments function is incredibly useful if you don’t have time to go back and wade through pages of comments. It’s also an interesting guide as to what is acceptable, what isn’t and if the moderators are being inconsistent, which they often are.

  131. Snoopy

    TheirABC apparently sent Siobhan Heanue from New Delhi to Zimbabwe to produce this tosh. I wonder how many late model cars in fuel queues she drove past to find a ‘representative’ clapped out Nissan?

    fuelling the black market trade of scarce US dollars, the very problem that is exacerbating the devaluing of local currency.

    I would have thought that a market confirms value rather than reduces value?

    BTW, “zollars” is an invention of the international media. It’s not used locally.

    And the transaction tax, while stupid, did not precipitate the currency crisis. It was simply one element in a policy announcement by the the finance minister. But as it was the only thing in the announcement that was somewhat within the understanding of your average journalist it’s what they now ascribe everything too.

  132. stackja

    Google CEO admits company had a sexual harassment problem — says it has fired 48 employees for sexual misconduct
    Google CEO Sundar Pichai sent an email to employees in response to a report in The New York Times about sexual misconduct at the company.
    Pichai says 48 employees have been terminated for sexual misconduct in the last two years.

  133. zyconoclast

    Polling puts Victorian Labor on track to win state election

    Why vote for the ersatz gimp when you can get the real gimp?

  134. Leigh Lowe

    KZN man arrested for allegedly having sex with cat.

    Pussy grabber?

  135. calli

    At the unveiling of her official portrait on Wednesday, Julia Gillard said she’d wanted it to reflect that “I was different to every other prime minister who came before me”, and she hoped it would send some messages to the schoolchildren who saw it in future years.

    Ahahahah! Did she think the artist would portray her as a man?

    What an idiot.

  136. C.L.

    According to the records, he (Cesar Sayocis) is a registered Republican …

    Ted Kennedy was a registered Democrat.

  137. Geriatric Mayfly

    ANGELA SHANAHAN
    What’s wrong with Tasmania? The plan to degenderise birth certificates is identity politics gone mad.

    It could get worse. Delivery attendants will be forbidden to announce the newborn’s sex as a hate crime against the gender confused. As for pre-birth scans a code of ‘ethics’ will forbid gender identification ‘Clump of Cells’ will be stamped on the photograph and relayed to the mother.

  138. Geriatric Mayfly

    KZN man arrested for allegedly having sex with cat.

    I’ve heard of claw marks after a torrid romp in the hay, but this is taking things to a new level.

  139. Cassie of Sydney

    “Geriatric Mayfly
    #2850191, posted on October 27, 2018 at 10:25 am
    KZN man arrested for allegedly having sex with cat.

    I’ve heard of claw marks after a torrid romp in the hay, but this is taking things to a new level.”

    Perhaps his defence can be that “as he now identifies as a tomcat, what law has he broken…after all cats can have sex with other cats!”

  140. Gab

    According to the records, he (Cesar Sayocis) is a registered Republican …

    Sure. And an unknown youtuber caused the Benghazi attack.

  141. C.L.

    It is one of the most abundant cornucopias of natural riches and potential on God’s earth …
    But Democrats are in charge of it.
    California Ranks as Poorest State, One of the Worst for Income Inequality.
    ———-
    Via Instapundit

  142. Herodotus

    The Paywallian article featuring TA’s call for unity has been invaded by the “get him out of Warringah” crowd in comments. looks like the Oz comments section might be being denatured al la Bolt’s.

  143. after all cats can have sex with other cats!

    Does monty having sex with himself count?

  144. Death Giraffe

    Snoopy
    #2850142, posted on October 27, 2018 at 8:54 am
    KZN man arrested for allegedly having sex with cat

    ..
    Incredible bravery.

  145. Death Giraffe

    Ted Kennedy was a registered Democrat.

    ..
    So was Ted Bundy.

  146. Infidel Tiger

    So the pipe bomb hoaxer is a Native American stripper.

    America is a great place. You can literally be anything you want to be.

  147. Top Ender

    Mother Lode, don’t forget The Lark Ascending too.

  148. Zatara

    Gore admits UN IPCC report was ‘torqued up’ to promote political action – ‘How [else] do they get the attention of policy-makers around the world?’

    PBS host Judy Woodruff to Former Vice President Al Gore: “They are painting a much more alarming picture of what we face than we had previously known…”

    Gore: “The language that the [UN] IPCC used in presenting it was torqued up a little bit, appropriately – how [else] do they get the attention of policy-makers around the world?”

    Gore admission that the UN IPCC report was “torqued up” in order to “get the attention of policy-makers around the world” is just the latest in a long line of evidence that the UN climate panel is nothing more than “a purely political body posing as a scientific institution.”

  149. Death Giraffe

    Or John Wayne Gacey, he meant.

  150. John Constantine

    What level of international trust and confidence will their shorten looting cartel build up?.

    Big international business targeted for looting, the Aussie dollar either supported with big interest rates or sold down, or just printed as required by crony corruption.

    Hiding international investments from the Aussie State will be a challenge, but well worth it.

    Aussie superannuation, as valuable as a spoken statement from shorten.

  151. Cassie of Sydney

    Herodotus
    #2850195, posted on October 27, 2018 at 10:33 am
    The Paywallian article featuring TA’s call for unity has been invaded by the “get him out of Warringah” crowd in comments. looks like the Oz comments section might be being denatured al la Bolt’s.”

    I noticed that with another article the other day…..inundated by an anti-Abbott crowd..no doubt GetUp is funding their subscription. I am going to write to the Oz and tell them that if this keeps on happening then they will lose me as a subscriber….my subscription is already hanging by a thread.

    Last week I commented on an another comment….the original comment was..

    “likes of Abbott and other Delcon jihadists”

    To which I replied….

    The only “terrorist” will be Phelps if she wins and I hope she doesn’t.

    My comment was rejected (within a few seconds).

    So I immediately sent an email to the Oz asking why it was acceptable for a commentator to describe Abbott as a “delcon jihadist” but my comment describing Phelps as a “terrorist” was deemed unacceptable.

    I haven’t received a reply.

    Moreover, that particular “rejected comment” has been deleted from my general “comments” folder. Interesting censorship by the Oz and I will be following up on this.

  152. John Constantine

    The first aim of their incoming shorten cartel will to be to make all Australia the same as Melbourne, but some places better weather.

    (With Adelaide’s electricity).

    After that comes their Great Big Crony Gulag.

    Show us your papers, citizen, you have nothing to fear from the State paramilitary Death squads if you are not hiding anything.

    Comrades.

  153. Leo G

    “I was different to every other prime minister who came before me”

    An odd one indeed.

  154. John Constantine

    Looking back at how their American left could win just by cornering republican politicians in lifts for a womanly yelling, we need to dump voting strategies and corner black handed turnbullites politicians until they respect their base more than they fear Chrissy pynefilth.

  155. 1735099

    probably a hoax
    That was quick – from a false flag to a hoax in a matter of hours.
    This bloke is the archetypical Trump supporter – thick, violent and ignorant – https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-america/suspicious-package-sent-to-senator-fbi-says-20181027-p50cak.html

  156. cuckoo

    the Tallis Scholars are indeed named after Thomas Tallis.

    One of the greatest men I have ever known was a music critic who composed the following limerick:

    The Tudor composer Tom Tallis
    Had eleven-odd inches of phallus
    With this noble machine
    He rogered the Queen
    ‘Til her cries of delight filled the palace

  157. Snoopy

    Death Giraffe
    #2850201, posted on October 27, 2018 at 10:36 am
    Snoopy
    #2850142, posted on October 27, 2018 at 8:54 am
    KZN man arrested for allegedly having sex with cat

    ..
    Incredible bravery.

    A gumboot would be useful accessory in such a situation I expect. Just like when marking a tomcat.

  158. Myrddin Seren

    How the invasion of Grenada was planned with a tourist map and a copy of ‘The Economist’

    Incredible account.

    Just a taste – how did the Marxists launch a coup to take over Granada in the first place ?:

    …in March 1979, when Maurice Bishop, head of the Marxist New JEWEL (Joint Endeavor for Welfare, Education, and Liberation) Movement, or NJM, staged an armed coup while Gairy was in New York trying to persuade the United Nations to conduct research on extraterrestrial life and UFOs.

    Clint Eastwood’s ‘Heartbreak Ridge’ looks like a sober documentary compared to the reality.

  159. stackja

    Cassie of Sydney
    #2850209, posted on October 27, 2018 at 10:46 am

    They can’t handle the truth.

  160. feelthebern

    Downer gets mentioned on Tucker Carlson again.

  161. Roger

    Laura Tingle – “the best in the business”, as Leigh Sales repeatedly opines on 7:30 – with a litany of wrongology on the Morrison government.

    Sure, they’re bad…but her remedy is for them to move further Left.

    She’s clearly grieving over Maladroit’s demise and should probably be on leave.

  162. Geriatric Mayfly

    A gumboot would be useful accessory in such a situation I expect. Just like when marking a tomcat.

    The use of a prophylactic in reverse, so to speak.

  163. Mitch M.

    Cesar Sayoc jnr, 56, charged with sending pipe bombs to prominent Democrats

    Possibly disturbed individual because it would take a long time to make all the necessary preparations.

  164. Mother Lode

    Apparently Khashoggi is in pieces now

    Truly a man apart.

  165. Infidel Tiger

    Downer gets mentioned on Tucker Carlson again.

    Lock him up!

  166. I should note that as a person who is neither young nor black, I was invited as a supporter of Turning Point. It was fun for my wife and me to be almost the only white people in the crowd, other than the press.

    This’d be the same press that’s continually preaching “diversity”?

  167. mh

    So the pipe bomb hoaxer is a Native American stripper.

    Now Elizabeth Warren – sometimes known as Pocahontas – has the answer to why she didn’t get a pipe bomb.

  168. feelthebern

    Remember when Haliburton was the devil?
    Now NY Times has a shot at Washington Post owner.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/26/opinion/amazon-bezos-pentagon-hq2.html?smtyp=cur&smid=tw-nytopinion

    How long before California Democrats start marching against the tech giants with gusto ?

  169. None

    Laura Tingle who’s bonking Sam Neill who offered to escort Geoffrey Rush to a party to make him feel better about being accused of sexual assault. Now on the surface I would say Rush is innocent and I think his defamation case should succeed (it seems the defence lawyers are arguing the Telegrsph’a scurrulous reports made absolutely no impact on his career and his career was a nothing burger anyway which kind of suggests their strategy is to limit damages not to prove truth as a defence). But regardless, Sam’a offer creates a nice little #metoo moment for Lara Tingle and her lista sIsta friends like Cattle Sales.

  170. None

    Cassie of Sydney

    #2850209, posted on October 27, 2018 at 10:46 am

    good on you for calling out the Australians double standards. Another way to put them into the pincer movement is to point out this double standard to competing press or two outfits like Media Watch. A little bit of a lynskey might do them good. Mind you the Australian is no longer a Broadsheet of any repute. When John Lyons published that b******* about Abbott wanting to invadw Iraq with three soldiers and the Australia’s editor backed him up, it was evident to me at least that this paper was no longer worth supporting.

  171. Bombs?

    All 13 packages were similar; manilla envelopes containing crude pipe bombs that consisted of a roughly 15-centimetre PVC pipe, a small clock, a battery, some wiring and “energetic material” that could ignite with heat, shock or friction, Wray said.

    Sounds like a packet of matches in a piece of soaker hose and a water timer. A flare at the very worst.
    The steroids have addled his brain and shrunk the old fella. He’s angry alright.

  172. Pedro:

    Hancock had a run in with bikies at his Ora Banda pub, and shortly after a bikie was shot dead at their campsite. No one was ever charged over that murder.

    Oh yes, I remember now – think I was working in Kalgoorlie Hospital ATT.
    Something to do with the rape of a very underage girl whose father had rifles and a very bad temper?
    Well done that man.
    One less piece of shit on the red dirt.

  173. Cassie of Sydney

    “None
    #2850263, posted on October 27, 2018 at 12:40 pm
    Laura Tingle who’s bonking Sam Neill who offered to escort Geoffrey Rush to a party to make him feel better about being accused of sexual assault. Now on the surface I would say Rush is innocent and I think his defamation case should succeed (it seems the defence lawyers are arguing the Telegrsph’a scurrulous reports made absolutely no impact on his career and his career was a nothing burger anyway which kind of suggests their strategy is to limit damages not to prove truth as a defence). But regardless, Sam’a offer creates a nice little #metoo moment for Lara Tingle and her lista sIsta friends like Cattle Sales.”

    Excellent analysis…agree entirely……whilst I reckon Geoffrey Rush is innocent….so is Craig McLaughlin. I posted about this a few days ago…what I find interesting and amusing is the hypocrisy of these people….I am very sure that in the lefty luvvie world…that is the narrow world that Tingler and her cohorts inhabit…the whole @metoo movement wasn’t meant to entangle people like poor Geoffrey. I haven’t seen any of them defending McLaughlin. Why? Because McLaughlin doesn’t have the cache of Rush. It is grotesque snobbery and elitism. I bet Sales, Tingler and Neill all came down heavy and pronounced judgment on Kavanaugh. Such is their hubris and narcissism that these stupid people refuse to see that once you let the “laughing genie” out of the bottle…..it will grow and grow and grow and begin biting everyone….because the genie doesn’t care about your green left politics, it doesn’t care if you are part of the “in crowd, it doesn’t care if you are a world famous Shakespearian actor…..the genie will not be satisfied until it has gobbled everyone up.

  174. Snoopy

    Sounds like a packet of matches in a piece of soaker hose and a water timer.

    It wasn’t even a timer, Gez. Just a very simple digital clock without an alarm.

  175. Infidel Tiger

    It’s a pretty good guide that anyone with a bumper sticker about politics is a fucking nutcase.

  176. Calli:

    I don’t do bottom spanking, Mark.

    Damn.

  177. Entropy

    Infidel Tiger
    #2850273, posted on October 27, 2018 at 1:06 pm
    It’s a pretty good guide that anyone with a bumper sticker about politics is a fucking nutcase

    Quite so.

  178. Infidel Tiger

    The Simpsons is getting rid of Apu, one of the greatest TV characters in history.

    What a fucking world.

  179. zyconoclast

    Keep NYC trash free adverts

    one

    two

  180. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Were the ‘MAGAbomber’ explosives in any way operational? The feds don’t seem to think so – even as they insist the 14 IEDs were ‘not a hoax’
    Cesar Sayoc Jr, 56, was arrested on Friday and charged with five federal crimes in the ‘MAGAbomber’ case
    His list of charges did not include attempted murder, giving a strong indication that the IEDs were not operational

  181. JC

    Infidel Tiger
    #2850273, posted on October 27, 2018 at 1:06 pm

    It’s a pretty good guide that anyone with a bumper sticker about politics is a fucking nutcase.

    Almost as bad as

    Baby on board.

    I would like to ram those fucks along with Greens supporter stickers.

  182. Tel

    Your word for today is “patsy”.

  183. H B Bear

    Now Elizabeth Warren – sometimes known as Pocahontas – has the answer to why she didn’t get a pipe bomb.

    Fauxcahontas blew herself up a couple of weeks ago.

  184. JC

    feelthebern
    #2850237, posted on October 27, 2018 at 11:54 am

    Downer gets mentioned on Tucker Carlson again.

    He shouldn’t travel overseas for a while.

  185. zyconoclast #2850282, posted on October 27, 2018 at 1:22 pm
    Keep NYC trash free adverts

    The ads in those photos are jokes, mock ups, right?

  186. Snoopy

    Infidel Tiger
    #2850278, posted on October 27, 2018 at 1:18 pm
    The Simpsons is getting rid of Apu, one of the greatest TV characters in history.

    What a fucking world.

    Carl and Dr Hibbert must be feeling nervous.

  187. C.L.

    Punter has splurged $200,000 on Winx at 2/9 (TAB).
    I guess he figures it’s not a lot of risk for some easy money.

  188. H B Bear

    The Simpsons is getting rid of Apu, one of the greatest TV characters in history.

    Don’t worry. If he is a real illegal immigrant he’ll be right back.

  189. Leo G

    … “energetic material” that could ignite with heat, shock or friction

    Granulated ammonium nitrate, I expect. Not even classed as an explosive.

  190. JC

    They love Beta.

    Beto O’Rourke tops $70M as race with Ted Cruz passes $100M; ActBlue donors sent staggering $53M
    Filed under 2018 Elections at 5 hrs ago

    Get a load of his quals.

    O’Rourke attended Carlos Rivera and Mesita Elementary schools.[13] After spending one year at El Paso High School, he enrolled in Woodberry Forest School, an all-male boarding school in Madison County, Virginia, in 1991.[14] While it was an academic opportunity, according to O’Rourke’s, it was also “a way to get some distance” from his “dominant” father.[14] O’Rourke attended Columbia University where in his junior year he co-captained Columbia’s heavyweight rowing crew.[15] He graduated in 1995 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English literature.[16][17] He is fluent in Spanish.[18]

    O’Rourke was arrested by University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) police in 1995 on burglary charges after jumping a fence on the university’s property.[19][20] The UTEP police department later declined to pursue charges.[20] O’Rourke was arrested, after a crash in Anthony, Texas at 3:00 a.m. on September 27, 1998, for driving while intoxicated (DWI), but the charges were dismissed in 1999 after he completed a court-recommended DWI program.[17][19][20][21] He has publicly discussed the incident since that time and has apologized for it.[22]

    Note, he was DUI.

    Beta also had a music career.

    Music career

    As a teen, he developed a love for punk music, along with two of his friends from El Paso— Mike Stevens and Arlo Klahr.[14] They each began to learn to play instruments, and by the beginning of his freshman year at Columbia in 1991, the trio recruited drummer Cedric Bixler-Zavala (eventual vocalist for At the Drive-In and The Mars Volta), and they formed the band Foss.[23] During their summers they toured the US and Canada.[14] O’Rourke was a bassist. The group released a self-titled demo and a 7″ record, “The El Paso Pussycats”, on Western Breed Records in 1993.[23]

    Then, Beta left the music scene for an illustrious business career…. as a nanny.
    Business career (1995–2005)

    Following college, O’Rourke worked as a live-in nanny for a family in Manhattan, then at Hedley’s Humpers as an art mover, before working with his uncle at a startup internet service provider.[14][24] During this time, he fell into a depression, unsure of what to do with his life.[14] However, his friends Stevens and Klahr (along with his friend from college, David Guinn) joined him in New York, and they rented and renovated an inexpensive 2000-square-foot factory loft in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.[14] Interested in the publishing industry, he found a job as a proofreader at H. W. Wilson Company in the Bronx, and wrote short stories and songs in his free time.[14] He began to miss his family and lifestyle in El Paso,[14] and returned to the city in 1998.[25]

    After coming home, O’Rourke wanted to tackle the “brain drain” of El Paso, or the exodus of youth because of lack of opportunity.[14] The following year, he co-founded Stanton Street Technology, an internet services and software company that develops websites and software.[24][26] His wife, Amy, operates the business as of March 2017.[27] For a few years, the company also published an online (and briefly print) newspaper, also called Stanton Street, that O’Rourke modeled on alternative periodicals like the Village Voice and t

    Then onto City Council.

    El Paso City Council (2005–2011)

    Yep, he’s the reincarnated Bobby Kennedy.

  191. Infidel Tiger

    While people are now erasing darkies from TV.

    We knew this day would come.

  192. zyconoclast

    zyconoclast #2850282, posted on October 27, 2018 at 1:22 pm
    Keep NYC trash free adverts

    The ads in those photos are jokes, mock ups, right?

    Apparently they are similar to others such as Boston sports supporters

  193. C.L.

    Following college, O’Rourke worked as a live-in nanny for a family in Manhattan, then at Hedley’s Humpers as an art mover, before working with his uncle at a startup internet service provider. During this time, he fell into a depression, unsure of what to do with his life. However, his friends Stevens and Klahr (along with his friend from college, David Guinn) joined him in New York, and they rented and renovated an inexpensive 2000-square-foot factory loft in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Interested in the publishing industry, he found a job as a proofreader at H. W. Wilson Company in the Bronx, and wrote short stories and songs in his free time. He began to miss his family and lifestyle in El Paso, and returned to the city in 1998.

    I can’t work out if this a Seinfeld script for Cosmo Kramer or George Costanza.

  194. JC

    Compare Cruz to Beta’s resume.

    Cruz attended two private high schools: Faith West Academy near Katy, Texas;[23] and Second Baptist High School in Houston, from which he graduated as valedictorian in 1988.[12][24][25]

    During high school, Cruz participated in a Houston-based group known at the time as the Free Market Education Foundation, a program that taught high school students the philosophies of economists such as Milton Friedman and Frédéric Bastiat.[17][26]

    Cruz graduated cum laude from Princeton University in 1992 with a Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy[27] from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.[2][28] While at Princeton, he competed for the American Whig-Cliosophic Society’s Debate Panel and won the top speaker award at both the 1992 U.S. National Debating Championship and the 1992 North American Debating Championship.[29] In 1992, he was named U.S. National Speaker of the Year and, with his debate partner David Panton, also Team of the Year by the American Parliamentary Debate Association.[29] Cruz and Panton later represented Harvard Law School at the 1995 World Debating Championship, losing in the semi-finals to a team from Australia.[30][31][32] Princeton’s debate team named their annual novice championship after Cruz.[32]

    Cruz’s senior thesis at Princeton investigated the separation of powers; its title, Clipping the Wings of Angels, draws its inspiration from a passage attributed to US President James Madison: “If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.” Cruz argued that the drafters of the Constitution intended to protect the rights of their constituents, and that the last two items in the Bill of Rights offer an explicit stop against an all-powerful state.[10][33]

    After graduating from Princeton, Cruz attended Harvard Law School, graduating magna cum laude in 1995 with a Juris Doctor degree.[2][34] While at Harvard Law, he was a primary editor of the Harvard Law Review, an executive editor of the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy, and a founding editor of the Harvard Latino Law Review.[28] Referring to Cruz’s time as a student at Harvard Law, Professor Alan Dershowitz said, “Cruz was off-the-charts brilliant”.[35][36][37][38] At Harvard Law, Cruz was a John M. Olin Fellow in Law and Economics.[

    We can despise Harvard all we want, but getting into Harvard law, if you not a legacy or affirmative actioner, it’s really hard. Harder still if you’re Chinese.

    Legal career
    Clerkships
    Ted Cruz in Nashua, New Hampshire, on April 17, 2015

    Cruz served as a law clerk to J. Michael Luttig of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit in 1995[39][41] and to William Rehnquist, Chief Justice of the United States, in 1996.[2] Cruz was the first Hispanic to clerk for a Chief Justice of the United States.[42]
    Private practice

    After Cruz finished his clerkships, he took a position with Cooper, Carvin & Rosenthal, now known as Cooper & Kirk, PLLC, from 1997 to 1998.[43] While with the firm, Cruz worked on matters relating to the National Rifle Association, and helped prepare testimony for the impeachment proceedings against President Bill Clinton.[44] In 1998, Cruz was briefly one of the attorneys who represented Congressman John Boehner during his litigation against Congressman Jim McDermott, which concerned the alleged leak of an illegal recording of a phone conversation whose participants included Boehner.[45][46]
    Bush administration

    Cruz joined the George W. Bush presidential campaign in 1999 as a domestic policy adviser, advising then-Governor George W. Bush on a wide range of policy and legal matters, including civil justice, criminal justice, constitutional law, immigration, and government reform.[43]

    Cruz assisted in assembling the Bush legal team, devising strategy, and drafting pleadings for filing with the Supreme Court of Florida and U.S. Supreme Court in the case Bush v. Gore during the 2000 Florida presidential recounts, leading to two wins for the Bush team.[39][47] Cruz recruited future Chief Justice John Roberts and noted attorney Mike Carvin to the Bush legal team.[44]

    After Bush took office, Cruz served as an Associate Deputy Attorney General in the U.S. Justice Department[2][47] and as the director of policy planning at the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.[2][35][47]
    Texas Solicitor General

    and then

    Return to private practice

    After leaving the Solicitor General position in 2008, Cruz worked in a private law firm in Houston, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP, often representing corporate clients, until he was sworn in as U.S. senator from Texas in 2013.[10][39][67] At Morgan Lewis, he led the firm’s U.S. Supreme Court and national appellate litigation practice.[67] In 2009 and 2010, he formed and then abandoned a bid for state attorney general when the incumbent Attorney General Greg Abbott, who hired Cruz as Solicitor General, decided to run for re-election.[12]

    D’rats perfer Beta because he looks like Bobby Kennedy and can use a skate board.

  195. zyconoclast

    The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) ruled that the woman, known only as Mrs S, was convicted by a lower court in Vienna for disparaging religious doctrines and was ordered to pay a 480 euros fine plus legal fees.

    She appealed the decision and her case as thrown out by the Court of Appeal in the Austrian capital as well as the country’s Supreme Court.

    The 47-year-old from Vienna was reported to have held seminars in which she made the blasphemous comments while debating the marriage between Mohammed and Aisha, a six-year-old girl.

  196. John Constantine

    Speaking of going off like a bomb?.

    Friday’s Wycheproof store sheep sale blew up all the meatworks collusion plans to drive down the price of sheep.

    A few late season storms in New South Wales, and some small areas of South Australia and southern victoria with green feed was all it took to flip oversupply into a shortfall.

    Plenty of ewes over 300 bucks, lots over 200 bucks each.

    If Paris signed convention requires destocking, but market signals are for a massive restocking push, the State will be Required to act to make livestock unattractive through compliance burdens costing more than a bubbling market offers in dollars.

    It looks now as if as soon as it rains next Autumn, anything capable of birthing a lamb will be joined, so no ewe mutton for meatworks at any almost any price.

    The big gamble is that if you pay 300 bucks a head now, and it doesn’t rain in autumn, it gets all embarrassing.

  197. mh

    The Simpsons is getting rid of Apu, one of the greatest TV characters in history.

    The Left have been campaigning for a while on this. SBS were heavily promoting a documentary The Problem With Apu. I didn’t see it though.

  198. Colonel Crispin Berka, King's Fusiliers Corps.

    Greetings, I bear a gift.

    https://i.imgur.com/1K5Dc4O.jpg

    Constantin Reliu is alive even though a Romanian court has rejected the man’s claim after he was officially registered as deceased. A court spokeswoman said Friday that 63-year-old Constantin Reliu lost his case in the northeast city of Vasului because he appealed too late. The ruling is final.

    I thought it might be an Onion headline gone astray, and was not exactly reassured when it was being circulated by the Daily Mail. But even the Guardian and CBS News are repeating it, so I guess it is real.
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/romania-constantin-reliu-battle-prove-not-dead-annul-death-certificate/

    It’s just down to probability. Douglas Adams wrote enough material that eventually some of it had to come true.

  199. Twostix

    An indian nationalist? How are they going to explain that?

    Trump’s even realigning the left’s totem pole now. Is there anything the man can’t do?

  200. calli

    I saw what you did there, ‘stix.

    Chuckle.

  201. Cpt Seahawks

    I arrived late at Belmont Racecourse that day, happened to park very close to the car, noticed the lookouts, everywhere, Don should have been aware.

  202. Twostix

    The indian need not worry.

    In 15 years time a nice tenured position at a university will await him.

    As awaited Bill Ayers and Bernadette Dohrn.

  203. Entropy

    First they come for Apu, then They will come for Koothrappali.

  204. Confused Old Misfit

    I wish they’d just come for The Simpsons. Please!

  205. Steve trickler

    In 1855 Toronto, a fireman and a clown walk into a brothel…..

    The History Bloke in fine form.



    A few laughs along the way.

  206. rickw

    His list of charges did not include attempted murder, giving a strong indication that the IEDs were not operational

    Mailing plumbing fittings covered in duct tape isn’t attempted murder??!!

  207. Infidel Tiger

    Can we compile a complete list of darkies to be removed drom TV please.

    I don’t watch much TV anymore so can’t assist.

  208. Entropy

    That history dudes story is a good demonstration of why full on libertarianism doesn’t work in populations of any size. It is an agrarian fancy just as much as agrarian socialism.

  209. rickw

    A gumboot would be useful accessory in such a situation I expect. Just like when marking a tomcat.

    We used to do the tomcats on the farm like that, welding gloves mandatory. Also found that dental rubber bands worked much better than lamb elastrators.

  210. notafan

    Just about every gas station, no matter how isolated the location in Tennessee Kentucky etc was manned by an Apu, way back in September 2015 when I was in the US

    It’s a stereotype because it’s a stereotype.

    A lot kinder than those slack jawed yokels.

  211. .

    That history dudes story is a good demonstration of why full on libertarianism doesn’t work in populations of any size.

    Bullshit.

  212. Tel

    While people are now erasing darkies from TV

    Just in time for TV to become irrelevant…

  213. Entropy

    That was too easy. Mainly because it’s true.

  214. While people are now erasing darkies from TV

    Is Ray “Darkie” Martin gone yet?
    (I don’t watch a helluva lot of TV)

  215. Mother Lode

    While people are now erasing darkies from TV

    Just in time for TV to become irrelevant…

    No coincidence. It is the way that TV has made itself irrelevant.

  216. Mailing plumbing fittings …

    There’s the problem.

    US Male.

  217. mh

    What about the Indian from Big Bang theory?

    If Apu is gone, then that guy should go.

  218. .

    Entropy
    #2850350, posted on October 27, 2018 at 2:52 pm

    That was too easy. Mainly because it’s true.

    No, you’re spouting bollocks.

    There is virtually no difference between principled conservatism and libertarianism/classical liberalism in practice.

    Unless you are arguing that principled conservatism is anti-freedom, which is left-wing nonsense.

  219. JC

    Peter Sellers was always the best Apu.

  220. .

    Getting rid of Apu? They did a pretty good thing explaining why that is bullshit when Marge reads Lisa a story about southern planters.

    The whinging Indian bloke’s problem with Apu is…that a white dude does the voice. Dangerous stuff. If people can’t pretend to be other people, can you really identify as X, and do Arabs and Africans really belong in Poland or Finland?

    I didn’t think they’d take it this far; but that is where is this woke nonsense ends – in strict, politically correct segregation.

  221. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    While people are now erasing darkies from TV

    what’s TV?

  222. .

    Long form podcasts are where it is at.

    Wow. Woah.

  223. Steve trickler

    The boom at 2:44? Something to think about.

    Getting close to 500 mph – 804.672 kph at this point.

    A long way from supersonic.



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