Open Forum: December 22, 2018

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1,512 Responses to Open Forum: December 22, 2018

  1. stackja
    #2890547, posted on December 22, 2018 at 9:47 am
    2GB discussion that 20 somethings don’t know who Hunch is.

    Nick
    #2890548, posted on December 22, 2018 at 9:49 am
    Stack, I know 20 somethings who don’t know who SHY is.

    I know 20 somethings who don’t know how many states make up Australia.

  2. Zyconoclast

    We do remember pynofilth trying to suck get up into working with him to destroy non turnfailure liberals.

    Chrissy doesn’t try to suck, it’s the one thing he is good at.
    Long, hard and often.

  3. JC

    Sold it, Helen. Went off the shelf last December. Farming and me don’t mix. I’m terribly allergic to grass. although Omaris nasal spray is a miracle.

    vac pack and sell as preprepared meal, just cook and add vegies of choice, with some handy recipies and pretty pictures stuck on the packet. Price according to restaurant, not weight

    Don’t forget though, the writing over the packaging has to be in Japanese scrawl in order to make it look authentic.

  4. Helen

    Nup 150 g portions @ $25.00 per main only makes $166 per kg. Pricing not my forte. May need to be more inventive. It would have to be $75.00 per main at 150 g serve to make 500.00 per kg.

  5. Lean beef basically tastes like a lesbian’s bike shorts.

    I.T. sure goes that extra mile in research, so that we don’t have to.

  6. Marbling of fat in grass fed beef isn’t going to be easy to achieve.

  7. Heh, Helen, cattle, eh? They are nearly as stupid as Merino sheep.

    I’ll challenge that statement.
    The diametric opposite is actually true.
    Cattle are as intelligent as sheep are dumb.
    Particularly true with Bos Indicus.

  8. Helen

    Yep Japanese writing and a translation to english, complete with the usual grammar errors for authenticity. And Japanese pictures, maybe a swordsman tough, discriminating, manly. As manly as one can be in a dress.

    On second thoughts, maybe I will leave the marketing up to others.

    l’ll just fatten the cows – but I need a ranch in the inside country – where the grass is green and rich.

  9. Tel

    Are there any potential SCOTUS picks that are more conservative or politically to the right of Trump’s first two picks?

    Janice Rogers Brown

    Yes, admittedly she’s from California, but has somehow remained sane despite that thus demonstrating incredible strength of character. Also the “Progressive” morons hate her so, Trump should pick a fight over Brown which is what he does so well.

  10. Helen

    Marbling of fat in grass fed beef isn’t going to be easy to achieve.

    Hence the grain feeders.

  11. mh

    COMPLICIT. But Schumer wont give a fvck.

  12. johanna

    Helen – the big marble is called the Tom Bowler. Dunno how that would go as a marketing tool.

    Socrates – some cattle are smarter than others, particularly those which have been domesticated or semi-domesticated. They have been bred for temperament and brains, not just meat.

    But your average bred-for-the-abbatoir beast is as dumb as a box of rocks.

  13. RobK

     There’s got to be room for some wank value upside on “luxury” pork products
    Don’t the Spanish do pork fed in olive groves?

  14. OldOzzie

    The so-called ‘adults’ in the Trump administration are surprisingly childish

    Mattis’s petulant resignation fits a pattern

    Roger Kimball

    What Malcolm said of the Thane of Cawdor — ‘nothing in his life/ Became him like the leaving it’ — cannot be said of General James Mattis’s leavetaking his position as Secretary of Defense.

    Let me first say that General Mattis has long served his country with distinction, betraying immense care for the Marines and soldiers under his command as well as condign fierceness towards the enemies of civilization. As Secretary of Defense, he obliterated ISIS as a fighting force and has overseen the beginnings of a critical upgrade of America’s military infrastructure, which had been allowed to atrophy under the lead-from-behind posturing of Barack Obama.

    Like President Trump, I liked the fact that Mattis’s nickname was ‘Mad Dog,’ though I understand he dislikes the soubriquet. After the America-last, apologize-first foreign policy of Obama, it was nice to have a Secretary of Defense with sufficient backbone to compliment the steeliness of a robust Commender-in-Chief such as Donald Trump.

    At the same time, I remember several conservative friends expressing reservations about Mattis when his nomination for the post of SecDef was announced. He was, it was widely rumored, a Hillary supporter and, what’s more, his view of foreign policy was much more in line with the Bush-Obama species of moralism than Trump’s ‘we’ll-do-what’s-in-our-national-interest’ pragmatism.

    So it was hardly surprising that rumors of Mattis’s imminent departure have circulated at least since last summer. As the Trump administration matured and the President’s policy of ‘America First’ (which does not, as POTUS perhaps neglects to point out frequently enough, mean ‘America Alone’) came increasingly on line in his foreign policy, it was inevitable that fissures between Mattis and Trump would open up.

    Predictably, the neo-con fraternity has its collective knickers in a twist over Mattis’s announced departure. Max Boot, who is always good for a laugh these days, epitomized the angst in some recent tweets. ‘Jim Mattis is gone,’ he said in one. ‘God help America. And the world.’ But then it has been obvious for some time that for Max the criterion of a good decision is that it was not taken by Donald Trump.

    For example, when the President announced a couple of days back that he was withdrawing American troops from Syria — thus taking another step towards fulfilling his campaign promise to extricate America from needless foreign entanglements — Max skirled that the decisions was ‘a giant Christmas gift to our enemies.’ But one wag pointed out that it was not so long ago that Max said the opposite, insisting ‘Trump can’t do anything right — we don’t need troops in Syria.’ Okee-doke. I am not sure if that is Walt-Whimanesque logic (‘Do I contradict myself? Very well I contradict myself. I am large. I contain multitudes’) or something out of the more recondite precincts of Hegelian dialectic where, the sage of Berlin told us, ‘X = not-X.’ Whatever the explanation, Max’s pirouettes do put us on notice about what to expect from those NeverTrump quarters.

    It should also be said that that even if the President and his Secretary of Defense were in perfect accord about things, it is hardly surprising that a Secretary of Defense should leave after two years. Indeed, by the time he departs, at the end of February, Jim Mattis will have served longer than the last three Secretaries of Defense: Leon Panetta, Chuck Hagel, and Ash Carter.

    The sad thing about Jim Mattis’s exit is his grandstanding, not to say petulant and immature, mode of departure. The letter announcing his resignation, circulated yesterday, is half bureaucratic boilerplate (‘I have been privileged to serve,’ ‘proud of the progress,’ etc., etc.).

    But those nuggets are set in a jelly of snarky recrimination about how he, Jim Mattis, has always believed that our strength as a nation is ‘inextricably linked’ to our system of ‘alliance and partnerships.’ Further, he says we must treat our allies ‘with respect’ while remaining ‘resolute and unambiguous’ about ‘those countries whose strategic interests are increasingly in tension with ours,’ e.g., Russia and China.

    You do not need an advance degree in hermeneutics to unpack the implications of such statements. ‘I, Jim Mattis, am the adult in the room. I want to foster our partnerships with our allies — unlike some people — and I want to be tough with respect to opponents like Russia and China’ — again, not stated but clearly implied, unlike some.

    The implication is made all-but-explicit in the next paragraph which begins ‘Because you have the right to have a Secretary of Defense whose views are better aligned with yours on these and other subjects…’ Well, because of all this, I quit. In other words, I am the good guy who wants to reward our friends and stand up to our enemies, whereas you, Donald Trump, do not.

    I think there is plenty of room for disagreement and shades of opinion about how the United States ought to conduct its foreign policy. I can understand how Donald Trump’s heterodox behavior and rhetoric raises eyebrows among establishment diplomats. The President speaks a novel language most of us are unused to hearing among politicians. I believe that thus far the he has been admirably resolute in his dealings with Russia and China while at the same time regularly reminding us that ‘it would be a good thing, not a bad thing’ to have good relations with both countries. I think that is true, notwithstanding the thuggishness of Putin and the neo-Maoist ambitions of Xi.

    In any event, the larger point here is that Secretary Mattis’s letter of resignation exhibits a petulance and smallness unbecoming a man of his distinction, accomplishments, and position. I was sorry to see it. Curiously, however, it was of a piece with the behavior of other former high-ranking officials in the Trump administration. The most conspicuous is Rex Tillerson, Trump’s first Secretary of State, whose chief qualification for the job seems to have been that he looked the part. Since being abruptly fired, he has taken to sniping at the President publicly, an unbecoming and counterproductive habit. The takeaway, alas, is that many of the figures who were hailed as the adults in the Trump administration have turned out to be grandstanding partisans. In the aftermath of Mattis’s resignation, the spigots of fake news are gleefully disgorging dire predictions of ‘global chaos’ and ‘international shock waves.’ The whole spectacle is childish and distasteful, and it reminds us that it is not always as easy to tell who are the real adults in the room as we might think.

  15. jo

    Spanish pork is the best, my wife doesn’t eat pork generally except when we are in Spain.

  16. Notafan

    Black pigs in oak groves for iberican ham

    baby pigs for suckling pig segovian style

    I am planing on eating both kinds in a couple of weeks 🙂

  17. Notafan

    looks anxiously around waiting for spelling squawker to arrive and ponce

  18. Notafan

    looks anxiously around waiting for sp elling squawker to arrive and ponce

  19. RobK

    The best pork I have tasted I bought privately from a local grower who fed them only lupins and cereal seconds from his local seedworks. Outstanding flavour. A joy to eat.

  20. Infidel Tiger

    Spanish ham is reason enough that we must pray Europe survives.

  21. OldOzzie

    Palaszczuk hikes public service jobs

    Queensland’s public service workforce grew by another 1000 jobs in the September quarter — bringing the number of new employees since Labor came to power in 2015 to 30,000.

    The increase is more than double the 14,000 jobs slashed during Campbell Newman’s reign.

    The size of the workforce has grown from 196,856 full-time equivalent employees at the end of the Liberal National Party’s term in January 2015 to 226,469 in September this year.

    n June 2017, there were 212,639 public servants employed by the Queensland government. The figures were in the July 1 to September 30 public sector employment report released to The Weekend Australian yesterday.

    The release comes less than two weeks after the Labor government’s mid-year economic ­review showed a $1 billion blowout in employee expenses in the next four years. That was on top of a $3.5bn blowout revealed in June. Queensland’s annual wage bill is now more than $7bn higher than during the final year of the Newman government.

    Premier Annastacia Palas­zczuk has repeatedly defended her government’s hiring policies.

    The figures come ahead of the release of a review into the public service growth by former QUT vice-chancellor Peter Coaldrake.

    Opposition Deputy Leader Tim Mander said the government had lost control of the state’s ­finances.

  22. Zyconoclast

    The NHS destroys another young life.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-bristol-46634002

    With unlimited funds and expertise for trans freak surgery, is there anything they can do to fix this for a normal boy?

  23. calli

    I had a half piglet in Toledo in a cafe under the aquaduct. I ordered “roast pork”, thinking it would be the usual sliced stuff, a bit of crackling and some veggies a la Sunday roast.

    No dice. Just half a porker on a plate drowned in delicious sauce.

    Now you make me want to go back, nota.

  24. OldOzzie

    What Makes Trump Run

    It is an understatement to say that many Americans, particularly mass-media pundits, are baffled by President Trump’s “polarizing” behavior. There has never been any public figure quite like him: a president who speaks his mind so forcefully, often impolitely, while acting impetuously.

    Let me suggest that Trump’s behavior is perfectly understandable if viewed in the context of his business background. As the Obama administration reflected governance by an egalitarian community activist, the current administration is rule by a hotel magnate.

    This observation reflects my first-hand experience. Beginning in the late 1950s until the mid-1970s my father owned multiple large hotels (most with bars and restaurants) in New York City, Chicago, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., Palm Beach, Fl, Puerto Rico, New Orleans, and elsewhere. Unlike Trump, he had stockholders but, very much like Trump, he exercised power as an unchallenged boss, able to fire anybody in an instant for whatever reason no matter how flimsy.

    Overseeing a hotel empire is comparable to managing a fire or police department in a Detroit-like city. Hotels operate 24/7, 365 days a year and exist in near perpetual crisis. I grew up hearing about electricity or hot water suddenly going kaput, reservation systems gone awry, unions threating picket lines, or health inspectors warning about closing restaurants while an awaiting mass transit strike meant that hotel workers could not show up for their jobs. Meanwhile, banks might threaten receivership unless a half-million mortgage payment was made by next Monday, but the money did not yet exist.

    Then there are endless lawsuits, real and fake, along with employees filing grievance claims on everything from wrongful termination to racial discrimination. There were periodic missives from government taxing agencies and multiple other regulators concerning such things as reporting employee tips and overtime. No doubt, my father’s hotel empire helped dozens of lawyers pay their children’s college tuition and finance nice suburban homes. And to top it off, big-city hotels are incredibly multicultural with a polyglot staffs whose cultures can conflict.

    The upshot is that turning a profit requires a hard-headed “unpresidential” sometimes frantic management approach quite different from the style embraced by our political elites. Key decisions often had to be made on the spot, not shoved off for “further study.” Can you imagine President Obama personally overseeing a large downtown Chicago hotel with 250 poorly educated employees all the while trying to put 500 heads in beds 365 days a year against competitors fighting for the same clientele? He wouldn’t last a week.

    Hotels are not a business for delicate egos and soft rhetoric. Indeed, the willingness to take huge financial risks and successfully browbeat tough opponents is a recipe for creating an industry dominated by super-sized egos or, to use Spanish slang, people with cojones. Nice guys harboring self-doubts or are unwilling to stage temper-tantrums fall by the wayside. Its all Darwinian.

    Leadership by necessity is highly personal. You cannot appoint a committee to investigate when a desperate 9 P.M. call from the front desk tells you that there’s no hot water and hundreds of guests are threatening to check out and are refusing to pay. You telephone the chief engineer and you command him, no ifs, ands, or buts, to haul his ass down to the boiler room and fix the problem. If he explains that he’s on vacation, or that the problem is not fixable, you fire him and contract his assistant and make him an offer he cannot refuse — “fix the f…king water problem or join the unemployment line.” If that doesn’t work, find somebody who can solve the mess and don’t worry about being offensive.

  25. Hence the grain feeders.

    Good thinking. That would achieve it.
    Though we’d need the Macquarie Dictionary to redefine the word “grass” to get away with it.

  26. OldOzzie

    Whole Suckling Pig Served on a Platter with apple in mouth, then taken away for carving at Capitan Torres Restaurant Liverpool Street Sydney with Sangria, was excellent – Minimum 10 and had to order 3 days in advance

  27. Old Ozzie: Speaking only for myself, but having flown an R-22 mustering aplenty (but not enough for my thrill gene to be satiated) the thought of a drone scares the living daylights out of me.
    Far from go up & bump one, I’m not sure I’d leave the ground were a drone around.
    My vital signs are adjusting just from writing this, (pulse, blood pressure, sweat glands, quivering hands, etc)
    The two things which scared me the most were power lines and a shotgun shell falling through the floor & jamming a pedal.
    The thought of a drone in the sky at the same time as me, scares me a whole lot more.

  28. johanna

    In case there was any doubt that the nanny state is dementedly trying to spoil Christmas, check this out:

    Natassia Chrysanthos

    It’s the ultimate anti-Christmas feast: three oysters, one-and-a-half prawns, an 80g slice of roast turkey and a serving of vegetables.

    If that doesn’t quite fill you up, consider dessert – a cup of fruit with two scoops of ice cream or 40g of Christmas pudding.

    A healthy Christmas lunch.

    It seems highly unsatisfactory, but it’s what our plates would look like come December 25 if we stick to the Australian Dietary Guidelines.

    “I don’t think anybody meets the guidelines,” admits Clare Collins, Professor in Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Newcastle. “If you were to try, there’d be no ham, that’s for sure.”

    Natassia has a Grik surname, and is (despite being paid by Fauxfacts) obviously disgusted. For certain, her Grik family would be appalled and insulted if she took the ghastly Australian Dietary Guidelines as gospel. They might contemplate taking her to hospital as being obviously ill, or perhaps pregnant.

    I am pretty comfortable in believing the the ADGs will not be featuring on Cats’ and Kittehs’ menus this Christmas.

  29. Mitch M.

    The Lazarus Effect, Dr. Sam Parnia.

    She is a critical care specialist with a resuscitation focus.

    Not surprisingly what we see on the screen is very misleading regarding resuscitation. It is much less successful in real life and the rate hasn’t changed in decades.

    The early chapters are tedious, the “What it is like to die” chapter is absolutely fascinating. It defies common sense, religious ideas about life after death, ideas about consciousness, it mocks the current neuroscience approach to understanding brain function, and very much challenges the view the awareness, cognition and consciousness requires a very active brain.

  30. Helen

    The grain feeders are out in the paddock of grass – it would be similar to eating the grass in full grain – just fed separately, so I think grass fed would be do-able.

  31. Tom

    Great stuff, Old Ozzie. The pieces you’ve reproduced on Mattis and Trump’s hotel background are excellent reading — not least because my Paywallian subscription is effectively unusable as its spastic website tends to freeze my laptop whenever I try to download content.

  32. OldOzzie

    Socrates at the Pub
    #2890782, posted on December 22, 2018 at 4:16 pm

    Old Ozzie: Speaking only for myself, but having flown an R-22 mustering aplenty (but not enough for my thrill gene to be satiated) the thought of a drone scares the living daylights out of me.

    Socrates at the Pub,

    If you were one of the guys I see mustering in the Outback on Outback Pilots – its like watching a Ballet Dancer/Acrobat performing in the air, I take my hat off to you and hold you in awe.

    Have been up in R22s in UK and in OZ in Outback, as well as a number of R44s in Australian Outback – Great Little helicopters

    Was thinking about getting above and dropping down onto Drone – Too Dangerous?

  33. OldOzzie

    Ruinous energy policy is all pain with no gain

    Chris Kenny

    The Liberal Party has torn itself apart for a decade on climate and energy policy, and it is going to continue to do that next year as it battles crucial state and federal elections. The NSW moderates, who have taken over the state branch with an insidious brand of factionalism and patronage, are like the Blob from the 1950s sci-fi movie: spineless, pointless and smothering everything in their path. No one knows what the moderates stand for; most adroit at targeting those in Liberal ranks who espouse conservative values and policies, they echo Labor and leftist attacks on the Coalition and shrink from debate except against their own.

    Their electoral legacy is there to behold: a minority federal government wallowing in the polls, a Victorian opposition trounced by a hard-left Labor government shrouded in scandal, and a NSW government facing the prospect of defeat despite presiding over an economy and infrastructure agenda that is the envy of the nation.

    Federally, the 2016 electoral ­result tells the story. The Coalition has not been usurped by a rampant Labor Party. Rather, the right of centre has fractured, with One Nation and other minor parties and independents reaping the benefits. Labor has benefited from this mainly through preferences rather than a boosted primary vote — until the open warfare in Liberal ranks after the knifing of Malcolm Turnbull. Bill Shorten is the luckiest Australian since Steven Bradbury; he looks set to take a political victory that is the equivalent of winning the crucial last set of a Wimbledon final by receiving four double faults.

    Don Harwin is the latest so-called moderate to display political and economic ineptitude, undercutting the re-election chances of his own team and the Morrison government, such as they are. As NSW Energy Minister, he proposes zero net emissions for his state by 2050 and accuses the Morrison government of ­refusing to build this target into national policy because of the federal Liberal Party’s “climate wars”.

    Needless to say, he is portrayed as a hero by Labor, the Greens, the ABC, much of the Canberra press gallery and the vested corporate interests of the energy sector.

    Harwin is unlikely ever to be asked, let alone answer, the obvious questions. Why would NSW reduce emissions to net zero? How could this benefit the planet when global emissions are rising? What would it cost? Who would pay? Has he commissioned a cost-benefit analysis? Why does NSW export cheap energy to the world in the form of coal but baulk at further use of this resource itself? Will his policy reduce or curtail global temperatures? What science and technology will be available to deal with these issues in 2050? How will people on fixed and low incomes deal with higher electricity prices? How will the reliability of supply be guaranteed? And, if voters really wanted to pursue such futile, risky and expensive climate gestures, why wouldn’t they just vote Labor or Greens?

    It is difficult to grasp why Liberals would not focus on price and reliability to protect jobs, support families and underpin economic opportunity. This should be core business for those interested in mainstream politics.

    If Harwin, Turnbull or anyone else could point to a looming crisis that could be averted by compromising our energy needs, then it might be worth considering. But they have to do better than the familiar mantra, seldom interrogated, that climate change is real and we must do something about it now. Those who claim to back a scientific approach often lack ­rational arguments. It seems silly to have to go through the basics but perhaps we should. Most of this debate is stuck in a superficial reverb about a dire crisis and a proposed response without justification of either.

    End of Part 1

  34. zyconoclast

    The secret to going from ‘childless’ to ‘child-free’ is going overseas

    It’s been 18 months since our last failed round of IVF, and this is the happiest I’ve been in years.

    I thought I was so ready for IVF and everything that went with it. My mum is an expert on research in psychosocial aspects of assisted reproductive technology, and I’m the everything bagel of ART kids (the product of IVF surrogacy and donor sperm, with just a hint of adoption).

    I read all the information and statistics. I knew that I would have my best chance if we tried before I was 30. We were ready.

    But it turns out that I was ready for everything except failure and the need to lean on Mum’s other expert subject – her PhD in women’s experiences of infertility.

    IVF is expensive, and the hormones can be extremely taxing. The egg retrieval is one of the most painful things I’ve ever experienced (and I once had to put my own elbow back in the socket after a quad-bike accident).

    Unless you know a man in your life willing to donate sperm for home insemination, lesbians have fairly limited options when it comes to creating life. One of the important parts of the process is knowing your emotional and financial limits.

    While this story has a sad beginning, it actually has a very happy middle, and an ending still to be written. Because, although it turns out the journey from “childless” to “child-free” is long and difficult, there’s plenty of light, love and support in that tunnel (though, given the subject, perhaps a different visual metaphor would be better).

    My wife and I tried the first thing everyone does when at first they don’t succeed – we got a dog. Then we discovered that just taking daily Claratyne wasn’t as effective as we hoped, and now Percival runs around a farm in the country.

    Then we did the thing most people tell you never to do while grieving, and sold our house. We’d bought a four-bedroom house in a suburb full of young families, ready to fill it with kids. Staying in such a place is never a good way to heal. So, we renovated it, sold it for a tidy profit, bought the nicest two-bedroom inner-city apartment we could afford and set about rediscovering what we wanted our lives to look like.

    We started dining more at restaurants, we filled the apartment with beautiful things that you just couldn’t have with a small child around and we started going to the gym four days a week to make ourselves physically stronger. We slept in, made last-minute plans to go to Sydney, and focused more on our careers. We did everything that’s difficult to do with kids. And it was wonderful.

    The easiest way to transition from needing kids right now to being comfortable putting them off is to go on more long-haul flights. While being asked to hold one of the most beautiful babies I’ve ever seen for much of the way from Abu Dhabi to Sydney the month after stopping IVF wasn’t a great start, I’ve never been more grateful for my job requiring me to travel overseas frequently. The sweet, beautiful, quiet babies on long-haul flights are the minority, and while I’m sure your own child is always lovable, other people’s children are great triggers for reconsidering discovering that for yourself.

    Also, try inviting toddlers with lollipops into your pristine home. That’ll cure you of any pangs for at least a few months.

    The other thing that helps is knowing that “not now” doesn’t always have to mean “never”. When I turned 30 this year, I had that brief Bridget Jonesian panic of thinking that the fertility window had shut for good, before I remembered that one of the bonuses of being married to a younger woman is always having access to a back-up uterus. I also had the pleasure of seeing my cousin and her fiancée have their first kid when the gestational mother was 35, so maybe there’s time yet. I’ve seen other friends get pregnant after years of trying. And, if all else fails, there’s always fostering a child that needs a loving home, even if you don’t get to keep them.

    The journey from childless to child-free is a long one but it’s one you’ll conquer, even if it doesn’t always feel that way.

  35. johanna

    The joyless Nanny State strikes again:

    It’s the ultimate anti-Christmas feast: three oysters, one-and-a-half prawns, an 80g slice of roast turkey and a serving of vegetables.

    If that doesn’t quite fill you up, consider dessert – a cup of fruit with two scoops of ice cream or 40g of Christmas pudding.
    A healthy Christmas lunch.

    It seems highly unsatisfactory, but it’s what our plates would look like come December 25 if we stick to the Australian Dietary Guidelines.

    “I don’t think anybody meets the guidelines,” admits Clare Collins, Professor in Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Newcastle. “If you were to try, there’d be no ham, that’s for sure.”

    Despite being paid (she hopes) by Fauxfacts, the author has a Grik name and seems to be unimpressed. Not surprising, as if she ate like that en famille they would be insulted, or consider taking her to hospital. She would have to be ill, or perhaps pregnant, to refuse food like that.

    The Australian Dietary Guidelines were no doubt bubbled in some cauldron at vast expense to taxpayers. Nobody takes any notice of them except food n^zis who run preschools and school canteens. As soon as people can choose what they eat, out they go.

    And looking at this example, no wonder.

  36. DrBeauGan

    OldOzzie
    #2890779, posted on December 22, 2018 at 4:03 pm
    What Makes Trump Run

    It is an understatement to say that many Americans, particularly mass-media pundits, are baffled by President Trump’s “polarizing” behavior. There has never been any public figure quite like him: a president who speaks his mind so forcefully, often impolitely, while acting

    The rubbish about Trump being vulgar and impetuous needs to be understood. It comes from a group of people brought up on bullshit and waffle. That’s their idea of intellectual respectability.

    The old Chinese culture was similar, and westerners were thought to be amazingly crass for wanting to skip the ritual and get to the point. I understand they have changed their minds on this.

  37. OldOzzie

    Chris Kenny Part 2

    As we know, the effect of global warming is a matter of considerable ongoing research, assessment and contention. Average temperatures have risen by about a ­degree during the past century but the climate stubbornly has refused to behave in accordance with the alarming models produced by most scientists. We have no control sample; we don’t know whether the planet would have warmed, cooled or hovered like a wine fridge were it not for the emissions we have produced, mainly in the second half of that 100 years.

    While scientific consensus tells us increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is likely to produce greater warming, there is legitimate debate about the extent, detrimental effects, benefits and the relative role of other variables in a changeable climate system.

    Appropriate responses based on science and economics range from business as usual to ­abandoning mitigation in favour of adaptation. Technological ­developments are bound to play a major role in everything from cutting emissions to adapting to a warmer world.

    Given bureaucrats and politicians have decided through the Kyoto and Paris processes that emissions reduction is the goal, there should be detailed debate about what policies can best deliver that outcome. When it comes to fixed power generation, this is a dilemma where there actually is a silver bullet — if we decided we ­urgently needed emissions-free, reliable electricity, we know how to get it. The fact nuclear energy is largely ignored in this debate tells us much about the agenda and real urgency, or lack thereof.

    In this newspaper on Thursday, Bjorn Lomborg, a lonely voice of sanity in this debate, offered one of the pithiest and most important observations about global warming. “It is not the end of the world,” he said. It is funny because it is true and is at odds with the zeitgeist of catastrophism. From Al Gore to Tim Flannery, from last week’s Carols Against Coal to Shorten and Harwin, there is a never-ending procession of Chicken Littles to frighten our kids, poison our politics and burden our economies. Yet no scheme to make Australian households and businesses pay more for power will enhance the planet’s future. These policies exist primarily to trumpet the fashionable sensibilities of their spruikers.

    Because we share one atmosphere, no nation sensibly would take a policy decision without considering what is happening in the rest of the world. This is where the overzealous activism of people such as Harwin, Shorten and the Greens is exposed as foolish and debilitating. We have turned our advantage of cheap and abundant energy into a competitive disadvantage. Power prices have increased an average of 70 per cent in real terms across the past decade, and low-income households now spend 10 per cent or more of their income on electricity.

    Prices have been driven largely by the cross-subsidisation of renewables, leading to duplicated generation, additional transmission and mothballing of cheap power generation. Additional costs hit taxpayers directly from budget expenditure on grants and rebates for renewable schemes.

    The Renew Economy website has estimated the additional investment at $60 billion. Some of this would have been required to replace or upgrade existing plants to increase capacity, but most was unnecessary except to promote renewables and reduce emissions.

    Resultant financial pressure on families, businesses and industry has stifled spending and investment. Direct job losses have come from closure of coal-fired generators in South Australia, Victoria and NSW, and there have been indirect job losses in manufacturing, aluminium and steel plants where power costs have been a factor.

    Reliability has been compromised too — South Australia left itself so reliant on interstate dispatchable generation that when its interconnector to Victoria was tripped, the entire state was blacked out for the first time in its history. The direct hit on its economy was calculated at $367 million and it triggered an extra $500m in state government spending on diesel generators and batteries to protect against future vulnerability.

    Balanced against these costs are the benefits. So far, they amount to nil. The latest international data has global carbon emissions growing at 2.7 per cent annually, or by more than twice the total annual emissions from Australia. So, the amount of emissions we aim to cut annually by 2030 are being added by the rest of the world (mainly China and India) every four weeks.

    For all our pain, there has been precisely no gain. Those countries that have reduced emissions are mainly those enjoying side benefits from economic decisions — switching to gas, using abundant hydro or nuclear. While dumping Paris, the US has lowered emissions from power generation by using fracked gas.

    Other nations increase emissions as they lift people out of poverty. In Asia, the subcontinent and Africa, hundreds of millions of people only now are starting to enjoy the improvements in quality of life, longevity and prosperity that flow from abundant and ­affordable energy.

    Australia alone has turned climate and energy policy into an economic millstone and political suicide bomb. Harwin, with the assent of Premier Gladys Berejik­lian, seeks escalation of economic hardship while driving wedges into the single largest and most damaging policy schism in the Coalition. Genius.

    The NSW moderates think they will appeal to the enlightened denizens of their state and reap political benefits, wrongly interpreting the Wentworth by-election and Victorian election results as demands for a green-left consensus. The Coalition exists to be a beacon of economic good sense and pragmatism. It came into office in the 2013 landslide on the back of Tony Abbott’s campaign to axe the carbon tax and lower electricity prices. It forgot its mission after the Blob elimin­ated Abbott.

  38. johanna

    before I remembered that one of the bonuses of being married to a younger woman is always having access to a back-up uterus.

    OMG.

    I wonder how the ‘back-up uterus’ feels about that statement?

    Just as well that objectifying women as walking uteruses is so utterly tied up with patriarchy.

  39. Bruce of Newcastle

    Better toy for drone splatting at airports is the 30kW ATHENA laser.

    During recent testing with the U.S. Army’s Space and Missile Defense Command at the Army’s White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, the 30-kilowatt weapon slayed five Outlaw drones. Not toy hobby sized drones, but drones with nearly 11 foot wingspans. [Sep 2017]

    No chance of ordnance landing on someone down range.

  40. johanna

    Just had a comment about Christmas food swallowed up by the Spaminator.

    Are prawns and oysters haram now?

  41. Tom

    Have been up in R22s in UK and in OZ in Outback, as well as a number of R44s in Australian Outback – Great Little helicopters

    Socrates, my brother used to sell Enstrom helicopters and reckons Robinson — particularly the R44 — is one of the most dangerous helicopters ever built with an horrendous crash record in Australia. One of the reasons is the Robinson is an ultra-cheapie that’s way underpowered.

    Glad you survived.

  42. OldOzzie

    ALP’s owners hope to turn back time

    Katrina Grace Kelly

    We end 2018 in a sorry state, politically. Our federal government limps towards the 2019 election, and although a surplus is allegedly on the way, there are structural deficiencies within that will always cruel the good news.

    On its worst day, the Coalition presents as a mean boys club cast in a homogenous mould, selfish, self-obsessed and hypocritically self-righteous. Like introspective managers, its members sit in their offices poring over spreadsheets, delighting in the improving numbers, while out on the factory floor the unions circulate, whispering messages of discontent and planting the seeds of resentful envy.

    As a result, next year we have this to look forward to: being ruled by new Labor, which remains tied to the socialist objective set out in a mission statement written in 1921.

    Despite much talk, this objective has never been abandoned and the ALP still formally defines itself as a “democratic socialist” party that seeks to achieve “the democratic socialisation of industry, production, distribution and exchange, to the extent necessary to eliminate exploitation and other antisocial features in these fields”.

    There is no better way to achieve a socialist outcome in industry, production, distribution and exchange than through industrial relations legislation, and, accordingly, Labor’s owners — the unions — have their desired changes all mapped out.

    If the grand plan makes it through parliament, we are really in for dramatic change.

    Bargaining at the enterprise level has failed, according to unions. In many respects this is true. The bargaining system is best avoided, and if it has failed then the failure is the result of three reasons.

    One, we live in a free country. Despite rules that can mandate negotiations, no business can be forced to make an offer of an enterprise agreement to its workforce — and so some simply don’t, no matter what.

    Two, nothing lasts forever, and so no contract can be binding indefinitely. An enterprise agreement, like any other written contract in existence, once past its expiry date, can be dissolved. In extreme circumstances, workers then can see their pay packets fall back towards the award wage as the benefits of the agreement are lost.

    This is awful, but sometimes a smaller pay packet is preferable to unemployment.

    Three, everything, including the bargaining system, is subject to the checking mechanism of the free market.

    While one company can be forced into an agreement with overly high wages and conditions, sooner or later, if every other player in the industry isn’t forced there too, competition might cause the company to lose market share, and then wages will have to moderate or jobs will be lost.

    Faced with these three realities, someone has put their dreaming hat on and conjured up the enticing prospect of industry bargaining.

    This scheme comes with a Fair Work Commission empowered to bang the gavel and compel employers to pay wage outcomes.

    It is a fantastical dream; if realised, with minimal effort, union membership would skyrocket and riches would flow into union coffers.

    Under an industry bargaining model, the union would first serve the relevant employer group with a log of claims and a draft enterprise agreement. In this way, in a room somewhere, a handful of people would sit down around the table and negotiate the wages and conditions for the employees of businesses they have never come into contact with.

    If there was disagreement, the union could call a strike in a large unionised company and try to force the employer group to agree to sign up.

    If the strike didn’t work, then the union could apply to the Fair Work Commission and ask it to arbitrate (enforce by order) the agreement.

    Once the agreement was arbitrated, every single company in the industry would receive notification from the commission that the agreement now applies to their workers. They would be informed that they must adopt the agreement and comply with its wage rates or be subject to prosecution and back-pay debt.

    The second part of the plan, never discussed openly, is the desire to charge compulsory bargaining fees for all the workers in the industry who are not union members.

    The “freeloader” problem — workers who benefit from union-negotiated pay rises but won’t join a union — is often complained about.

    The imposition of compulsory bargaining fees would solve that problem, as every worker in the industry would need to pay the union in exchange for the new agreement that has just been negotiated with the employer group or arbitrated in the commission.

    Who is to say what will happen next year.

    But at this stage it appears as though industry bargaining is a dream that the Labor machine is hellbent on realising.

    It is a pre-1980s scenario. Back in those days, every self-respecting union official drove a Ford or a Holden, and always carried golf clubs in the boot.

    Merry Christmas to all.

    Katrina Grace Kelly
    Columnist

    Katrina Grace Kelly is a regular columnist with the Australian. Her early years were spent in the Labour movement, before she started her own industrial relations consulting business.

  43. zyconoclast

    The hemp industry still has work ahead to win legal status for hemp-derived cannabidiol, or CBD oil, as an ingredient in food or dietary supplements despite the big farm bill President Donald Trump signed this week designating hemp as an agricultural crop.

    CBD oils have become increasingly popular in lotions, tinctures and foods, but their legal status has been murky and the Food and Drug Administration has sent warning letters to some companies making health claims for CBD.

    In a statement following Thursday’s bill signing in Washington, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb restated his agency’s stance that CBD is a drug ingredient and therefore illegal to add to food or health products without approval from his agency.

    “Selling unapproved products with unsubstantiated therapeutic claims is not only a violation of the law, but also can put patients at risk, as these products have not been proven to be safe or effective,” Gottlieb wrote.

  44. zyconoclast

    Soon, 5,000 new immigrants are coming in (Sweden)- flying in from Africa and the Middle East

    The Government has today decided to instruct the Migration Board to “resettle” 5,000 so-called quota refugees to Sweden during 2019 as well. Immigration will take place in close cooperation with the UN Globalist Refugee Agency UNHCR, announcing the transitional government on Friday.

    The quota refugee immigration to Sweden continues. Next year, thousands of new immigrants will come, the government has decided today.

    It was in the Migration Policy Agreement in the autumn of 2015 that the Government and the other parties in the immigration liberal ill-health cartel, in addition to the Moderates, the Center Party, the Liberals and the Christian Democrats, agreed that Sweden would gradually increase the number of quota refugees to 5,000 per year before the end of the mandate period.

    Now comes the announcement that the Migration Board will bring in another 5,000 immigrants from Africa and the Middle East next year.

    “It is about offering protection for the most vulnerable refugees while at the same time taking joint responsibility in the EU together with the major refugee reception countries in the world,” says Migration Minister and Deputy Minister of Justice Heléne Fritzon (S) today.

    The Swedish Migration Board also recently reached the 2018 target with the transfer of 5,000 so-called “refugees and other persons in need of protection” through what the authority named “resettlement” in Sweden.

    2018 immigrants were taken from countries such as Niger, Egypt and Turkey.

  45. Rockdoctor

    Queensland’s public service workforce grew by another 1000 jobs in the September quarter — bringing the number of new employees since Labor came to power in 2015 to 30,000

    One thing from this is the deterioration of services is noticeable. Qld Health would have to be the stand out in my dealings recently, no one answers phones, returns calls and waiting times are steadily getting worse for appointments. Qld Transport isn’t much better and Roadtek is a sheltered site that does next to nothing in a timely manner the state of rural roads is atrocious that speed limits are being lowered, 2 years to re-open Sarina Range from Cyclone Debbie, Eaton Range Road Works at 3/4 of a decade to do…

    Personally I think the only thing that will turn it around is if Trad gets her way Coal is pretty well much put on the backburner (i.e. Compliance drilling with mines in care & maintenance) and large parts of Brisbane/Gold Coast start suffering.

  46. The grain feeders are out in the paddock of grass – it would be similar to eating the grass in full grain – just fed separately, so I think grass fed would be do-able.

    It’d work brilliantly!

  47. Notafan

    Calli I’d forgotten all about piggie when I booked and then last week remembered the place my Columbian landlord recommended in Madrid.

    So going back there.

  48. Bruce of Newcastle

    Ruinous energy policy is all pain with no gain

    Tim Blair puts it more simply.

    GLADYS BOOKS HER PLACE IN THE CLIMATE CHANGE GRAVEYARD

    Attempting to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the name of addressing climate change is an extremely effective way to end Australian political careers.

    Gillard, Rudd (twice), Turnbull (twice). In NSW both Iemma and Rees were offed over climate related electricity policy and Keneally’s government was finally put out of its misery at the 2011 election.

    Gladys either boots Harwin out or will be booted out herself, along with her government.

  49. If you were one of the guys I see mustering in the Outback on Outback Pilots – its like watching a Ballet Dancer/Acrobat performing in the air, I take my hat off to you and hold you in awe.

    It is not as hard as it looks.
    That part came naturally, by instinct.
    Mind you, I was taught very well.
    None of it is impromptu, every last manoeuvre & combination has been done plenty of times in practice, and in the low-flying syllabus test, before ever being done in the field.
    Hovering on the other hand didn’t, and never did, come naturally.
    Dynamism is easier than static stability. One of the features of helicopters.

    (I’ve no idea what you is this “outback pilots” to which you refer, am I missing something?)

  50. OldOzzie

    Socrates at the Pub

    (I’ve no idea what you is this “outback pilots” to which you refer, am I missing something?)

    Channel 7 Outback Pilots

    or

    Stockmen of the Sky

  51. Jo Smyth

    At least the Democrats will have one less thing to worry about over Christmas. They are suddenly so worried about all the Kurds in Syria, well the Saudis have sent troops to protect them.

  52. OldOzzie

    Socrates at the Pub

    I mentioned this previously on the Forum, but I believe you would enjoy the 20 videos on Mike Patey Wilga Draco Bsuh Plane Creation

  53. Thanks Old Ozzie. I’ll have a look if I get to a computer that has a video card.
    My favourite piece of aviation reality TV will always be Troy Dann’s engine failure in a Bell-47, right over a swamp, unplanned and live on TV complete with audio of his radio call, culminating in emergency autorotation into the waist-deep swamp, with bonus points for carrying out the hotter-than-ten-pistols supermodel passenger he happened to have on board.

  54. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    “It is about offering protection for the most vulnerable refugees while at the same time taking joint responsibility in the EU together with the major refugee reception countries in the world,” says Migration Minister and Deputy Minister of Justice Heléne Fritzon (S) today.

    nothing more vulnerable than a jihadi

  55. mh

    There is a ‘possible giant hail’ warning current for the Gold Coast.

  56. Bruce of Newcastle

    Fractured but whole.

    A big space crash likely made Uranus lopsided

    Detailed computer simulations show that an enormous rock crashed into the seventh planet from the sun, said Durham University astronomy researcher Jacob Kegerreis, who presented his analysis at a large earth and space science conference this month.

    The South Park script writes itself…

  57. Fractured but whole.
    A big space crash likely made Uranus lopsided

    The jokes just write themselves.

  58. OldOzzie

    Socrates at the Pub
    #2890814, posted on December 22, 2018 at 5:25 pm

    Thanks Old Ozzie. I’ll have a look if I get to a computer that has a video card.
    My favourite piece of aviation reality TV will always be Troy Dann’s engine failure in a Bell-47, right over a swamp, unplanned and live on TV complete with audio of his radio call, culminating in emergency autorotation into the waist-deep swamp, with bonus points for carrying out the hotter-than-ten-pistols supermodel passenger he happened to have on board.

    The R22 in the UK had been bought by one of my UK Directors (an Accountant) and he had been planning the purchase for 20years – when they sold the Company, he bought an R22 and flew it from his 5 Acres in Surrey- soon discovered that the cheapest part of buying a helicopter was the purchase – so being an Accountant, he bought a nearby (Goodward Airfiled) Helicopter repair company that was in financial trouble and set about re-building (successfully) the business – He demonstrated an Auto Rotate Landing in the R22 with me onboard at the airfield – scared the heck out of me – they moved into converting ex-Russian Military Helicopters for civilian use.

  59. pete m

    Large hail hit northern end gc but car windows survived so not too nasty

  60. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Spanish ham is reason enough that we must pray Europe survives.

    +1

  61. Makka

    Kenny, the blob has a name. Photios. There is only one Lib MP with a chance of leading the LNP back to government. Abbott. He’s the only one who could bring back the base in sufficient numbers. The current lot aren’t worth feeding.

  62. Makka

    Jambon de Bayonne is a national treasure and is the only reason the French Republic needs to survive.

  63. Tel

    Spanish ham is reason enough that we must pray Europe survives.

    Why can’t Australia make that? We already do better wine than France, and almost as good cheese.
    We stole their truffles too. Only reasonable that we should do the ham.

  64. Bruce of Newcastle

    Lucy in the sky with Trojans.

    Navigating NASA’s first mission to the Trojan asteroids

    In 2021, the feat of navigation that is the Lucy mission will launch. To steer Lucy towards its targets doesn’t simply involve programming a map into a spacecraft and giving it gas money – it will fly by six asteroid targets, each in different orbits, over the course of 12 years.

    Lucy’s destination is among Jupiter’s Trojan asteroids, clusters of rocky bodies almost as old as the Sun itself, and visiting these asteroids may help unlock the secrets of the early solar system. Lucy will encounter a Main Belt asteroid in 2025, where it will conduct a practice run of its instruments before encountering the first four Trojan targets from 2027-2028. In 2033, Lucy will end its mission with a study of a binary system of two Trojans orbiting each other.

    Who ever came up with this mission plan deserves a diamond studded medal for ingenuity. If they ever offer to play me at snooker I’d refuse instantly.

  65. Infidel Tiger

    Why can’t Australia make that? We already do better wine than France, and almost as good cheese.

    No, we do better mid range wine than france.

    The best of French wine is so superior to ours it is even ludicrous to compare. Admittedly the price charged is also ludicrous.

    Even with the best endeavour you can’t reicate terroir.

  66. Ubique

    The French will be forced to stop producing ham and wine. It’s offensive to their new masters.

  67. miltonf

    Time for the 6th republic!

  68. Old Lefty

    You may have noticed that certain communications from the County Court of Victoria are singed by a Ms Nevena Spirovska, Medial Liaison Officer. I was interested to notice that she has a concurrent gig as a left-wing political and social activist with a prominent on-line presence in which, inter alia, she rubbishes Scott Morrison.

    Here is an extract from her LinkedIn page:
    ‘My employment background and expertise is in strategic communication management, University facilitation and lecturing, campaign management and community work.

    I currently divide my time between the County Court of Victoria, teaching at Victoria University, as Vice-President of National Homeless Collective, as well as writing, and other philanthropic ventures.

    Highlights of my career include being an Australian delegate to the 2018 United Nations Commission For Women, working as Federal Secretary coordinating the Australian S3x Party’s State and Federal election campaigns from 2014 – 2017, and successfully managing the election of Fiona Patten MP as the Australian S3x Party’s first elected member to Parliament. In December 2018, I graduated as a Fellow of Australian Progress.’ [Note, by the way, that Ms Patten’s party, now renamed the Reason Party, is very close to the government; Andrews publicly offered her a job when it looked as if she might lose her seat.]

    And here is Ms Spirovska’s Twitter page:
    https://twitter.com/NevenaSpirovska?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

    They seem to have an interesting approach to apolitical and impartial administration of justice in Victoria these days. I wonder if a former staffer of the DLP or Bernardi’s Australian Conservatives would ever have been recruited, or allowed to carry on campaigning in the job. Somehow I doubt it.

  69. Old Lefty

    Sorry, ‘signed by’ in the first line.

  70. DrBeauGan

    miltonf
    #2890836, posted on December 22, 2018 at 6:59 pm
    https://www.spiked-online.com/2018/12/21/the-european-spring/

    Excellent article Brendan O’Neill. Profound.

    Followed by:

    Dear Doreen, My 16-year-old son has missed his last two periods. Could he be pregnant? Sue, Brighton

    Dear Sue, I can understand your concern but I wouldn’t be too concerned. It is perfectly normal for young men to skip their period for one, two or three months in a row. Sometimes it can last for years. Many boys have been known to miss periods for years and even decades. Studies have shown that some men can skip periods well into their fifties, by which time the menopause kicks in, so it won’t matter by then.

    So don’t worry if this continues. It is just nature taking her course.

    Doreen

  71. Bruce of Newcastle

    Young boys often miss periods in high school. Especially maths and home economics periods.

  72. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    the real issue, trashed fertility rates, is slowly picking up awareness

  73. Why can’t Australia make that? We already do better wine than France, and almost as good cheese.

    Alas we’ll never manage to make cheese approaching the standard of the French, not while we have to pasteurise first, ensuring that all our cheese pretty much tastes like soap.

    Meantime the French, unhindered by flavour-killing laws, are making cheese that smells like a roo that has been dead for 2 weeks. * Slurrrrrp *

  74. classical_hero

    Homage to the greatest Christmas movie ever.

    https://youtu.be/4Wi28Vsi_ZU

  75. Helen

    P
    Been shopping for ethical minke meat, but no go so far. Any suggestions?

    Nevertheless, it’s a frantic time of year at her Marrickville butchery and shop, where a well-credentialed goose will come in at $230 and a traditional bone-in ham from a pig that had a good life will set you back about $35/kg. A big supermarket ham on the bone, by compar­ison, will cost about $8/kg.

    “We only cure the legs of whole pigs we buy from a handful of NSW farms,” she says. “Most butchers meet demand by buying boxes of legs from abattoirs or agents to turn into hams.”

  76. Steve trickler

    Ubique
    #2890824, posted on December 22, 2018 at 6:13 pm
    The Green-left are demented, dangerous and the enemy of civilisation. British police arrest two eco-terrorists who have disrupted over 700 flights to and from Gatwick airport.

    Check out the visuals.



  77. 132andBush

    The f#ckwits have caused the burning of more kerosene than less.

  78. the “What it is like to die” chapter is absolutely fascinating. It defies common sense, religious ideas about life after death

    In what way? Genuinely interested.

  79. H B Bear

    Let’s hope the courts throw the book at the two swampies. Unlike every other eco-terrorist that ever makes it to court.

  80. Leigh Lowe

    The best of French wine is so superior to ours it is even ludicrous to compare. Admittedly the price charged is also ludicrous.

    Even with the best endeavour you can’t reicate terroir.

    So, you are a terroirist, no?
    I think the price charged in Australia for French wine is ridiculous.
    Pound for pound, when you buy French wine in France it is reasonably priced (cheaper than we pay here for similar quality) and you don’t pay double or triple off restaurant wine lists.

  81. mh

    Let’s hope the courts throw the book at the two swampies.

    They won’t. They will have the right politics. ‘The book’ is reserved for Tommy Robinson types.

  82. Nick

    I think the price charged in Australia for French wine is ridiculous.
    Pound for pound, when you buy French wine in France it is reasonably priced (cheaper than we pay here for similar quality) and you don’t pay double or triple off restaurant wine lists.

    Fair point. You can get a very decent Margaux in France for 20 Euro. It would be a lot more here.
    Cheese wise they beat us on the single producer triple cream goodies they have, along with ev3n basics such as Comte.

  83. stackja

    2GB report – man burnt in transformer explosion was stealing copper.

    Man badly burned in Blacktown factory explosion
    Ben Pike, The Sunday Telegraph
    December 22, 2018 7:04pm
    Subscriber only
    CCTV footage has captured the moment a severe burns victim staggered into a western Sydney service station desperately seeking help after being critically injured in a nearby factory explosion and fire.

    It also shows emergency services personnel touching Joseph Anderson, 56 from Marayong in Sydney’s west, on the shoulder unexpectedly, causing him to recoil in pain.

    The frightening images, obtained exclusively by The Sunday Telegraph, show Mr Anderson running from an abandoned industrial estate into the Sunnyholt Rd, Blacktown service station about 7.15pm on Friday.

  84. Mark A

    Helen
    #2890848, posted on December 22, 2018 at 8:07 pm

    P
    Been shopping for ethical minke meat, but no go so far. Any suggestions?

    Nevertheless, it’s a frantic time of year at her Marrickville butchery and shop, where a well-credentialed goose will come in at $230 and a traditional bone-in

    That’s an insane price.
    Nothing special about farming geese.
    (fattened goose around here is $8/Kg)

  85. Further to my last, see Gerard Henderson’s Media Watchdog no. 367 for Ms Spirovska’s old boss Fiona Patten on a certain prelate who may not be named. I’M m sure the employment of Ms S would give him and his supporters every confidence in the system.

  86. Steve trickler

    Commercial radio plays the same shit, over and over again at this time of year.

    This is different.



  87. mh

    The Worrisome Word in Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Cancer Diagnosis

    Experts note that although the Supreme Court justice is not in imminent danger, the presence of two separate malignancies in her lung raises the possibility of metastatic cancer elsewhere.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2018/12/rbg-cancer/578869/

  88. Armadillo

    Who the hell eats a goose? Or ducks for that matter? That’s just weird.

  89. Armadillo

    There is a reason you don’t see “caged” geese and ducks. Or feedlot fed buffalo. They’re crap.

  90. Tel

    If you are buying multi-hundred dollar “investment wine” then you are a full-on tool by definition. These annoying people don’t drink the wine they just stare longingly at the label and pass it to the next guy at a higher price who does the same. Bernie Madoff for wine! By the time someone does drink it, he has to pretend to enjoy that sucker because he bought the bottle for a thousand bucks.

    Where it came from is irrelevant at that stage. It’s all about telling a story to make the sale. It’s like those art warehouses where everyone gets their overpriced “investment art” which they never hang on the wall because it’s all waaayyyyy too valuable, and you are supposed to nod along and tell them it looks nice. Dopey bastards.

    I agree that Australia’s cheese is not as good as the French, but we are getting there. Also agree that government should get out of the way on stupid milk pasteurized legislation… dang those regulators are dumb as rocks. Just make sure it’s got a label that clearly says either pasteurized or unpasteurized and the consumer makes a choice. Why is this so Far King difficult? Raw milk justice now!

  91. Mark A

    Armadillo
    #2890863, posted on December 22, 2018 at 9:02 pm

    Who the hell eats a goose? Or ducks for that matter? That’s just weird.

    Eating armadillos is even more weird, still people do it.

  92. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    2GB report – man burnt in transformer explosion was stealing copper.

    3rd world problem comes to aus

  93. Armadillo

    Eating armadillos is even more weird, still people do it.

    These people are sickos. The four main food groups are cow, pig, lamb and chooks. It needs to be mandated.

  94. Armadillo

    Why the fuck would anyone eat a goat? It needs to be put on the visa application.

    Have you ever eaten a goat? Answer YES, it’s an automatic decline.

  95. Australian and French wine are very similar – they both come packaged in glass bottles.

    After that the differences tend to stack up. For example, French wine is very drinkable while Australian wine is not. Also, any European wine purchased in its country of origin is very reasonably priced while Australian wine is ridiculously expensive. As well as this, wine purchased from the winery that made it in Europe means you get it at an even better price, whereas in Australia it’s at the same price that you’ll get retail in a shop or sometimes even more expensive because “The Cellar Experience!”

  96. H B Bear

    Italian braised goat is fine in winter.

  97. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Have you ever eaten a goat? Answer YES, it’s an automatic decline.

    Nothing wrong with goat, it makes a good curry.

  98. Why the fuck would anyone eat a goat? It needs to be put on the visa application.

    The most common question asked by recent arrivals to my payroll, from any of those dungheaps we play cricket against, is “Where in this town is the Goat Meat Butcher?”

  99. I’ve been getting into hunting here in Holland. Haven’t got my gun licence yet but I’ve been out a few times as a beater in the fields. Hunting hare. Marvelous fun. There’s nothing quite like slowly walking across a muddy field with a set purpose. Much like the Western Front during The Great War, I expect.

    Small but select hunting club that pays for the yearly rights to hunt on the farmers’ fields in a large area. The club has existed since before WWII. They have a little club house that always has the pot belly roaring away and they all smoke cigars and drink sloe gin at 9am. Lots of green tweed and beautiful shotguns. After the hunt we head back to the hunt where a big meal is laid on, then we go outside for the formal celebration and thank you to the hares which were gracious enough to be shot for out benefit. First time I was there they all apologised profusely to me for being so casual.

    Picked up a couple of fat hares from the butcher today that I dropped off last week. Going to be Christmas dinner at the rellies’ place in Munich.

  100. JC

    If you are buying multi-hundred dollar “investment wine” then you are a full-on tool by definition. These annoying people don’t drink the wine they just stare longingly at the label and pass it to the next guy at a higher price who does the same. Bernie Madoff for wine! By the time someone does drink it, he has to pretend to enjoy that sucker because he bought the bottle for a thousand bucks.

    Have you ever tried a several thousand dollar bottle of wine. It’s truly an experience you will never forget. We had a client dinner once and we were gobbling down top shelf Frog 60s wine from their best vineyards. The one thing I will always recall was that the first taste was brandy. The dessert wine was a Château d’Yquem and it was like someone said – angels dancing on your tongue.

  101. Armadillo

    Storm porn alert.

    House got smashed by the mini cyclone on Thursday in Tamworth. Picked up a full size fridge outside and threw it about 3 metres. Ripped the roof to pieces. A next door neighbour has most of my airconditioner. Nice people. They can keep it.

    Highlight was that an arsehole neighbour out the back copped one of my trees straight over his car. Missed the fence completely. Phoned the insurance lady. Not my problem. Meh.

  102. Armadillo

    H B Bear (put on some pants dude) and Zulu just made my “list”.

    Guys, don’t eat goats. It’s not natural.

  103. hzhousewife

    Let’s hope the courts throw the book at the two swampies. Unlike every other eco-terrorist that ever makes it to court.

    Wouldn’t be great if they were faced with civil claims one after another from all the delayed passengers. Would take years.

  104. Not Uh oh

    Carols in the Domain on channel 7. Just keeps getting worse each year.

  105. Armadillo

    Curry was invented to make unedible food palatable.

  106. Guys, don’t eat goats. It’s not natural.

    Goat was a common meat in much of the north & west at one time.
    And the meat of the poor man.

  107. jupes

    FAKE NEWS: MEDIA, NEO-CONS CLAIM TROOPS ARE UNHAPPY TO BE LEAVING SYRIA

    Most troops would indeed be unhappy to leave Syria. Most join to go to war.

    Of course that depends on how much actual ‘war’ they are doing.

  108. areff

    Poor old Ross Wilson, down to a two-note range. The only thing worse would have been if he did a duet with Izzy Di.

  109. jupes

    Much like the Western Front during The Great War, I expect.

    LOL

    Probably not Adam.

  110. jupes

    Poor old Ross Wilson, down to a two-note range.

    It’s been downhill for Ross since 1971.

  111. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Goat was a common meat in much of the north & west at one time.
    And the meat of the poor man

    Goat, being served for dinner on certain Kimberly stations, was a not – so – subtle hint that it was about time to kill some beef.

  112. areff

    Mighty Kong did a decent album and Primal Park has a number of good tracks. Especially this one:

  113. jupes

    Have you ever tried a several thousand dollar bottle of wine.

    No. Have you got any?

    There’s at least one restaurant in Sydney that offers wines over $10,000 a bottle. I imagine that they are more likely to be drunk by someone like Singo after he’s too drunk to appreciate it rather than a connoisseur ordering a bottle at the beginning of the meal.

    But what would I know?

  114. Pedro the Ignorant

    I have to own up to liking goat meat. Acquire taste after working in the NorWest for years.

    Millions of the beasts in the Murchison and Gascoyne regions of WA and a nice young one makes a good feed for the cost of a .22 bullet.

    Slow roast the back legs, use the backstraps in a stew or curry, chuck the rest to the dogs.

  115. pete m

    goat meat is largest by weight consumed meat in world.

  116. Pedro the Ignorant

    Best wine with a feed of goat from the camp oven is Chateau Collapsible Dry Red.

    Superb vintage!

  117. Armadillo

    And the meat of the poor man.

    The ones eating rabbits were rich. Ever had a curried rabbit?

    I maintain that “curry” was invented to disguise the disgusting taste. It’s like putting a lemon in a Corona beer.

    I rest my case.

  118. Helen

    There is a reason you don’t see “caged” geese and ducks

    Haha, where do you think foi gras comes from? Caged and force fed corn every day. Cultural so the peta mob cant do anything about it. When I was on a visit to EU years ago we had occasion to meet with the EU ag mob and they were very down on bull fighting. What about your foi gras I said? And your Belgian Blues that cannot give birth with out caesarean section? Silence. They also thought that Australia was ‘natural’. I said no, – it is man made, aboriginies have been burning it for thousands of years.

    Anyway, a few Christmases ago mum and I ordered a goose from the butcher. It was a largish gathering so we had goose, turkey and DUCK! The duck was the best. The goose cost $150.00 was terribly fatty (maybe we cooked it wrongly) and we said we would never do that again – the goose, that is. The rest was great.

    Captain and I always have duck for christmas, stuffed with my secret stuffing recipie, half each with all the trimmings and divine gravy. A treat. Not this year, though. I got some bug tails and mussels, some other small shellfish which I might do in a garlic sauce on Christmas day, if we do his family thing and have the turkey on Christmas eve. Our family was always late hot lunch (in the hot desert, with no aircon ) by which time everyone was suitably lubricated with the christmas whiskey, which was cracked during the present opening. Then we all collapsed after cleaning up, snores issuing gently from all over the house, to appear, zombie like, for a nibble in the evening.

  119. Baldrick

    TheirABC’s take on U.S. Government shut-downs …
    Under Obambi:

    ABC News ✔ @abcnews
    US president @BarackObama blames government shutdown on an “ideological crusade” by Republicans
    6:50am · 2 Oct 2013

    Under Trump:

    ABC News ✔ @abcnews
    The first rule of a shutdown? Blame the other side. The second? Don’t look happy about it.
    5:17pm · 22 Dec 2018

  120. Armadillo

    Helen, you just made my “list”. Don’t eat ducks. Think of Donald, Daisy, Hewie, Lewie and Dewey.

    It’s a downhill slope. Next thing your mob will wanting to eat the 101 Dalmations.

  121. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    It’s a downhill slope. Next thing your mob will wanting to eat the 101 Dalmations.

    You’ve never done survival training, have you? I’ve eaten snake, goanna and whitchetty grubs.

  122. Mark A

    OT
    Help if you can.
    Looking for the make and model of an old firetruck, possibly mid 1940s.

    Thanks

  123. It’s a downhill slope. Next thing your mob will wanting to eat the 101 Dalmations.

    In China, they eat all food types.

  124. Helen

    I draw the line at puppy dog, although they have puppydog restaurant alleys in some asian cities. And horse, even though they have a horse butcher in Perth and you can have it at a certain chinese restaurant in Darwin, but I will have a go at most other protein. Not pussy cat though, although the aborigines will pay top dollar for pussy cat. Witchetty grubs are excellent.

    And probably no armadillo, although I have eaten goanna and snake. It would make me think of you, Arma, and I couldnt do it. Unless I was starving. Flying fox, no, (stinky) emu , no (I have observed the grease comes out in your pores for days after.)

    Anyway, it all depends on how hungry you are. I ate a galah once, yes, I was hungry, it was shite.

  125. Steve trickler

    The tear gas will come.

    Playing the Ruptly link above at 50% audio is a hoot.

    Combined with this.



  126. mh

    jupes
    #2890886, posted on December 22, 2018 at 10:17 pm
    FAKE NEWS: MEDIA, NEO-CONS CLAIM TROOPS ARE UNHAPPY TO BE LEAVING SYRIA

    Most troops would indeed be unhappy to leave Syria. Most join to go to war.

    Of course that depends on how much actual ‘war’ they are doing.

    Any evidence, anecdotal or otherwise, that US troops are unhappy to be leaving Syria?

  127. Armadillo

    Anyone here eaten a Koala?

  128. Armadillo

    No wonder the planets in a mess. You buggers would eat anything.

  129. None

    It’a going to be a loooooong night with parties all around with bad taste in music and a few too many load ferals roaming the streets.
    And God how tacky. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6522507/amp/Tom-Daley-husband-share-sweet-photo-baby-son-face-backlash-fans.html

    Is poor poor child, this poor child.

  130. DrBeauGan

    I’ve eaten bear. Not all of one.

  131. Mark A

    Armadillo
    #2890912, posted on December 22, 2018 at 11:30 pm

    No wonder the planets in a mess. You buggers would eat anything.

    Just practicing for the time we have to.
    You’ll be sorry and starving with you elitist taste.

  132. Steve trickler

    Blood on the sidewalk.

  133. jupes

    Any evidence, anecdotal or otherwise, that US troops are unhappy to be leaving Syria?

    Soldiers prefer to be on operations than training.

  134. None

    I’ve eaten guinea pig. That’d be rodent for those of you who aren’t educated.

  135. Armadillo

    You’ve never done survival training, have you?

    I keep one step in front of my creditors, and one step behind my punters. Survival training of sorts. I eat steak and three vege. No snakes. goanna or grubs. I’d like to keep it that way.

  136. I ate donkey once out shooting. Not recommended.

  137. The Germans never gave up on propaganda. This is appalling.
    https://mobile.twitter.com/AmyMek/status/1076221983535366145

    The video is appalling, very.

  138. mh

    Soldiers prefer to be on operations than training.

    Oh please. So you are saying you can just plant US soldiers in any shitheap without any real purpose, but as long as they are part of some kind of military operation they won’t want to leave.

  139. Gab

    I’ve eaten impala and crocodile. I don’t recommend crocodile.

  140. The Germans never gave up on propaganda. This is appalling.
    https://mobile.twitter.com/AmyMek/status/1076221983535366145

    Exhibit A in the ongoing attempt to make white men bad, and men who find goats attractive good and desirable.

  141. Armadillo

    Just practicing for the time we have to.
    You’ll be sorry and starving with you elitist taste.

    I’ve built a Bourbon bunker. You guys “shoot it out”. That’s why you get paid the big bucks and your Government ends up betraying you.

    The sooner everyone realises one thing, the better off we will all be. The people support you, but the Government doesn’t give a fuck.

    We are governed by naciccistc lunatics.

  142. jupes

    Oh please. So you are saying you can just plant US soldiers in any shitheap without any real purpose, but as long as they are part of some kind of military operation they won’t want to leave.

    Well I’d guess there would be a range of opinions and factors, but as long as they actually had a purpose i.e. killing bad guys, then I doubt that they would want to leave.

    On the other hand, if they were spending the majority of their time in camp or had been there for an extended time, then they might want to leave.

  143. jupes

    I’ve eaten impala and crocodile. I don’t recommend crocodile.

    My experience of crocodile was tasty but chewy.

  144. Armadillo

    naciccistc

    I’m going to add that word to the many other that “spell check” thinks might actually be real.

  145. Armadillo

    I’m starting to suspect that some Cats volunteer at WIRES just to get a free feed.

  146. triggered

    The Chinese will eat anything with four legs except a table.

    Speaking of the Chinese, in the early gold mining days, Chinese meat was preferred by the locals over European, more vegetables, less salt, in the diet made it better. Should bode well for any survivalists in the hills when China fully takes over.

  147. triggered

    I’m guessing many of the US troops in Syria were Green Berets who would have been embedded with the Kurds and formed close relations.

  148. JC

    Adam
    #2890928, posted on December 22, 2018 at 11:59 pm

    The Germans never gave up on propaganda. This is appalling.
    https://mobile.twitter.com/AmyMek/status/1076221983535366145

    Exhibit A in the ongoing attempt to make white men bad, and men who find goats attractive good and desirable.

    You have to say though it’s hard to believe anyone with an IQ above 65 would fall for this vid. It’s poorly made and laughably predictable. Here’s the thing, if people here find it incredibly stupid, why would you expect anyone else to be taken in by it?

  149. None

    Why JC? Because it’s the same line of propaganda used by the Nazis. It’s full of schmslz and sentimentalism – Note 3 protagonist is a woman with a child as have been other refugee propaganda videos. There is never a father in sight – and when you have a population that has abandoned it’s Christianity and the understanding of charity and reason you are left with an intellectual vacuum and emotionalism, and a society raised on self hatred and hurt feelings. And that is dead easy to manipulate. These are the same psychological tactics used by the overseas interest that targeted Ireand and in the gay marriage campaign. They went for pure emotionalism.

  150. JC

    We spoke about these girls at a friend’s dinner this evening. Someone looked up the Dept of Foreign Affairs (or whatever it’s called) and the read out the travel advice. It advises not to travel there and I would assume all western countries would be advising the same about Morocco at the moment.

    People take chances because the odds of traveling even in a dangerous place is that you’ll still get out alive unless you’re a westerner in ISIS controlled territory. The odds of risk my be elevated, but it’s still not 100% nor 90% or even 50% or even 1% that you will be killed or hurt.

    Here:

    In 2017, there were 10.3 million tourist arrivals, compared with about 10.1 million in 2016, a 1.5% year over year increase. 30% of the tourists were one of the 3.8 million Moroccans living abroad. Marrakech itself had over 2 million visitors in 2017. Most of the visitors to Morocco continue to be European, with French and Spanish nationals making up almost 40% of all visitors. Most Europeans visit in April and the autumn, apart from the Spanish, who mostly visit Morocco in summer, between June and August.

    So taking out the Moroccans living abroad and returning there were around 7 million foreign visitors in 2017. How many foreigners were killed? 10?

    Assuming people stick to the tourist spots the odds are infinitesimally small you would be hurt.

  151. JC

    None

    I’m not judging the tastefulness of the stupid propaganda piece . I’m simply suggesting it’s ineffective crap and no one would be taken with that bullshit. Were you? No? If not, then why are you expecting others to be far more gullible?

  152. Bruce in WA

    No, we do better mid range wine than france.

    The best of French wine is so superior to ours it is even ludicrous to compare. Admittedly the price charged is also ludicrous.

    Even with the best endeavour you can’t reicate terroir.

    Yeah, nah. You do know Australian wines are winning international competitions over and above the Frog gilgie’s piss, don’t you?

  153. mh

    I find Rand Paul impressive:

    Sen. Paul praises Trump’s ‘incredibly bold maneuver’ to withdraw US troops from Syria, says money can be used elsewhere

    https://video.foxnews.com/v/5982136692001/?intcmp=obnetwork#sp=show-clips

  154. Old Ozzie: Thank you for the link to “What Makes Trump Run”
    Nearly every line of that I can relate to.
    Never before have I seen such a spot-on description of the role of hotel operator.
    It will be shared among others who will appreciate the blinding accuracy.

  155. JC

    Yea Driller, you’re presidential material. We always knew. That’s because running a broken down pub in a regional backwater with a/c keys is the same as running casino in AC. Air conditioning and Atlantic City are the same thing because of the same first letters of each word. STFU and go clean the bar, you boofhead.

  156. Aaaand heres JC being a wanker.
    (or; business as usual) 😉

  157. JC

    Driller

    You don’t even breathe the same air as Trump, you airhead. He doesn’t run a pub in backwoods Australia. Go clean the freaking bar.

  158. Aaaaaand JC continues to be a wanker.
    (or, situation still normal)

  159. JC

    These are Trump’s hotels, or more likely hotels the Trump organization lends his name to for a royalty fee. Trump Org doesn’t really operate them.

    Tell us which one resembles the Backwater Hotel, you lease?

    Let me guess, Trump International Hotel & Tower® New York

    I can visualize the resemblance.

  160. Mark A

    johanna
    #2890795, posted on December 22, 2018 at 4:38 pm

    before I remembered that one of the bonuses of being married to a younger woman is always having access to a back-up uterus.

    OMG.

    I wonder how the ‘back-up uterus’ feels about that statement?

    Just as well that objectifying women as walking uteruses is so utterly tied up with patriarchy.

    Not sure you got it right, I’ve read it twice and I think that she is in a lesbian marriage, no man involved.

    Feel free to correct me if I’m wrong.

  161. Mark A

    Mark A
    #2890952, posted on December 23, 2018 at 2:07 am

    johanna
    #2890795, posted on December 22, 2018 at 4:38 pm

    PS. on the other hand I may have got your sarc. comment wrong?
    Possibly.

  162. JC seems to be burning with jealousy over Trump having plenty in common with me.
    The green-eyed monster is in danger of turning JC into a wanker.
    Oops… too late.

  163. Yeah, nah. You do know Australian wines are winning international competitions over and above the Frog gilgie’s piss, don’t you?

    Australian wines are designed to win awards. That’s what they focus on. The Europeans tend to focus on drinkability and value for money. Australian customers count on and are thus duped by awards because they know jack shit about wine.

  164. johanna

    Mark A – Box 2 is correct.

    This unpleasant lesbian regards her younger partner as a back-up uterus, which we have been endlessly told is a sign of patriarchial oppression.

    Re the Great Wine Debate – it’s a bit like the debates about what should or should not go on a pizza. Sure, there is a discernable difference between good wine and cat’s piss wine, but at the upper levels it’s a matter of taste, with a goodly dollop of snobbery thrown in.

    The top grade German and Italian wines are very good indeed, but the French have done a magnificent job of marketing. California now produces some excellent stuff, as does Chile and of course Australia and Unzed.

    For the average consumer, it’s the mid-price wine that matters most, and we have nothing to be ashamed of in that department. The only edge I will concede to the frogs in that regard is beaujolais, which is a wonderful light drop, ideal for lunch on a hot day, and we don’t seem to make anything comparable in that mid price range.

    When the olds last went back to Europe they thought the vin ordinaire was very ordinaire indeed compared to what you could get for the same price here.

  165. zyconoclast

    Great Pacific garbage patch $20m cleanup fails to collect plastic
    Engineers at the Ocean Cleanup project are working on a fix to stop collected debris leaking back out from the 600m barrier

    A giant floating barrier launched off the coast of San Francisco as part of a $20m project to cleanup a swirling island of rubbish between California and Hawaii, is failing to collect plastic.

    The mastermind behind the Ocean Cleanup, an ambitious plan to clear a swathe of the Pacific twice the size of Texas of floating debris, reported four weeks into testing that while the U-shaped device was scooping up plastic, it was then losing it.

    Inventor Boyan Slat, 24, said that the slow speed of the solar-powered 600m-long barrier means it is unable to hold on to plastics, but a team of experts is now working on a possible fix.

    “What we’re trying to do has never been done before. So, of course we were expecting to still need to fix a few things before it becomes fully operational,” Slat explained.

    A crew of engineers will work for the next few weeks to widen the span of the floating barrier so that it catches more wind and waves to help it go faster, he said.

    [There is more]

  166. Caveman

    Sen. Paul praises Trump’s ‘incredibly bold maneuver’ to withdraw US troops from Syria, says money can be used elsewhere

    Better the troops deployed to an area which serves America’s interests better like the Pacific , hint China.

  167. zyconoclast

    Better the troops deployed to an area which serves America’s interests better like the Pacific , hint China.

    Or the Mexican border.

  168. pete m

    One

    Let’s see if armadillo is awake.

  169. pete m

    Four we ate Mexican last night tasted funny

  170. pete m

    Five and retiring as spam sucks too.

    Did Trump gather not fighting for wall was a bad look?

    I thought house passed spending bill he wanted and was to go to senate which rep control?

  171. Tom

    I love this by Lisa Benson (America’s most underrated cartoonist) in Week In Pictures.

  172. Tom

    Tucker Carlson’s final show of the year yesterday was a cracker, a special edition confronting America’s biggest issues. Fast-forward through the government shutdown talk and start at 9m30s with a Democrat rebel urging his party to snap out of its stupor on border protection (which it can’t because it sees illegal immigrants as its replacement electorate to guarantee political power in the future); then, from 14m, the left’s love of foreign wars and retired general Douglas Macgregor on the sabotaging of Trump’s agenda by his inner circle; from 24m, the truth about why the “war on drugs” can never work with author Johann Hari; from 31m, author David Harsanyi on why liberty can’t exist without gun rights; from 36m, businessman and movie financier Mike Lindell on the rights of the unborn child; and finally, from 40m, Dan Bongino on the strategy Trump will use to get his border wall funding.

  173. helen

    No thanks Zatara, interesting but too much left over cold meat for two people.

    Also the ducks in Woolies freezer too small, at 1.8 kg and the chickens too big.

    Maybe a top knot pigeon inside the duck, that might do it. I built a trap for them once. A cyclone bed propped up with a stick, rope on stick, wheat in the shadow of the bed.

    Wait til there is a bunch under, twitch the rope and the go over and pluck their heads off which were poking through the cyclone. Quick pluck then off to Mum and ask her to grill them. Yum.

  174. helen

    No thanks Zatara, interesting but too much left over cold meat for two people.

    Also the ducks in Woolies freezer too small, at 1.8 kg and the chickens too big.

    Maybe a top knot pigeon inside the duck, that might do it. I built a trap for them once. A cyclone bed propped up with a stick, rope on stick, wheat in the shadow of the bed.

    Wait til there is a bunch under, twitch the rope and the go over and pluck their heads off which were poking through the cyclone. Quick pluck then off to Mum and ask her to grill them. Yum.
    iPad probs

  175. bespoke

    Socrates at the Pub
    #2890945, posted on December 23, 2018 at 1:15 am
    http://www.recipes.com/roasted-whole-

    armadillo

    Armadillo’s are toxic and should be eliminated completely to lift the world IQ along with model a’s.

  176. Helen

    Law banning child marriage declared unconstitutional in German High Court.

    Sharia rules.

  177. bespoke

    Helen

    Some time ago I offered to take Pommy acquaintance to see a mates sheep station and he said would rather go to see aboriginal farms. I’m thinking of sending him a list of settlements but he can go without me.

  178. calli

    I stayed in Trump Las Vegas. Best hotel of the trip. Standouts – scrupulously clean, very large room and beautiful bathroom, generously sized toiletries replaced every day, soft dreamy beds and pillows. Cheap as chips. Plus a little kitchen – call housekeeping and they’ll send up pots, pans, toasters, whatever.

    And no dopey greenie virtue signalling “leave ya wet towels on the rack and save da planet” crap – the towels were replaced every day regardless.

  179. calli

    You need a spatchcock for the turducken, not a full sized chook.

    I prefer cooking each bird individually, as each requires a different technique and stuffing. Though it’s been a while since I cooked a full turkey – not since the Beloved hunted and gathered a monster that barely fitted into my already v large oven. Stuffing the beast reminded me of Mr Bean losing his watch.

  180. min

    Some comments re French wine and the most expensive I have had. Hubby and I were staying in a luxury manor house on the edge of Dartmoor where the wife was a cordon Bleu chef and proprietor had a wine cellar of over 1000 different wines . Len Evans and Murray Tyrrell were staying there after judging wine in France. Len told us that one white wine could only be described as love in a rowboat (hope Cats can work out that out) and invited us for a Port after dinner a Taylor’s 1938 . The only Port I have ever liked however a friend who was Beverage manager at 5 star hotel told us that vintage was £1000 a bottle.

  181. calli

    Got it min. Chuckle.

    I went to a wine tasting in France (Loire) – chablis of up to thirty years old paired with local cheese. Different vintages, different cheeses. It was fun and very edumacational and the wine was excellent. The tasting was in a cavern where the wine was cellared – apparently the location changed the taste of the wine or something.

    Cue the cork vs screwtop debate! 🙃

  182. calli

    The meme makers read my mind.

    And in another movie…

    A chuckle-rich selection this week. Thanks Tom and Pete m.

  183. calli

    Adam, that’s ordering, not storing for easy quaffing.

    And I’m not a modern man. 😂

  184. Boambee John

    Tom at 0439

    retired general Douglas Macgregor on the sabotaging of Trump’s agenda by his inner circle;

    MacGregor made a name for himself in the 90s with a book on army reform, which he followed up in the mid-noughties with another on reform under fire. After he retired he wrote a third book in which his frustration with being largely ignored by the hierarchy started to show through.

    In the late 1930s, an obscure colonel named George Marshall was lifted over about 400 more senior officers to become a very successful US Army chief of staff. MacGregor might be the kind of bloke DT is looking for to implement a round of real reform.

    Just sayin’.

  185. Boambee John

    Richard Fernandez has a good item, Ours to Reason Why, on the wider implications of the Syria withdrawal.

  186. C.L.

    Canberra bus drivers to be trained in domestic violence policing:

    All ACT public servants to be trained to identify domestic violence, frontline courses to intensify.

    All ACT public servants — including shop workers, office staff and bus drivers — will be trained in spotting domestic violence, including little-understood controlling and coercive behaviours, how to respond to victims and where to find them help.

  187. C.L.

    Fred Nile won. The new, holy Australia …

    Basketball great Andrew Gaze apologises over ’embarrassing’ comment broadcast on live TV.

    Australian basketball legend Andrew Gaze has been left red-faced after a wandering camera picked up an ‘inappropriate’ comment he made during a team huddle.

    The slur was made during a third-quarter timeout in his Sydney Kings’ clash against the Cairns Taipans on Thursday night at Cairns’ Convention Centre.

    Overheard by the cameras, which Gaze claims he didn’t know were on, the basketball great was heard saying: ‘Against a zone… this baseline guy’s got a finger up his a***.’

    Slur?

  188. OldOzzie

    Adam
    #2890982, posted on December 23, 2018 at 8:11 am

    Cue the cork vs screwtop debate! 🙃

    Alrighty then!

    Interesting article

    I have had cork problems with all my 90s Penfolds Bin 707, Bin 389 (no more of these left), Bin 407, Bin 28, Bin 128 with the top half of the corks disintegrating then a struggle to get the rest of the cork out with corkscrew – but the wines after straining through a nuance aerator and strainer have been excellent.

    I have a lot of 90s Bin 407, Bin 28 and Bin 128 left and receiving an email from Penfolds on their recent re-corking clinic thought I would give it a try.

    However when I compared all my bottles with the Penfolds DIGITAL ULLAGE MEASURE that I had printed out, every bottle was in the 4-5.5 cm level – Re Corking not required.

    Based on a Reccomendation by Penfolds, I purchased the Monopol Westmark Germany Steel Two-Prong Cork Puller with Cover (Silver Satin)

    Nearly worked on recent uncorking of Bin 407 94 and Bin 128 and 28 1998’s but still disintegrated

    I have now purchased a Air Pressured Corkscrew and Vacuum Stopper set (pierce the cork with a needle then pump to pressurise and push the cork up) and will be trying out on Christmas Day on Bin 407 1994.

    Interestingly I have had no problems with Penfolds Koonunga Hill 1996, 98 and 2000 corks , they have come out smoothly , same with 90s St Hugo’s

  189. Helen

    bespoke
    #2890977, posted on December 23, 2018 at 7:47 am

    heh heh, it would be ejumacational for him, for sure.

    I met a canadian girl the other day who said her interest and training was in early childhood and disadvantaged children or something and with the stars in her eyes said she wanted to work with indigenous children. Let her have her dreams, I thought. The reality will hit hard soon enough.

  190. Helen

    You need a spatchcock for the turducken, not a full sized chook.

    Good idea. Perhaps cats could gather at Chez Lizzie one day and put all this wonder together. The cheese, the wine, the turducken, the glazed ham. Yum.

    And the camerarderie.

  191. Robber Baron

    Speaking of propaganda. I was watching Play School on ABC kids yesterday with the kids and the presenters were making a mobile of “things in the sky.” Well. they put up birds, planes and even a moon. But the moon was particularly interesting…it was crescent shaped. Now, would any cat immediately think that the moon was crescent shaped? The propaganda is strong at the ABC. Their ideology is dangerous.

  192. OldOzzie

    Helen
    #2890998, posted on December 23, 2018 at 9:23 am

    bespoke
    #2890977, posted on December 23, 2018 at 7:47 am

    heh heh, it would be ejumacational for him, for sure.

    I met a canadian girl the other day who said her interest and training was in early childhood and disadvantaged children or something and with the stars in her eyes said she wanted to work with indigenous children. Let her have her dreams, I thought. The reality will hit hard soon enough.

    Helen,

    you could have suggested Mt Leibig, Balgo, Kintore, Papunya, Halls Creek or even Fitroy Crossing for starters

  193. rickw

    Helen,

    you could have suggested Mt Leibig, Balgo, Kintore, Papunya, Halls Creek or even Fitroy Crossing for starters

    Reality good and hard!

  194. triggered

    Sharia marriage law has nothing on US marriage law.

    no state, except Delaware and New Jersey, forbid minors to marry in certain circumstances, such as parental consent, judicial consent, pregnancy, or a combination of these situations. In half of the states, children under 16 can be married too. In the 32 states which have an absolute minimum age set by statute, this age varies between 14 and 18, while in 18 states there is no statutory minimum age if other legal conditions are met. Although in such states there is no set minimum age by statute, the traditional common law minimum age is 14 for boys and 12 for girls – ages which have been confirmed by case law in some states. Over the past 15 years, more than 200,000 minors married in US, and in Tennessee girls as young as 10 were married in 2001, before the state set a minimum age of 17 in 2018.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Age_of_marriage_in_the_United_States#cite_note-3

  195. stackja

    Survivor of Warsaw Ghetto uprising dies
    Deutsche Presse Agentur
    December 23, 2018 8:19am

    The last living survivor of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising has died at the age of 94 in Jerusalem, local media are reporting.

  196. stackja

    triggered
    #2891006, posted on December 23, 2018 at 9:43 am

    Child Bride – From Wikipedia
    This article is about the 1943 film. Child Bride, also known as Child Brides, Child Bride of the Ozarks, and Dust to Dust

  197. stackja

    A mum’s brave sacrifice helped save little Yannik
    AARON LANGMAID, Sunday Herald Sun
    December 22, 2018 9:00pm
    Subscriber only

    If Christmas truly is the time for giving, then little Yannik Salehi can one day thank his mum for the greatest gift of all.

    But the beaming 22-month-old will eventually learn how his parents’ selfless determination to keep him alive led to a remarkable story of Aussie medical success.

    Mum Inga Stanzel, 44, donated part of her liver to ensure her infant son’s survival after he became seriously ill without warning this time last year.

  198. areff

    Boambee Joan: Like your Def Sec pick, but this is the dream candidate as far as I’m concerned: Pierre Spray.

    Polymath, all-round genius, ‘cheap hawk’ and relentless critic of Pentagon procurement boondoggles that get very little bang from bulk big bucks. Worth noting, he designed the F-16 on the sly with the great John Boyd. Pentagon wouldn’t fund a cheap air-superiority fighter, so he and Boyd, along with fellow procurement critic Ernie Fitzgerald, gave their project an innocuous title and came up with F-16 while the brass wasn’t looking.

    Sprey is one of the greatest things to come out of France since cheese.

  199. stackja

    Lawyer X allegedly given free rein at Barwon Prison to gather information: whistleblower
    Anthony Dowsley and Patrick Carlyon, Sunday Herald Sun
    December 22, 2018 11:32pm
    Subscriber only

    Lawyer X was given unprecedented access to the state’s highest-security jail to take part in information gathering missions, senior prison officers allege.

    A whistleblower claims other ­unorthodox methods were used to ­reward/induce prisoners co-operating with police.

    In a letter seen by the Sunday Herald Sun, the staffer said Lawyer X was given free rein to enter Barwon Prison “at any time”.

    “A number of senior officers here in the prison have commented on some of the ongoings here that should never have occurred,’’ the letter reads.

    The whistleblower claims senior officers had been voicing their concerns about how the prison was run during the gangland era since the Lawyer X story was revealed.

    The accusations include that:

    LAWYER X was allowed entry to the prison “at any time’’ to speak with ­inmates she convinced to inform;

    CARL Williams and at least one other inmate, who was close to ­Lawyer X, were taken from the prison for outings including to see family and friends;

    EXPENSIVE computers and running machines were purchased for prisoners who co-operated with police;

    A PRISON boss’s secretary ran ­errands for Purana detectives;

    DRUG boss Rob Karam was placed and remains in solitary confinement without reason; and

    PRISON officers were told to include those absent prisoners in their daily muster counts.

    However, the Sunday Herald Sun has been told officers kept two lists to keep track of those taken outside the prison.

    It is also understood members of the Corrections Major Offenders Unit agreed to demands from the anti-gangland Purana Taskforce on where prisoners were placed and their movement off the facility.

  200. Sheesh

    Is areff’s real identity the famous Snagglepuss?

  201. DRUG boss Rob Karam was placed and remains in solitary confinement without reason; and

    PRISON officers were told to include those absent prisoners in their daily muster counts.

    However, the Sunday Herald Sun has been told officers kept two lists to keep track of those taken outside the prison.

    One must question the timing of this. i.e. during the disappearing news item period

  202. stackja

    incoherent rambler
    #2891020, posted on December 23, 2018 at 10:33 am

    Vic Pol and Vic courts kept this secret.

  203. stackja

    Public opinion turns on Chief Minister Michael Gunner after NT Government’s ‘week from hell’
    Editorial, NT News
    an hour ago
    Subscriber only

    CHIEF Minister Michael Gunner’s pre-emptive move to sack Ken Vowles has comprehensively blown up in his face — at least for the short term.

    There is no doubt he has suffered a brutal blow to his leadership but whether it will become fatal is as yet unknown.

    The weight of public opinion has undoubtedly tuned against Gunner and he has made a martyr of his Labor rival.

    His argument that, upon induction, his Caucus signed an agreement not to publicly snipe each other justifies the move in his mind but it doesn’t pass the public sniff test.

    The electorate don’t care about some private ministerial agreement that has been broken.

    All they see is the reality in front of them and how much they are struggling. They see a minister axed, for being honest with the public about how dire our economy is. Vowles was the only minister to command unequivocal support across key NT industry associations, yet those who have been borderline incompetent remain in Cabinet. Gunner was elected on a platform of establishing an ‘open and transparent government’ yet he has sacked a minister for being exactly that.

    This is what the public sees. It will be a tough job to change perception.

  204. Senile Old Guy

    The NT:

    Ken Muggeridge is hoping a surge of community support can save Christmas for more than 100 young children who had their presents smeared with Nutella, doused in soft drink and smashed by vandals. The chief executive of the Alawa Aboriginal corporation returned home on Sunday to find a group of young people had destroyed many of the gifts he’d collected for the children of Minyerri, a town of about 400 people, 240 kilometres south-east of Katherine in the Northern Territory. He said the community was well-aware of the perpetrators, and some even had younger siblings who were now without presents.

    All done by known aboriginal, probably male, criminals. Who will be treated with kid cloves.

  205. Tekweni

    I have always been amused by the Zulu’s phobia about eating rodents. When canefields were burnt in Zululand there would be mass exodus of wild life. The farm workers would dispatch any fleeing animals that they could. Amongst the animals there were always cane rats. These are a large rodent that always reminded me of porcupines. Now cane rats have a long tail so once one was dispatched by knocking it on the head with a knobkerrie its tail was chopped off. Then the animal was held up and it was proclaimed that it was no longer an igundane (rat) and it could feature on the menu. Despite invites to feast on cane rats I never did.

  206. stackja

    Senile Old Guy
    #2891025, posted on December 23, 2018 at 10:47 am

    The billions wasted!

  207. Roger

    Sharia marriage law has nothing on US marriage law.

    ?

    In all those instances parental and/or judicial consent is required for an exception to state laws which mostly set the minimum age at 18.

    Under sharia a father can arrange a marriage for a daughter as young as 9 without her consent (some schools of Islamic jurisprudence say the daughter must have reached puberty).

  208. stackja

    At least 20 killed, 165 wounded after tsunami hits Indonesia
    3 minutes ago

    JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Government officials say that at least 20 people were killed after a tsunami hit the coast around Indonesia’s Sunda Strait, the BBC reports.

    The national disaster management agency says 165 people were hurt and dozens of buildings were damaged Saturday night, according to the BBC.

    The agency says the possible cause of the tsunami were undersea landslides after the Krakatoa volcano erupted.

    The Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra connects the Java Sea to the Indian Ocean.

  209. DrBeauGan

    Adam
    #2890982, posted on December 23, 2018 at 8:11 am
    Cue the cork vs screwtop debate! 🙃

    Alrighty then!

    What a load of codswallop. You’re not being properly traditionalist unless you drink your wine from an amphora which has been sealed with a wax plug, and which you have cut open with a bone knife last used for sacrificing virgins. Johnny come lately new fangled nonsense about bottles and corks and corkscrews is barely different from screw tops. Bah. Humbug.

  210. Rae

    In all those instances parental and/or judicial consent is required for an exception to state laws which mostly set the minimum age at 18.

    Under sharia a father can arrange a marriage for a daughter as young as 9 without her consent

    The father arranging the marriage has clearly given parental consent and the arrangement is legal in all those states where there is no minimum age for such an arrangement.

  211. Boambee John

    areff
    #2891012, posted on December 23, 2018 at 10:08 am
    Boambee Joan: Like your Def Sec pick, but this is the dream candidate as far as I’m concerned: Pierre Spray.

    As someone getting on in years, I don’t wish to be ageist, but at 81 he might be a tad too old for the job!

  212. Roger

    Face plant.

    The father arranging the marriage has clearly given parental consent

    But the daughter hasn’t, which is quite different from US laws.

    and the arrangement is legal in all those states where there is no minimum age for such an arrangement.

    Which is probably none. Even majority Islamic states have laws re marriageable age and consent which sharia subverts.

  213. Shy Ted

    Living in a cold climate? Need a last minute gift for a loved one? Have I got something for you.

  214. H B Bear

    I have now purchased a Air Pressured Corkscrew and Vacuum Stopper set (pierce the cork with a needle then pump to pressurise and push the cork up) and will be trying out on Christmas Day on Bin 407 1994.

    Not sure I’d be to happy pumping a wine bottle like that. Any flaw in the glass and you would be collecting the bottle from every corner of the room. Do you wrap the whole thing in a towel or something?

  215. Senile Old Guy

    The ABC has a recommended book list.

    Whether you’re enjoying the Australian fantasy of a book on the beach this summer, catching up on the couch after Christmas, or stealing moments on public transport, this list of favourites from ABC RN’s book experts has got you covered.

    You can guess how this goes.

    The fictional novelist Arthur Less is gay, single, and about to turn 50. He’s stuck on his latest book, and he’s just received a dreaded invite to his ex-boyfriend’s wedding.

  216. DrBeauGan

    The ABC has a recommended book list.

    Anybody consulting the ABC for a reading list deserves all he gets.

  217. Senile Old Guy

    Anybody consulting the ABC for a reading list deserves all he gets.

    True. I am currently reading “1942: Australia’s Greatest Peril”.

  218. Boambee John

    From the Certainty thread.

    “mh
    #2891015, posted on December 23, 2018 at 10:18 am
    Candy, both Republicans and Democrats were taken over by interests loyal to the globalist elites.”

    Same here with the Lieborals and the Liars.

  219. Rae

    Face plant.

    Not by me. But you seem to be trying to do one. Here again is the article linked by triggered.

    Parental consent means just that. It does not mean consent of the child, no matter how much you wish it did.

  220. JC

    How do you sue over this?

    (Bloomberg) — The Trump administration was accused in a federal lawsuit of violating the constitutional rights of two U.S. Air Force members by firing them after they tested positive for HIV.

    A staff sergeant and a senior airman who received discharge notifications just before Thanksgiving had their appeals denied despite compliance with fitness assessments and medical treatment, as well as support from their commanding officers, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Alexandria, Virginia. They were diagnosed last year during regular screenings and are asymptomatic as a result of ongoing treatment, according to the complaint.

    “These decisions should be based on science, not stigma,” their lawyer, Scott Schoettes, said in a statement. “There’s not a job in the world a person living with HIV cannot safely perform, including the job of soldier.”

    The complaint is the latest challenge to Trump administration policies affecting the LGBT community, including a plan to ban transgender people from serving openly in the military.

  221. Old Lefty

    Thanks stackja. I’m sure the instructions for dealing with a certain high-profile accused have already been signed off in Spring St – copied from the gulags.

  222. bespoke

    Black Ball
    #2891049, posted on December 23, 2018 at 11:50 am
    https://babylonbee.com/news/braveheart-to-get-all-female-reboot-starring-lena-dunham
    If only it were true.

    He! funny until you realize that’s not far from what they think.

  223. stackja

    First right-wing extremist in NSW placed on ESO
    Miranda Wood, The Sunday Telegraph
    December 23, 2018 12:00am
    Subscriber only

    A Sydney man has become the first right-wing extremist in NSW to be monitored under strict new surveillance laws, because he is allegedly at high risk of committing an act of terror.

    Ricky White, who had previously made anti-Semitic threats of violence and sexual assault, and set fire to a Pentecostal church in Taree, has been placed on an Extended Supervision Order under the Terrorism (High Risk Offenders) Act.

    Attorney-General Mark Speakman said the ESO was sought by the state government because White, 28, could carry out a “serious terrorism offence if not kept under supervision”.

  224. Black Ball

    Well I am personally looking forward to the all female cast of Saving Private Ryan.

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