Monday Forum: January 28, 2019

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1,253 Responses to Monday Forum: January 28, 2019

  1. Leigh Lowe

    Catallaxy is like those parts of town that NRL administrators try to warn rookie NRL players about …
    “Nothing good happens there after midnight.”

  2. Armadillo

    mOnster would be awake feverishly checking the inter webs for anti-Trump talking points.

  3. Armadillo

    My hunch is that the Government is going to get closed down. Again. Longer this time around.

  4. Mark A

    Armadillo
    #2920360, posted on January 29, 2019 at 2:47 am

    My hunch is that the Government is going to get closed down. Again. Longer this time around.

    I’m in the dark as to the number of US federal employees, who go without pay, are concerned.
    They are quoting around 800k to a million, who is classed as such?
    We have nearly as many public ‘servants’ in a place of 25 mil.

  5. Mark A

    I have the feeling, that unless the orange one has something up his sleeve, he is going to lose this round, not sure it will be to his disadvantage though, come the next presidential election.

  6. Tom

    David Rowe has only two derangements: Trump and Abbott.

  7. Tom

    Ben Jennings (Guardian, London) on Theresa May’s Brexit plan.

  8. Tintarella di Luna

    Thank you Tom

  9. Bruce of Newcastle

    Leak simple and funny!
    Rowe artistic and boringly repetitive.
    I’m sad as back when he didn’t have ADS and TDS he also was funny.

  10. calli

    Good stuff Arky! That car is coming along brautifully.

    Something old and character filled out in the shed you say? Chuckle.

    It’s a project worth doing. And thanks for letting us in on it.

  11. calli

    beautifully

    Although it has been a bit of a brat and you have fillum to prove it.

  12. Up The Workers!

    Thanks, Tom.

    With respect to Johannes Leak’s cartoon, yes the Liberal Party is shedding talent.

    If its members had the view that the only reason to get into Parliament in the first place was to get themselves the highest salary, lurks, perks, schemes and scams they had ever larded their pockets with in their lives to date, they’d have joined Bull Shitten’s eponymous Party, the ‘Australian Liars Party’ in the first instance.

    At least the Liberals still have some people of talent on their benches to lose (some of them, I am assured, can actually read, write and add up, which is quite an achievement when compared with the knuckle-dragging simians and the Labor lawyers on the Opposition benches.

    What was the last “talent” seen on the Labor(sic) benches where the members are collectively too dumb to even spell their own Party name correctly – Craig Thomson’s virtuoso performance to an almost empty House (even the Labor goons mostly walked out) blaming everybody else and breaking the drought with his crocodile tears? Slippery Pete playing “dress-ups”? Juliar Gillard’s spectacular mis-handling of the truth and her galloping misandry before being booted out the door by her own Caucus?

    Bull Shitten’s eponymous Party only has crap on its Benches, and zero talent to lose, but Old Richo showed them the way. When he had the same problem, he had surgery to remove that problem. Maybe they should have the same sort of surgery that Richo had, to fix their problem? What have they got to lose?

    Big surgery…big problem to be fixed.

  13. stackja

    Hampton Beach attack: mum calls for witnesses after her son was beaten by gang
    Paul Shapiro, Bayside Leader
    January 28, 2019 6:15pm
    Subscriber only

    A furious mother whose son was savagely attacked by a gang of vicious thugs at Hampton Beach wants the culprits caught as soon as possible.

    Helen, who didn’t want her surname published, said the “terrifying” attack had left her 15-year-old son and his two mates “petrified”.

    The three boys were sitting by the water near the Hampton Life Saving Club about 9pm on January 14 when they were surrounded by a group of 15 youths.

  14. stackja

    Fears grow as bat-wielding vigilantes menace youths at Wyndham Vale
    Tamsin Rose and Kieran Rooney, Herald Sun
    January 28, 2019 9:00pm
    Subscriber only

    A group armed with baseball bats has targeted young men of African appearance in an alarming escalation of Melbourne’s gang tensions.

    Weapon-wielding caucasian youths descended on Wyndham Vale train station on Monday, looking for African-Australians who had assaulted and robbed two teens travelling home from the movies on Sunday night.

    An ugly stand-off, witnessed by the Herald Sun at the station at about 2.20pm, has been described as symbolic of the current friction in the community.

  15. Eyrie

    Australia Day Honours List

    Any Cats know how the awards work? I’m trying to figure out how a complete scumbag and miserable excuse for a human being made the list (I’m sure he’s on lots of people’s lists).

  16. stackja

    Mentone train station: schoolchildren safety at risk unless security patrols increased
    Paul Shapiro, Moorabbin Kingston Leader
    January 29, 2019 12:00am
    Subscriber only

    A school principal is leading a campaign to boost security at Mentone train station, after several reports of students being menaced by gangs.

    The safety of thousands of schoolchildren is at risk unless more protective service officers (PSOs) are deployed at the busy station, Kilbreda College principal Nicole Mangelsdorf has warned.

  17. stackja

    Protests expected as cashless welfare card rolled out in Bundaberg
    Matthew Killoran, The Courier-Mail
    January 29, 2019 1:00am
    Subscriber only

    PROTESTS are expected in Bundaberg today as the controversial cashless welfare card is rolled out in the region.

    It is the first time the welfare measure — which quarantines about 80 per cent of dole payments so they can’t be used for drugs, alcohol or gambling — has been trialled outside a predominantly indigenous community.

  18. stackja

    QNMU challenged by upstart NPAQ
    Janelle Miles, The Courier-Mail
    36 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    THERE’S a new kid on the industrial relations block in Queensland that’s putting traditional unions on notice – represent your members or risk losing them.

    The Nurses Professional Association of Queensland was set up five years ago as an alternative to one of the state’s most powerful industrial forces – the Queensland Nurses and Midwives’ Union.

  19. Eyrie

    “PROTESTS are expected in Bundaberg today as the controversial cashless welfare card is rolled out in the region.”
    What are they going to do? Go on strike?
    If they don’t like it get a job.

  20. Bruce of Newcastle

    Via Powerline’s picks comes this one:

    Byron York: On closer examination, Roger Stone indictment is less than it seems

    It’s technical but worth reading. The indictments that Mueller have hit Roger Stone with, via a 5.30am raid live on CNN with 29 FBI agents, are completely crazy. Truly Mueller is Beria’s successor.

    If that is the measure of a crime then every single Democrat would be rotting in jail for the rest of their lives, including Mueller himself over the Uranium One case, yet none of them are even being investigated.

    Justice and the rule of law in the US are hanging on the slenderest of threads.

  21. Bruce of Newcastle

    Remember when the Left told coal miners to “learn to code”, after they were fired because of Obama’s climate policies?

    Telling Fired Journalists “Learn To Code” Is Now “Abusive Behavior” On Twitter

    “I am told by a person in the know that tweeting “learn to code” at any recently laid off journalist will be treated as “abusive behavior” and is a violation of Twitter’s Terms of Service”

    On the other hand I wouldn’t trust any code that a lefty ex-journalist wrote.

  22. stackja

    Zali Steggall’s co-campaign manager Louise Hislop praised GetUp boss at speech she attended
    Anna Caldwell, State Political Reporter, The Daily Telegraph
    January 28, 2019 11:46pm
    Subscriber only

    The woman behind the Zali Steggall campaign to oust former PM Tony Abbott in his seat of Warringah has been schooled by GetUp activists in campaigning.

    The Olympian received cautious encouragement from Labor leader Bill Shorten on Monday, but distanced herself from left-wing activist outfit GetUp, saying “I don’t have anything to do with GetUp”.

    However, The Daily Telegraph can reveal Ms Steggall’s co-campaign manager Louise Hislop has praised former long term GetUp campaign boss Sally Rugg for contributing to her “education and self-improvement” when she attended a speech by Ms Rugg in September.

  23. Baldrick

    Thanks Tom. Al Goodwyn wins today.

  24. Des Deskperson

    “Australia Day Honours List

    Any Cats know how the awards work? ”

    No. It’s one of the most opaque processes anywhere in Australian government. In particular, the High Court has affirmed that that documents relating to Australia’s national honours system are not subject to FOI legislation:

    https://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/opinionsonhigh/2013/12/06/kline-case-page/

    The entire purpose of the honours system is, of course, to validate rich and successful people who might otherwise be seen simply as money grubbers, careerists or worse.

  25. Baldrick

    The Olympian distanced herself from left-wing activist outfit GetUp, saying “I don’t have anything to do with GetUp …

    … yet.”

    Here’s what she said launching her campaign two days ago:
    “Ms Steggell indicated she would accept the support of left-wing activist group GetUp, which is likely to commit resources to removing Mr Abbott. “I will welcome support from all community groups that want to see change in Warringah,” she said.

  26. 2dogs

    Telling Fired Journalists “Learn To Code” Is Now “Abusive Behavior” On Twitter

    The journos themselves had done the same to coal miners.

    This was using Theseus to slay Procrustes, and Procrustes didn’t like it.

  27. stackja

    Liberty Quote
    Everyone wants to live at the expense of the State. They forget that the State lives at the expense of everyone.

    — Frédéric Bastiat

  28. OldOzzie

    The Future for Australia under Bill Shorten Labor/Greens Givernment

    Be Careful What You Wish For – Warren’s Unconstitutional Wealth Tax Is Just The Beginning

    PS the Use of “Givernment” is deliberate

  29. 132andBush

    Thanks Tom,
    Rowe is deranged.
    I’d say Abbott is everything he isn’t as a human.

  30. OldOzzie

    UN out of its depth on boats The Australian Editorial

    Politicians should ignore the woolly-headed ideas of the UN refugee agency’s ­chief in Indonesia, Thomas Vargas, who wants Australia to end turnbacks of asylum boats. He claims turnbacks “just don’t work”, push asylum-seekers into harm’s way and leave other countries to deal with the problem. Experience shows otherwise.

    In tandem with offshore detention and temporary protection visas (which Labor, foolishly, has promised to abolish) turnbacks have been an essential strand of the Coalition’s successful Operation Sovereign Borders. The policy stopped the boats after Labor’s dismal watch, when 50,000 asylum-seekers arrived on 800 boats and 1200 people died at sea.

    Regardless of initial teething controversies over turnbacks related to Australia’s inadvertent incursions into Indonesian waters, the policy produced a significant benefit for Indonesia. After the launch of Operation Sovereign Borders in September 2013, the number of people registering with the office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in Indonesia, the main launch pad for sea journeys to Australia, dropped from 1608 a month to 296 in December 2013. By March, the number of new asylum-seekers arriving in Indonesia had fallen by 70 per cent.

    Pragmatic Indonesian politicians had long recognised the need for Australia to act, with former Indonesian president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono memorably advising the Rudd government to “take the sugar off the table”, thereby reducing the burden of asylum-seekers on both countries as our northern neighbour increasingly became a transit point.

    Former foreign minister Bob Carr rightly dismissed the UN’s warning yesterday, pointing out the greater humanitarian consideration was to stop people-smugglers putting asylum-seekers on dangerous vessels. However, the view of Labor for Refugees national co-convener Shane Prince that turnbacks did nothing to protect vulnerable people fleeing persecution shows the pressures a Shorten government would face from within Labor ranks over turnbacks.

  31. stackja

    Des Deskperson
    #2920399, posted on January 29, 2019 at 7:39 am
    The entire purpose of the honours system is, of course, to validate rich and successful people who might otherwise be seen simply as money grubbers, careerists or worse.

    I disagree on one OAM, the man I know is not rich and only successful through his much unpaid humble work.

  32. OldOzzie

    Breezily dismissive response to power cuts isn’t cool

    Judith Sloan


    I really like the warm weather and I expect some very hot days at this time of the year. But we are prepared: we close up the house early, shut the windows, close the blinds and curtains. We’re lucky to have airconditioning but I don’t really like it, so we use it sparingly.

    Last Friday, the temperature was expected to soar above 42C in Melbourne. Mid-morning I got in the car to catch up with a pal for coffee. It was already very hot.

    I was listening to the radio and was assured by Victoria’s Energy Minister Lily D’Ambrosio that “blackouts are something that will absolutely not be a feature of today, or a possibility

    She went on to remark that “what the market operator’s done is put in place … their proper planning to ensure that they have sufficient reserves in place to be able to meet these types of situations”.

    Having observed the missteps of this minister and her general incompetence, I should have known that Melburnians were in trouble.

    By the time I was driving home, a series of rolling brownouts (a cute term for electricity being cut off in whole suburbs) was under way.

    The chief executive of the Australian Energy Market Operator, Audrey Zibelman, was cheerfully informing us that cutting back 100 megawatts involved about 30,000 households losing power. She didn’t seem particularly concern­ed because there was a possibility that a cold front might hit Melbourne a bit earlier than forecast.

    Mind you, it was not just households that lost power. All those small businesses without power were effectively forced to close. And many food outlets simply had to throw out rapidly spoiling foodstuff. Presumably, some staff members lost pay.

    But according to Greens leader Richard Di Natale it was OK — just look at the sacrifices people made during wartime.

    Was he joking? And how could he seriously argue that the prime reason for the load shedding was coal-fired electricity?

    It’s worth taking a look behind the scenes. Demand management (much beloved by Zibelman) was playing an active role as large businesses accepted financial bribes to use less power. The aluminium smelter in the west of the state was also being switched on and off — again, something for which compensation is paid.

    The spot price of electricity during this period was regularly peaking at the cap of more than $14,000 per megawatt hour. It had peaked at more than $60,000 in South Australia the previous day when an emergency was declared and reserves called up.

    One estimate puts the additional costs incurred last week at almost $1 billion, enough to fund at least one new high-efficiency, low-emissions coal-fired power station. These costs will be passed on to consumers in due course.

    What was the contribution of wind and solar during all this? Almost nothing. On Thursday, wind was contributing about 3 per cent to South Australia’s electricity supply and on Friday in Victoria, it was similarly low until the change.

    Solar was adding little. In any case, domestic systems generally won’t operate unless the customer has power from the grid. The ideal temperature for maximum output from solar is about 28C, with a significant loss of efficiency as the mercury rises.

    The problems with a number of dispatchable generators, including some brown coal-fired generators in the Latrobe Valley, were contributing to the shortfall of supply. But for D’Ambrosio to contend that the continuation of the Hazelwood plant would not have saved the state is laughable: the plant’s capacity was 1600 megawatts.

    It’s hardly surprising that a number of dispatchable power plants are prone to break down. With all the subsidies heading in the direction of intermittent renewable energy, there are inadequate financial incentives for the owners to keep them up to scratch.

    Last week demonstrated the unacceptable fragility of the grid to high temperatures. We had been told by AEMO that the reliability standards imposed on the system were such that we should expect an adverse outcome only once a century. It would seem that occasion arrived last week. On the face of it, this seems unlikely.

    Notwithstanding the massive investment in renewable energy over the past several years — $20bn was invested just last year — the effective addition to supply is much less than the quoted ­capacity figures.

    Indeed, the contribution of renewable energy in South Australia was so insignificant on Thursday that the bank of standby diesel generators was switched on, belching out emissions and ultimately costing a fortune for consumers. Mind you, were it not for those generators, it would have been very ugly in Adelaide as well.

    It’s clear what Zibelman — whose job must be hanging by a thread — has in mind to avoid this situation occurring again, and that could be soon.

    She wants to see hundreds of millions of dollars spent on new interconnectors between the states and a separate expensive capacity market established so she can have adequate reserves to call on when the supply-demand gap becomes tight. These capacity markets ­operate in a number of other countries but they don’t come cheap and they are vulnerable to ­manipulation by the participants.

    The bottom line is that the objective of affordable and reliable electricity is now further away than ever. The addition of subsidised renewable energy, even in the context of some battery backup, can’t produce reliable power but is likely to drive more dispatchable power sources out of the market before their effective expiry dates are reached. It’s why the federal government’s tender process to underwrite more dispatchable power entering the system is so important.

    But let me leave the last word to D’Ambrosio.

    Having promised that there would be no load shedding, she then switched her tune to tell us that “I understand that any loss of power — however brief — is a worry, and that it’s something that we would all rather avoid and not see happen. People should be rightly disappointed that the power grid was not up to the task.”

    The apologetic stance didn’t last long. Reverting to the party line, she told journalists late on Friday that “setting an ambitious renewable energy target (of 50 per cent by 2030) will boost jobs and investment across regional Victoria, as well as drive down power ­prices for Victorian businesses and families”.

    Curiously, she claimed that “wind power came through today (Friday) — it produced sufficient power generation”. That would be when the crisis was over. Someone really needs to tell her she’s just dreamin’ while she sits in her airconditioned office.

  33. Mater

    No. It’s one of the most opaque processes anywhere in Australian government. In particular, the High Court has affirmed that that documents relating to Australia’s national honours system are not subject to FOI legislation

    The Honours and Awards system is much like the United Nations.
    Anyone who works intimately with either of them realises immediately how corrupt, nepotistic and disgusting they really are.
    Both also seem quite able to maintain a facade of respectability to the greater populace, despite all evidence indicating quite the opposite.

  34. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2920412, posted on January 29, 2019 at 8:03 am

    Next we get blackout BS Bill?

  35. Top Ender

    The Awards system in Australia is pretty easy.

    Anyone can nominate anyone.

    If you want to nominate X, you write up him or her in an application form, obtained here.

    You’ll need four referees able and willing to comment favourably on the nominee.

    Send it off, and wait. The vetting process – validating your evidence etc – can take up to two years.

    I have nominated three people so far, and the applications were successful.

  36. Mark A

    calli
    #2920384, posted on January 29, 2019 at 6:35 am

    Good stuff Arky! That car is coming along brautifully.

    Something old and character filled out in the shed you say? Chuckle.

    I caught that too, and thought to myself: then there is that old car in there as well to admire.

  37. Des Deskperson

    ‘I disagree on one OAM, the man I know is not rich and only successful through his much unpaid humble work.’

    Doubtless deserved, Stackja, but then rich and successful self – promotor Pirate Pete was obviously considered to be more worthy that your mate. He’s got an AM:

    “For service to literature as a biographer, sports journalist and commentator, and to the community through contributions to conservation, disability care, social welfare and sporting organisations.”

    ‘I have nominated three people so far, and the applications were successful.’

    Top Ender, what level of honour did they receive?

  38. Nelson Kidd-Players

    Thanks, Tom. Tom Stiglich for me, based on the artwork as much as the joke. He’s done a brilliant job in making Trump and Pelosi recognisable while being so true to the original Peanuts characters.

  39. stackja

    Oops! Florida man mistakenly swiped laxatives, not opioids: report

    Peter Hans Emery thought he was getting pain killers. His bowels probably informed him otherwise.

    Police arrested the Pinellas Park man after he allegedly stole what he thought were powerful opioids, the Smoking Gun reported. It turned out they were Equate Gentle Laxative pills, which promise “gentle, predictable overnight relief” from constipation.

    That’s not exactly what Emery had in mind.

    “He threw them away when he learned they were something else,” according to the arrest report.

    The report did not say how or why the pills were mixed up. They belonged to an unidentified person who lives at the same address as Emery.

    If that person was trying to pull a laxative-based joke on the 56-year-old Emery, it apparently worked.

    The arrest report said Emery took the pills from a lock box last week, and that a video camera showed him pouring some pills into his hand. The container he’d grabbed was labeled “Hydrocodone-Acetaminophen,” a powerful narcotic.

    Police say Emery took two pills then threw the rest away. He was arrested on felony charges since he had two prior theft convictions.

    There was no indication whether the laxatives later provided gentle overnight relief.

  40. Top Ender

    Des, you can’t stipulate what level of honour people get – the research committee at federal government house does that.

    Two got an OAM, and the other the next level up, the AM.

  41. OldOzzie

    ‘Canberra Swamp’ costs us $8bn a year – Adam Creighton Economics Editor

    The cost of the political class, or swamp as Donald Trump might call it, has been estimated at more than $8 billion a year by an analysis from the Institute of Public ­Affairs, which is calling for “deep-seated, structural reform to Australia’s administrative state”.

    The federal government provided non-government health, div­ersity and social welfare groups more than $191 million, a further $440m went to international organ­isations such as the Inter­national Monetary Fund, while the major political parties received $62.8m following the 2016 federal election, the IPA monograph says.

    “The nature of the Canberra Swamp perverts liberal democracy, entrenches established special interest and represents a gross misuse of taxpayer money,” the report says.

    “The key participants in the swamp include the major political parties and their staffers, the ­bureaucracy, the major consulting firms, the bulk of the legal establishment, so-called civil society, health and welfare and environmental groups that receive government handouts.”

    The US President, echoing language used by Ronald Reagan in the early 1980s, made “draining the swamp” a plank of his campaign in 2016. The Trump administration has since been famously slow to fill positions and more recently oversaw the longest shutdown in the US government.

    Since the Coalition won office in 2013, the federal public service head count has fallen to 152,000, the lowest level since 2006, but more sweeping recommendations for consolidation from the 2014 National Commission of Audit were ignored.

    An independent review of the Australian Public Service, overseen by former Telstra chief David Thodey, is due to report in the first half of this year.

    The biggest component ($5.5bn) of the $8.1bn total cost ­estimated for the 2017 financial year emerged from the growing excess of public sector average wages over private. “One of the main ways through which the swamp operates is by providing higher salaries for those who are party to the swamp,” the IPA found, noting average weekly public sector earnings of $1410 in early 2017 compared with $1117 for private sector workers.

    Since 2015, public sector wage growth has been higher in 13 out of 14 quarters. “The government would have saved $1.24bn a year if public servants received 9.5 per cent superannuation instead of the standard 15.4 per cent.

    The Canberra Swamp is a network of vested interests so extensive that measuring the full and total cost of sustaining it is a significant undertaking; as such, this is only a snapshot, and a conservative estimate,” said Morgan Begg and Daniel Wild, the report’s ­authors.

    Among the biggest beneficiaries of taxpayer funds outside the public sector were the Cancer Council, which received $39m, Reconciliation Australia ($10.1m) the Ethnic Communities Council of Queensland ($11.1m), Birdlife ($2.9m), Oxfam ($19.1m), the AIDS Council of NSW ($13.4m) and ACOSS ($14m).

    Federal departments spent $585m in total on major consulting firms in 2017, including $254m by the Department of Defence.

    A 2016 IPA report estimated the federal government maintained 1181 entities.

    Other IPA research found excessive regulation was costing the economy about $176bn, equivalent to 11 per cent of GDP.

  42. JB of Sydney/Shanghai

    Great work on the old Model A rebuild Arky.

    Looking forward to when you get around to replacing the motor. There is just something about an old flathead, be it a four, six, or eight. Simplicity, elegance, and a reminder of where it all started.

    Good on you.

  43. Leigh Lowe

    On the matter of Orders of Australia.
    Late last year we attended (ie were dragged to) a yartz function in Canberra by a relative of mine.
    The particular yartz quango had identified him as someone who could be potentially soaked for donations or, more importantly, as a vehicke for their personal advancement.
    Nearly every board member and senior executive of this blood-sucking band of mercenaries had the AO stuck to their lapel … for services to the Yartz no doubt.

  44. Bruce of Newcastle

    Via Drudge some good news:

    A cure for cancer? Israeli scientists say they think they found one

    MuTaTo is using a combination of several cancer-targeting peptides for each cancer cell at the same time, combined with a strong peptide toxin that would kill cancer cells specifically. By using at least three targeting peptides on the same structure with a strong toxin, Morad said, “we made sure that the treatment will not be affected by mutations; cancer cells can mutate in such a way that targeted receptors are dropped by the cancer.”

    He equated the concept of MuTaTo to the triple drug cocktail that has helped change AIDS from being an automatic death sentence to a chronic – but often manageable – disease. … “We used to give AIDS patients several drugs, but we would administer them one at a time,” Morad explained. “During the course of treatment, the virus mutated, and the AIDS started attacking again. Only when patients started using a cocktail, were they able to stop the disease.”

    The MuTaTo cancer treatment will eventually be personalized. Each patient will provide a piece of his biopsy to the lab, which would then analyze it to know which receptors are overexpressed. The individual would then be administered exactly the molecule cocktail needed to cure his disease. However, unlike in the case of AIDS, where patients must take the cocktail throughout their lives, in the case of MuTaTo, the cells would be killed, and the patient could likely stop treatment after only a few weeks.

    “MuTaTo fries cancer” would be a fine headline!

  45. OldOzzie

    Liberal turncoat Oliver Yates to battle Treasurer Josh Frydenberg

    Joe Kelly
    Political Reporter

    A disgruntled Liberal Party figure and renewable energy backer — who claimed his energy-trading business would make more money under higher electricity prices — is set to run as an independent candidate against Josh Frydenberg in the Melbourne-based seat of Kooyong.

    The entry of former Clean Energy Finance Corporation chief executive Oliver Yates into the race for the blue-ribbon seat — once held by Robert Menzies — comes as a number of Liberal candidates and MPs face challenges from independents, Greens and former party members on climate change.

    The Australian last month revealed Labor and the unions were eyeing off campaigns in Kooyong and Higgins — the latter being vacated by cabinet minister Kelly O’Dwyer — following the disastrous Victorian election result.

    Former GetUp media director Adrian Dodd, who also served as a communications adviser at the ACTU, is understood to be helping Mr Yates prepare a tilt in Kooyong — held by the Treasurer on a margin of 12.8 per cent after a redistribution — with speculation mounting last night the challenge would be unveiled by tomorrow morning.

    A senior Victorian Liberal source said last night Mr Yates, a long-time Liberal member, had betrayed his party. “He has zero profile locally and has been virtually invisible within the Liberal Party,” the source said.

    Liberal sources said last night that Mr Yates, a senior executive at Macquarie Bank for more than 20 years and the founding chief executive of the CEFC from 2012-17, had held ambitions of a parliamentary career with the party. They said he had held talks a decade ago about running for the blue-ribbon Sydney electorate of ­Bradfield or a NSW Senate seat.

    A Liberal source said the penalty under party rules for challenging an endorsed sitting member was automatic expulsion.

    As independents line up to try to win Liberal strongholds, some with the support of former Labor strategists, the Coalition will be forced to sandbag seats once considered safe, including Kooyong, where Mr Frydenberg has increased his margin at the past two elections. Tony Abbott is facing challenges in his Manly-based seat of Warringah from champion skier and barrister Zali Steggall, former Malcolm Turnbull adviser Alice Thompson and indigenous activist Susan Moylan-Coombs. Mr Yates tweeted support for Ms Steggall on Saturday.

    There is also speculation Liberal defector Julia Banks could run as an independent against Health Minister Greg Hunt in the Victorian seat of Flinders.

    The Wentworth by-election campaign, which delivered the Sydney seat to independent Kerryn Phelps, is being viewed by some strategists as a method to unseat Liberal MPs in traditionally safe electorates. Anthony Reid, who helped Dr Phelps, will run Ms Steggall’s campaign in Warringah.

    Mr Yates, who clashed with Mr Frydenberg over the Coalition’s national energy guarantee, was ejected from a $10,000-a-table Victorian Liberal fundraiser in late 2017 after objecting when senator Jane Hume presented Scott Morrison with a fake lump of coal — a reference to the then treasurer’s move to bring a sample of the fossil fuel into the House of Representatives. Mr Yates, son of former Liberal MP William Yates, said it was “not a laughing matter”. He later described the government’s energy policies as immoral and warned the Liberals had been hijacked by the far-right and had drifted from their core values.

    Quoted in RenewEconomy in November 2017, Mr Yates said he was inclined to establish a “Liberal Environment Party” and that the first seat he would “target” was Kooyong “because that is where I live”.

    A month before, Mr Yates and former ACT deputy chief minister Simon Corbell set up the Clean Energy Derivatives Corporation to back contracts with wind farms and solar farms. Speaking to The Australian Financial Review, Mr Yates said he hoped to raise $250 million and argued the company would make more money if electricity prices stayed higher. “Without a federal policy it’s probably going to mean power prices remain higher for longer (which is) better for us if we write contracts at a fixed price,” he said. “If the price falls significantly we’ll be paying out and if prices remain higher for longer we’ll be reaping a return.”

    Mr Yates was contacted for comment.

  46. johanna

    Eyrie
    #2920389, posted on January 29, 2019 at 7:01 am

    Australia Day Honours List

    Any Cats know how the awards work? I’m trying to figure out how a complete scumbag and miserable excuse for a human being made the list (I’m sure he’s on lots of people’s lists).

    The procedure is on the website, but essentially a person has to be nominated by someone else, and then lots of forms get filled out enumerating the person’s ‘achievements.’ The secretariat then makes its own inquiries, to verify the claims.

    It’s far from foolproof, as we all know. Many a scoundrel has been gonged, and one or two have even had their awards revoked.

    It also is much easier for people with good connections and who are good at filling out forms to get one. Hence the numerous judges, lawyers, doctors, public servants etc in the top tiers. Devoting a big slab of your life to actually helping the community never gets you to the top tiers.

    Mind you, I don’t think that your average person cares much about them one way or the other.

  47. Boambee John

    stackja
    #2920411, posted on January 29, 2019 at 8:02 am
    Des Deskperson
    #2920399, posted on January 29, 2019 at 7:39 am
    The entire purpose of the honours system is, of course, to validate rich and successful people who might otherwise be seen simply as money grubbers, careerists or worse.

    I disagree on one OAM, the man I know is not rich and only successful through his much unpaid humble work.

    I think that Des has exaggerated for effect.

    Recipients of the OAM have in virtually all cases done worthwhile work for little reward. This also applues, but to a lesser extent, to recipients of the AM.

    Above that, Des’s structure applies almost universally.

  48. Eyrie

    Des Deskperson, thanks for that. It was about what I thought. There may be deserving cases out there but apparently you get one of your mates to nominate you, they provide the names of a few referees and put in the nomination. Mrs Eyrie just looked it up.
    What would be interesting to know is the percentage of awards vs nominations.

  49. stackja

    OldOzzie
    #2920439, posted on January 29, 2019 at 8:46 am

    ‘Liberals’ present and past

    Colourful corporate cowboy

    By Mike Steketee and National Affairs Editor
    TheAustralian
    12:00AM January 31, 2009

    Gordon Barton was unusual in more ways than one. He was a fabulously wealthy entrepreneur who built an international empire and brought it all crashing down around him. He fought the establishment not only in challenging rules that restricted the way he ran his business but by setting up a political party, starting a left-wing newspaper and taking over a book publisher. He enjoyed a lavish lifestyle but also poured a great deal of his money into causes he believed in. He lived what might euphemistically be called a full life that included serious relationships with multiple women, sometimes at the same time. For a period during the 1970s he was a well-known public figure but quickly slipped out of view.

    Eleven days later, he set up the Liberal Reform Group which ran 22 candidates at that year’s federal election, winning an average of 5 per cent of the vote in each seat. He had caught a wave of change.

    By the time of the next federal election in 1969, the group had become the Australia Party. Though it never won seats, psephologist Malcolm Mackerras credited it with delivering the preferences that gave Labor victory in the 1972 election after 23 years in Opposition. Barton wrote later that it was a blueprint for modern liberalism. “Australian culture and politics had for too long clung to the stereotypes of the past. Australians were haunted by their atavistic memories of threats from Russia, China and Japan.”

    Barton claimed he was approached by one of the major parties – he would not say which – with the offer of a Senate seat if he kicked $50,000 into the party’s coffers and cut his other political ties. “I suggested it should be the other way around,” he said. In 1977, the Australia Party merged with the New Liberal Movement that was the forerunner of the Australian Democrats under Don Chipp.

    Not content with his own political party, Barton ventured into newspaper publishing. It began with the Sunday Observer in Melbourne in 1969 and was followed in 1971 by the weekly Nation Review. Edited by Richard Walsh, it was irreverent, scatological and took particular delight in lampooning the hapless Liberal prime minister Billy McMahon. Its stable of stellar writers included Mungo MacCallum, Barry Oakley, Morris Lurie, James, Bob Ellis and Phillip Adams. It lasted almost 10 years. Near the end, Barton offered it to Adams, who was enthusiastic until Barton passed over to him the file of 50 or so unsettled defamation writs.

    Next, Barton took over the venerable book publisher Angus and Robertson. “The book establishment was to Barton like any other establishment: there to be punctured,” writes Everingham. William Deane, later to become governor-general, successfully defended the firm against a prosecution brought by the vice squad against the publication of Philip Roth’s Portnoy’s Complaint, about a New York boy’s obsession with masturbation.

  50. Des Deskperson

    ‘Des, you can’t stipulate what level of honour people get – the research committee at federal government house does that.’

    Thanks, Top Ender; interesting. So it’s the Honours and Award Secretariat that actually sorts out the ACs from the OAMs. This process is, of course, exempt from FOI and, as they say, shrouded in secrecy.

  51. johanna

    Lots of schadenfreude on offer today as the left wing media in the US sack thousands of staff.

    What is particularly amusing is watching them use the tactics formerly directed at their ideological opponents against their former employers. They are creating twitterstorms of hate, doxxing, going on competitor media to say how awfy their former employers are, etc.

    It is indeed funny that Twitter deemed that suggesting that they learn to code is abusive. But, it was OK for laid off loggers or factory workers.

    Fortunately for them, the US economy is going gangbusters and there are plenty of jobs going in the … errr … hospitality industry. Although, given their abysmal social skills, perhaps that won’t be such a good fit either.

    Oh, well.

    (Tries to care, fails.)

  52. JC

    Taleb coins a new word or at least one I’ve never heard.

    Pedophrasty

    Definition: Argument involving children to prop up a rationalization and make the opponent look like an asshole, as people are defenseless and suspend all skepticism in front of suffering children: nobody has the heart to question the authenticity or source of the reporting. Often done with the aid of pictures.

    also true

    In a rational society, pedophrasty should be a powerful tag, at par with “racism” and “sexism”

    Next time leftwing douchebags wheel out the kids, like the ABC does on programs such as Q&A, they should be tagged as practicing pedophrasty.

  53. mh

    OldOzzie
    #2920401, posted on January 29, 2019 at 7:43 am
    Global Warming Continues

    CHICAGO COLDEST EVER?
    FROSTBITE IN MINUTES!
    -60° WIND CHILL MINNEAPOLIS

    Coldest ever? Global warming’s a bitch.

  54. JC

    Another one
    Bigoteering

    Originates with Tim Ferriss, describes tagging someone (or someone’s opinions) as “racist”, “chauvinist” or somethinglikeit-ist in situations where these are not warranted. This is a shoddy manipulation to exploit the stigmas accompanying such labels and force the opponent to spent time and energy explaining “why he/she is not a bigot”.

    Taking a shot at Rowling should be an Olympic sport.

    Second Order Bigoteering: in addition to bigoteering, siding with one party in a conflict based on race or gender without even investigating the source of the problem, as commonly practices by the children book author J.K. Rowling or the podcaster Mike Duncan— such as siding automatically with the professional BS operator Mary Beard in an intellectual conflict with a man, simply because Mary Beard was a woman, without understanding the nature of the dispute, then spinning arguments to explain their support.

  55. Leigh Lowe

    Eyrie

    #2920444, posted on January 29, 2019 at 9:01 am

    Des Deskperson, thanks for that. It was about what I thought. There may be deserving cases out there but apparently you get one of your mates to nominate you, they provide the names of a few referees and put in the nomination

    I am pretty sure having the “right” nominator and referees is crucial.
    Hint … having Tony Abbott MP on your form is probably not an advantage.

  56. calli

    Uh oh. More warningy “warnings”. This time the fries get it.

    Back to food parcels from the Colonies.

  57. Bushkid

    From the look of his “cartoons”, David Rowe seems to be a pretty sick individual. What sort of person draws like that? Just so damned ugly all the time.

  58. johanna

    Above comment inspired by a great article at The Spectator entitled ‘Bonfire of the ‘Journalists’:

    These companies have not been able to generate the revenue they promised their investors because they have not been able to scale, or to cut their umbilical, traffic-driving cord with Facebook and Google. They haven’t been able to scale because the journalists they’ve hired are, frankly, not very good at their jobs. Take the HuffPost opinion section, featuring Pulitzer-worthy work like: ‘My Uterus Costs More Than A Porsche’; ‘2018 Was The Year American Women Embraced Their Inner Witch’; ‘Does God Listen To Cardi B’; ‘Every Fat Person, Healthy Or Not, Deserves Respect.’ As Truman Capote observed in another context: ‘That’s not writing, that’s typing.’

    The digital ‘creative’ class gnashed and wailed as they were bereaved of their jobs. It would be easier to sympathize with them if they hadn’t spent the last 10 years consumed by a project to make the country an even dumber place than it already is (all those damn lists, all that agitprop). The ‘creatives’ that row the digital galleys genuinely believe that they’re special. They think they’ve been doing the world a favor, that they’ve used their ‘voices’ to start a ‘conversation’ about the ‘topics that really matter’. But they’ve confused their own colossal self-regard with independent thinking. They’ve confused their posturing with developing content that’s worth paying money for. Some of them – and I’m chuckling as I type these words – even think that they’re writers.

    Well worth a read.

    Fauxfacts luvvies are finding this out also.

    But, we still have that carbuncle on the body politic, TheirABC. Their staff share all of the faults of the sacked ones in the US, but they will never be sacked.

    They can’t write, can’t spell, and their knowledge of grammar or etymology is infinitesimal. Their critical faculties would not raise a blip on one of those machines we see in hospitals on TV. They cannot disentangle opinion from fact. In short, they would never have even got a cadetship at the SMH or The Age in 1960, let alone a job at the ABC, which took the cream of the crop.

  59. Snoopy

    TheirABC

    On a warm tropical Friday morning just before Christmas, the Northern Territory Government laid bare what many had suspected for years: the NT was dead broke and borrowing $4 million a day just to meet operational expenses, including public servants’ salaries.

    The debt — long raised by the previous Country Liberals government as a political bogeyman — is now projected to blow out from $3 billion to an eye-watering $35 billion over the next 10 years.

    Some bogeyman.

  60. feelthebern

    The Afr is speculating that Christopher Pyne is the next to jump ship.
    What happened to being in the Winners Circle, Chrissy ?

  61. johanna

    Woops, just mentioned s p e l l ing and am in moderation.

    Will try again.

  62. cohenite

    OldOzzie

    #2920439, posted on January 29, 2019 at 8:46 am

    Liberal turncoat Oliver Yates to battle Treasurer Josh Frydenberg

    Yates is a piece of work, well into the john Hewson camp of sprouting alarmism, making a motza from it and still claiming to be a conservative.

    Until the libs can discover some convictions and have the courage of them they will be undermined from within by these faux conservatives who are really greenie spivs. Just think yates has been the head the CEFC for years doshing out $billions for renewable scam projects. The bastard should be horse-whipped. And what will the gutless libs do about these arseholes, nothing except sprout some idiocy about everyone has the right to run for parliament. Just once I’d like to see a conservative call these bastards for what they are: traitors.

  63. johanna

    johanna
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.
    #2920464, posted on January 29, 2019 at 9:50 am

    Above comment inspired by a great article at The Spectator entitled ‘Bonfire of the ‘Journalists’:

    These companies have not been able to generate the revenue they promised their investors because they have not been able to scale, or to cut their umbilical, traffic-driving cord with Facebook and Google. They haven’t been able to scale because the journalists they’ve hired are, frankly, not very good at their jobs. Take the HuffPost opinion section, featuring Pulitzer-worthy work like: ‘My Uterus Costs More Than A Porsche’; ‘2018 Was The Year American Women Embraced Their Inner Witch’; ‘Does God Listen To Cardi B’; ‘Every Fat Person, Healthy Or Not, Deserves Respect.’ As Truman Capote observed in another context: ‘That’s not writing, that’s typing.’

    The digital ‘creative’ class gnashed and wailed as they were bereaved of their jobs. It would be easier to sympathize with them if they hadn’t spent the last 10 years consumed by a project to make the country an even dumber place than it already is (all those damn lists, all that agitprop). The ‘creatives’ that row the digital galleys genuinely believe that they’re special. They think they’ve been doing the world a favor, that they’ve used their ‘voices’ to start a ‘conversation’ about the ‘topics that really matter’. But they’ve confused their own colossal self-regard with independent thinking. They’ve confused their posturing with developing content that’s worth paying money for. Some of them – and I’m chuckling as I type these words – even think that they’re writers.

    Well worth a read.

    Fauxfacts luvvies are finding this out also.

    But, we still have that carbuncle on the body politic, TheirABC. Their staff share all of the faults of the sacked ones in the US, but they will never be sacked.

    They can’t write, can’t spe*l, and their knowledge of grammar or etymology is infinitesimal. Their critical faculties would not raise a blip on one of those machines we see in hospitals on TV. They cannot disentangle opinion from fact. In short, they would never have even got a cadetship at the SMH or The Age in 1960, let alone a job at the ABC, which took the cream of the crop.

  64. Snoopy

    The Afr is speculating that Christopher Pyne is the next to jump ship.

    It would be more satisfying if Pyne jumped from the boat. At depth.

  65. Peter Greagg

    Thanks to Top Ender’s short piece on Nelson last night. Most enjoyable and enlightening.
    I had gone to bed and have only just read it.

  66. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    It would be more satisfying if Pyne jumped from the boat. At depth.

    Christopher Pyne jumps ship, and the Morrison Government rises even further in the polls?

  67. Mother Lode

    Bigoteering

    Originates with Tim Ferriss, describes tagging someone (or someone’s opinions) as “racist”, “chauvinist” or somethinglikeit-ist in situations where these are not warranted.

    The thing is that flinging tags like ‘racist’ and ‘misogynist’ only has affect if the person thus labelled finds the tags disagreeable.

  68. lotocoti

    Pyne is the next to jump ship.

    The very model of a one-way swimmer.

  69. johanna

    Snoopy, I read somewhere this morning that Pyne was admonishing the Chicoms about something or other. No doubt the Politbureau will be tossing and turning all night, wondering how to appease him and his mighty thews.

    Calli, the stream of lies about Brexit is getting crazier and crazier. People will starve, there will be no medicines, ports will stop operating, industry will close down – why, it sounds like Venezuela in the making.

    There must be an awful lot of money and power at stake for the Remainers to use such hysterical tactics. Leaving aside the nice progression into EU sinecures for politicians and bureaucrats, there has got to be a lot more to it.

  70. Bruce of Newcastle

    projected to blow out from $3 billion to an eye-watering $35 billion over the next 10 years.

    Population 246,700 via the wiki.
    So the debt will be $142,000 each for every man woman and child, many if not most of whom are on welfare. Can territories go bankrupt?

  71. min

    A past thread from Shy Ted , commented that if psychology worked there would be no smokers ,drinkers or other assorted problems .
    Firstly ,the diagnosis has to be correct. For instance no cure for personality disorders, so if a Narcisisstic Personality Disoder deigned to front up to get help to give up smoking , they would not last in therapy .someone who turns up with relationship problems and has a BorderlinePersonality Disorder and the underlying problem not treated ,of course Psychology won’t work.
    However this maybe a huge problem as there has been a huge percentage increase in these disorders.
    Change your thinking

  72. 132andBush


    Bigoteering

    Originates with Tim Ferriss, describes tagging someone (or someone’s opinions) as “racist”, “chauvinist” or somethinglikeit-ist in situations where these are not warranted.

    The thing is that flinging tags like ‘racist’ and ‘misogynist’ only has affect if the person thus labelled finds the tags disagreeable.

    Exactly what’s happening to KAK.

    All the virtue signalers standing in a mob yelling “RACIST!”

  73. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Veteran NBC News presenter Tom Brokaw has been criticised for saying on the network that Hispanic-Americans should “work harder at assimilation”.

    left goes apeshit

  74. Mother Lode

    The Afr is speculating that Christopher Pyne is the next to jump ship.

    So all that money for the sub program, plus expecting Navy personnel to carry out their tasks with equipment less well suited them (with therefore additional risk) – all to prop up that mincing fop who is throwing in the towel before the next election anyway.

    What a piece of shit.

  75. Mother Lode

    Can territories go bankrupt?

    Morally? Yes.

    Largely because financially, in practice, no.

  76. calli

    He added: “I also happen to believe that the Hispanics should work harder at assimilation.
    “That’s one of the things I’ve been saying for a long time.
    “You know, that they ought not to be just codified in their communities but make sure that all their kids are learning to speak English, and that they feel comfortable in the communities.”
    But his fellow guest on the roundtable, PBS NewsHour’s Yamiche Alcindor, said: “The idea that we think Americans can only speak English, as if Spanish and other languages wasn’t always part of America, is in some ways troubling.”

    Why didn’t Alcindor respond in Spanish, if that language is so “part of America”?

  77. thefrollickingmole

    JC
    #2920453, posted on January 29, 2019 at 9:28 am
    Taleb coins a new word or at least one I’ve never heard.

    Pedophrasty

    Its an excellent word and highly suited to sticking on the worrying classes as a mark of shame.

    And Bigoteering has another function other than insult.
    Its a way of declaring you dont have to engage with a persons arguments, almost a fetish in itself.
    Once you have declared someone a second Hitler you dont have to communicate with them any more, after all you wouldnt chat with hitler would you?

  78. calli

    Brokaw put one teenie toe outside the reservation.

    Tweeter haters took pot shots at it, but Brokaw winded up shooting his entire foot off by apologising profusely.

    How’s that limp old fella?

  79. Snoopy

    How long before the US is officially bilingual like Canada?

  80. Boambee John

    calli

    How’s that limp old fella?

    I read “limp” as an adjective qualifying “old fella”!

  81. Snoopy

    If only the US was more like the rest of Latin America.

  82. John64

    The debt ……. is now projected to blow out from $3 billion to an eye-watering $35 billion over the next 10 years.

    That’s would be an astonishing $120,000+ for every Territorian.

    That sort of financial incompetence is treasonous.

  83. Oldozzie

    WSJ Opinion Best of the Web

    The Shutdown and the Federal Workforce

    To apply public pressure, essential workers had to furlough themselves.

    News consumers may find it odd that coverage of the partial shutdown of the federal government was largely devoted to the shutdown’s impact on employees of the government itself rather than on the lower-paid citizens they are supposed to serve. New estimates of the economic impact of this longest-ever shutdown and a closer look at the events that brought it to an end may provide an explanation. A remaining question, as the private economy demands workers as never before, is just how overstaffed the federal bureaucracy really is.

    The Congressional Budget Office reports today on the modest economic impact of the shutdown during the end of last year and the start of this one—an impact that will be offset in the future:

    In subsequent quarters, GDP will be temporarily higher than it would have been in the absence of a shutdown. Although most of the real GDP lost during the fourth quarter of 2018 and the first quarter of 2019 will eventually be recovered, CBO estimates that about $3 billion will not be. That amount equals 0.02 percent of projected annual GDP in 2019. In other words, the level of GDP for the full calendar year is expected to be 0.02 percent smaller than it would have been otherwise.

    The affected agencies were operating without nearly half of their normal staff—some 380,000 furloughed workers deemed non-essential—and the economic impact was not material to the $21 trillion U.S. economy.

    The essential government workers were not necessarily operating at full speed either. In fact, those eager to end the shutdown couldn’t muster the necessary political pressure on the White House until some of the workers deemed essential started furloughing themselves.

    Sarah Jones writes in New York magazine:


    Trump announced his deal hours after air traffic controllers brought flights in several of the nation’s busiest airports to a crawl. Controllers have missed two paychecks — as have hundreds of thousands of other federal workers and subcontractors. Hours after the Federal Aviation Authority announced severe delays at LaGuardia, Newark, and Hartsfield-Jackson airports, Sara Nelson, the head of the flight attendants’ union, publicly urged her members to mobilize “immediately” against the shutdown by visiting the offices of their congressional representatives. “If air traffic controllers can’t do their jobs, we can’t do ours,” she told New York on Friday.

    Air traffic controllers and flight attendants didn’t act alone. The Washington Post reported that 14,000 IRS workers did not show up to their (unpaid) jobs this week. Previously, multiple outlets reported a spike in the number of TSA agents calling out of work sick — though they were not sick, at least not in the physical sense…

    Workers bore the cost of the shutdown, and it shouldn’t surprise anyone that they began to revolt. By withholding their labor, they redirected the pain the Trump administration had inflicted upon them. Their actions were not strikes in the formal definition, because that option is not legally available to most workers affected by the shutdown.

    Airline delays were needed to apply pressure to a public that largely failed to notice the impact of a prolonged closure of significant parts of the government. Even in the industry most affected, the results were hardly catastrophic. Andrew Tangel and Alison Sider of the Journal reported last week:

    Some of the biggest U.S. airlines warned passengers would soon face worse delays and more canceled flights if the partial federal government shutdown drags on further.

    American Airlines Group Inc. Southwest Airlines Co. , Alaska Air Group Inc. and JetBlue Airways Corp. on Thursday said they could increase their revenues in the first quarter despite the shutdown. Shares in American and Southwest climbed more than 6% and JetBlue rose over 5%.

    Should it have been this hard and taken this long to identify a problem resulting from a prolonged shutdown affecting numerous federal agencies? In theory, government employment is for the purpose of delivering public services, as opposed to a jobs program for well-educated people who don’t want to make things or sell things.

    There is certainly no need for a federal jobs program, as the private economy remains in dire need of workers. The Journal’s Sarah Chaney noted last week:

    Initial jobless claims declined by 13,000 to a seasonally adjusted 199,000 in the week ended Jan. 19, the Labor Department said Thursday. This marks the lowest level for claims since November 1969, when applications clocked in at 197,000.

    Here’s hoping that after budget negotiators resolve their border arguments they’ll find time to help at least some federal workers pursue new opportunities in the private sector.

  84. Mater

    Muddy, here’s a suggestion for the Cat Lexicon:

    Statist-ics:
    ‘Erroneous or deliberately deceptive figures used to an advocate a political system in which the state has substantial centralized control over social and economic affairs. Eg, 97% of climate scientists believe…’

    Other variations can be derived from it:

    Statist-ician:
    ‘A statist-ician is a person who works with theoretical or applied statist-ics to an advocate a political system in which the state has substantial centralized control over social and economic affairs.’

    And so on…

  85. thefrollickingmole

    Lucky the emperor of the EU isnt a creepy Biden type eh?? Check the first 30 seconds of this for the old sots welcome to a rather startled looking lady.

    https://youtu.be/-yII1PEhtS8

  86. dover_beach

    If anyone tells you they’re from the Show Me state, always, always ask to see their papers.

  87. OldOzzie

    America Lost Vietnam but Saved Southeast Asia

    Had the U.S. stayed out of Indochina, it might have had to intervene in the Philippines at greater cost.

    By William Lloyd Stearman

    America got into World War II because of Vietnam. When the Japanese conquered what was then French Indochina in September 1941, the U.S. replied with severe economic sanctions, which convinced the Japanese that America was hostile and might use its fleet to block Tokyo’s conquest of Southeast Asia. In December the Japanese attacked the U.S. fleet at Pearl Harbor.

    President Dwight Eisenhower, remembering that Indochina had been a base for conquest, declared on April 7, 1954, that a communist victory there could topple the newly independent countries of Southeast Asia like dominoes. The containment strategy against Soviet communism dictated that Washington prevent this. U.S. involvement in Vietnam followed, step by step.

    The military presence began with advisers, whose numbers continued to grow. When the threat from North Vietnam increased in 1965, President Lyndon Johnson decided to introduce combat troops—first Marines, then a far greater number of soldiers.

    Things seemed to be progressing well until the Tet Offensive of Jan. 30, 1968, in which North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces attacked much of South Vietnam. Even the U.S. Embassy grounds were occupied. Negative television coverage had a decisive effect on U.S. public opinion—yet the offensive ended badly for the communists. Hanoi was delighted that the U.S. media had turned its defeat into victory.

    President Richard Nixon began “Vietnamizing” the war in 1969 by withdrawing combat ground troops. This phase was largely completed in 1971. America did, however, continue to provide air, naval and logistical support and advisers. On March 30, 1972, Hanoi staged a huge offensive aimed at final victory. Initially it seemed certain to succeed. But with massive U.S. air support and good advice, South Vietnamese troops were soon on the offensive. By autumn, “on the ground in South Vietnam the war had been won,” former CIA Director William Colby wrote in his 1989 book, “Lost Victory.”

    Hanoi thus asked for negotiations. which interfered with continued fighting. The war ended with the Jan. 27, 1973, Paris Peace Agreement, which was immediately met with gross violations, mostly by the communist side.

    After U.S. troops and prisoners of war returned, Americans lost interest in South Vietnam’s fate. Congress greatly reduced aid and banned further U.S. military involvement in the region, effectively ensuring a communist victory. Saigon fell April 30, 1975.

    It is widely believed that the Vietnam War was unwinnable. But a 2004 History Chanel documentary featured interviews with knowledgeable North Vietnamese who thought otherwise. They said U.S. and South Vietnamese ground troops could have effectively blocked the Ho Chi Minh Trail in eastern Laos, denying its enemy essential supplies and troop reinforcements. Other North Vietnamese said they were puzzled that the U.S. failed to do so. This logical, war-ending move was ruled out by decision makers in Washington because it would “broaden the conflict”—never mind that the enemy had already broadened it by using Laos as a base and supply chain.

    The defeat created more than a million South Vietnamese refugees, who escaped by sea. More than 300,000 drowned, according to a Red Cross estimate. Large numbers also died in concentration camps or were executed.

    Yet even the defeat in Vietnam accomplished a lot. “In 1965, when the U.S. military moved massively into South Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia and the Philippines faced internal threats from armed insurgencies and the communist underground was still active in Singapore. Indonesia [was] in the throes of a failed communist coup,” Singapore’s founding father, Lee Kuan Yew, wrote in his 2000 memoir, “From Third World to First.” “America’s action enabled noncommunist Southeast Asia to put their own houses in order. By 1975, they were in better shape to stand up to the communists. Had there been no U.S. intervention, the will of these countries to resist them would have melted and Southeast Asia would most likely gone communist.”

    The 1965 combat-troop buildup had a bracing effect in Southeast Asia. It reportedly encouraged the British defense of Malaysia. Far more important was its effect in Indonesia. In 1970, President Suharto told U.S. officials and columnist Robert Novak that the large-scale introduction of combat troops substantially encouraged Indonesian forces to repulse a major, and nearly successful, Chinese-dominated communist coup that began the night of Sept. 30, 1965. Coup assassination squads had already murdered six top generals, and Suharto—then the army’s strategic reserve commander—must have been tempted to flee to safety. Instead, he rallied his units and suppressed the coup.

    Had the coup succeeded, it probably would have spread to the Philippines. That would have triggered the 1951 Defense Agreement, which would have obliged the U.S. to help in its defense. Such a conflict might have been far worse than Vietnam. The U.S. intervention in Vietnam achieved a strategic victory by saving Southeast Asia—albeit not Vietnam itself—from communism.

    Mr. Stearman, who served on the National Security Council staff under four presidents, is the author of “An American Adventure, From Early Aviation Through Three Wars to the White House” (Naval Institute Press, 2012).

  88. Myrddin Seren

    Judith upthread:

    The bottom line is that the objective of affordable and reliable electricity is now further away than ever.

    That is an objective for you and me.

    Except we don’t count.

    If actions are to be believed, the Real Objective is intermittent, expensive and ultimately rationed electricity – with a hierarchy of access based on power, wealth and connections.

    No point in being a New Aristocrat without manifestly unprivileged New Serfs.

  89. johanna

    Old Ozzie, I get that you think you are doing us all a favour (especially by bolding the bits that you deem to be important because we are too dumb to work it out) but my scrolling finger is getting tired.

    You remind me of srr, who took up huge slabs of real estate here because she thought that her priorities were much more important than anyone else’s. She also bolded bits for the intellectually challenged among us. It’s an ego trip, and bad netiquette.

    Plus, you have previously been warned.

  90. stackja

    OO – Yes, MSM helped NV. USA gave Thailand time unlike Japan taking Thailand and then Malay, Singapore. MSM unhappy with Indonesia surviving communist coup bid.

  91. cohenite

    Old Ozzie, I get that you think you are doing us all a favour

    He is; for those who don’t subscribe to the Australian.

  92. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Old Ozzie, I get that you think you are doing us all a favour

    Given that the original article is behind a paywall, he is.

  93. C.L.

    Definition: Argument involving children to prop up a rationalization and make the opponent look like an asshole, as people are defenseless and suspend all skepticism in front of suffering children: nobody has the heart to question the authenticity or source of the reporting. Often done with the aid of pictures.

    Also known as the won’t somebody think of the children?
    In the Rudd era at Catallaxy, references were often made to … for our children and our children’s children’s children.

  94. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    U.S. Ramps Up Huawei Fight With Iran, Trade-Secret Charges
    Employees offered bonuses to steal rival tech, prosecutors say

  95. Tom

    … my scrolling finger is getting tired.

    Mine’s not, Jo — especially after the recent smoting.

    OldOzzie’s paywall-busters are appreciated.

    PS: I basically can’t use my Paywallian subscription because its spastic website freezes whenever I try to extract content. News Corp websites are the worst news websites in the world.

  96. C.L.

    Of course, some people really do love children.

  97. dover_beach

    In the Rudd era at Catallaxy, references were often made to … for our children and our children’s children’s children.

    Indeed, and the people making these arguments – still making these arguments – were cockahoop about abortion.

  98. Snoopy

    United Arab Emirates Government criticised for giving all of its gender balance awards to men

    Work to remove the gender gap and this is the thanks you get. Why bother?

  99. C.L.

    What’s killing the fish?

  100. Mother Lode

    especially after the recent smoting.

    Who got smoted?

  101. thefrollickingmole

    OldOzzie

    Ive mentioned before the domino theory was quite realistic.
    North Vietnam resisted so well because it shared a border with a “sugar daddy” willing and able to offload heaps of equipment and supplies.
    Thats would have been the template all the way along, supply the commie shits and render defeat impossible long enough for the “west ” to leave.

    Also I think Im supposed to feel bad for this blokes parents…
    Recovered grandchild 121
    Maximiliano was stolen as a newborn. His parents were tortured and ‘disappeared’ by a brutal regime; his mother possibly drugged and thrown into the sea to die. For 40 years, he had no idea.

    The military ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1983, and during that time an estimated 30,000 people disappeared.
    Ordinary Argentinians had no idea their towns and cities were also home to 700 clandestine torture centres.

    Unfortunately it appears his family were Commie thugs and murderous shits.

    He learned his parents had been members of Ejército Revolucionario del Pueblo, The People’s Revolutionary Army.
    In the 1970s the left-wing group kidnapped industrialists and killed police.
    After the military coup in 1976, they knew their time was up.
    Maximilano’s parents had already bought airline tickets to go into exile when they were both detained.

    Followed by a happy ending.

    Notorious death flights
    His mother Ana-Maria Lanzillotto was eight months pregnant at the time.
    He’s been able to piece together her final days with the help of Catalina Lanis, who was in detention with Ana-Maria.
    What she told him is like something out of The Handmaid’s Tale.
    “Catalina told me that they were moving them around a lot,” Maximiliano says.
    “One time they stopped in the middle of one of these trips and they … pretended to shoot them, about 10 to 20 women.”
    Eventually the women were taken to a detention centre where they were chained to their beds, blindfolded.
    It was there that Maximiliano’s mother went into labour. She was taken away to give birth, and never seen again.
    It’s possible, as Ms Guevara from ESMA explains, that she was on one of the notorious death flights.
    “It consisted of giving a sleeping drug to the desaparecidos and then taking them in trucks to an airport, putting them into aeroplanes and throwing them into the river, Rio de la Plata, or into the sea,” Ms Guevara says.

    And nothing of value was lost.

  102. Tom

    Googleory, Mother Lode. But he can’t stay away (because he’s addicted to being an arsehole). So he’ll be back presently with a new alias as obvious as one of Bird”s.

  103. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Googleory, Mother Lode. But he can’t stay away (because he’s addicted to being an arsehole). So he’ll be back presently with a new alias as obvious as one of Bird”s.

    Good riddance.

  104. dover_beach

    I can’t rememeber if it was Steve from B or Fatfingers telling us that we had a moral obligation to future children but not to actual children in the womb.

    This is what liberalism does to you.

  105. C.L.

    WaPo/SMH run weird utterly piece about Trump showing more everyday people the White House residence (which they own) than any other Presidentwhich they narratively rig as a gross negative.

  106. Not Uh oh

    Keep it going Old Ozzie. I’m reading it and appreciating your efforts.

  107. mOnster would be awake feverishly checking the inter webs for anti-Trump talking points.

    Rubbish. They turn up in his inbox at 4am like every other leftard.

  108. struth

    That’s bullshit Johanna

    He posts stuff behind paywall and emphasises what he finds interesting, letting us know that is what he picked up on.
    It isn’t about him thinking we are too dumb at all, in fact the reasons he highlights it and does therefore not need to comment on it is because he knows we’ll get it.

    Put the feisty female shit to bed, it’s hyper sensitive nonsense.
    Go and make me a sandwich, woman.
    I should like egg and lettuce , please.

    That should initiate a response!!!!

  109. duncanm

    With a debt like that, the NT should be abolished and absorbed by WA and Qld.

    … but I expect neither would have it.

  110. Myrddin Seren

    Australia will have an extra 1.25 million jobs in five years and no government debt in a decade if the coalition remains in power, the prime minister has promised.

    The coalition’s jobs and debt targets would be achieved through key pillars of the coalition’s economic plan, including a strong budget, lower taxes, support for small business and reliable and affordable energy.

    Unspoken in this is – why Australia will need an additional 250,000 new jobs each and every year ?

    P-p-p-Ponzi ?

  111. johanna

    So exposing Doomie to copyright/paywall infringement is kewl?

    Here’s the thing. You can get away with it on an ad hoc, random, basis.

    But if people from a company I won’t mention discover that their stuff is being copied in full, every day on a free site, they just might take action. Indeed, it is highly likely that they will take action.

    The desire of one person to become a beacon for his views is understandable, if not deserving of praise.

  112. Mother Lode

    Thanks, Tom.

    Garooglaryy will be down in the basement now, echoes of non-descript music filtering in from some remote room, sitting naked at an old sewing machine where he is attaching button eyes and stitching a mouth onto a sock, all the while muttering. Occasionally he will freeze and go dumb, slowly turning his head and straining his ears into the gloom for the echo of some imagined sound. When content that he is safe and alone he will go back to his stitching and murmuring.

  113. struth

    NT only has about three private sector tax payers there , so that’s only 10 billion per Territoian taxpayer.

    Or is it likely we’ll all pay, just like we will for the power problems of the ethnic states of hivisistans electrickery woes

    The government spreads the joy around, you know.

  114. johanna

    Wow, so many fans of the bore-athon posting giant slabs of what he finds interesting.

    I’ve got a few essays on the philosophy of economics saved. Perhaps I should post them, even if they take several pages. Why not?

  115. Roger

    Encouraging news I don’t remember this being noted here:

    In December “far right” (i.e. centre-right nationalist) party Vox won the balance of power in Andalusia, effectively ending 36 years of socialist rule in the Spanish state.

    Here are their policies.

    The return of illegal immigrants to North Africa and the promotion of Spanish history, language and culture are key, along with lower taxes!

  116. Roger

    With a debt like that, the NT should be abolished and absorbed by WA and Qld.

    … but I expect neither would have it.

    No thank you!

    Perhaps we could lease it to China for 100 years?

    They already have the port.

  117. johanna

    The NT has always run on the basis that the Commonwealth will bail them out. In fact, it has to bail them out, because the NT is part of the Commonwealth. Its debts are the Commonwealth’s debts.

    It is hard to imagine a worse model for responsible government.

  118. struth

    Could I get a bit of mayonnaise on the egg and lettuce , Johanna?
    Oh, and I don’t mind a bit of pepper.

    Making food for men is cathartic for a woman.
    Just trying to help.
    I’m not even really hungry.

  119. bespoke

    johanna, don’t be so cranky I like Old Ozzie’s contributions and others including yours.

  120. Mother Lode

    Australia will have an extra 1.25 million jobs in five years and no government debt in a decade if the coalition remains in power, the prime minister has promised.

    Is this to be ScoMo’s moment of epiphany? Labor is going to lie, so the Lib’s hopes lie in lying better!

  121. mh

    Australia will have an extra 1.25 million jobs in five years and no government debt in a decade if the coalition remains in power, the prime minister has promised.

    Morrison is saying that if you vote them in for the next 10 years they will pay off all the debt. Lol

    Let us see how the government debt is going:

    http://www.australiandebtclock.com.au

    Commonwealth government debt is $679, 606, 905, xxx (the last 3 digits are ticking over so fast you cannot view it). So the Coalition will pay back around three quarters of a Trillion dollars if you keep electing them. Lol

  122. Roger

    Unspoken in this is – why Australia will need an additional 250,000 new jobs each and every year ?

    P-p-p-Ponzi ?

    My thought too.

    And those jobs will be promised to regional centres where local councils will greedily approve more postage stamp size blocks for development and infrastructure and services will play catch up. The same model/malaise that has had a deleterious effect on quality of life in the great cities will now be applied to regional cities.

  123. struth

    Australia will have an extra 1.25 million jobs in five years and no government debt in a decade if the coalition remains in power, the prime minister has promised.

    After they’ve imported 25 million third world welfarists we get 1.25 million jobs from his ponzi scheme.

    Jobs Making mud bricks and collecting dried turd for fuel.

  124. stackja

    Ian Alexander “Molly” Meldrum AM is an Australian music critic, journalist, record producer and musical entrepreneur. Wikipedia
    Born: 29 January 1943 (age 76 years), Orbost

    How Meldrum dodged suits for Aussie classic
    By ALAN HOWE
    12:00AM DECEMBER 28, 2015

    The story of The Real Thing is almost unreal.

    Morris had been modestly successful with Somebody’s Image, whose remake of the Joe South song Hush charted well in 1967.

    But the Bob Dylan fan liked the idea of going solo, and Meldrum liked the idea of managing him, and knew he needed a hit to start the ball rolling. Early in 1969, Meldrum was backstage at the old Channel 0 studios during the live broadcast of Uptight, its four-hour, Saturday morning pop show.

    Young was strumming an acoustic guitar and singing a song he planned to give to Ronnie Burns called The Real Thing. Meldrum heard in it a song that Young did not and insisted then and there that Morris was the man to sing it. Young saw it as a folkie baroque-pop affair, perhaps driven by cellos like the Beatles’ I Am the Walrus, and unsuited to a solo artist.

    Meldrum booked time at the then already legendary Armstrong recording studio opposite Melbourne’s Albert Park Lake.

    To describe what Meldrum had in mind for the song as wildly ambitious is to understate his daring. The plan — if he had one — was to distil every recent achievement at London’s famed Abbey Road studios into a heroic Sgt Pepper’s-in-a-single. Young’s song was just its skeleton. Meldrum often has been underestimated through the years; rest assured, this was a purposeful departure from the cheerfully functional pop hits of the day.

    His first act of defiance was to ignore the rule that radio wanted three-minute pop songs. The year before, the Beatles’ Hey Jude had doubled that. Meldrum would treble it.

    Rock bands had four or five musicians. Records were made to strict budgets. Time in the studio was metered. There were rules. Only a bundy clock was missing.

    Morris was a solo act. So Meldrum built him a band, recruiting Australia’s rock elite, starting with the Groop, and its singer Ronnie Charles, keyboard player Brian Cadd and bass player Don Mudie.

    Weeks later Cadd and Mudie formed Axiom. Roger Hicks, from Zoot, shaped the song’s distinctive acoustic guitar motif, and Billy Green from Doug Parkinson In Focus was on lead guitar and sitar.

    For the first few minutes of the song Morris tells us, with the thin details supplied by Young, about The Real Thing. As the pace picks up, the band deviates into melodic corners and a children’s choir enters tentatively but then threatens to take over.

  125. Leigh Lowe

    dover_beach

    #2920503, posted on January 29, 2019 at 10:51 am

    If anyone tells you they’re from the Show Me state, always, always ask to see their papers.

    Way back last century I had a few dealings with a couple of corporations from the State of Misery … er, Missouri …
    FMD, the “I’m from the ‘show me’ state” got rolled out every three minutes in contract negotiations.
    Me : “The sun rises in the East”
    Them :“Well, our state motto here in Misery is “show me”, so …”
    Me : “OK, water runs downhill.”
    Them : “Us being from the ‘show me’ state …”
    And on and on it went.

  126. Confused Old Misfit

    There was some discussion of IQ tests last night.
    I ran across this which might be of interest.
    IQ, Race & The Jewish Question.

  127. struth

    India has more people employed than Australia, so why is the number and not the type and percentage, important?

  128. Confused Old Misfit

    There was some discussion of IQ tests last night.
    I ran across this which might be of interest.
    IQ, Race & The J * wish Question.

  129. calli

    Oddly enough, I’m whipping up an egg-and-lettuce salad as we speak. I’ll flick youse some.

    As for that basement…

  130. Confused Old Misfit

    There was some discussion of IQ tests last night.
    I ran across this which might be of interest.
    IQ, Race & The J * wish Question.

  131. struth

    Thanks Calli, but stirring Johanna actually stuffed me up.

    I got hungry thinking about it and am now scoffing a prawn sanga with really fresh bread.
    And a cuppa.

  132. johanna

    Men, as Lizzie’s example shows us, are very simple creatures.

    Wave a pair of tits, or a troll, in front of them and they just can’t resist.

    We women watch and wait. We are Texas Rangers, we are behind you.

  133. Leigh Lowe

    stackja

    #2920388, posted on January 29, 2019 at 7:01 am

    Fears grow as bat-wielding vigilantes menace youths at Wyndham Vale
    Tamsin Rose and Kieran Rooney, Herald Sun
    January 28, 2019 9:00pm
    Subscriber only

    A group armed with baseball bats has targeted young men of African appearance in an alarming escalation of Melbourne’s gang tensions.

    After three years of muggings, beatings and riots, followed by the obligatory VicPol OH&S retreat to a safe distance with “no arrests made but investigations are ongoing “, watch this space.
    The aspiring Babe Ruths will now cop the full riot-squad vengeance for wanting to do what Plod won’t.

  134. calli

    Fact check on the Meldrum wiki:

    MacArthur Park released April 68 length 7:21

    Hey Jude released August 68 length 7:11

    Both were huge hits.

  135. Fisky

    In case anyone is confused as to why Leftists are always coming up with fake causes (like trannies in bathrooms) to stir up their followers, it’s because they absolutely do not want people talking about stuff like this –

    As laid off BuzzFeed employees mourn their jobs with fresh tears, the company is rebranding itself with new hires: Cheaper humans they will call “editorial fellows.” BuzzFeed will pay them hourly wages. They will not give them health benefits.

    The Left are now the downsizing, offshoring corporate elite; having switched sides in the class war expect them to double down on race war against the white working class.

  136. Roger

    India has more people employed than Australia, so why is the number and not the type and percentage, important?

    I know your question was rhetorical, struth, but…

    Because we’ve sacrificed our culture on the altar of Mammon and he is an insatiable god.

  137. Leigh Lowe

    Confused Old Misfit

    #2920563, posted on January 29, 2019 at 12:01 pm

    There was some discussion of IQ tests last night.

    Scroll to the top ‘o this page for an assessment of last night’s discussions.

  138. EvilElvis

    so she can have adequate reserves to call on when the supply-demand gap becomes tight.

    AEMO and Zibelman, what a fucking joke. Market operator? What infrastructure do you own? What investments of private money have you made? None! You’re a government installed ‘stakeholder’ who has no skin in the game other than your exorbitant salary and bending to the green lobby for renewable kickbacks.

  139. johanna

    Oh, and I enjoyed the debate over IQ last night, which featured intelligence and nuance.

    I suppose that Zippy, Molyneaux and others are still running the line that their bullshit racial IQ tests mean something.

    Can’t help wishing the were put out into a desert or wilderness on their own, with nothing but their massive IQs to sustain them. They’d be lucky to last a long weekend. But, hey, they know everything there is to be known about intelligence – except when it comes to survival.

  140. Leigh Lowe

    Fisky

    #2920568, posted on January 29, 2019 at 12:10 pm

    As laid off BuzzFeed employees mourn their jobs with fresh tears, the company is rebranding itself with new hires: Cheaper humans they will call “editorial fellows.” BuzzFeed will pay them hourly wages. They will not give them health benefits.


    Just a random thought.
    What is the legal status of an “editorial fellow”
    ?
    Hypothetical. Buzzfeed publishes a story about, oh, I don’t know … the President ordering his lawyer to lie to Congress, or say, a kid from Kentucky kicking the shit out of respected Indian chief, “Two Dogs Running”.
    Both stories turn out to be manufactured bullshit.
    If the story was written by an employee, maybe Buzzfeed carries the can legally.
    But, what if it was written by an “editorial fellow”? Does he/she/zhe accept legal editorial responsibility?

  141. johanna

    EvilElvis
    #2920574, posted on January 29, 2019 at 12:18 pm

    so she can have adequate reserves to call on when the supply-demand gap becomes tight.

    AEMO and Zibelman, what a fucking joke. Market operator? What infrastructure do you own? What investments of private money have you made? None! You’re a government installed ‘stakeholder’ who has no skin in the game other than your exorbitant salary and bending to the green lobby for renewable kickbacks.

    Elvis, sorry to have to bring this up.

    You have to stop holding back and being over-tactful in the face of a glaring truth.

  142. Baldrick

    As laid off BuzzFeed employees mourn their jobs with fresh tears, the company is rebranding itself with new hires

    Imagine ABC staff being held to account like Buzzfeed for publishing fake news.

    No, neither can I.

  143. struth

    so she can have adequate reserves to call on when the supply-demand gap becomes tight.

    Also, what I love about all this rot being pushed by dumb public servant bints is the assumption that there will be no growth, not by business or population, and really, how depressing is that.

    Gee, if you were an investor or looking to start a business that requires even a powered bloody angle grinder, would you consider Australia?

    Not with these dripping snot filled, saliva drooling , insulaturds running the show.

  144. LL, they as the publisher are liable. It would be no different to publishing a defamatory article by a freelancer.

  145. Leigh Lowe

    johanna

    #2920577, posted on January 29, 2019 at 12:25 pm

    Oh, and I enjoyed the debate over IQ last night, which featured intelligence and nuance.

    The maths puzzle which followed … not so much.
    It was like several people travelling down different streets answering the question, “what colour is the house at #70?”
    Poster 1 : “Blue”
    Poster 2 : “Fuck off. It’s white”
    Poster 3 : “I am in a Bentley”
    Poster 4 : “There is no #70 in the street.”
    Poster 5 : “What if it is clinker brick?”

  146. Bushkid

    feelthebern
    #2920467, posted on January 29, 2019 at 9:52 am
    The Afr is speculating that Christopher Pyne is the next to jump ship.
    What happened to being in the Winners Circle, Chrissy ?

    Don’t worry, little prissy chrissie will make sure he’s in the winners circle, no matter what. His sort always do, and at other peoples expense. Always.

  147. struth

    we are behind you.

    If only.

  148. Leigh Lowe

    LL, they as the publisher are liable. It would be no different to publishing a defamatory article by a freelancer.

    OK, it was the use of thr term “editorial” which caught my eye.
    So, all that is happening is that they are copping a whack in pay, conditions and security of tenure in return for a grandiose title?
    Sounds very millennial to me.

  149. struth

    Lunch break over, back on your heads……………….

  150. C.L.

    Today’s biggest story:

    A CURE FOR CANCER? ISRAELI SCIENTISTS SAY THEY THINK THEY FOUND ONE.
    ———-
    Via Instapundit/DRUDGE

    A small team of Israeli scientists think they might have found the first complete cure for cancer.

    “We believe we will offer in a year’s time a complete cure for cancer,” said Dan Aridor, of a new treatment being developed by his company, Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies Ltd. (AEBi), which was founded in 2000 in the ITEK incubator in the Weizmann Science Park. AEBi developed the SoAP platform, which provides functional leads to very difficult targets.

    “Our cancer cure will be effective from day one, will last a duration of a few weeks and will have no or minimal side-effects at a much lower cost than most other treatments on the market,” Aridor said. “Our solution will be both generic and personal.”

    RTWT for details.

  151. C.L.

    Can’t help wishing the were put out into a desert or wilderness on their own, with nothing but their massive IQs to sustain them. They’d be lucky to last a long weekend. But, hey, they know everything there is to be known about intelligence – except when it comes to survival.

    This doesn’t make any sense.
    Animals with no intelligence whatsoever survive in the desert – whereas higher species cannot.
    The question is whether or not Israel or Zambia is more likely to build a rocket or cure cancer.
    We all know the answer.

  152. EvilElvis

    Is this to be ScoMo’s moment of epiphany?

    ScoMo (FMD) hasn’t realised that he’s the uncool bloke who rocks up to a pub with his hiviz wearing, blue collar mates, with his ‘Sharks’ paraphernalia ridiculously draped over him, in off season, because he thinks it’s cool and grounding and sits on a lemon squash all evening but still gets a taxi home, just to be safe. Little does he know that his ‘mate’ Thommo has been around to Chateau ScoMo tonight, and every Friday night they’ve been getting together, to sort out Mrs ScoMo.

  153. Bruce of Newcastle

    India has more people employed than Australia, so why is the number and not the type and percentage, important?

    Funny you should ask that…

    200,000 Liters of Water a Day to Keep Solar panels Clean

    RAMANATHAPURAM: The world’s largest solar power plant, installed by the Adani Group in 2,500 acres in Kamuthi taluk of Tamil Nadu, is not as green or sustainable as it seems. Local residents claim the 648 MW renewable energy plant is a water guzzler. … Near the dried Gundar riverbed on Kamuthi-Mudukulathur road at Kottai Medu, one can find borewells functioning round the clock, filling 6,000-8,000 litre tanks that are attached to tractors.

    Around 40 tractors are said to have been contracted by Adani Green Energy (TN) for cleaning the giant solar modules, each of which is approximately 125 ft long and 28 ft wide. Two contract workers in each vehicle fetch water and clean the modules, often twice a day. The panels need to be kept clean, else production could drop by as much as 25 per cent.

    Yes that would be the same Adani of hated-by-Aussie-Greens fame.
    Yes that solar panel farm employs 40 tractors and 80 guys just to wash the panels.
    Every day.
    For a plant that produces as much energy each day as Hazelwood did in 2 hours.

    Quality Australian jerbs courtesy of Electricity Bill! I wonder if they’ll employ Indians on 457s to do these new age green jerbs?

  154. There area great many people whose IQs are in the stratosphere and live a humble life, yet a lot of low IQ but smart spivs amass fortunes.

    But enough about me and JC having lunch.

  155. thefrollickingmole

    johanna
    You have to stop holding back and being over-tactful in the face of a glaring truth.

    Its so frustrating when you have to read between the lines to guess at a persons meaning isnt it?

    C.L.
    Read that one, very interesting, and apparently an offshoot of AIDs drug therapy.
    Where AIDs combo drugs dont eradicate it entirely it doesnt seem to be the same for cancer.

  156. calli

    A small team of Israeli scientists think they might have found the first complete cure for cancer.

    And, naturally, it will be a target for BDS morons the moment it becomes widely available.

    No? If not, why not?

  157. Confused Old Misfit

    One thing of note in that link on IQ that I posted was the observation that intelligent people are not necessarily “Nice” people.
    Nor are those that consider themselves to be so.

  158. EvilElvis

    You have to stop holding back and being over-tactful in the face of a glaring truth.

    Your ‘tits and trolls’ comment got me wound up, Johanna. 😉

  159. Boambee John

    Australia will have an extra 1.25 million jobs in five years and no government debt in a decade if the coalition remains in power, the prime minister has promised.

    And how many new “citizens” will we “gain” in that period?

  160. mh

    ScoMo (FMD) hasn’t realised that he’s the uncool bloke who rocks up to a pub with his hiviz wearing, blue collar mates, with his ‘Sharks’ paraphernalia ridiculously draped over him, in off season, because he thinks it’s cool and grounding and sits on a lemon squash all evening but still gets a taxi home, just to be safe…

    Not sure. After Morrison declared that the Coalition is going to pay off all government debt I reckon he’s been smoking some good shit

  161. Stimpson J. Cat

    Mike has transitioned from Gorilla Mindset to Islam Mindset. Stay off the roids kids.

    Mike Cernovich 🌹🦍🇺🇸
    Mike Cernovich 🌹🦍🇺🇸
    @Cernovich
    Christianity has given us a country where 11 year olds dance for adult men who throw dollars on the stage.
    Christianity gave us a church that molested children and sold out their flock (Covington) to the left.
    A moderated form of Islam is probably the West’s only hope.

  162. Stimpson J. Cat

    A small team of Israeli scientists think they might have found the first complete cure for cancer.

    Why are they thinking so small?
    Just ridiculous.
    Male Pattern Baldness cure first please.
    Let’s get our priorities right for once, people.

  163. Steve Trickler:

    You just know that second pilot had a grin from ear to ear.

    A pity we don’t have a similar bit of geography for our pilots to play in.

  164. Leigh Lowe

    Don’t worry, little prissy chrissie will make sure he’s in the winners circle, no matter what. His sort always do, and at other peoples expense. Always.

    Absolutely.
    The slimey little prick will be already setting up ScoMo to appoint him as Hagh Commissioner to Somewhar Nahce.

  165. Lysander

    One thing of note in that link on IQ that I posted was the observation that intelligent people are not necessarily “Nice” people.

    Hmm yes, a socialist comment dressed up as egalitarianism. As the opposite is just as equally true:

    -Dumb people are not necessarily “nice” people.

  166. John Constantine

    Their pyne has the private polling.

    We know how it works, gillard had her government’s donations in the hands of her next employers long before she left politics.

    Is pyne less rat-cunning than gillard?.

    How grateful is the clinton foundation to bishop for all the funding?.

    Comrade Maaaaaates.

  167. calli

    The slimey little prick will be already setting up ScoMo Shortie to appoint him as Hagh Commissioner to Somewhar Nahce.

    I suspect it’s been going on for some time.

  168. Leigh Lowe

    A small team of Israeli scientists think they might have found the first complete cure for cancer.

    Headline in the SMH …
    Z10n1st plot to close Palestinian Oncology Hospitals.
    If the cure becomes available it will create an interesting moral dilemma for any BDS types who get cancer

  169. C.L.

    A small team of Israeli scientists think they might have found the first complete cure for cancer.
    ——–

    Headline in the SMH …
    Z10n1st plot to close Palestinian Oncology Hospitals.

    Gold.

  170. Lysander

    Will change the date activists be invoiced for police presence?

  171. 132andBush

    The ABC – Australia’s Buzzfeed Corollary

  172. Mother Lode

    If the cure becomes available it will create an interesting moral dilemma for any BDS types who get cancer

    Doesn’t stop them using Goolag.

  173. C.L.

    The face of woke.

    From this report in the left-wing Daily Mail:
    Yumi Stynes calls Kerri-Anne Kennerley a ‘COCKROACH’ and cancels her appearance on Studio 10 as their Australia Day ‘racism row’ rages on and protesters gather outside the network’s HQ.

    Terrorists are now after Kennerley.
    Unfortunately she isn’t smart enough to escalate.

    ‘I am still deeply offended with being called a racist, which is completely untrue,’ she said …

    Nup. That won’t win it for you Kezz.

  174. calli

    Schumer’s first baby? I wouldn’t be to chuffed at that hideous cake.

    It looks as though her SIL is wishing her a fine crop of haemorrhoids.

  175. JC

    This doesn’t make any sense.
    Animals with no intelligence whatsoever survive in the desert – whereas higher species cannot.
    The question is whether or not Israel or Zambia is more likely to build a rocket or cure cancer.
    We all know the answer.

    Fair point.

    Take a time machine back in time to say 120o.

    Who’d you have said would achieve those things
    in 800 years?

    I’m seriously shocked that the Americans are hitching rides into space with Russians. That would have been hard to predict 40 odd years ago.

  176. C.L.

    Who is this googly-eyed Stymes bird, by the way?

  177. Stimpson J. Cat

    Who is this googly-eyed Stymes bird, by the way?

    One of those former Hot Asian chicks that absorbed too many bad uppity Western Woman habits.

  178. thefrollickingmole

    Oh noes, people who commit crimes are jailed.

    More than half of the inmates held in prisons for young people in England and Wales are from a black and minority ethnic (BME) background, the highest proportion on record, the prisons watchdog has said, prompting warnings that youth jails have hit “American” levels of disproportionality.

    About 51% of boys in young offender institutions (YOIs) – prisons for boys aged 15 to 17 and young adult men aged 18 to 21 – identified as being from a BME background, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons (HMIP) found.

    In addition, the inspectorate found 42% of children in secure training centres (STCs) – prisons for children up to the age of 17 – were from a BME background.

    The proportion of BME boys and men behind bars in YOIs in England and Wales is nearly four times the 14% BME proportion of the wider UK population.

    Go on guess the Gruinaids solution to this problem of people being locked up for crimes??

    “I raise some serious concerns about our courts, about the paucity of black and ethnic minority judges and magistrates right across the country. I thought the government response was poor in relation to the judiciary. I said that at the time, I still believe that.

    “There are too many judges that have no connection to the areas these young people are growing up. They’ve never even done a day trip. I think that’s a problem.”

    Lammy’s review said prosecutions against some BME suspects should be deferred or dropped to help tackle the bias against them in the criminal justice system.

    Followed next week by an article on how terrible it is BAME youths are stabbing each other to death and simultaneously claiming they arent over-represented in crime figures.

    (not a race thing, its a culture thing BTW)

  179. Bruce in WA

    I have nominated three people so far, and the applications were successful.

    I have only nominated one, spending considerable time and effort on the application — for zilch.

    Why? His persona is considered non-pc, redneck, de trop, despite everything he does behind the scenes.

  180. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    I suppose that Zippy, Molyneaux and others are still running the line that their bullshit racial IQ tests mean something.

  181. C.L.

    … prosecutions against some [brown] suspects should be deferred or dropped to help tackle the bias against them in the criminal justice system.

    Which “bias” arose because they commit vastly more serious crimes than white people.

  182. Mother Lode

    Amy Schumer Shares ‘Horrifying’ Vagina Baby Shower Cake

    Amy Schumer strikes me as having a pathological need to talk about her lady-parts. She seems to have an unslakeable thirst for other people’s responses. From people she feels ideological kinship she desires to be feted. From her opponents she needs to think she is somehow ‘defeating’ them, that they are cringing in the face of her vulva-themed confrontation.

    It seems a common theme among comediennes.

    They complain about being treated as sex objects, but then depict women as little else but nevertheless demanding respect.

  183. Stimpson J. Cat

    I suppose that Zippy, Molyneaux and others are still running the line that their bullshit racial IQ tests mean something.

    Why on earth would anyone want smart kids?
    Sane people thinking they are clever gave us Socialism, Marxism, Communism, Nazism, Veganism, and BGTLX.
    Smart people should be banned from having children.
    They got us into this f$cking mess in the first place.
    Disgraceful.

  184. Snoopy

    Is it intelligence or knowledge? Can an Inuit survive in the Kalahari? Can a Bushman survive in the Arctic?

  185. Tel

    Amy Schumer Shares ‘Horrifying’ Vagina Baby Shower Cake

    Oh go on … such a cute bubba!

    You guys have no sense of humor. Very occasionally even Amy Schumer can get a laugh. Don’t be uptight just because you don’t like her personality.

  186. Mater

    I have only nominated one, spending considerable time and effort on the application — for zilch.
    Why? His persona is considered non-pc, redneck, de trop, despite everything he does behind the scenes.

    I was witness to what amounted to a bidding war between units to see who could be awarded the highest honour. The resulting recommendation amounted to what was essentially a fairytale; something akin to Monty’s reality.
    This and much, much more.
    I treat all modern awards with cynicism.

  187. Leigh Lowe

    Who is this googly-eyed Stymes bird, by the way?

    Who is she?
    She’s this.
    Along with that lefty creep George Negus thought it wss OK to slag a VC winner as “brainless” and a “dud root”.
    But both of them are perfectly happy to lecture from on high about “respect”.

  188. Mater

    I’ve also seen some particularly principled people refuse to accept very high awards as a protest against what they saw as a compromised system.

  189. The Afr is speculating that Christopher Pyne is the next to jump ship.

    Go on. Are you going to tell me he has landed a job with a French submarine manufacturer?

  190. C.L.

    Kenneally has to go hard or go home.
    She should sue old Grover-eyes.

  191. Stimpson J. Cat

    Is it intelligence or knowledge?

    A combination of both is best.
    Animals have instincts which are inherited genetic knowledge.
    Humans have it as well except ours are called emotions and are generally pretty sh$t in comparison.
    The real test of intelligence is the ability to control instincts.

  192. Leigh Lowe

    From this report in the left-wing Daily Mail:
    Yumi Stynes calls Kerri-Anne Kennerley a ‘COCKROACH’ and cancels her appearance on Studio 10 as their Australia Day ‘racism row’ rages on and protesters gather outside the network’s HQ.

    Protestors gather?
    Count them at the link.
    Seven (7).
    None of whom look like they are buying funeral insurance or treadmills or multi-function ladders, which seem to be the only products advertised on Channel Ten before midday.
    But, hey, seven committed protestors means there could be 30 more out there.
    BTW, that towering public intellectual Yumi Styne’s main job is co-hosting a radio show called “The 3PM Pickup” which is aimed squarely at inner suburban stay-at-home mums doing the pick-up from school in the Raaange Rover.

  193. thefrollickingmole

    Tel

    Shes a horrible scold who has made a career because many blokes cant touch what shes allowed to joke about because “magic vagina”.

    Amy Schumer has scolded “The Bachelor” host Chris Harrison for calling a contestant “complicated,” as if it’s a negative characteristic of a woman.

  194. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    One of those former Hot Asian chicks that absorbed too many bad uppity Western Woman habits.

    stymes was never hot, she always came across as a cold hard nosed bitch

  195. Mother Lode

    I’ve also seen some particularly principled people refuse to accept very high awards as a protest against what they saw as a compromised system.

    More honourable than the honoured.

  196. EvilElvis

    One of those former Hot Asian chicks that absorbed too many bad uppity Western Woman habits.

    I’m with Zippy, Stimpy. Despite your previous form this is the first time I’ve thought you actually need serious help.

  197. JC

    The real test of intelligence is the ability to control instincts.

    That’s why dogs and sheilas on their own will never get to the moon, They can’t control their emotions, although they both share a superior sense of smell to male humans.

    Trained dogs can smell a teaspoon of sugar in contained water equal to two large swimming pools.

    Does that make sense?

  198. Mater

    More honourable than the honoured.

    As the old adage goes, Mother Lode:

    “Many VC’s were earned…some were even awarded!”

  199. Hay Stockard

    Evil Elvis,
    I’ll watch The Mule this weekend. Thanks for the feedback. Along with others on hereI’m a huge Clint Eastwood fan.

  200. Mater

    More honourable than the honoured.

    Unfortunately, and as a consequence, you’ll never read about the exploits of these individuals in the War Memorial.

  201. JC

    Zipperhead.

    Will you stop posting that flake and fake Molyneaux, FFS. This is like a repeat of the Live Leak abuse you once put us through. Molyneaux is a fake artist. A total bullshiter.

    One of the reasons he had his stupid head handed to him was because the moron is peddling this bullshit that the intellectual top brass in the Mediterranean during its heyday hailed from Northern Europe. In other words Aristotle’s real name was Hans Dietrich and Plato’s was Dirk Schimmelpfennig. This is where all this crap started.

    Go take the living room out for a drive and STFU.

  202. C.L.

    The real test of intelligence is the ability to control instincts.

    ————–
    That’s why dogs and sheilas on their own will never get to the moon

    No better example of intelligence over instinct was Neil Armstrong hovering above the moon’s surface with 20 seconds of fuel left, looking for a boulder-less landing site.

    America went from that to panicking about a boy in a cap.

  203. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    I don’t know why it bothers people to suggest racial groups are statistically different and that it includes IQ, it’s just a fact, it just goes to show how much egalitarian marxism has infiltrated people’s thinking. Does it matter? of course it matters as it is astatistical predictor of criminality, income and even health. The key word here is statistical.

    That the debate elicits such a knee jerk emotional reaction is so leftoid and pathetic.

  204. Stimpson J. Cat

    Will it get through?

    ACLU
    @ACLU
    🚨 Today at 5:30pm the Senate is voting on a bill promoting state laws that suppress the right to boycott Israel — even though multiple judges have found such laws to be unconstitutional.
    REMINDER: This bill includes the Combating BDS Act, which would encourage states to adopt unconstitutional laws that suppress boycotts of Israel.
    Now is the time to be loud: Tell Senators to protect the First Amendment. (link: http://www.aclu.org/BDS-boycott) aclu.org/BDS-boycott

  205. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Will you stop posting that flake and fake Molyneaux, FFS.

    HAve you lost your reading glasses? I didn’t post any molyneaux.

  206. Stimpson J. Cat

    I’m with Zippy, Stimpy. Despite your previous form this is the first time I’ve thought you actually need serious help.

    I’m talking 19 years ago you idiots.
    Settle down.
    I’m taking my meds STFU.

    😁

  207. thefrollickingmole

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Because its culture rather than genetics.

    There is possibly/probably a genetic component but its odds on to be a tiny component.

    Ive met highly intelligent people completely stuffed by their “group culture”, deformed to the extent boozing and drugging is preferable to being a fully functioning part of whats around them.

    It can happen to any race, we have a burgeoning underclass of all varieties in Oz.
    Which BTW is a great argument for not mass importing people from failed cultures.

  208. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    who knew scientific american was a hot bed of alt-right racism
    Research Confirms a Link between Intelligence and Life Expectancy
    The reasons are unclear, but higher IQ is correlated with longer life span

  209. Eyrie

    “The same model/malaise that has had a deleterious effect on quality of life in the great cities will now be applied to regional cities.”
    If you are going to fuck the country you have to fuck it thoroughly and completely. This will be the only thing the Federal Government has ever done 100% properly and actually finished the job.

  210. Infidel Tiger

    The reasons are unclear, but higher IQ is correlated with longer life span

    What explains Australia having such high longevity then?

    That would seem a major flaw in that argument.

  211. Stimpson J. Cat

    What explains Australia having such high longevity then?

    Possibly Vegemite and VB.

  212. JC

    I don’t know why it bothers people to suggest racial groups are statistically different and that it includes IQ, it’s just a fact, it just goes to show how much egalitarian marxism has infiltrated people’s thinking. Does it matter? of course it matters as it is astatistical predictor of criminality, income and even health. The key word here is statistical.

    That the debate elicits such a knee jerk emotional reaction is so leftoid and pathetic.

    I’m happy to tell you why. Because a great deal of the stuff coming out is total bullshit. It appears to be more to do with culture than genes.

    Moly has been peddling the junk science that Northern Europe is the kernel of high level human intellect. However this is basically invalidated by the fact that east Asians have a higher IQ and they were in the bog house until 50 years ago.

    I really have no strong answers to much of this, because I’m humble enough to appreciate the fact that we simply don’t know. Having said that, I’d hazard a bet that culture has a great deal to do with things. Now, if culture and genes interplay… well we don’t know at this stage, but I think there is cause for further study.

    Lets face facts, a kid in Afghanistan sent to a madrasa, learning to memorize the Koran is NOT going to end up not in the running to be the eventual CEO of JP Morgan* or Microsoft. That’s not going to happen.

    The current CEO is a Greek, by the way 🙂

  213. thefrollickingmole

    Shots fired…..
    https://dalrock.wordpress.com/2019/01/21/call-me-unchivalrous/

    Q: Sure chivalry was corrupted in the later part of the twentieth century, but wasn’t the original form pure and good?
    A: No. From the very beginning chivalry’s teaching on men and women was a parody of Christianity. All of the worst parts of chivalry (as we know it) go back to the twelfth century seminal works, including Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart and De Amore.

  214. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    There is possibly/probably a genetic component but its odds on to be a tiny component.Ive met highly intelligent people completely stuffed by their “group culture”, deformed to the extent boozing and drugging is preferable to being a fully functioning part of whats around them.

    These single points are not statistical descriptors. The only way you can tell what is going on is to plot a representative sample on graph paper.

    read the SA article above.

  215. JC

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #2920664, posted on January 29, 2019 at 2:26 pm

    Will you stop posting that flake and fake Molyneaux, FFS.

    HAve you lost your reading glasses? I didn’t post any molyneaux.

    Oh okay. That video link you posted as a rejoinder to a criticism of Moly wasn’t you.

    Hang on, I think it was you. 🙂

  216. JC

    Research Confirms a Link between Intelligence and Life Expectancy

    Zip, I wouldn’t have picked you suggesting Sardinians have the highest IQ in the world. 😉

  217. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    It appears to be more to do with culture than genes.

    what culture do ashkenazi jews have to create disproportionate number of billionaires ignoring that they have the highest average IQ of any group?

    people just don’t have any sort of handle on statistical descriptors and how they play out.

  218. thefrollickingmole

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Its a “sciency” article which nearly negates itself by pulling the “many other factors” trick at the end.

    One possibility is that a higher IQ contributes to optimal health behaviors, such as exercising, wearing a seatbelt, and not smoking.

    And culture does the same.

    IQ is an incredibly limited way of measuring a persons “worth”.

    Bubba the white bikie with an IQ of 120 is in all probability going to be less “worthwhile” than black Bob Okkiedookie with his 110 IQ and his nursing job.

  219. JC

    than black Bob Okkiedookie with his 110 IQ and his nursing job.

    You mean Bobbie or Roberta, no?

  220. Mother Lode

    The reasons are unclear, but higher IQ is correlated with longer life span

    Could be.

    I can certainly say that in all of my 573 years that would seem to be the case.

  221. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    SYDNEY – Scour Forbes magazine’s 2012 annual list of Australia’s richest people and the following statistic leaps out: five of the nation’s top 10 billionaires are Jewish.

    South African emigre Ivan Glasenberg, the chief executive of Glencore, is second on the Forbes list with a fortune estimated at around $7 billion; Westfield Group chief Frank Lowy, a Czech-born Holocaust survivor who arrived penniless in Australia via Israel in 1952, is fifth and worth almost $4.5 billion; property tycoon Harry Triguboff, the son of Russian Jews who was born in China before immigrating to Australia in 1947, is sixth with about $4 billion; Anthony Pratt, the boss of the cardboard recycling giant Visy, whose father came as a refugee from prewar Poland, is seventh with an estimated $3.5 billion; and Australian-born businessman John Gandel, the son of Polish-immigrant parents, is listed eighth with $3 billion.

  222. Makka

    Trump continues to win:

    A new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll shows that Speaker Nancy Pelosi — not President Donald Trump — plummeted most in popularity during the 35-day government shutdown.

    The new poll shows the Speaker of the House experienced a 6-point drop in her approval rating. Only 28 percent of Americans rated Pelosi as favorable, while 47 percent rated her as unfavorable — a stunning 19 percent “upside down” unfavorable figure.

    The Wall Street Journal reports that while voters in their poll did hold him responsible for the shutdown, Trump is down only 3 percent total since November, when the midterm elections were held. Hardly the roundhouse kick to the head that it could have been, given the bad mainstream press.

    https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/427254-new-poll-shows-speaker-pelosis-approval-rating-down-during-government

  223. stackja

    HMAS Adelaide (I)
    After the capitulation of France, the Vichy Government made a very strong bid to establish a Vichy regime in New Caledonia, despite a predominant Free French following amongst the population. Australia was very interested in this move, as the threat of having a hostile population in a covering position on the east coast of Australia was very serious, and one which could not be tolerated.

    The Dumont d’Urville was in port with a pro-Vichy Captain in command. The commissioners found that no De Gaulle Committee had been formed, although the majority of the people were for De Gaulle. Adelaide (I) arrived at Vila (New Hebrides) on 7 September 1940 and remained there until 16 September when she departed for Noumea escorting the Norwegian tanker Norden. Aboard Norden was the Temporary Governor of New Caledonia, Commissioner-General of Western Pacific and High Commissioner of New Hebrides appointed as such by General De Gaulle.

    Adelaide (I) and Norden arrived at Noumea on 19 September to find that the pro-Vichy authorities had practically declared martial law, and that the city was full of the De Gaulle supporters. The crowd, which numbered several thousand, marched to Government House and demanded the Governor’s resignation in favour of the De Gaulle appointee. The Governor finally agreed to permit the new appointee to land, which he did at noon, and Adelaide (I) withdrew to patrol off the harbour entrance, with the object of inspiring confidence ashore, exercising restraint on Dumont d’Urville, and maintaining mobility.

    The crowd escorted the De Gaulle appointee to Government House, and after consultation it was agreed that the pro-Vichy Military Governor would hand over at 1500 on 19 September. After protracted negotiations and much diplomacy, Dumont d’Urville sailed for Indo-China on 25 September 1940 and the situation ashore gradually became normal. Adelaide (I) departed Noumea in October and arrived back in Sydney on 8 October 1940.

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