Wednesday Forum: March 6, 2019

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1,924 Responses to Wednesday Forum: March 6, 2019

  1. Top Ender

    And a very telling paragraph here.

    As for the Nazis, they generally did not have to kill in order to seize the property of Germans other than J e w s. This was because, as we have seen, they established socialism by stealth, through price controls, which served to maintain the outward guise and appearance of private ownership. The private owners were thus deprived of their property without knowing it and thus felt no need to defend it by force.

  2. notafan

    Btw Kibbutz were making a virtue of necessity in the beginning

    The only way to ward off rampaging Bedouin was to be numerically stronger.

    And not everyone was a member of the collective, it appears, most if not all employed outside labour

    Many kibbutzim hired Mizrahi Jews as labourers but were less inclined to grant them membership

  3. notafan

    Btw Kibbutz were making a virtue of necessity in the beginning

    The only way to ward off rampaging Bedouin was to be numerically stronger, as well as to establish claims to land under dispute.

    And not everyone was a member of the collective, it appears, most if not all employed outside labour

    Many kibbutzim hired Mizrahi J ews as labourers but were less inclined to grant them membership

  4. Mark A

    Winston Smith
    #2952460, posted on March 7, 2019 at 10:32 am

    Winston, you as a semi doctor, what’s your opinion about a blood pressure reading of 114/52 for a 55 year old?

    I thought it was a bit low but the doc reckons it’s just great.

  5. Boambee John

    Numbers at 1042

    The facts of history haven’t changed, but the interpretations have.
    Clear evidence of that is all over this forum.

    Such evidence often appears in your posts. You really don’t seem to read what you write.

  6. feelthebern

    I note that Alex Trebek apparently has stage 4 pancreatic cancer. Which means not much time left for him. Love Jeopardy, not sure why Australian television producers haven’t done the same here.

    Two things.
    They did with Tony Barber back in the 90’s.
    Was a ratings disaster.
    Maybe the typical quiz show watching Aussie isn’t as smart as the typical quiz show watching American.

    Re pancreatic cancer.
    It depends. Cancer treatment for the masses is no better than a kid with a chemistry set.
    At the high end, with the real treatments, his chances are 10 times better.
    That said, that only takes him up to around 40%.

  7. C.L.

    The SMH continues the calumny (just in case ….)

    https://www.smh.com.au/national/victoria/church-knew-pell-was-at-centre-of-decades-old-lurid-sex-claims-20190307-p512ci.html

    Helen Last is a well-known nutball who has been raving on about “secret red files” and George Pell for several years. She has a head like a dropped pie and a disintegrated sense of reality to match. Today she claims an “ex-seminarian” only known as “Joe” rocked up to her office one day wanting $20,000 for some photographs of George Pell having a gay orgy at Mannix College. She hasn’t got the photos and Fairfax deadpans that they can’t find “Joe.”

  8. 1735099

    Socialism, collectivism, is unstable.

    And oligarchic capitalism never goes belly up?

  9. calli

    I visited a kibbutz when I was in Israel. And yes, there’s trooble at kibbutz because, you guessed it, some are working harder than others and have to share.

    Hmmmm.

  10. notafan

    How long has capitalism been around?

    Thousands of years.

    Tell me I’m wrong.

  11. DrBeauGan

    1735099
    #2952593, posted on March 7, 2019 at 1:38 pm
    Socialism, collectivism, is unstable.

    And oligarchic capitalism never goes belly up?

    Being unstable has everything to do with how a system responds to shocks, not that it doesn’t have shocks.

  12. calli

    When I was young, my friends and I used to sit around, drink coffee, listen to music and dream.

    Wouldn’t it be great if we could live in a small community and share everything – work, chores, income, everything?

    I took a long, hard look at them and thought, No way!

    Yes, I was very young.

  13. DrBeauGan

    That should have been stable, not unstable.

  14. Boambee John

    cohenite
    #2952512, posted on March 7, 2019 at 11:27 am
    Oh look, numbers hasn’t condemned communism.

    I once spent some time attempting unsuccessfully to get m0nty to condemn the numerous murderous crimes of communism. Numbers seems to take the same slimy morally gutless approach.

    JC you know m0nty, is there any chance that he and Numbers might be related?

  15. Stimpson J. Cat

    Jair M. Bolsonaro
    @jairbolsonaro
    O que é golden shower?
    8:26 PM · Mar 6, 2019

  16. C.L.

    Wouldn’t it be great if we could live in a small community and share everything – work, chores, income, everything?

    Isn’t that what you ended up doing, Calli? 🙂

  17. calli

    Yes, C.L. It’s called a “family”.

    And The Beloved is the Boss or so he thinks.

  18. DrBeauGan

    I took a long, hard look at them and thought, No way!

    Yes, I was very young.

    But not gullible, Calli.

  19. max

    You probably think it’s faith, Notafan, but the socialists had oodles of it.

    Yeah …. nah.

    Poverty, chastity, obedience. Particularly the last.

    And humility. When you spend your life in a monastery or convent the greatest torment and the greatest consolation must be your companions. The rule of silence would be essential.

  20. thefrollickingmole

    1735099
    #2952584, posted on March 7, 2019 at 1:27 pm
    Only in America.

    Would a corrupt set of judges be trialed, found guilty and face jail time?
    I dont know it occasionally happens elsewhere (not in Oz though, Murphy being exhibit “a” and the willingness of our judiciary to overlook their own illegal activities is legendary.

  21. DrBeauGan

    A family is certainly a co-operative endeavour, and relatively stable. But it’s small enough to identify the freeloaders and authoritarian enough to stop them getting away with it.

  22. DrBeauGan

    Poverty, chastity, obedience. Particularly the last.

    I have, in common with most people, a lot of trouble with the last two. Which is why trying to make monasticism compulsory for a large population has not been successful.

  23. calli

    authoritarian enough to stop them getting away with it.

    You better believe it! 😀

  24. notafan

    Which is why trying to make monasticism compulsory for a large population has not been successful.

    Who tried to do that?

  25. max

    Which is why trying to make monasticism compulsory for a large population has not been successful.

    Most of us don’t want to be chaste and obedient. It makes all the difference.

  26. DrBeauGan

    Poverty, chastity, obedience. Particularly the last.

    I have, in common with most people, a lot of trouble with the last two. Which is why trying to make monasticism compulsory for a large population has not been successful.

    I’m not too keen on poverty either.

  27. DrBeauGan

    Which is why trying to make monasticism compulsory for a large population has not been successful.

    Who tried to do that?

    Stalin.

  28. Peter Campion

    Cassie, I just caught the repeat of Bolt. Nice work ma’am!

  29. OldOzzie

    The Greens’ learned blockhead
    The Mocker

    High-flying barrister Julian Burnside has work to do in order to convince the great unwashed that he’s not just another pious toff.

    The federal seat of Kooyong in Melbourne’s eastern suburbs is the bluest of blue-ribbon seats. It has existed since Federation and is one of only two original electorates in Victoria never to have been held by the Labor Party. Seven representatives have served there, all white males who were on average 43 years old when first elected to the seat.

    To the Greens, the seat symbolises everything the party supposedly despises — a white patriarchal gerontocracy, the accumulation of wealth to the detriment of the masses, and the absence of diversity. The last thing you would expect of a party that thrives on identity politics would be to nominate an affluent, ageing, white Anglo-Saxon male. But that is exactly what it did this week when it announced Julian Burnside AO QC as its candidate. That’s right, a man who turns 70 this year and was born when Ben Chifley was Prime Minister and the White Australia Policy still operated. Who came second in preselection, Sam Newman?

    Burnside is a long-time resident of Hawthorn, where the median house price is around $2.3 million. The suburb features grand mansions, old money, and Scotch College, one of the most prestigious and wealthiest private schools in the country. He was born into privilege, the son of a prominent Melbourne surgeon, and educated at Melbourne Grammar. As a barrister, he grew rich from representing wealthy clients such as corporate fraudster Alan Bond. But according to the Greens’ website, the party speaks “on behalf of those who wouldn’t otherwise get much of a say inside parliament: children, refugees, students, individuals and families living in poverty…” Honestly, it is almost as if the party’s constituency was not society’s marginalised, but instead those insufferable types who publicly wail for the wretched in the hope it shifts attention from their bourgeois lifestyle.

  30. 1735099

    This letter is doing the rounds of the veteran network at the moment.

    TREATMENT OF DISABLED WAR VETERANS/ WAR WIDOWS WITHDRAWN . DENIED . CANCELED . DISCRIMINATED
    Importance: High

    To the Federal LIberal Government Members and Senators of Western Australia. During the time Prime Minister Morrison is in our State we would be obliged if you would bring the following record of government treatment of our Disabled War Veterans and War Widows to his attention. You will not hear this litany of betrayal of the unwritten promise to care for our Defenders in their Disability from the Ministers office or Department officials. You will only hear the truth of life under the heel of our Repatriation system from those who live that life.

    ABBOTT-TURNBULL-MORRISON LIBERAL NATIONAL COALITION GOVERNMENTS

    TREATMENT OF OUR DISABLED WAR VETERANS AND WAR WIDOWS

    WITHDRAWN . DENIED . CANCELED . DISCRIMINATED

    DENIED the Australian Average Wage to our War Disabled Veterans (TPI) unable to continue in employment to provide for themselves and their families
    (The Average Wage is $1,668 per week the TPI rate defined as a replacement income is $704 per week).
    WITHDRAWN. Concession Fares train travel over Commonwealth Rail
    (A concession in place since WW2 recognising the death of a spouse and wounding and trauma of our Diggers sustained in defence of the people of our nation and its values.)
    CANCELLED. ‘Trip Fall Prevention Programme’ .
    (Aged Disabled Veterans and War Widows were visited once a year by an Occupational Therapist to assess trip and fall hazards in the home and advise on preventive measures)
    CANCELLED. Health Information/community event email newsletter.
    (A monthly email from DVA State Offices that kept Disabled and War Widows up to date on medication, health advice and events to encourage participation in the community)
    WITHDRAWN. ‘Restoring Disability Pension Parity’ promise.
    (DVA Disability pensions lost parity with other pensions under the ALP government of Kevin Rudd. The Coalition promised to restore parity on coming to government.
    DISCRIMINATION Refusal to remove legislation from the VEA 1986 that reduces a Disabled Diggers replacement income/pension when their partner engages in paid employment .
    (The majority of spouses of our nations War Disabled are female. When these wives, mothers and carers of our married Disabled have paid employment their income reduces the governments liability for the upkeep of our Disabled by two fifths of his pension compared to an unmarried Disabled. This gender discrimination prevents the Disabled from partnering thus inhibiting their fundamental human right to the company of another in a loving relationship)
    The reason the ABBOTT, TURNBULL and MORRISON GOVERNMENTS give our nations Disabled Veterans and War Widows for the lack of action on these matter is “We cant afford it” this while these same governments dedicated over ONE BILLION DOLLARS of Australian taxpayers funds to the centenary of WW1 commemorations.

    Not one Digger was brought back from the dead for this inordinate spend. However correcting the denied , withdrawn, cancelled and discrimination will allow our War Disabled , War Widows and their families to not just survive in today’s Australia but to advance and thrive along with the peoples whose values and freedoms they have given much to protect and defend.

    On behalf of
    Disabled Veterans of Australia Network
    PO Box 698
    Applecross, WA 6953

    NB – I am not personally impacted by any of this, as I’m not TPI, but is does lift the lid a little on government, on the one hand, cosying up to veterans for the political kudos it attracts, but smacking them across the face by withdrawing long standing financial support on the other.
    DVA’s correspondence is embossed with “Saluting Their Service”.

  31. DrBeauGan

    Honestly, it is almost as if the party’s constituency was not society’s marginalised, but instead those insufferable types who publicly wail for the wretched in the hope it shifts attention from their bourgeois lifestyle.

    What a surprise to learn that Greens are appalling hypocrites. Not.

  32. Tom

    Cassie, I just caught the repeat of Bolt. Nice work ma’am

    +1.

    And, for those who haven’t seen it (like me as I don’t watch Blot), here it is.

  33. OldOzzie

    Imported workers add tax value – Bernard Salt

    This is the story of the demographic and the tax reasons behind the transformation of the Australian workforce.

    I want to start by introducing my own creation, the Tax-Services curve, which proposes that across the life cycle there are times when you pay more tax than you receive in services, and other times when you receive more services than you pay in tax.

    The most obvious recipients of this cross-life cycle flow of tax dollars are kids and the aged, neither of whom work and yet who consume services such as education and healthcare. There must be an equilibrium point where the amount of tax paid equals the value of services received.

    The question of whether we are living beyond our means — not raising enough tax or being too generous with services — is answered by the equation where the area of “B” cannot be less than the sum of “A” plus “C”, as in the Tax-Services curve graph.

    The equilibrium line rises, falls and tilts depending on tax policy, on our ability to recover tax, on workforce participation rates and on the underlying demography.

    Plus, a surplus or a deficit of tax dollars can be carried forward and repaid or drawn down upon over time.

    So healthy baby-boomers surging into the 25-55 workforce a generation ago should have produced a surplus that can now be drawn down upon as they push into retirement. The Australian response to the shift in the demographics of the workforce has been to double the level of immigration within a generation.

    Here is the blunt truth about our immigration program.

    By importing young skilled workers, we avoid having to allocate tax dollars to the Part A (age 0-24) stage of the life cycle, and we reap the benefits of 30 healthy working years, where the volume of tax paid is greater than the value of services received.

    Young, healthy, imported workers export tax dollars to kids and to retired Australians.

    During the five years to the last census, about 169,000 of the 625,000 workers added to the workforce were born in Australia. These locals entered the workforce in greatest numbers between the ages of 30 and 55.

    Freshly imported workers, arriving within this same five-year timeframe, outnumbered local workforce entrants by a factor of 2:1. Plus, newly arrived workers were predominantly aged 25-35, which is slap-bang inside the (“Part B”) tax-exporting stage of the life cycle.

    Let’s see how the policy of importing young workers has panned out across the Australian urban system between the last two censuses.

    During the five years to 2016, foreign-born workers comprised 456,000, or 73 per cent, of the net new worker population, as measured by the census. The Australian-born component was measured at less than half this figure and represented just 27 per cent of all net new workers.

    Without a skilled migration program, Australia would need to have found a net extra 90,000 (mostly skilled) workers every year during the first half of this decade. Some cities rely more on immigrant workers than others. This is especially the case in so-called gateway cities favoured by immigrant workers. These are our largest urban centres, but they can also include rising knowledge or university towns.

    During the five years to 2016, the Sydney workforce increased by 209,000 including 152,000, or 72 per cent, of foreign-born workers. For Melbourne, the foreign-born share of net new workers was 129,000 or 69 per cent of the total. For post-mining-boom Perth, the foreign-born share of net new jobs was 54,000, or 86 per cent of the total.

    It is fair to say that none of these capital cities could have functioned efficiently without the contribution of foreign-born workers earlier this decade.

    I have, in fact, assembled key figures for foreign-born versus Australian-born net new workers across the 25 biggest cities with a growing workforce between the last two censuses. The purpose is to show the extent to which cities rely upon immigration to underpin our standard of living and our tax base. These figures are revelatory.

    During the five years to 2016, the Canberra employment market expanded by 9489 net extra workers, according to census data. Foreign-born workers accounted for 94 per cent of this growth.

    In the university and, arguably, the knowledge-worker, cities of Geelong and Newcastle, 84 per cent of net new jobs were accounted for by young overseas-born skilled workers.

    In Wollongong, however, it’s a different story. Of the 7671 net new jobs recorded by the census during the five years to 2016, just 4 per cent were overseas-born workers. In nearby St George’s Basin (lifestyle communities near Jervis Bay and Nowra) this proportion was 14 per cent, and in Maitland near Newcastle it was 16 per cent.

    I think there are gateway cities attracting foreign-born workers and that most of these are capital cities and university towns. However, I suspect that if I continued the analysis to include smaller cities then mining towns such as Karratha would rank alongside Canberra as a gateway city.

    And if I look at the country of birth of net new workers in Sydney and Melbourne, an interesting variation is evident.

    In both cities more than two-thirds of net new workers during the five years to 2016 were born overseas. And the leading sources of new workers were China and India. However, 11,000 net new workers in Sydney came from Nepal, the harbour-city’s third-largest “new workforce” and yet, oddly, this cohort wasn’t significantly represented in Melbourne.

    I think it is the universities, and their marketing programs pitching to potential students in China and India, and in Nepal, that is determining the extent to which immigrant workers find pathways via gateway cities into the Australian workforce.

    Here is a cohort and a source of workers that is young, healthy and skilled. They are pouring into the workforce in proportions that are different to the overall population mix where barely one-third was born overseas.

    Australia’s capital cities and university towns (and most likely mining towns) are this nation’s gateway cities, and they are vigorously pulling the national demography towards a more youth­ful, a more skilled, and a more cosmopolitan composition.

    Our values and our consumer preferences will be skewed in this direction during the 2020s. The way we eat, the way we decorate our homes, even our beliefs and our affectations, will be reshaped by this Anglo-Mediterranean-Asian-India-Arabic-Nepalese ­fusion culture spilling out of culturally-powerful gateway cities. Australia is in the unique position of having the capacity and tolerance to accommodate large-scale immigration.

    And when you think about the tax advantages at a time of a baby bust, it’s easy to see the value of the contribution that these young foreign-born workers are making to the Australian standard of living and quality of life.

  34. Pedro the Ignorant

    That insufferable blowhard Julian Burside, Greens candidate for Kooyong, has been honking about introducing death duties in the remote possibility he gets elected.

    That will go over like a concrete kite with all the silvertails in Kooyong, the fourth wealthiest electorate in Oz.

    Wealthiest electorates by house prices (the Fin)

  35. Shy Ted

    The Guardian outdoing itself today. Fashion idiot. Hot leftie woman idiot. Cartoon idiot
    . Leftie wymmyns pics. Free blindness test after the last one.

  36. Old School Conservative

    When Milo’s visa was denied, one of the “conservative” presenters on an afternoon 2GB show said it was because Milo had defended pederasty in the past.
    Today’s Oz releases a Home Affairs letter saying the refusal was due to Milo’s potentially provocative statements about minority groups such as indigenous Australians, Muslims, African Americans, and the LBGTIQ community.
    Add to that the possibility of violent protests and an “unpaid bill” from VicPol, and hey presto, no visa.
    I wonder if 2GB will apologise?

    Note the delicious irony of Home affairs defending the LBGTIQ community from one of their own, and African Americans from a man married to a male African American.
    Irony? Or just headspinningly stupid.

  37. Old School Conservative

    Tom
    #2952620, posted on March 7, 2019 at 2:25 pm
    …like me as I don’t watch Blot

    Time to do so Tom.
    Bolt is a good fighter for the right. Boost his ratings for him!

  38. OldOzzie

    Tom
    #2952620, posted on March 7, 2019 at 2:25 pm

    Cassie, I just caught the repeat of Bolt. Nice work ma’am

    +1.

    And, for those who haven’t seen it (like me as I don’t watch Blot), here it is.

    Cassie,

    Add another +1

    excellent work and I will restart Series Recording of Bolt and Credlin and watch when my wife is not around (she says she gets upset with me talking to the TV )-

  39. Stimpson J. Cat

    it’s easy to see the value of the contribution that these young foreign-born workers are making to the Australian standard of living and quality of life.

    A-ha ha ha ha ja ja ha ja ha ja!!!!
    Subtitles for everyone!!

  40. struth

    The kibbutz movement was a success for some decades.

    They were farms using slave labour of starry eyed youth thinking socialism was cool.
    It didn’t last that long and are basically capitalist enterprises ( as they basically were before except using cheap slaves).

    They always struggled and fought behind the scenes.

    Dickheads.

  41. Shy Ted

    Aw, spaminated. Just go to the Guardian – Anne Summers looking hot, First Dog, Women battling sexism in photography. And the Greens are proposing private sponsorship of refugees. No numbers of course but if Manus can do it for $110k p.a. lefties are going to be queueing up because they care so much.

  42. OldOzzie

    Shy Ted
    #2952623, posted on March 7, 2019 at 2:38 pm

    . Leftie wymmyns pics. Free blindness test after the last one.

    Shy Ted,

    that should have come with a Heart Attack warning – I am going to have Nightmares for awhile recovering from seeing that Picturs

  43. struth

    Good onya Calli.
    Excellent work.

  44. Bruce in WA

    Just watched Bolt. Nicely written, Cassie!

  45. OldOzzie

    Pedro the Ignorant
    #2952622, posted on March 7, 2019 at 2:37 pm

    That insufferable blowhard Julian Burside, Greens candidate for Kooyong, has been honking about introducing death duties in the remote possibility he gets elected

    And the Thick-head Youngsters of Today supporting Labor/Greens (and I will include my youngest in that) don’t realise they are blowing their own , as well as Australia’s Future by voting for Climate Change and Labor/Greens Policies as well as screwing their own Future Inheritance – I try to point out to them that the Standard Inheritance Rate Tax in the UK is 40% on assets above the GBP 325.000 Threashold

  46. Speedbox

    Good stuff Cassie. Well done.

  47. Fat Tony

    Cassie – well done on BoltA

  48. Elle

    That’s our Cassie. Bravo 👏

  49. Arky

    Cassie doing what all of us should

  50. Johno

    “DENIED the Australian Average Wage to our War Disabled Veterans (TPI) unable to continue in employment to provide for themselves and their families.
    (The Average Wage is $1,668 per week the TPI rate defined as a replacement income is $704 per week).”
    You are a lying sack of shit Numbers. The TPI provides an income of $2789.40 per fortnight for a married man. This income is tax free.All medical and dental is free and provided at private hospital level.

    You sad little turd.

  51. Arky

    Start a best health fund thread.

  52. Boambee John

    Old School Conservative
    #2952625, posted on March 7, 2019 at 2:39 pm
    When Milo’s visa was denied, one of the “conservative” presenters on an afternoon 2GB show said it was because Milo had defended pederasty in the past.

    So, just like Their ABC did in the 1970s, up to and including the Commission Chairman?

    Deport the ABC!

  53. Johno

    “CANCELLED. ‘Trip Fall Prevention Programme’ .
    (Aged Disabled Veterans and War Widows were visited once a year by an Occupational Therapist to assess trip and fall hazards in the home and advise on preventive measures)”

    Another lie you disgusting commo. This programme was discontinued because hardly anyone used it.Every year they would send letters out to eligible diggers and no-one was interested.
    A mate of mine was eligible,got the visit, and was given two bedside lamps.

  54. struth

    During the five years to 2016, the Canberra employment market expanded by 9489 net extra workers, according to census data. Foreign-born workers accounted for 94 per cent of this growth.

    I think that could be called an own goal, Bernard.

    Think harder, me boy.

    You’ve just made your whole article irrelevant.

    During the five years to 2016, the Sydney workforce increased by 209,000 including 152,000, or 72 per cent, of foreign-born workers.

    Natural public service expansion numbers in Australia these days.

  55. Old School Conservative

    I think that could be called an own goal, Bernard.

    Struth, Struth, Struth.
    According to our resident grammar nark, that should read “Home goal”.
    Numbers being wrong again – who would have thought?

    PS has anyone seen numbers and Monty in the same room together?

  56. yackman

    Mater @ 11.54 am.
    rather late to respond however: I heard “Billy” Kent Hughes at a local church (Methodist?) PSA (Pleasant Sunday Afternoon) in Kew around 1966. He referred to the clergyman as Padre.
    Also went to his campaign meeting in the Camberwell Town Hall during the ’66 election. About 20 attended including some young bloke who upset WKH by using the term “shellshock” in a derisory way. He reacted by saying have you ever heard a shell? in a very angry tone.
    Quite a man, no uncertainty about what was right and wrong. Also instrumental in getting the 1956 Olympics and can be seen in photos and film as a race starting official.
    Typical of authority figures in my orbit in the 1950’s and 60’s.

  57. Siltstone

    Cassie – well done on BoltA

    I just called up NIB on 1800 046 090, talked to the person trying to sell me health insurance and asked for a bunch of brochures to be mailed to me. When I receive them I’ll call up and engage in a lengthy conversation about fees and, just as they think they are signing me up to ultra top cover, I will raise the the matter of NIB’s problem with free speech. I’ll need to speak to a manager about that, and perhap an even more senior manager as well. I’ll do this for my own enjoyment over a couple of glasses of wine.

  58. Knuckle Dragger

    Love it, Cassie! Activism does indeed work both ways.

    Bolt also appears to have slowed his TV voice since he started out. Much, much better – might start watching him again.

    ‘Numbers is a window licking, crayon eating communist retard’.

    Is that activism?

  59. mh

    Leftist reporter claims to have seen anti-AOC graffiti but provides no evidence

    In what could be the latest example of a left-wing, fake hate report, Mother Jones D.C. bureau chief David Corn claims to have found “obscene anti-AOC graffiti in a bathroom stall at the Phoenix airport.”

    David Corn

    @DavidCornDC
    I just spotted obscene [email protected] graffiti in a bathroom stall in the Phoenix airport. Yes, really. (Not going to post a photo of it.)
    4:04 AM – Mar 6, 2019

    David Corn

    @DavidCornDC
    · Mar 6, 2019
    I was on a United flight to Houston about noon. Near that gate.

    PHX Sky Harbor
    @PHXSkyHarbor
    Thanks for the follow-up. Our Facilities team checked the restrooms in the area last night, and although they didn’t find anything, those restrooms are checked and cleaned several times a day.
    11:25 PM – Mar 6, 2019

    https://www.infowars.com/another-liberal-hate-hoax-this-time-aoc-was-the-alleged-target/

  60. Cassie of Sydney

    Thanks everyone…I’m blushing…however I only did what we should all be doing. This is what the left do so well…..they fight….well…it’s time for us, the silent majority, to fight back.

  61. Boambee John

    OSC at 1523

    PS has anyone seen numbers and Monty in the same room together?

    Since he knows m0nty personally, I earlier asked JC whether they might be related.

    Given tbe differing ages, perhaps father and (wrong side of the blanket) son?

  62. max

    Just posted a polite letter to Mark Fitzgibbon at NIB. I mentioned you, Cassie, so keep blushing !

  63. calli

    I’m in HCF, on a scale so ancient it no longer exists. So, while I’m still covered for obstetrics 😀, I would be paying a helluva lot more for less if I switched.

    Meh. The Beloved had both knees done last year for the princely sum of $800. Not complaining.

  64. calli

    We all need a bit of U.S. Grant in us, Cassie.

    Fight ya slackers!

  65. You are a lying sack of shit Numbers. The TPI provides an income of $2789.40 per fortnight for a married man.

    Except I didn’t make any assertions – I just posted the network’s letter –

    (The Average Wage is $1,668 per week the TPI rate defined as a replacement income is $704 per week).

    If you reckon it’s wrong, you’d better take it up with them.
    Your figure of $2789.40 is about twice what DVA says they pay TPI recipients.

    The DVA website says TPI Special Rate is $1394 per fortnight.

    Someone’s telling porkies, and it’s not me, you abusive gimp.

  66. bespoke

    If you can’t, just piss off….

    What a charming pillar of the community is commo 1735099

  67. OldOzzie

    How Do You Solve a Problem Like Ilhan Omar?


    As I wrote recently at PJ Media, there’s something about the Somalis that makes them different from other cultural aliens who have arrived in—or, in the Somalis’ case, been deliberately imported to—the United States. An ethnic group low on its share of geniuses (Average IQ in Somalia: 68 – Shares #38 position with Angola, Burkina Faso, Chad, Djibouti and Swaziland on the World Ranking List) but long on violence, the Minnesota Somalis have the disgraceful distinction of sending more men and boys to join foreign terrorist organizations such as al-Shabab and ISIS over the past dozen years than any other place in the country. And this, of course, is Omar’s district—why would we have any doubt that she will represent it faithfully?

    Recently one of the first Somali policemen in Minnesota, Mohamed Mohamed Noor—with a name like that, what could go wrong?—was charged with murder in the 2017 shooting death of Justine Damond; he goes on trial next month, having pleaded not guilty. (Be sure to read the details of the killing at any of the links.) And now, open gang—perhaps “militia” will soon be a better word—warfare is breaking out in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis as the Somalis (known colloquially in the military and intelligence services as “skinnies”) recreate the same hellish conditions they fled in their East African homeland:

  68. thefrollickingmole

    Can you imagine the wailing if trump turned around and did this to a whole network?

    Democrats bar Fox News from 2020 debates over ‘inappropriate’ Trump ties
    DNC chairman says New Yorker exposé on Trump ties to Fox News cast doubt on network’s ability to hold ‘fair and neutral’ debates


    Im sure there will be lots of articles like this springing up…any…minute…now..
    After the White House Banned Jim Acosta, Should Other Journalists Boycott Its Press Briefings?

    I mean no journo would ever shatter their credibility by leaking questions to a pollie, would they.
    Donna Brazile on passing debate questions to Hillary Clinton’s campaign

    Oh wait, Don just did…
    Donald J. Trump

    Verified account

    @realDonaldTrump
    Follow Follow @realDonaldTrump
    More
    Democrats just blocked @FoxNews from holding a debate. Good, then I think I’ll do the same thing with the Fake News Networks and the Radical Left Democrats in the General Election debates!

  69. Eyrie

    Alinsky’s Rules actually work for right wingers too. I’m open to suggestions for modification.

  70. Johno

    Numbers you are a complete and utter truth free zone. I quoted the figure for a married TPI recipient.

    Now it is up to you to apply your amazing investigative skills and work out how that figure is arrived at.

    BTW I have seen a recent photo of you.RUOK? you look harassed .
    Don’t abuse me, you little disgustathon, you are not worthy.

  71. thefrollickingmole

    OldOzzie
    #2952661, posted on March 7, 2019 at 3:55 pm
    How Do You Solve a Problem Like Ilhan Omar?

    Well if your a tribal lefty you claim its all the evil Trumpenfhureres fault and “tone” or something.

    Ilhan Omar and the weaponisation of antisemitism
    Joshua Leifer

    Ilhan Omar’s most recent comments have been stripped entirely of their context, their intentions twisted and reversed. During an event in Washington DC last week, she spoke sensitively about her commitment to human rights advocacy, her experiences of Islamophobia, and her compassion for her J ewi sh constituents. Then Omar said: “I want to talk about the political influence in this country that says it is OK for people to push for allegiance to a foreign country … I want to ask, why is it OK for me to talk about the influence of the NRA, of fossil-fuel industries, or big pharma, and not talk about a powerful lobby that is influencing policy?

  72. Ovverburdened

    Quickly skimming latest comments shows Brazil’s President Bolsonaro has scored a geurnsey.
    Apologies if I’m being redundant.

    The reportage as such at news.com.au does two things.

    It shows that it is impossible to argue with the currently statistically abnormal members of the cult of moral decline, which is an intrinsic part of the progressive socialist program.
    To complain and declare depravity for their recorded exploits being broadcast when they are happy to behave this way in a public space regardless of the sensibilities of any onlookers has no internal logic.

    It shows that news.com.au by the language and prejudicial cross references in the article is on board with the social experiment.

    I don’t want a conservative news source.
    I want factual and detached reporting of facts and events, however this type of reporting is not part of the business plan.

  73. Now it is up to you to apply your amazing investigative skills and work out how that figure is arrived at.

    Your figure – your explanation.

  74. Helen

    Arky what are you doing with a jumper on? Dont you know it is the hottest summer – eva?

  75. Johno

    Hey Bobby boy,Not gunna happen. You stated one figure I have completely demolished that. Now it is up to you to prove your figure or withdraw.

    You may grovel,I am big hearted like that.

  76. Helen

    Lizzie and Hairy hoping for you.

  77. Helen

    Now back to ripping out trees, by the km2. Hugely.

  78. bespoke

    D7’s rock Helen unless you’ve operated a D9 😉

  79. You stated one figure I have completely demolished that.

    It’s not “my figure”.
    It’s DVA’s figure.
    If you claim that you’re getting twice what DVA say you’re entitled to, you’re the one who needs to explain.

  80. Derp

    Socialism, collectivism, is unstable.
    And oligarchic capitalism never goes belly up?

    Captain Whatabout rides again.
    An honest pedant ought to at at least try to live by their own rules…

  81. thefrollickingmole

    It’s not “my figure”.

    You post it, you own it.

    No disclaimer in your original post it was presented as gods own truth.

    Still im sure it is beyond you to actually pick up the phone and check or anything.

  82. struth

    Talking about D9 s and other tracked dozers and the like.
    They are always fun to put on a low loader like a drake or similar, because you have the tilt spot as it comes off the ramp that I will admit many a time has had my arse biting through the seat.

  83. Johno

    You really are a little sea gull Bobby.Squark in,shit on everything, fly off.
    Why do you come here? Every time you post, some one here completely demolishes you.

    Are you lonely? You look lonely.

    Why won’t you defend your position? Is it because you know you are full of it? Yeah that’s it.

  84. struth

    We’ve already established Numbers doesn’t know what he links to.
    His arrival back here seems to be as one who comes back to die, and his last revenge is he’s going to make us watch his nervous breakdown and collapse.

  85. Helen

    We are in Bupa, top tier, $50 co payment, but every trip to hospital requires lots of extras, aenethisist is never covered, if you want the best Dr, he doesnt do deals with your providor, so you have to shell out 6K or more for his nimble fingers, but you dont have to wait – so there is that.

    CL posted that the ALP are going to force public hospitals to carry out terminations or lose their funding. So who is going to be turned away from elective surgery on the public wait list so little janey can have her botched birth control taken care of?

    Maybe Bill will have a soylent green room off the surgery waiting room. Ah yes Mrs Hopeful, your knee operation, let me see, 65 yo, pensioner, take the green door … with life expectancy of another 20 years, just saved a heap for the gubbmint.

  86. bespoke

    An honest pedant ought to at at least try to live by their own rules…

    1735099 is a socialists, rules are for other people.

  87. Maj A (Rtd)

    Johno I am a married TPI and my forthnightly pension is $1414.20 (includes chemist subsidy) . For once numbers is correct!

  88. thefrollickingmole

    Good article here.
    https://www.city-journal.org/global-warming

    In 2005, I had a conversation with Rajendra Pachauri, an Indian railway engineer, who remade himself into a climatologist and became director of the IPCC, which received the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize under his tenure. Pachauri told me, without embarrassment, that, at the UN, he recruited only climatologists convinced of the carbon-dioxide warming explanation, excluding all others. This extraordinary collusion today allows politicians and commentators to declare that “science says that” carbon dioxide is to blame for global warming, or that a “scientific consensus” exists on warming, implying that no further study is needed

  89. Helen

    tilt spot as it comes off the ramp

    I asked Captain for a seat belt as she bucks a bit if you have to drive over bigger felled timber. But I’m used to it now, just like riding a horse, it is all in the balance. I do admit to some early suckamullah clenching, though. I am after a neat little box to sit on my right side, where I can put my bits and pieces. Saved my sunglass case the otherday, just about to head over onto the tracks. lol.

  90. struth

    So which police force is worse, numbers?

    One shooting criminals or one not doing anything while they rape thousands of girls, running people over, chucking acid and stabbing, because they’re politicised and scared of being called names?

  91. Johno

    Now Bobby poos. You originally stated a figure for an unmarried TPI recipient and misrepresented that as being for a married TPI recipient.
    Now Bobby poos the TPI is not income replacement. The TPI is COMPENSATION for injuries suffered. See how you stuffed that up, you disgustathon?
    Now if a soldier,who actually fought,is, because of injuries suffered unable to work he is eligible for the Service Pension.
    I never said I was getting anything from DVA, that is your distraction squirell.

    RUOK ? Your are little bit more sniffy than usual.

  92. 1735099

    Why won’t you defend your position?

    Because I don’t have a “position” to defend.
    You, on the other hand, claim that the DVA special rate pension is twice what appears on the DVA website, but are unable to explain the difference.
    You’re the one with the position, and as it stands, it’s more than a little untenable.

  93. Boambee John

    1735099
    #2952673, posted on March 7, 2019 at 4:19 pm
    Fox news, the USA’s very own Pravda.

    CNN, the USA’s very own Tass.

    New York Times, the USA’s very own Izvestia.

    Gee, this is fun. Can anyone play?

  94. OldOzzie

    Books – WSJ

    ‘Ten Drugs’ Review: Better Living Through Chemistry

    All sorts of medicinal wonders have emerged from laboratories—and nature itself—with missteps and eureka moments along the way.

    In an age of technological wonders, few can equal the life-altering and life-saving drugs that have poured forth from laboratories and research teams in the 20th and early 21st centuries. Anti-psychotic drugs have emptied mental hospitals. Antibiotics have added years to average life expectancy. Birth control pills have transformed sex lives—and mores. Seeming miracles can feel almost routine: Jimmy Carter, after being diagnosed with metastatic melanoma in 2015, took a recently approved drug called pembrolizumab, which redirected his immune system and played a decisive role in ridding him of cancer.

    In “Ten Drugs: How Plants, Powders, and Pills Have Shaped the History of Medicine,” Thomas Hager, a veteran science writer, chronicles a range of drug-related breakthroughs, tracking the experimental efforts, occasional missteps and eureka moments that preceded them. The story, though filled with remarkable achievements, is of course not entirely a triumphalist one.

    Opium, for instance, derived from the poppy plant, has been in use for at least 10,000 years, making it one of the oldest drugs known to man, and it has been an important trading item since Roman times. As Mr. Hager emphasizes, opium and its derivatives and synthetic forms—most recently fentanyl—have freed millions from intractable pain, but they have also condemned millions to the travails of addiction and to early death. In the 19th century, with a quarter of its population addicted, China resisted the importation of opium, leading to two wars with Britain, the principal player in the opium trade. Enormous resources have been poured into decoupling the pain-killing power of opiates from their powerful addictive nature, Mr. Hager notes, but so far without success.

    For millennia, drugs were found in nature, from plants most of all. But in the 1830s the first non-natural drug was developed in a laboratory, and the modern drug industry was born. That drug was the sedative chloral hydrate, from which chloroform, one of the first anesthetics, was derived.

    Mr. Hager introduces us to the German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-73), “a true genius, a great teacher, who was passionate about applying chemistry to everything—especially living processes.” It was Liebig’s investigations—as he was “playing with molecules, learning what transformed one into another”—that led him to turn chloral hydrate into a sweet-smelling liquid whose fumes, as it happened, induced a loss of consciousness. A couple of decades later chloroform was being used in surgery. But like so many drugs, chloral hydrate was liable to misuse. When combined with alcohol, it produced so-called knock-out drops, what Mr. Hager calls “the original date-rape drug.” The same combination—supposedly used for fleecing customers and credited to a Chicago saloon keeper—became the fabled “Mickey Finn.”

    Other discoveries, as Mr. Hager shows, emerged from more deliberate pursuit. In the 1960s, a Japanese college student, Akira Endo, having read a biography of Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of penicillin, wondered whether mold might yield not only antibiotics but drugs that would lower cholesterol in the blood. A decade later, as a research scientist, he pursued the idea. He went through almost 4,000 molds, Mr. Hager says, before finding what he was looking for—in a mold that was spoiling a bag of rice in a Kyoto grain shop. Another member of the genus Penicillium, it produced the first statin, a class of drugs now taken by tens of millions of people every day.

    One of the revelations of Mr. Hager’s chronicle is the role that serendipity can play. A mid-20th-century French surgeon named Henri Laborit wanted a drug that would calm his patients before their operations and prevent surgical shock. At the time, antihistamines were being investigated for their ability to help hay-fever and cold sufferers. But antihistamines had side effects, one of which was to make patients drowsy. Laborit thought this side effect might be just what he needed. He asked the French drug company Rhône-Poulenc for help. As luck would have it, Rhône-Poulenc had been trying to find better antihistamines and had a number of failures on the shelf. One of them, called RP-4560, was especially ineffective. It didn’t stop runny noses, but it did make patients drowsy. It was all side effect.

    Laborit tried it, and it worked wonders keeping patients calm. One day, Laborit happened to be talking with the head of psychiatry at his hospital, who was bemoaning the need to keep so many of his patients in restraints to prevent them from harming themselves or others. Laborit suggested RP-4560. A patient who had been admitted twice for violent irrational behavior was given a dose 10 times what Laborit used on his surgical patients. The patient fell asleep after a few hours, and when he woke up he stayed calm for an additional 18 hours. After three weeks of treatment, he was, Mr. Hager writes, “rational enough to play bridge.” Thus was born the first anti-psychotic drug.

    While sticking mostly to history, Mr. Hager touches on the economics of the drug industry. It costs billions of dollars to bring a drug to market, he reminds us, and many candidates never make it, pushing up the price of those that do. When a blockbuster drug does erupt, it can be enormously profitable. The statin Lipitor “became the most commercially successful drug in history,” with sales of more than $120 billion between 1996 and 2011. Rare diseases, because the potential return on investment is so much lower, get short shrift.

    Mr. Hager previews the wonders yet to come, such as drugs with sensors that send a signal when they are taken, helping the elderly or the mentally ill to keep their doses on a strict schedule. Super computers allow the modeling of ever more complex molecules, speeding up drug development. The ability to read the genomes of individual patients and manipulate their DNA holds out enormous promise. If Mr. Hager’s well-written and engaging chronicle is any guide, there may be unforeseen downsides to such developments, but the upside will certainly be worth celebrating.

  95. struth

    I once had to load a bloody communist china crane on to a drake float at Brisbane wharf, that had just been imported.
    It’s tracks were as smooth as a baby’s bum, no grip and it was raining.
    They made me load it right next to the wharf edge.
    I had about six old tyres to put down but this bloody chinese heap of shit just kept sliding everywhere while trying to load it.
    I nearly went into the drink.
    I couldn’t even make it up to the tilt spot , fulcrum, if you will, before it kept sliding of the ramps.
    I used to load bloody headers and sprayers and crap in all sorts of stupid places, 777 dumpies and the like.

    Now sometimes with the work I do now, I get a bit of a callous on my thumb.
    And sometimes when I’m changing strings, I sometimes prick a finger with the string.

  96. cohenite

    Hey numbers, condemn communism you sack of shit.

  97. 1735099

    Hilarious.
    Either you can’t read, or you have the attention span of a goldfish.
    I’ve already posted (twice) what the network’s letter says.
    I’ll remind you (again) that what is in that letter is not my claim, but the claim of members of that network.
    The words “married” or “unmarried” don’t appear anywhere in that letter.
    That’s entirely your interpretation.
    You seem unable to justify the discrepancy between your figure and DVA’s.
    To quote a certain redhead – “Please explain”.
    Or, in other words, sit down – the dog is pissing on your swag.

  98. OldOzzie

    The Stupidity in Australia Continues

    Big energy projects at risk after WA’s EPA unleashes ‘onerous’ carbon rules


    Tens of billions of dollars in new resource projects will be at risk after Western Australia’s Environmental Protection Authority announced tough new measures around carbon dioxide emissions.

    The EPA, which makes recommendations to the WA government about whether major projects should proceed, today announced it would expect companies to demonstrate how they will offset all emissions from their developments.

    The new regulations will affect planned projects such as Woodside Petroleum’s $US11 billion Scarborough gas project and its $US20.5bn Browse development, as well as existing projects such as the $US34bn Wheatstone LNG plant and the $US45bn Gorgon LNG plant.

    EPA chairman Tom Hatton told reporters this morning that the body was setting a “higher bar” for major projects.

    “For some it will be more onerous than they may have enjoyed in the past,” Dr Hatton said.

    “One of the reasons we plan to give the proponents a lot of time to consider plans is because it is onerous and puts a greater burden on transparency and planning and offsetting.”

    He said the tougher interpretation reflected the lack of progress being made by Australia in meeting its climate targets, arguing that current Federal regulations do not go far enough.

    “In our view those (Federal) regulations are not going to deliver the outcomes as currently applied that are necessary for Australia to meet its international obligations under the Paris Agreement. That’s why we’re doing this,” he told reporters this morning.

    The tougher guidelines will apply to all major projects already under assessment by the EPA, such as Scarborough, as well as any future major projects. Both Gorgon and Wheatstone will also be assessed under the new criteria given they have both been referred back to the body by the WA government with a specific request to study their emissions abatement efforts.

    The tougher new guidelines will add another hurdle to major developments in WA at a time when the resource-reliant economy remains sluggish.

    Fresh data released this week showed a 0.3 per cent fall in WA’s gross domestic product during the December quarter.

    The stricter interpretation could add substantially to the cost of new developments, with industry already up in arms about the changes.

    A spokeswoman for Woodside said the changes could affect projects that would otherwise replace other dirtier sources of emissions elsewhere in the world.

    “Direct and arbitrary regulation at the State level, as proposed by the EPA, appears out of step with Australia’s international targets and the associated emissions trajectory, raises further potential for conflict between regulation and jobs, and may perversely penalise investment in cleaner fuels such as natural gas which have a big role to play in global emissions reduction,” the spokeswoman said.

  99. bespoke

    Seamstress Struth

    Catchy!

  100. twostix

    Twice this month the Very Best of Australian Women (just ask them, they’ll tell you) have been, and made Australia famous, throughout the world for all the wrong reasons.

    One was the cringe-death inducing shitshow of the the bunch of highly paid public servants at the Workplace Equality Agency being gently educated by David Leyolnhelm that they completely ‘forget’ (didn’t forget), to factor in that men work more hours than women in their gender equality paper .

    The other is Labor retard Terri Butler embarrassing us all when Jordan Peterson was on Q&A.

    It’s not that she’s stupid that this necessarily went viral, it’s that she was bogan and rude.

  101. Johno

    Now ,Now little bobby. I will type slowly so you may comprehend.
    You said a married man on TPI received only $704 dollars a week. This is a complete lie SNIFFY.
    You don’t mind me calling you SNIFFY?
    If a married man is TPI, he is eligible for the Service pension.
    As a result he receives $2789.40 per fortnight.Free medical and dental at private hospital level. He also receives educational assistance for all children up to age 25 there is a very long ETC after this .
    See Bobby, when you shift goal posts around and blatantly lie, this only works with people who arn’t completely across the subject. In this instance I am across the subject.
    You stated a position. Any reasonable person can see that you have been demolished, again.
    You will now reply with a sniffy, offhanded denial. Not gunna work boyo. Or should I say Sniffy?

  102. OldOzzie

    Franking credits: Labor staffer attacks ‘whingeing Baby Boomers’

    Victoria’s opposition planning spokesman Tim Smith told The Australian the post was an “insight into Labor’s true prejudices” and showed a “lack of respect” for older Australians.

    “This mean and nasty Facebook post gives us real insight into Labor’s true prejudices against self funded retirees and the over 55’s,” he said.

    “This total lack of respect for hard-working Australians shows the divisive class war politics that should have ended decades ago are back with a vengeance.“

    Coalition treasury spokeswoman Louise Staley sought to highlight Ms Ohlmus’s comments during Question Time in state parliament, as she quizzed the Premier about escalating land tax.

    “Land tax collection has increased from $1,751m to $3,433m, or 96.1 per cent since the election of the government,” Ms Staley said.

    “Is the heartless nature of the government’s increase in taxes simply because those most likely to be affected by Labor’s tax policies, that is senior Victorians, are, as the Premier’s private office describes, just simply “whingeing baby boomers”?”

    Mr Andrews replied: “The answer to that question is no.”

  103. Eyrie

    ” it produced the first statin, a class of drugs now taken by tens of millions of people every day.”
    Immensely profitable for the drug companies and a great way to make people sick and kill them early.
    Some trials show a nearly 400% increase in chances of Diabetes Type 2, other effects muscle pain, loss of memory, atherosclerosis, premature aging etc etc. The very small good effects are probably due to anti-coagulant effects which other drugs with far less serious side effects can address.
    Things should be banned for those over 60 as lowering cholesterol to the very low levels the medical profession wants shows an increase in all cause mortality including cancer. Ladies over 60 don’t need to worry as the all cause mortality goes down as cholesterol increases. High cholesterol wards off infections and may even help prevent Alzheimers. Do your own research.
    Having been nuke scanned twice in 3 days because the stuffed up the first time and some other recent events I’m less than impressed by the medical profession.
    Now what was somebody saying earlier about medical malpractice causing vast numbers of deaths?
    Checkout this: http://vernerwheelock.com/263-no-way-to-run-an-airline/

  104. Tom

    Tens of billions of dollars in new resource projects will be at risk after Western Australia’s Environmental Protection Authority announced tough new measures around carbon dioxide emissions.

    You’d reckon someone at Trades Hall in Perth would have a word with Sneakers McGowan about the jobs being destroyed by the Green zealots in the bureaucracy.

    Liars are even dumber than the Stupid.Fucking.Liberals.

  105. Tom

    BTW, do any WA Cats know what has happened to H.B. Bear? Haven’t heard from him for weeks/months.

  106. OldOzzie

    Culture or beach: where you’re from influences searches

    Nerida Conisbee

    I’m your classic Melburnian Sydneysider. I lived in Melbourne for most of my life, but now live in Sydney. I like to think that provides me with a unique perspective on both cities.

    There are certainly a lot of stereotypes … Melburnians wear a lot of black, are into culture and obsessed with AFL. In Sydney, it’s all about the beach and water.

    The lifestyle is more casual, which is reflected in how people spend their spare time. We can clearly see just how different both cities are from how people search on realestate.com.au.

    Granny flats and water-related terms

    Apparently, Sydney loves a granny flat. This term comes up every month as one of the most searched in Sydney. Also popular are those relating to water. Sydneysiders definitely love the water, while Melburnians are less fussed, perhaps not surprisingly given the relative attractiveness of Melbourne’s beaches and rivers compared with Sydney’s.

    Melbourne isn’t into granny flats, either. This probably isn’t driven by a lack of fondness for grandparents, but by the fact that Melbourne continues to be much cheaper than Sydney.

    Tasmania vs Gold Coast

    Sydney property seekers do not understand the appeal of Hobart — too cold, the beaches are too rugged and, while MONA is interesting, it doesn’t warrant buying a house down there. Melbourne property seekers are in love, however, and probably account for a sizeable chunk of the price increases we have seen over the past couple of years. For Sydney-based property seekers, we see high search volumes on the Gold Coast — more beach, more sunshine and more like Sydney.

    Warehouses and courtyards

    While Sydney is all about water and granny flats, Melburnians are busy searching for warehouses and courtyards. A warehouse that can be converted is also a popular option with STCA (subject to council approval), featuring frequently in Melbourne search activity. Melbourne’s obsession with development is strong — no other capital city features a development-related term in their top 10 search terms.

    Inner city and beachside

    If you are a renter in Melbourne, you want to be in inner Melbourne, preferably northside with the most popular suburbs for renters including places like Northcote, Fitzroy and Brunswick. For renters in Sydney, it is all about the beach, particularly the northern beaches with places like Queenscliff and Balgowlah.

    But the most striking difference is between the most popular streets in each of our largest cities.

    In Sydney it is Wolseley Road, Point Piper, home to $20 million-plus waterfront mega mansions.

    In Melbourne, it is Highett Road, Richmond, home of $1m-plus terraces in a once grungy, now gentrified inner-city suburb.

    In the end, perhaps this is the underlying difference between Melburnians and Sydneysiders. For Sydneysiders, it is aspirational to be rich, but for Melburnians, it is much better to be cool.

    Nerida Conisbee is chief economist at REA Group

  107. twostix

    “In our view those (Federal) regulations are not going to deliver the outcomes as currently applied that are necessary for Australia to meet its international obligations under the Paris Agreement. That’s why we’re doing this,” he told reporters this morning.

    I’ve been saying for a number of years now that as the Commonwealth loses the heart of the fragile nation that created it, and so in turn loses confidence in its purpose, power is moving back to the original seats of power on this continent. The real assemblies that the australian nation was founded upon and where there is a true sense of purpose, nationhood, history and power is: the states.

  108. Johno

    “DENIED the Australian Average Wage to our War Disabled Veterans (TPI) unable to continue in employment to provide for themselves and their families”
    (The Average Wage is $1,668 per week the TPI rate defined as a replacement income is $704 per week).

    “Themselves and their families”

    Would that be a married soldier SNIFFY?
    No discrepancy. You post it you own it..
    You may apologise.

  109. 1735099

    You said a married man on TPI received only $704 a week.

    A lie. Scroll back and read what is in black and white.

    The letter (not me) said (and I quote) “the TPI rate defined as a replacement income is $704 per week”.
    The “married” reference is entirely your interpretation. There is no mention of “married” or “unmarried” anywhere in that letter. Read it again.I did not “say” what you claim.
    You are a blatant liar, clear to anyone who takes the trouble to scroll back and compare what the letter says, with what you claim I said. You went off well and truly half-cocked.
    You have two obligations.
    One is to apologise for your lies and misrepresentation.
    The other is to explain the difference between your figure and DVAs.

  110. OldOzzie

    Eyrie
    #2952709, posted on March 7, 2019 at 5:06 pm

    ” it produced the first statin, a class of drugs now taken by tens of millions of people every day.”

    Some trials show other effects muscle pain

    Yep told my Cardiologist I was dropping Statins because of Muscle Pain as had my wife – he said no problems as Heart OK and now on yearly check and much to my wifes disgust as I like Fatty Chops and Steaks, my Chloresterol is 3.7 vs her 6.7

  111. bespoke

    1735099
    #2952716, posted on March 7, 2019 at 5:17 pm

    One is to apologise for your lies and misrepresentation.

    You first, about one a day for the next six months will do.

  112. Boambee John

    “In our view those (Federal) regulations are not going to deliver the outcomes as currently applied that are necessary for Australia to meet its international obligations under the Paris Agreement. That’s why we’re doing this,” he told reporters this morning.

    The only “international obligation under the Paris Agreement” is to set a national target. There is no legal obligation to meet the target.

    Not for nothing did Michael “Hockey Stick” Man call tge Agreement a “fra.d.

    The EPA man is either ignorant, pursuing a political agenda, or both.

  113. OldOzzie

    Home Affairs letter outlines reasons why Milo Yiannopoulos could be denied visa

    Milo Yiannopoulos says the Liberal Party are “not fit to govern” if they cannot protect free speech, as he faces the possibility of being denied a visa to Australia.

    The far right celebrity told The Australian he was “confused, appalled, amused and devastated” to receive a Department of Home Affairs letter telling him he could be denied a visa over an unpaid $50,000 security bill to Victoria Police and extremist riots outside his controversial 2017 Australian shows.

    He pointed towards the recent Australian tour by Eygptian Islamic preacher Sheik Omar Abdel Kafi – who called 9/11 a “comedy film” – and said he was being denied the same right to free speech.

    “The idea that any western country would welcome a hate preacher like Omar Abdelkafy while banning a champion of free speech, capitalism and Christianity is unconscionable, but it’s especially awful coming from Australia, until recently a fair-minded land of common sense,” he said.

    “As it happens, I’m glad Abdelkafy got to speak. I believe everyone deserves the right to make their case. Australians can then decide for themselves what they believe on the basis of all the available evidence. The government cannot be involved in deciding which opinions are okay to state and which aren’t.”

    “Australians should remember this day and remember who did this when they cast their votes at the next election. If the Liberals can’t stand up for the fundamentals of a free society, they aren’t fit to govern.”

    Mr Yiannopoulos’s call against the Liberals could complicate Scott Morrison’s attempt to bring back votes from right splinter groups like One Nation.

    The British commentator has a strong following among the far right in Australia including One Nation leader Pauline Hanson,

    Mr Yiannopoulos said the riots outside his Melbourne show in December 2017, which led to five police officers being injured was caused by the “feral left” and that deplores political violence.

    Why Milo may be denied visa

    Home Affairs officials have told Milo Yiannopoulos he could be denied a visa partly due a $50,000 bill to Victoria Police.

    The Notice of Intention to Consider Refusal letter, which has been obtained by The Australian, states he may not pass the character test for entry into Australia due to the arrests made at his 2017 Australian shows, his statements about minorities, and Victorian Police Minister Lisa Neville saying he and his promoters had not yet paid security costs.

    But the pressure on Immigration Minister David Coleman to allow Mr Yiannopoulos continues to mount and his tour promoter, Penthouse Australia’s Damien Costas, told The Australian he never received a bill from Victoria Police.

    “The Department of Home Affairs (the Department) holds information about which suggests you may not pass the character test … in the event the person were allowed to enter or to remain in Australia, there is a risk that the person would: incite discord in the Australian community or in a segment of that community,” the Home Affairs letter reads.

    “There were significant protests at Mr YIANNOPOULOS’ events in Sydney and Melbourne in December 2017, despite the location of Mr YIANNOPOULOS’ speaking engagements being withheld by event organisers until 24 hours prior to the events.

    “Hundreds of protestors rallied outside the events. The protest at Mr YIANNOPOULOS’ Melbourne event involved violence and five police officers were reported as having been injured. The protest at Mr YIANNOPOULOS’ Sydney event also culminated in seven arrests.

    “Victoria Police issued Mr YIANNOPOULOS with a bill of $50,000 for the cost of policing his event in Melbourne. Mr YIANNOPOULOS was reported in July 2018 to have not paid the Victoria Police bill.

    “Mr YIANNOPOULOS was reported as saying ‘I love it when protestors turn up to my shows … when people are yelling in the streets, it gets me off’. Mr YIANNOPOULOS states he is a ‘troll’ and that ‘one of the purposes of trolling is to generate as much noise and public outcry as possible’.

    “Mr YIANNOPOULOS has made controversial statements in relation to minority groups such as indigenous Australians, Muslims, African Americans, and the LBGTIQ community.”

    Mr Yiannopoulos took to Facebook last night to share articles on his difficulties entering Australia, and quoted his supporter Pauline Hanson.

    Mr Yiannopoulos’ spokesman in Australia, Luke Izaak, said this was the third time Mr Yiannopoulos had received notification from Australian authorities that he intended to deny his visa, including before his 2017 tour which included a trip to Parliament House.

    Mr Costas said he has never received a bill from Victoria Police and that Mr Yiannopoulos intends to fight any attempts to stop him coming to Australia.

    “I’ve never received a bill from Victoria Police. And if I had, I would challenged the veracity of that bill. It was political grandstanding,” he told The Australian.

    “Milo hasn’t said anything that hasn’t been said by politicians in The Australian Senate.

    “I believe the Minister (David Coleman) will see common sense and we look forward to Milo coming to Australia.”

    Victoria Police would not confirm that Mr Costas was ever sent a bill or that any of the $50,000 security costs had been recouped.

    “Victoria Police does not disclose the cost of engaging our services, or the private discussions held as part of the arrangements,” a Victoria Police spokeswoman said.

    “While we will not be commenting on any events in particular, public safety is a joint responsibility between the police and event organiser.

    “Commercial event organisers have a responsibility to provide adequate measures to ensure the safety of event participants, spectators and the general public.”

    The Department of Home Affairs said it has “nothing to add to this matter.”

  114. Eyrie

    Got this from Woodside:
    Woodside Petroleum Ltd
    ABN 55 004 898 962

    Dear Shareholder

    Download Woodside’s Sustainable Development Report 2018 here.

    The Report provides an overview of our sustainability performance across the key dimensions of our people, our environment, our approach and our future. As a company, sustainability is part of everything we do and will continue to inform our decisions and actions as we grow our operations.

    We listen to our stakeholders, and their feedback helped us to identify the key sustainability topics featured in the report, including climate change and greenhouse gas emissions, health and safety, social and cultural impacts on communities, and fraud, anti-bribery and corruption.

    The report has been prepared in accordance with the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Standards core-level reporting and complements Woodside’s Annual Report 2018, which details our operations and financial performance.

    I trust you will find this report of interest and encourage you to provide feedback to [email protected].

    Yours sincerely,

    Peter Coleman
    CEO and Managing Director

    so I replied:
    Dear Peter Coleman,

    As shareholders my wife and do not want Woodside to spend any money time and effort pandering to the idiot lefty greenfilth and their sustainobabble.

    We want you to grow the company and provide the highest level of dividends consistent with that.

    The whole climate change/global warming scam is just the latest version of “Popular Delusions and Madness of Crowds” (I spent 7 years professionally in the meteorology/atmospheric science/environmental bsuiness). If you don’t know of the book, look it up and download it from Amazon.

    As for “anti-bribery and corruption”, I simply don’t care. If you have to bribe government officials/politicians to get things done, so be it. They are all crooks anyway.

    “The report has been prepared in accordance with the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Standards core-level reporting” – this only means to me vast amounts of money which could be paid out as dividends are being wasted pandering to freeloaders and crooks.

    Man up, grow pair and push back against the anti-science crowd pushing the “climate change” nonsense.

    Regards

  115. Geriatric Mayfly

    The other is Labor retard Terri Butler embarrassing us all when Jordan Peterson was on Q&A.
    It’s not that she’s stupid that this necessarily went viral, it’s that she was bogan and rude.

    A glut of vacuity during her 5 minutes of fame.

  116. Baldrick

    I head out this morning and Numbers is one here whinging and whining.
    Come back this arvo and he’s still here whinging and whining.
    FFS man, get a life.

  117. JC

    Eyrie.

    I’m going to offer a critique next time you write this these idiots. Don’t offer your view on gerbil warming. Simply explain to the sack of turd that you’re a shareholder and expect him to act in the interests of shareholders – not using company funds to support his own personal views on scientific theory.

    Also don’t write to Coleman. Write to the Chairman complaining about Coleman’s looseness with company funds. Write to the other directors. Inform him/them that you will be taking this up with other shareholders at the next general meeting and you have found other shareholders of a similar view. That frightens them.

  118. Nick

    I’d rather Bernardi had some actual policies as an alternative choice as opposed to picking low hanging fruit such as I support Milo.

  119. Tel

    Milo Yiannopoulos says the Liberal Party are “not fit to govern” if they cannot protect free speech, as he faces the possibility of being denied a visa to Australia.

    Oh come on Milo. You have barely scratched the surface of why the Liberal Party are not fit to govern.

    Wait around another few months and we will find out why the ALP are similarly unfit.

  120. Geriatric Mayfly

    Illegal’ strike plan under fire
    A planned mass strike by the ACTU during the federal election will put workers at risk of massive fines, employers warn.

    As I recall, one of the first utterances of that McManus bint was to encourage the wukkas to break the law when it suits.

  121. dover_beach

    I’ve been saying for a number of years now that as the Commonwealth loses the heart of the fragile nation that created it, and so in turn loses confidence in its purpose, power is moving back to the original seats of power on this continent. The real assemblies that the australian nation was founded upon and where there is a true sense of purpose, nationhood, history and power is: the states.

    I think you’re right. State governments have direct power of education, health, planning, and the like. If you want to reverse what is going on, nationally, you have to begin with a state. That is where I would be putting my efforts, politically.

  122. dover_beach

    twostix, BTW, loved your comment re 1880-1910 generation and today. I’d love to see some historical work done on that.

  123. bespoke

    Fair call Nick, They need to put more time into explaining in detail rather then relying on the MSM.

  124. Harlequin Decline

    Today out in the quiet streets of Balgowlah I saw an unusual sight .

    As I was turning left at an intersection there was an oncoming car wanting to turn right into the same street with a series a series of toots from somewhere behind him.

    Shortly after I turned the car zoomed past me and the sound of a lawnmower at maximum revs grew louder and louder behind me along with the tooting.

    As I slowed for a turn a postie on his little bike, flag flying, horn tooting and hi-viz aflapping buzzed past going flat chat in pursuit of the car.

    Must have released a new set of corporate values for Australia Post.

  125. egg_

    BTW, do any WA Cats know what has happened to H.B. Bear? Haven’t heard from him for weeks/months.

    Yeah, c’mon Bear – where are the selfless regular updates on The Green-Left Weekly Half Hour AKA The World Today on ABC RN?

  126. dover_beach

    VicPol:

    “Commercial event organisers have a responsibility to provide adequate measures to ensure the safety of event participants, spectators and the general public.”

    What a load of cobblers. The event was a lecture. The presence of police is not required because a lecture is rowdy, but because protestors are infringing the rights of those wishing to attend said lecture. To impose those costs on the lawful party is a disgrace. VicPol management needs to be cleaned out. It stinks to high heaven.

  127. Eyrie

    Thanks, JC, but I needed to feel better just now.

  128. bespoke

    Nick
    One of AC’s platforms is free speech so Bernardi’s comments are understandable.

  129. Helen

    Now sometimes with the work I do now, I get a bit of a callous on my thumb.
    And sometimes when I’m changing strings, I sometimes prick a finger with the string.

    Do you find it is easier to cry, too? I do. When I am in work clothes I am just a bit more resilient than I am in a dress and heels. 🙂

  130. Eyrie

    Mark A “what’s your opinion about a blood pressure reading of 114/52 for a 55 year old?”
    Yeah, modern medicine again. They think lower is better without thinking about it. Ask your doc what he would think about 80/40.
    BTW with a blood pressure that low don’t fly aerobatics. I lost a friend to g – loc years ago.

  131. Nick

    Bespoke, yeah, it’s consistent though I wish they trumpeted their own well thought out and innovative policies as opposed to obvious press release type announcements. God knows they have had the time to develop and articulate some.

  132. egg_

    1880-1910 generation

    Aunty mentioned research showing that as the most subsidised generation, not the baby boomers.

  133. DrBeauGan

    I am thinking of going to the Dominican Republic for the Perth winter. The main reason is that they do good cigars. While there I might take off for a few days in Cuba. The only reason for going there is the cigars.

    I shall have to brush up my Spanish. I am practising saying “Cuantos Pesos” and “Grassy arse señorita”. That should be enough.

  134. JC

    Thanks, JC, but I needed to feel better just now.

    You’ll feel much better when/if you win and winning means thus turd retreats or has his chairman retreat for him.

    Write to the chairman without offering an opinion and explaining that you find it reprehensible the CEO appears to be virtue signaling, that he doesn’t appear to have the best interests of the shareholders in an oil and gas company and he should, as chairman determine that if the CEO’s heart is not into extracting oil&gas he needs to be replaced immediately with someone who is. Tell him that other shareholders also feel that way and you won’t stop. I swear to you that you’ll receive a response. They are gutless fee rakers and get scared.

  135. egg_

    I head out this morning and Numbers is one here whinging and whining.
    Come back this arvo and he’s still here whinging and whining.
    FFS man, get a life.

    How much bandwidth is there in the Ward for the Chronically Confused?

  136. MatrixTransform

    homicidal maniacs, alcoholics, gun wankers, penis fetishists, women haters and homophobes…..

    …he forgot to include Tossers

  137. egg_

    The other is Labor retard Terri Butler embarrassing us all when Jordan Peterson was on Q&A.
    It’s not that she’s stupid that this necessarily went viral, it’s that she was bogan and rude.

    I blame horse tranquilizers – keeps the ALP harridans calm on air.

  138. MatrixTransform

    …conveniently

  139. MatrixTransform

    …lying by omission again

  140. While there I might take off for a few days in Cuba. The only reason for going there is the cigars.

    You’ll actually get better cigars for the money in Columbia.

    The Cuban market caters almost exclusively to tourists who get a lot of rubbish foisted on them.
    There are excellent cigars around, but you will probably need reliable local contacts to get your hands on them at a reasonable price.
    Rum is a little less complicated.
    You pretty much get what you pay for.

  141. Tintarella di Luna

    Eyrie
    #2952722, posted on March 7, 2019 at 5:40 pm

    Eyrie being an activist too, excellent and with the credibility of being an actual shareholder not a freeloader.

  142. OldOzzie

    QBE Insurance to put fossil fuel resolution to shareholders

    QBE Insurance has been forced to put to shareholders a vote on calls for it reduce its underwriting and investment in fossil fuel industries as investors ratchet up pressure on the financial services sector to act on climate change.

    A resolution put forward by Friends of the Earth-backed Market Forces and fund manager Australian Ethical would require QBE (QBE) to disclose short, medium and long-term targets for reducing exposure to coal, oil and gas assets, along with its plans and progress to achieve those targets.

    The resolution is the latest in a long-running international campaign to reduce carbon pollution by pressuring the financial services industry not to lend to, invest in or insure companies that are responsible for it.

    Two weeks ago global commodities miner and trader Glencore caved into pressure from the global Climate Action 100+ group that includes the $140 billion AustralianSuper fund to cap annual coal production 145 million tonnes a year.

    Last month, Woodside and Santos said they would also enter discussions with the Climate Action 100+ group to discuss their commitment and accountability on addressing climate change.

    QBE is the dominant underwriter of coal in Australia and if it were to follow the lead of European insurers and limit or cut their exposure to the industry it would leave a major hole in the market.

    The insurer has also included an amendment to its constitution demanded by Market Forces that is required to enable the resolution, and acknowledges the right of shareholders to seek information or propose resolutions. “However, such a resolution must relate to an issue of material financial relevance and cannot either advocate action which would violate any law or relate to any personal claim or grievance,” the proposed amendment reads.

    “Such a resolution is advisory only and does not bind the directors or the company.”

    QBE said the proposed climate resolutions had been requisitioned by shareholders representing approximately 0.2 per cent of QBE’s shares on issue.

    “QBE’s Board welcomes this dialogue on these important matters and will give the proposed resolutions thorough consideration before providing its recommendations to shareholders,” the company said in a statement to the market today.

    Climate change was a “material business risk for QBE” and the steps it was taking to address climate-related risks, including implementation of the recommendations of the Taskforce on Climate-related Disclosures, have been reported in its annual report.

    From The Comments

    – If We don’t have a viable and affordable Energy supply, then there won’t be anything to insure?

    Is it ok with QBE to Insure Cars, made with dirty coal from The US?

    Is QBE ok with providing cover for solar panels made in China, with Energy from Australian Coal?

    Where does that end?

    Once again it ends with an International company filling the gap – this time its insurance cover.

    One day We will realise how big a mistake, We made with Resources.

    If We were broke, this conversation wouldn’t even get a look in.

    What about getting the best return on investment for shareholders rather than pandering to the lunatic climate change activists. If enough corporates stand up to this lunacy then they’ll simply fade away.

    – Venezuela here we come

    – Well, yet another example that witchdoctors and superstitions rule the day: the Climate Change Bogey, that mythical monster worshipped by the inner city greens, and their vote snatching cohorts in parliament, individuals so driven by a vacuous appreciation of reality; the worship to ultimately drive the more thoughtful and practical of us into an enduring poverty.

    In any other environment this action would be considered blackmail

  143. Johno

    This is tedious .
    You are displaying the usual lefty bullshit.
    You posted a bullshit post. When you were called out you lied and ran.
    You made out the average weekly wage was $1600 plus per week but the poor old Digger only got $704.
    When a soldier is TPI he is eligible for the service pension as well this all adds up to $2324 per fortnight plus a fair bit for electricity etc. This is the single rate. Seeing as how you are fixated on this.
    You bullshitted on this and were found out. Being a socialist you are incapable of admitting a fault.
    Everyone here is totally bored with your garbage and I have a life to attend to.
    Piss off sniffy.

  144. JC

    I bought a pack of Benson & Hedges Smooth the other day from an owner occupied milk bar run by a Chinese woman. The cigs are disgusting and not what they should be. Are these fuckers importing/making fake brands?

    The pack says they are made in Singapore. Don’t we make cigs in Australia anymore?

    I don’t care about the 40 odd bucks but I do care about being taken for a fucking ride.

    Get a fucking load of BAT’s website. British American Tobacco. These large companies are a fucking disgrace. They’re embarrassed making a perfectly decent product customers buy. Canutes. Sometimes I think, Artie is right about big corps.

    https://www.bat.com/

  145. Johno

    JC. Australia has not made cigarettes since 2009.

  146. MatrixTransform

    Soon you find that those with ability want out, and you have to build a wall to keep them in. So the able stop working, and become needy. Soon everyone is in the needy class and your country goes broke.

    Well said

  147. JC

    Okay, thanks Johno. I didn’t know that.

  148. Leo G

    About 25 minutes ago a formation of three Army MRH90 tactical response helicopters passed over Epping in Sydney heading toward the city at treetop height.
    Any explanation for the unusual activity?

  149. DrBeauGan

    The Cuban market caters almost exclusively to tourists who get a lot of rubbish foisted on them.

    They are foisting rubbish on the buyers of their exported cigars too. It annoys me.

  150. Empire 5:5

    Also don’t write to Coleman. Write to the Chairman complaining about Coleman’s looseness with company funds. Write to the other directors. Inform him/them that you will be taking this up with other shareholders at the next general meeting and you have found other shareholders of a similar view. That frightens them.

    I second this. I have experienced Chairmen ordering heavy security for an AGM on the basis of an activist threatening to ask tough questions at the meeting. One who shall remain nameless even insisted a certain shareholder be refused registration at the AGM. He had trouble accepting this would be more painful than answering the questions in meeting, but acquiesced when his CoSec backed me up.

  151. Mark A

    Eyrie
    #2952746, posted on March 7, 2019 at 6:06 pm

    Mark A “what’s your opinion about a blood pressure reading of 114/52 for a 55 year old?”
    Yeah, modern medicine again. They think lower is better without thinking about it. Ask your doc what he would think about 80/40.
    BTW with a blood pressure that low don’t fly aerobatics. I lost a friend to g – loc years ago.

    My highest rating is a private retractable on a Piper Lance , so highly unlikely that I intentionally do any of that.

    My usual blood pressure range is 130/75 to 140/75 or thereabouts.
    This was for my annual compulsory checkup, if I still want to do field work, which I do.

  152. JC

    Here’s Climate Harken. He’s fucking obssessed with this swill. But lets be thankful about one thing and one thing only. These days, he stopped posting pedophrasty* after I beat it out of him. It started to become really disturbing… almost alarming. alarming in the true sense of the word.

    * Argument involving children to prop up a rationalization. Pedophrasts prey on our maternal (and paternal) instincts.

  153. Tintarella di Luna

    About 25 minutes ago a formation of three Army MRH90 tactical response helicopters passed over Epping in Sydney heading toward the city at treetop height.
    Any explanation for the unusual activity?

    According to my nearest and dearest returning from his local watering hole about 30 minutes ago those choppers were chopping their way over the water in Drummoyne

  154. 1735099

    You made out….

    I posted a copy of a letter.
    Any interpretation of it was yours, not mine.
    I seriously doubt you have sufficient grey matter to understand.
    You jumped to an erroneous conclusion, and have back-pedalled since using abuse and name calling as a smoke screen.
    I’ve referred enough school boy soccer to recognise this tactic when I see it.
    Most grow out of it by early teens.
    What happened to you?

  155. JC

    Let me walk back my earlier comment.

    Climate Harkel is still peddling pedophrasty albeit in a different format. It’s quite disturbing.

  156. Eyrie

    “About 25 minutes ago a formation of three Army MRH90 tactical response helicopters passed over Epping in Sydney heading toward the city at treetop height.
    Any explanation for the unusual activity?”
    Shit, they actually got 3 of the useless John Howard ordered pieces of crap to fly at once? Wonders will never cease. Another piece of Eurocrap like the ARH Tiger.

  157. Tintarella di Luna

    Wow just watching those three choppers very very low near Cockatoo Island so low they are churning up spray on the water – and there is another chopper a little bit higher up – might be supervising or something. Wonder what that’s all about

  158. Eyrie

    Probably a special forces tactical exercise.

  159. Eyrie

    BTW, they can’t approach at high speed and come to a stop nearly as fast as the Blackhawk.

  160. Pedro the Ignorant

    Choppers over Sydney belong to the Army, doing training exercises, and pissing off the Greenies.

    Army Choppers.

  161. Eyrie

    Are they Blackhawks or MRH90?

  162. Johno

    Listen to me you seriously deluded fuckwit. You posted shit . You were called on it . You lost.
    Get over it. Move on.
    I wasn’t abusing you. I was stating facts. You are a dill. You lost. Man up ..boy.

  163. Eyrie

    “pissing off the Greenies” So they are doing good, then?

  164. Leo G

    Another four ADF choppers just circled Mobbs Hill at low altitude from the southeast, then crossed Epping and toward the City.

  165. Mark A

    I’ve referred enough school boy soccer to recognise this tactic when I see it.

    To whom did you refer those games, and why?

  166. John Constantine

    homicidal maniacs, alcoholics, gun wankers, penis fetishists, women haters and homophobes…..

  167. John Constantine

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mx2UpGG4JEU

    homicidal maniacs, alcoholics, gun wankers, penis fetishists, women haters and homophobes…

  168. Tintarella di Luna

    Another four ADF choppers just circled Mobbs Hill at low altitude from the southeast, then crossed Epping and toward the City.

    Four were going low over Cockatoo Island again just now so it looks like they’ve got 7 in the air by the looks.

  169. struth

    Do you find it is easier to cry, too? I do. When I am in work clothes I am just a bit more resilient than I am in a dress and heels.

    I only cry when I look at the poor in the world I can’t help.
    When I think of the poor ra-pists and terrorists sitting in that tropical paradise waiting for their chance to cuddle a fluffy Koala.
    I feel driven to tears thinking about the children who , being born this year, won’t see their thirteenth birthday because the world is going to end in twelve years.
    I cry for the terrorists who want to fight for Isis but are now being denied entry back into their western countries to get much needed medical attention.
    I tear up at the thought that there aren’t the equal number of twats to penises in our parliament.
    I feel for the innocent children who may seem happy playing with lego, but are secretly in despair and misery, racked with maleness when they just want to put lipstick on and march in the Mardi Gras.

    I am inconsolable with grief that women who don’t work the same hours as men aren’t paid the same in this unjust country.

    And don’t get me started on the black necked Finch.

    I feel a country, folk song coming on.

    Join me won’t you.
    Hold hands.
    Light a candle, and remember, when we are being run over by terrorists, we have flowers.

  170. Tintarella di Luna

    They’re back again — I feel really safe now — they are so low near Cockatoo Island that you can’t see them because of the trees on the island, good camouflage except for the noise

  171. MatrixTransform

    Join me won’t you.

    sure … I’m drunk enough to sing, but not to dance

  172. amortiser

    Attended a showing this afternoon of Bill McKibben’s doco “Accelerate” – a global warming scaremongering show.

    It was put on by 350.org and presented by the Greens candidate for Bonner. According to her it was a non political event.

    The content included mention of the Maldives, Tuvalu, McKibben stating that coal was 18 th century technology and that the Great Barrier Reef was half destroyed amongst other mis information.

    On its completion there was discussion amongst the 7 people who turned up. When one suggested that it was amongst people who agreed with each other I pointed out a few issues.

    Despite the claims of warmers like McKibben, the Maldives didn’t disappear under the waves this year and Tuvalu had actually grown in size a fact confirmed by ABC fact checkers.

    If coal was 18 th century technology ( it’s not technology its mineral ore) the iron ore was 5000 year old technology. One of the participants agreed that McKibben’s comment was not appropriate.

    I pointed out that the Great Barrier Reef in a recent survey by tourist industry operators was only 5% affected by bleaching and that the rest was in good condition with a remarkable recovery from the natural bleaching events.

    They didn’t like the oracle being questioned and shut down the show at 4:30 when it was scheduled to go to 6:00. I was quite looking forward to demolishing the argument for another 90 minutes. When the only counter they have against you is that you don’t care for the futures of your children and grand children you know they haven’t got a comeback. I told the prick you said that that he was a disgrace in no uncertain terms.

  173. calli

    homicidal maniacs, alcoholics, gun wankers, penis fetishists, women haters and homophobes…

    Good heavens. The Labor Party?

  174. JC

    If coal was 18 th century technology ( it’s not technology its mineral ore) the iron ore was 5000 year old technology. One of the participants agreed that McKibben’s comment was not appropriate.

    The wheel is always a good counter against imbeciles talking about old vs new tech.

  175. JC

    I reckon when you think about it, the wheel is humanity’s greatest invention.I can’t think of anything more important and long lasting.

  176. Top Ender

    Any explanation for the unusual activity?

    If you can, go for it.

  177. Tintarella di Luna

    Just watching Credlin interviewing Gemma Sisia who has changed the world for poor children in Tanzania – She set up a school called St Jude’s. Wow now that is a trail-blazing woman making a difference – sans red shoes, sans gold shoes – just a passionate humble woman

  178. Infidel Tiger

    I reckon when you think about it, the wheel is humanity’s greatest invention.I can’t think of anything more important and long lasting.

    The toilet.

  179. Tintarella di Luna

    amortiser
    #2952792, posted on March 7, 2019 at 6:54 pm

    Wow amortiser – you’re an activist too. Love your work, excellent pushback on the paedastrophist.

  180. Tel

    Beer must surely be the pinnacle of human achievement.

    With pre-packaged bacon a close second.

  181. Infidel Tiger

    Sometimes I think, Artie is right about big corps.

    Everyone eventually comes around to my way of thinking.

    Corporatism is worse than socialism.

  182. JC

    I don’t know what I can say. I’m lost for words.

    Billionaire diamond trader, 65, dies during penis enlargement surgery at private Paris clinic

    Ehud Arye Laniado, 65, died during a penis enlargement operation in Paris
    The billionaire diamond trader reportedly suffered a heart attack during surgery
    A friend of the Belgian-Israeli’s said he was ‘always focused on his appearance’

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6777961/Billionaire-diamond-trader-65-dies-penis-enlargement-surgery.html

  183. thefrollickingmole

    So this is where the left is at the moment..

    Debunking the myth that anti-Zio ni sm is antisemitic

    Thousands of words spent saying “Im not racist about those hook nosed, money grubbing, foreskin flaying dead sea pedestrians who cause all the problems in the world and control everything”….

  184. JC

    The toilet.

    That’s only been around since Crapper invented it.

  185. bespoke

    ’ve referred enough school boy soccer to recognise this tactic when I see it.
    To whom did you refer those games, and why?

    Hahaha! Thanks Mark A.

  186. bespoke

    Crapper didn’t invent it JC. Just stuck his name on like Trump.

  187. Tel

    I don’t know what I can say. I’m lost for words.

    Must have been compensating for something.

  188. Cassie of Sydney

    Andrew Bolt is on fire tonight, exposing this pathetic, cretinous so called Liberal government’s CRAVEN decision to ban Milo yet this same pathetic, cretinous so called Liberal government has had no problem granting visas to hard core Marxist revolutionaries and anti-Is***l activists to attend a Marxism conference in Melbourne (where else!) next month. We are stuffed.

  189. thefrollickingmole

    I don’t know what I can say. I’m lost for words.

    Maybe he was sick of ladies indicating they were disappointed when he talked about his big rock?

  190. Tintarella di Luna

    Must have been compensating for something.

    Lack of self-esteem?

  191. JC

    Huh. Taking a crap, may not be derived from Crapper.

    Origin of the word “crap”

    It has often been claimed in popular culture that the slang term for human bodily waste, crap, originated with Thomas Crapper because of his association with lavatories. A common version of this story is that American servicemen stationed in England during World War I saw his name on cisterns and used it as army slang, i.e. “I’m going to the crapper”.

    The word crap is actually of Middle English origin and predates its application to bodily waste. Its most likely etymological origin is a combination of two older words, the Dutch krappen: to pluck off, cut off, or separate; and the Old French crappe: siftings, waste or rejected matter (from the medieval Latin crappa, chaff). In English, it was used to refer to chaff, and also to weeds or other rubbish. Its first application to bodily waste, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, appeared in 1846 under a reference to a crapping ken, or a privy, where ken means a house.

  192. DrBeauGan

    The greatest invention in the history of the world is cooking.

    You’ve got to have something to flush down those toilets.

  193. JC

    Lack of self-esteem?

    He was a billionaire diamond trader. Lacking self-esteem would not have been his problem. In fact, the opposite would have been.

  194. Cassie of Sydney

    People like Gemma Sisia give me faith in humankind and our future.

  195. Kev

    Bespoke – you are right,…… of course.

    The first modern flushable toilet was described in 1596 by Sir John Harington, an English courtier and the godson of Queen Elizabeth I. Harington’s device called for a 2-foot-deep oval bowl waterproofed with pitch, resin and wax and fed by water from an upstairs cistern.

  196. JC

    Doc

    That’s a process, not a something. An invention is something you can grip… sort of.

  197. DrBeauGan

    crapping ken

    Is there a crapping Barbie?

  198. Mark A

    Ehud Arye Laniado, 65, died during a penis enlargement operation.

    Took him long enough to notice the deficiency in that department.

    Friend wants to know the original size?

  199. JC

    Someone argued..I think it was David Friedman that science is derived from cooking.

  200. Eyrie

    “Corporatism is worse than socialism.”
    Corporatism is National Socialism.

  201. DrBeauGan

    Doc

    That’s a process, not a something. An invention is something you can grip… sort of.

    An invention is something you can patent. It’s a bit late for cooking, but inventions include computer programs these days.

  202. JC

    “Corporatism is worse than socialism.”
    Corporatism is National Socialism.

    Sure. When you wonder how could large industrial entities have taken up with the Nazis, you only have to look at how present day large corps are essentially doing the left’s bidding.

    However, capitalism lives on. It’s hard to kill. It lives on in private equity and unlisted business enterprises. It’s also very healthy with the clear objective of making profits for the owners. Be optimistic.

  203. stackja

    Twins Nima and Dawa arrive in Bhutan to heroes’ reception
    Grant McArthur, IN BHUTAN, Herald Sun
    23 minutes ago
    Subscriber only

    Formerly conjoined twins Nima and Dawa have arrived home in Bhutan to a rock star welcome, with their father crying tears of joy at being able to finally hug his daughters one at a time.

    Five months after they flew to Melbourne joined at the chest for separation surgery, the sisters landed back in to Bhutan late yesterday with mum Bhumchu Zangmo

    In an emotional reunion, dad Sonam Tsherang could barely describe his joy as he praised the Melbourne team which saved his daughters, 20 months.

    “When they were taken to Australia they were conjoined and it was very sad, I didn’t know what might happen,” Mr Tsherang said.

    “Now they have come home as two different persons, both are independent and walking.

    “They are very bright and cute. I am very happy.

    “They look very good, better than I thought they would.

    “All these days I have seen them only in video calls, now I am so happy to see them in person.

    “Last night I could not sleep because of the happiness I was feeling, now it is hard to describe what I am feeling.”

    People stopped to cheer the toddlers everywhere they went during their epic trip home.

    As they left the airport family and friends wrapped them in white silk scarfs to purify them and give them their blessings.

  204. JC

    It’s a bit late for cooking, but inventions include computer programs these days.

    Yea well, I find that side of patent protection to be absolute bullshit.

    Here’s something for you to ponder when someone comes up with the argument about software.

    I think the most important development in the modern banking business occurred in the early 80’s. Bankers Trust came up with the interest rate swap. It’s the bedrock of the derivatives business. It could never have been patented. These days patents are handed out in software for just adding a freaking bracket at the end of a string.

  205. Fat Tony

    Tel
    #2952802, posted on March 7, 2019 at 7:05 pm
    Beer must surely be the pinnacle of human achievement.

    With pre-packaged bacon a close second.

    Totally agree. Add ice-cream and chocolate – and you also have the 4 basic food groups covered.

  206. Helen

    Struth lols, no, I meant when you prick your finger. I bet when you were tucking you could bash your finger and just swear, but now you are softer, does pricking your finger make you cry?

  207. DrBeauGan

    Formerly conjoined twins Nima and Dawa have arrived home in Bhutan to a rock star welcome, with their father crying tears of joy at being able to finally hug his daughters one at a time.

    Five months after they flew to Melbourne joined at the chest for separation surgery, the sisters landed back in to Bhutan late yesterday with mum Bhumchu Zangmo

    In an emotional reunion, dad Sonam Tsherang could barely describe his joy as he praised the Melbourne team which saved his daughters, 20 months.

    If I weren’t the hardest of hard-boiled eggs, I could get rather pleased about that.

  208. stackja

    Joseph Banks formed a new institution to stop Britain falling behind in science and technology
    Troy Lennon, History Editor, The Daily Telegraph
    March 7, 2019 12:00am

    Major scientific, social and political heavyweights were gathered at the Soho Square home of Sir Joseph Banks, noted naturalist and president of the Royal Society. Among them was Henry Cavendish, a leading authority on the gases who would become known for his discovery of hydrogen. Also there was Sir Benjamin Thompson Count Rumford, whose expertise was in the area of thermodynamics but who also designed warships and was credited with inventing thermal underwear.

    The men were gathered to hear a proposal for the formation of an “Institution for diffusing the knowledge, and facilitating the general introduction, of useful mechanical inventions and improvements; and for teaching, by courses of philosophical lectures and experiments, the application of science to the common purposes of life.”

    The meeting took place 220 years ago today on March 7, 1799, and led to the establishment of the Royal Institution, the RI.

  209. Percy Popinjay

    All together now: Duuuuuuuhhhhhhhhh …

    Trigger warning: Irredeemable imbeciles.

  210. DrBeauGan

    I think the most important development in the modern banking business occurred in the early 80’s. Bankers Trust came up with the interest rate swap.

    You can’t patent an idea. You can certainly patent a process.

    Just as well; if the Maxwell equations had been patented by the Royal Society, it would own the planet by now.

  211. Geriatric Mayfly

    Is there a crapping Barbie?

    Glass top table not supplied.

  212. Grigory M

    That’s our Cassie.

    I hae ma doots. What Bolt read out didn’t sound at all like it was written by “our Cassie”.

  213. DrBeauGan

    I was disappointed to hear from JC that crap is yet another euphemism. I hate euphemisms.

    One day I shall discover that shit is derived from an old Saxon word meaning potato* peelings and it will break my heart.

    *Alright, make them turnips.

  214. Rockdoctor

    Leo G
    #2952767, posted on March 7, 2019 at 6:21 pm

    Likely to be Blackhawks if from Holsworthy. SF lads & Navy won’t have a bar of MRH-90 from what I have been told.

  215. DrBeauGan

    Or that fuck is derived from an ancient Egyptian word for poking your finger in your ear.

  216. Top Ender

    Some nicely savage letters to the editor about Julian Burnside in the Oz today:

    Julian Burnside’s crack at parliament seems mainly fuelled by hubris (“Libs to burn $1m to save Frydenberg”, 6/3). To begin with, he vengefully says his main aim is to get rid of Josh Frydenberg, one of the country’s best politicians. Next he wants to legalise heroin — I can just imagine Greens supporters in Kooyong being overcome with excitement. He then adopts that old chestnut of comparing the conservative side of politics with Nazism. Climate change has always been one of his babies. His take on death taxes I can live with.

    Finally, he appears in the media with the worst leader the Greens have had, a man who condemns cigarette smoking but advocates marijuana use when he knows that it has detrimental effects on the human brain.

    Peter D. Surkitt, Sandringham, Vic

    Julian Burnside is a virtue-signaller who gets his rocks off by being the cheerleader for the green fools who somehow think that by opening Australia’s borders to the riffraff of the world it will earn them a place in metaphorical heaven.

    One should never forget that prominent legal advocates, as a general rule, are so absorbed in their perceptions of their own self-importance that they could almost walk on water. While I am not a member of the Liberal Party, I have offered to hand out how-to-vote cards for Josh Frydenberg, my local MP, as a consequence of Burnside’s candidacy.

    Greg Angelo, Balwyn North, Vic

    I feel so very sorry for the voters of Kooyong for having a sanctimonious, holier-than-thou Greens candidate strutting about in their midst. Doubtless, he plugs his electric car into a grid powered by coal. You poor buggers, Kooyongites.

    M. Davis, Corinda, Qld

  217. Fat Tony

    DrBeauGan
    #2952831, posted on March 7, 2019 at 7:35 pm
    If I weren’t the hardest of hard-boiled eggs, I could get rather pleased about that.

    You better check that you’re not one of those china eggs my mother used to put in with the chooks, supposedly to encourage them to lay real eggs.

    If you’re not sure how to check, may I suggest running full-speed head-on into a brick wall.
    If your head becomes a shit-load of ceramic shards, then you have been a fake egg all this time.
    If your head becomes a heap of white rubbery stuff with a yellow core, then yes, you were a hard-boiled egg.

    Unfortunately, after this testing, you (or more likely, others) may know what you are, but you’ll be totally fucked.
    Some quote here about cracking eggs / omelettes or some shit.

  218. Cassie of Sydney

    “”Percy Popinjay
    #2952833, posted on March 7, 2019 at 7:38 pm
    All together now: Duuuuuuuhhhhhhhhh …

    Trigger warning: Irredeemable imbeciles.”

    Percy, I clicked on the link….and I started retching.

  219. egg_

    Unfortunately, after this testing, you (or more likely, others) may know what you are, but you’ll be totally fucked.

    Tell me about it.

  220. DrBeauGan

    DrBeauGan
    #2952831, posted on March 7, 2019 at 7:35 pm
    If I weren’t the hardest of hard-boiled eggs, I could get rather pleased about that.

    You better check that you’re not one of those china eggs my mother used to put in with the chooks, supposedly to encourage them to lay real eggs.

    It was CL who described me as very hard-boiled, Tony. His judgment.is generally sound.

  221. Eyrie

    Thanks Hark, now fuck off .

  222. mh

    Liberty Quote
    The idea that any western country would welcome a hate preacher like Omar Abdelkafy while banning a champion of free speech, capitalism and Christianity is unconscionable, but it’s especially awful coming from Australia, until recently a fair-minded land of common sense

    — Milo Yiannopoulos

  223. Fat Tony

    DrBeauGan
    #2952848, posted on March 7, 2019 at 8:10 pm

    It was CL who described me as very hard-boiled, Tony. His judgment.is generally sound.

    Dunno, mate. Always verify – my methodology is sound.

  224. egg_

    Billionaire diamond trader, 65, dies during penis enlargement surgery at private Paris clinic

    Women always go for a big… wallet.

  225. Fat Tony

    Harken Now = Trollius Faecus

    Your delusions of divinity are very sad.
    In all humility and with great consideration for your feelings, FUCK OFF

  226. cohenite

    The Stupidity in Australia Continues

    Big energy projects at risk after WA’s EPA unleashes ‘onerous’ carbon rules

    The members of the EPA:

    http://www.epa.wa.gov.au/epa-members

  227. vr

    How often have you seen a tv presenter in Australia have ash on their forehead on ash Wednesday?

    Bret Baier
    ‏Verified account @BretBaier

    Earlier today, @FoxNews was informed by @DNC that we will not be considered when it comes time to host Democratic presidential primary debates. Fox has released a statement that I wanted to share–
    (Also, it is Ash Wednesday & I went to church– hence the ashes for those asking)
    0:39
    3:22 pm – 6 Mar 2019

  228. egg_

    Is there a crapping Barbie?

    The German rubberwear edition.
    /Tim Blair

  229. DrBeauGan

    It was CL who described me as very hard-boiled, Tony. His judgment.is generally sound.

    Dunno, mate. Always verify – my methodology is sound.

    I might smash the wall. I can’t afford to buy a new wall.

  230. Fat Tony

    DrBeauGan
    #2952858, posted on March 7, 2019 at 8:22 pm

    Sad.
    Very…very low energy.

  231. Roger

    Percy, I clicked on the link….and I started retching.

    I laughed at two men who don’t realise how irredeemably stupid they are.

  232. Mark A:

    Winston, you as a semi doctor, what’s your opinion about a blood pressure reading of 114/52 for a 55 year old?
    I thought it was a bit low but the doc reckons it’s just great.

    Mark, I was a nurse – 30 years before the mast. Mostly rural/remote stuff.
    Too many factors come into play:
    Are you crook?
    Did you just stand up before it was taken? – Postural drop.
    What was the pulse? Did your pulse speed up when you stood?
    Are you overweight? Or slim and svelte like moi?
    Did the doc exhibit D cup cleavage during the process?
    Were you a bit dehydrated?
    Are you on any medication?
    Were you drunk?

    As you get older, the vascular system becomes less plastic and so a bit more pressure (meaning load) is required by the heart to get the red stuff to the organs. So it’s just more work for the same output.

    At 55, it seems pretty fair.
    For a 65 yo, I’d be happier with 120/80 pulse 75.
    But that’s just me – your doc is happy, so have a scotch for good luck, and remember that you have to croak like a frog to get into Heaven.

  233. DrBeauGan

    Sad.
    Very…very low energy.

    Yes, it is sad, Tony. You might find vitamin supplements help.

    Or losing weight and becoming Thin Tony.

  234. egg_

    Cassie of Sydney
    #2952846, posted on March 7, 2019 at 8:07 pm
    “”Percy Popinjay
    #2952833, posted on March 7, 2019 at 7:38 pm
    All together now: Duuuuuuuhhhhhhhhh …

    Trigger warning: Irredeemable imbeciles.”

    Percy, I clicked on the link….and I started retching.

    Caption contest?

    “What’s up, Doc?”

  235. 1735099

    Harken Now

    On this site there is a direct correlation between the amount of abuse you get and the credibility of your commentary.
    Be encouraged……

  236. Bruce of Newcastle

    adversely affecting the island’s liveability by salt water intrusion into those older inhabited areas used for farming and living.

    Hark, you are ignorant. The fresh groundwater halo around a coral sand island is due to rain water flushing down through the permeable strata. As an island gets bigger the halo also gets bigger because rain is falling on a larger area. So no, if rainfall is the same then increased salt water intrusion doesn’t occur.

    Salt water intrusion in populated islands is indeed happening. Because people are sucking the water up with bore pumps faster than rain is replenishing the aquifers. Last I heard CO2 does not cause pumps to pump too fast.

    ocean acidification may help kill off coral atolls

    Rubbish. Not only is pH a log scale, so thus requiring a tenfold rise in hydronium ion concentration for each unit lower, but the pH of the ocean varies all over the place. Corals adapt quite handily as the AIMS people found when they visited an atoll off New Caledonia: see super corals. Any critter that has a million kids at a time is going to adapt rapidly. Unfortunately PhD projects only run for 3 years so adaptation of corals to high CO2 has been poorly studied.

    As for the rest of your fantasy doomwailing pls provide links. I’ve already several times shown you hard data to the effect that frequency and intensity of cyclonic storms has been reducing with higher pCO2. There is no known changes in rainfall patterns or rates, and ENSO (which does change rainfall) is not known to be affected by pCO2 either. ENSO does however follow the ~60 year cycle, which means it is retracing the direction it went during the latter 30 years of the 20thC. Entirely naturally.

  237. Snoopy

    Helen
    #2952830, posted on March 7, 2019 at 7:33 pm
    Struth lols, no, I meant when you prick your finger. I bet when you were tucking

    Struth! I would never have picked that. I’ll bet you were popular at truck stops.

  238. Boambee John

    JC at 1927

    Sure. When you wonder how could large industrial entities have taken up with the Nazis, you only have to look at how present day large corps are essentially doing the left’s bidding.

    I wonder whether those trade union hacks who now boast of controlling every listed company in Australia will come to realise that they cannot afford to kill the geese that lay the golden eggs. Once the growth of their superannuation investments start to go down the toilet as they chase ever more extreme SJWanker brain farts, their members might learn a real lesson about capitalism, and turn on the turds running the show?

    We can but hope. More likely, the whole lot will follow that trade union store that used to operate in Melbourne into oblivion and the memory hole.

  239. rickw

    Tuvaluans might be guilty of oversimplifying the story of what will happen to their islands – but they could still become un-liveable due to climate change anyway.

    I’ve been to plenty of atolls in the Pacific.

    Harken has been conned by the islanders.

  240. Steve trickler

    These two people should have been called LIARS, to their face, before they got up and left their seats to exit the studio.

    Rogan was useless and Tim Pool needed to go one step further. And he didn’t. For what reason, i do not know. The opening 5 minutes should have been devastating. The Twitter Execs had an easy ride on that show.



  241. Mark A

    Winston Smith
    #2952863, posted on March 7, 2019 at 8:31 pm

    Thanks Winston, it was for an annual comp. checkup for work.

    No drugs or booze at 11AM, I felt the 52 a bit low hence the ask. Not on meds. either.
    She was very pleased , so some new research had changed the range of good vers. bad blood pressure if she was happy.

    I remembered 65 as lowest normal that’s why I asked.
    Hearing about the problems others have I got a bit worried here.

    Otherwise, apart from feeling the years’ wear and tear sometimes, I’m OK.

  242. Old Lefty

    Re NIB, Cassie, CEO Mark Fitzgibbon and Joel Fitzgibbon MP are the sons of a long-serving Labor MP. The word from my Newcastle contacts is that Dad steered the smart one into business, while the less smart one benefited from that venerable Newcastle Labor tradition of inheriting the family seat

  243. DrBeauGan

    Harken Now

    On this site there is a direct correlation between the amount of abuse you get and the credibility of your commentary.
    Be encouraged……

    You may be better at putting up with ignorant idiots than the rest of us, numbers.

Comments are closed.