Wednesday Forum: April 3, 2019

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1,689 Responses to Wednesday Forum: April 3, 2019

  1. memoryvault

    What if you’ve had an arm amputated?

    Well duh! Obviously … you buy the condom then go sue the manufacturer for a few million bucks because discrimination.

    Alternatively you could go out and meet two girls who are very, very, very good friends.
    That way, between the three of you you would still have one free hand.

  2. Arky

    I think Barnaby’s ex looks good.
    Not overdone like most female body builders.
    Good job.

  3. OldOzzie

    Embattled MPs ask why Adani coalmine hasn’t been signed off

    Joe Kelly
    Political Reporter

    Thick head ScoMo (TurdBull the Second) and the Idiot Liberals strike again

    A delegation of Queensland MPs have held an urgent meeting with Scott Morrison at parliament house this morning expressing concerns that federal approval for the Adani coal mine has not been signed off despite being rubber-stamped by the Environment Department.

    The Australian has been informed that a “face-to-face” meeting took place between several Queensland MPs and the Prime Minister.

    The MPs, who are fighting to hold seats in the battleground state, asked why the approval for a groundwater management plan had not been ticked off by Environment Minister, Melissa Price, amid concerns that a refusal to take action could lead to a final decision being made by a future Labor government.

    The Australian understands that Ms Price has refused to issue the approval in the face of intense lobbying by federal Liberal MPs in Victoria. Queensland MPs have warned that a go-slow on the federal approvals for the project would play badly in Queensland for the government.

    The Australian has spoken to several Queensland MPs who were unable to deny a meeting with the Prime Minister over the water management approval.

    The meeting comes just days out from the election being called and reveals the dilemma faced by the Coalition as it manages the threats to key Liberal seats in the inner cities of Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane from the anti-coal lobby while also seeking to hold key regional electorates in Queensland. The Coalition is setting up its campaign headquarters in Brisbane, with staff expected to begin arriving on the weekend.

    The revived concern within Coalition ranks over the Adani project also risks derailing the government attempt to reassert control of the political agenda in the wake of the budget which delivered a $300 billion tax cut package over the decade.

    The federal government had commissioned CSIRO and GeoScience Australia to assess Adani’s water management plan that was drafted to meet its obligations under the federal Department of Environment’s approval of the project.

    The reviews had called for improvements to the plan, which Adani then incorporated in a final draft of the water management plan that was submitted to the department on March 15.

    Sources said today that the revised plan was then cleared by the department and sent to Ms Price on Monday with a recommendation to approve it.

    The standoff follows the stalling of the construction of the mine by Queensland’s Labor government which had commissioned an extraordinary review of Adani’s plan to protect the endangered black-throated finch.

    That review – commissioned at the 11th hour after 18 months of consultation between Adani and state bureaucrats – led by Melbourne University ecologist Brendan Wintle, suggested a series of tough new rules that Adani is now negotiating with the state Environment Department.

    The federal government has already approved the version of the finch plan rejected by Dr Wintle.

    A spokesman for the Prime Minister said: “We do not comment on the PM’s schedule.”

    Adani’s spokeswoman said the company had been advised by Ms Price’s department that it had cleared the plan.

    “Through our continued engagement with the Department of Environment and Energy we have been advised that the Department has made the recommendation to Minister Price to approve the plan,” she told The Australian.

    “Through our continued engagement with the Department of Environment and Energy we have been advised that the Department has made the recommendation to Minister Price to approve the plan.”

    Chief executive of Adani Mining, Lucas Dow, said the company had been working with the federal and Queensland state governments to finalise the outstanding “groundwater dependent ecosystem management plan”.

    “Through our continued engagement with the Department of Environment and Energy we have been advised that the Department has made the recommendation to Minister Price to approve the plan,” Mr Dow said.

    “We have had certainty of process and timing from (the) Australian government to date and we will continue to work with them to finalise this outstanding management plan so that we can get on with delivering thousands of jobs into north and central Queensland.”

    Mr Dow said the plan had been two years in the making and involved the federal environment department engaging an “independent scientific review of the plan by technical experts from the CSIRO and Geoscience Australia”.

    “The Federal Department informed us that these experts made a number of recommendations in relation to improving our plan. The Department then provided Adani with a list of recommendations from CSIRO and Geoscience Australia to incorporate in our plan,” Mr Dow said.

    “All of the recommendations provided by the Department to Adani Mining were incorporated into an updated and final version of the management plan. “This updated and final version of the management plan was submitted to the Department of Environment and Energy a number of weeks ago”.

  4. bespoke

    Arky
    #2979542, posted on April 4, 2019 at 6:11 pm
    For any readers thinking I’m having a go at Lizzie, rather than pulling her leg, and feeling like sticking an oar in.

    Hi Hark.

  5. Bruce of Newcastle

    Nine just reported that “Joe Biden has resolved to be more mindful of people’s personal space”.

    There you go. Of the infinite number of possible headlines the Nein journos have chosen the stupidest, the most lefty, the most misogynistic and the most hilarious one possible.

  6. bespoke

    BoN

    Tucker Carlson recons Joe Biden is just a product of an older generation. BS! gropers are passive aggressive at very least.

  7. calli

    Finally, Aunty catches up with a story posted here on the weekend and on Seven Sunrise Tuesday.

    They need more money! Quick, Libs. Throw them some.

  8. dopey

    A380 first flight 2004. Production will cease 2021.
    747 first flight 1968. 2021 and beyond Boeing will still be building 747s.
    I like it.

  9. Tel

    Alternatively you could go out and meet two girls who are very, very, very good friends.
    That way, between the three of you you would still have one free hand.

    Naaaaa … get the money … the partner situation will become a lot easier when you can splash around some ill gotten gains.

  10. calli

    Joe Biden is just a product of an older generation.

    Utter hogwash. He’s 76. Neither my Dad (87) nor my Beloved (66) would dream of creeping up behind any woman and touching her or sniffing her. It’s a form of creepiness that would result in a hard slap (Dad’s generation) or a swift kick (mine).

    That none of the women did this tells you volumes about the influence of this sick individual.

    So much for “strong women”.

  11. Bruce of Newcastle

    Davidson should open a Stimpson, Lizzie, Arky, Bruce, Numbers and Monty fred.
    The only topics allowed: Model A’s, mind numbing travelogues, birds (both kinds)

    Here you go Arky.

    One of my projects is to get a photo of a grey butcherbird who the last half year has been landing on my arm to collect his dinner. Failed again this evening. Best I have is this one from last week. He is so quick he is hard to photograph, especially one handed with a very basic camera made for people with small fingers.

    Interesting critter. He’s the son of this butcherbird. Not much filial loyalty amongst grey butcherbirds: the kid, once he’d reached adulthood, teamed up with another male grey butcherbird to boot dad out of his territory. You don’t get a pension in butcherbirdland.

  12. bespoke

    His staff, calli have been making excuses for years. So this isn’t new revelation from Biden. Tucker is over compensating because of the # me too stuff.

  13. min

    Or Calli a step back onto his foot with a high heel, same as coping with frottelism.
    However what I want to comment on is has anyone noticed the climate alarmism peaks again to back up Shorten’s climate policy , talk about causing more existential angst.
    NASA figures show only .8 degree c is the temperature has increased since 1850.

  14. thefrollickingmole

    Possibly the shoddiest article ever produced in a mainstream publication.

    Its that bad.

    Chernobyl’s disastrous cover-up is a warning for the next nuclear age
    Kate Brown

    Heres some of the “OOga Booga” stuff.

    What we do know is that as fallout from bomb tests drifted down mostly in the northern hemisphere, thyroid cancer rates grew exponentially. In Europe and North America, childhood leukaemia, which used to be a medical rarity, increased in incidence year by year after 1950. Australia, hit by the fallout from British and French tests, has one of the highest incidence rates of childhood cancer worldwide. An analysis of almost 43,00 men in North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand, showed that sperm counts dropped 52% between 1973 and 2011.⁠

    Oh and apparently Soros funded “Not for profit” kicked in most of the money for the Steele dossier on Trump.
    Which Im sure the ABC will have as top news, after all a shady billionaire attempting to derail an election/spies/Nazi past, the story has everything!!!!

  15. Gen IV fission can burn waste and don’t have the same meltdown risks, whereas the Lockheed fusion reactor can be a gamechanger and will have no radioactive waste.

    Nothing to do at all with Chernobyl. Totally different technology.

  16. memoryvault

    Naaaaa … get the money … the partner situation will become a lot easier when you can splash around some ill gotten gains.

    Dunno about that, Tel.
    When Whitlam sent all us Nashos home in December 1972 I opted to hitch hike in uniform back to WA due to the wait for train tickets (six weeks). Went fine up until the turnoff to Ceduna from the Port Augusta – Whyalla road. I got stuck there until sunset when I got picked by by two utterly gorgeous young ladies in a very hot Mini, who talked me into going back to Whyalla with them “just for the night”.

    My mother reported me as a missing person six weeks later.

  17. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    New electric car charging station: $200 million will see you right for an Australia-wide network.
    Anther back of the beer coaster allocation, bringing you another Labor NBN thought bubble.

    Shorten thinks it will take ten minutes to recharge; lowest is 30 mins and most will take 6 hours.
    Bolt looking now at Shorten’s Budget reply.

  18. thefrollickingmole

    Urban bugmen in action.

    Brexit: bill to prevent no-deal passes Commons by one vote
    Government fails to block draft law from Yvette Cooper and Sir Oliver Letwin

    So an endless “extension” process until the people vote the right way on the cards Id assume?

    A cross-party group of MPs has forced through an emergency bill in less than six hours to instruct Theresa May to seek an extension to article 50 and avoid a no-deal Brexit, despite government opposition.

    The bill, spearheaded by Labour’s Yvette Cooper and the Conservative Sir Oliver Letwin, passed late into the night, with MPs defeating a number of obstructive amendments from both Brexiters and the government.

    It finally passed its third reading about half an hour before midnight by just one vote – 313 ayes to 312 noes – and must now pass the House of Lords.

    The bill was almost scuppered during a frenzied day in parliament after MPs initially voted by a majority of just one – 312 to 311 – to let the snap bill proceed.

  19. OldOzzie

    dopey
    #2979556, posted on April 4, 2019 at 6:42 pm

    A380 first flight 2004. Production will cease 2021.
    747 first flight 1968. 2021 and beyond Boeing will still be building 747s.
    I like it.

    Too Fat to Fly: Why There’s No Cargo Version of the Airbus A380

    An A380-F would be too fat to fly at a profit: The plane would hit the maximum payload (a constraint of weight) before its maximum cubic space (a constraint of volume). Its design can’t support the maximum payload required to generate a profit.

    Consider a comparison with the Boeing 747-400F, a popular air freighter. The 747 has a maximum take-off weight of 448,000 kilograms to the A380’s 575,000. In addition, the 747 has a cargo capacity of 710 m3 to the hypothetical A380-F’s 1134 m3. The A380-F would be able to carry 60% more volume than the 747, but only 28% more weight. It wouldn’t be fully loaded at typical levels of air cargo density, or at least nothing close to what can be supported by the thrust capacity of the 747.

    and

    People said it would never fly. Too expensive, too ambitious, too big.

    Boeing proved them all wrong.

    All these years later, 747s remain an integral part of the world airline fleet, thanks largely to their freight-carrying abilities. And though the longevity of Boeing’s 747 production line remains uncertain, there is little doubt that the type will continue flying well into the next 50 years.

    “There are other very capable aircraft on the market, but no other aircraft in production can match [the 747’s] massive capacity, range and efficiency,” says UPS 747-8 Freighter captain and programme manager Doug Menish.

    The 747 is the “highest-payload production freighter available, and the only Western-built production freighter with nose loading”, says George Dimitroff, head of valuations at Flight Ascend Consultancy.

  20. Tel

    Brexit: bill to prevent no-deal passes Commons by one vote

    The British Parliament does not have the authority to unilaterally prevent a no-deal Brexit from happening. The EU have not, to my knowledge, approved open ended extensions without some sort of a deal in place.

  21. Bruce of Newcastle

    whereas the Lockheed fusion reactor can be a gamechanger and will have no radioactive waste.

    Dot – Um, no.

    The equipment will glow in the dark after massive neutron bombardment for a few months or years. Which the Greens will oogabooga about.

    Steve Milloy has had a good series over the last several months on the fraudulent Linear No-Threshold model (LNT), which the Greens pushed for pollies to adopt. Which they did. The actual data supports the Hormesis model, which shows low dose radiation to be a good thing, since it stimulates the immune system.

    Who was LNT inventor Herman Muller? A lunatic eugenicist-communist. (25 Mar)

    Surprise, surprise.

  22. Rabid Koala

    Tucker is over compensating because of the # me too stuff.

    No. Tucker is just not being a cuck like most on the right and is going for the throat instead of acting as if he is too good to play the lefts game. We need an army of Tuckers.

  23. Pretty easy to contain though Bruce. Just whack it underground. Only costs a few grand and can power 80,000 homes. It would cost more than a (small) substation to install.

  24. Bruce of Newcastle

    Dot – Greens oogabooga about the most trivial things. Non-existent global warming. Coal. Meat. Christians. So far they’ve been quite amazingly successful at scaring the crap out of the gullible population.

    Which they will do re fusion too. They want us in caves eating grass.

  25. bespoke

    Rabid Koala
    #2979576, posted on April 4, 2019 at 7:14 pm
    Tucker is over compensating because of the # me too stuff.

    No. Tucker is just not being a cuck like most on the right and is going for the throat instead of acting as if he is too good to play the lefts game.

    So going for the throat is making cringing excuses for Biden.

  26. thefrollickingmole

    Ok those more knowledgeable than me might be able to hazard an answer.

    Why is the German economy going so crap while the US is going great?

    Here’s Associated Press’s take:

    German factory orders dropped sharply in February, erasing hopes of an industrial rebound in Europe’s largest economy as concerns over Brexit and international trade conflicts grow.

    The Federal Statistical Office reported Thursday industrial orders dropped 4.2% in February, following a revised 2.1% drop in January from December, according to seasonally and calendar adjusted figures.

    ING economist Carsten Brzeski said it had seemed that a trend of decreasing orders had ended at the end of 2018, but the “sharp drop in new orders clearly undermines latest tentative signs of a rebound in global activity in the first quarter.”

    Domestic orders dropped 1.6% in February, while foreign orders fell 6%. Of the foreign orders, those from inside the eurozone dropped 2.9% and those outside dropped 7.9%.

    I mean Merkel imported a million brain surgeons/engineers/star sportsmen to stimulate her economy how could it be going badly?
    Whereas the god emperor has been an orange meanie to migrants and put his own selfish countries interests first.

  27. calli

    New electric car charging station: $200 million will see you right for an Australia-wide network.
    Anther back of the beer coaster allocation, bringing you another Labor NBN thought bubble.

    Shorter Shorten – Rudd #metoo Redux

    Pity help us.

  28. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Rita Panahi on Bolt. She is so easy to like. Very feminine in the way she makes a very clear point. She’s a little girl, for a start, or so I think. Big girls are scary to little girls (the under 5’4″ crew) of whom I am representative of the higher range at 5’3″.

    I am taller than Tinta!
    I doubt though that I pack such a punch. 🙂

  29. Atoms for Peace

    We could stop all consensual condom sex by putting the things in clam shell packaging. Nothing sexy about getting them out of that, and they’d probably be unfit for service. There would be lots of blue language as a consolation prize.

  30. calli

    I’m 5’3.5”

    Nah nah na nah nah!

    You two are now my instant best friends.

  31. Bruce of Newcastle

    Why is the German economy going so crap while the US is going great?

    Well in the car industry they are fining the pants off the companies for not meeting impossible emissions standards which won’t save us all from not-happening global warming. Also they are forcing them to completely abandon 100 years of knowhow to, by 2030, build nothing but electric golf carts instead of beamers and porsches.

    They’ve also completely rooted their electricity grid and made their electricity the most expensive in the world.

    Plus they’ve recently imported several million people, put them all on welfare and are ignoring the crimes they commit.

    That they are doing as well as they are is pretty amazing in light of the performance of their ruling class.

  32. Boambee John

    I am engaged in yet another bunfight with the usual two suspects over at donaitkin.com.

    Does any one have a handy reference to a comparison between Australia’s CO2 emissions and the amount of CO2 absorbed by vegetation in Australia?

  33. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Hairy absolutely refuses to watch Shorten on Bolt. He’s a slimeball, I don’t want the pain to start right now if we have to put up with him forever, he says with a very miz expression on his face.

    Here he is now, in Parliament House, says Bolt and Hairy starts to disappear. If you want ta watch it, I’ll just go next door (the next room just down the hallway) and watch something else. Don’t go, I plead.

    So here we are, watching an old re-run of Frazier. An improvement.

  34. Which they will do re fusion too. They want us in caves eating grass.

    Which they will campaign for on a cloud AWS and on their iPhones.

  35. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    It’s one of the early ones, where the scripting is tight and good and the romantic tension between Niles and Daphne is running strong. The later ones, after they married, completly lost it, badly scripted and pathetic.

  36. Knuckle Dragger

    I see Tinder is going to do height verification for men.

    Are they going to do weight and makeup verification for women?

  37. Overburdened

    Shorten will wilt at the first crisis.

  38. hzhousewife

    Hairy absolutely refuses to watch Shorten on Bolt.

    What a sensible person, me neither. I have switched to episode three of “Informer”, UK police drama a friend taped for me, one of the lovely nurses from Call the Midwife is now an entirely different character trying to control the ISIS brigade in London, pretty good drama.

  39. Confused Old Misfit

    @Boambee John
    #2979591, posted on April 4, 2019 at 7:32 pm

    You might find something here: https://www.masterresource.org/desrochers-pierre/energy-and-society-desrochers-2/

    However, as the two would be constantly variable I wouldn’t think an estimation would be meaningful in any but a philosophical sense.

  40. Roger

    New electric car charging station: $200 million will see you right for an Australia-wide network.

    I suspect he forgot to factor in the CFMEU’s cut.

  41. memoryvault

    So far they’ve been quite amazingly successful at scaring the crap out of the gullible population.

    Correction Bruce. So far they have been successful in scaring the crap out of gullible politicians who believe the crap spouted by a handful of left wing socialist terrorists who convince them they will lose votes over the issue.

    The truth is, of course, that average Joe Voter couldn’tgive a stuff about it and is far more concerned about the price of electricity and whether they will still have a job come Christmas.

  42. Tom

    The 747 is the “highest-payload production freighter available, and the only Western-built production freighter with nose loading”, says George Dimitroff, head of valuations at Flight Ascend Consultancy.

    Correct.

    The 747 was originally designed to be primarily a freighter to be made obsolete by the supersonic Concorde. The latest very, the 747-8, is far superior in both payload range and payload to gross weight than the A380, which died because it was too big for a market fracturing with smaller widebodies like the Boeing 787 and the A350, which can bypass hubs to fly where people want to go without transiting intermediate stops that add 2.5-5 hours to total journey time.

    The 747 is also a sports car; it flies at 10-20 knots faster in cruise than the A380, which adds up to 30-60 minutes savings in trip time on ultra long haul sectors.

  43. Tel

    I see Tinder is going to do height verification for men.

    It was a joke … traditional for this time of the year.

    It happened to be a joke with men as the butt of it, but hard to find humour without offending someone, and if you offend women then you go out of business. So they offend men, which is a pretty darn safe thing to do. Because men can take a joke and women can’t. There I said it.

  44. mizaris

    Shorten thinks it will take ten minutes to recharge; lowest is 30 mins and most will take 6 hours.

    But no mention of the BILLIONS OF TONNES of dirt that will need to be mined to produce enough lithium for the batteries for these abominations.

  45. Tom

    The latest very version

  46. Overburdened

    Gave a chick the words and where I think the chords go for lit up by the bamboos.
    If she can sing it I will play it. She has a champion voice.
    More fun for me to not worry about the vocals, which when performed by me are akin to putting cats through a chipper, as described by one of the music aficionados on this site.

  47. Eyrie

    “I think Barnaby’s ex looks good.
    Not overdone like most female body builders.
    Good job.”
    Grotesque describes her for me.

  48. cohenite

    Does any one have a handy reference to a comparison between Australia’s CO2 emissions and the amount of CO2 absorbed by vegetation in Australia?

    For a start it’s all guess-estimates but anyway: emissions:

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10156841485189028&set=a.10151707641609028&type=3&theater

    Sinks:

    http://joannenova.com.au/2014/05/australian-deserts-are-controlling-global-co2-levels/

    Are you still arguing with that luke person? Tell him to get stuffed.

  49. Overburdened

    Of course in the Biden Era, old blokes may be excluded from gender interactions.

  50. Overburdened

    Eyrie
    She would tell you when you’re done

  51. Confused Old Misfit

    @Boambee John
    #2979591, posted on April 4, 2019 at 7:32 pm
    This article makes the point that CCO2 control is vested in the oceans.

  52. Roger

    The 747 is also a sports car; it flies at 10-20 knots faster in cruise than the A380, which adds up to 30-60 minutes savings in trip time on ultra long haul sectors.

    The things you learn here….just one of the reasons why the Cat is essential reading.

  53. Bruce of Newcastle

    But no mention of the BILLIONS OF TONNES of dirt that will need to be mined to produce enough lithium for the batteries for these abominations.

    To be charitable a billion tonnes of dirt is only about a third of a cubic kilometre. Bugger all on a continent the size of Oz.

    I am still amazed how much lithium is out there. When the mining minnows actually started looking it turned out to be common as.

  54. Boambee John

    cohenite at 1957

    Are you still arguing with that luke person? Tell him to get stuffed.

    Stu and Chris are the two.

    Stu has assured me that the world was in a state of climate equilibrium before the industrial revolution. I have reminded him of the Medieval, Roman and Minoan Warm Periods and the Little Ice Age. Haven’t checked his response yet.

    Chris simply refers to the suggestion that extensive vegetation and a small population compared to land area might make Australia a nett absorber of CO2 as a religious fantasy. Both are true believers. I don’t expect to convince them of anything, but it is fun stirring them up.

  55. Knuckle Dragger

    Frank, 7.38pm;

    That’s the very least that Tinder, as a responsible corporate citizen should be doing.

    I couldn’t find a link to the Dating Site Ombudsman on Google. It’s probably somewhere in Nigeria.

  56. Overburdened

    Regardless of how in depth or authoritative one is about a subject they feel strongly about, the default position is that
    We will take into account all of your opinions while we make our decisions.

  57. memoryvault

    http://joannenova.com.au/2014/05/australian-deserts-are-controlling-global-co2-levels/

    Neither Man nor “pollution” or deserts have anything to do with global (atmospheric) CO2 levels. Strictly in accordance with Henry’s Law, atmospheric CO2 levels rise and fall according to ocean surface temperatures. For the last 150 years ocean surface temperatures have been rising, and CO2 has been outgassing into the atmosphere.
    For the next 150 years the oceans will be cooling, solubility of CO2 will increase, and atmospheric CO2 levels will go down. And there’s absolutely fvck all humans can do about it in either direction.

  58. Knuckle Dragger

    They call it ‘consulting with key stakeholders’, OB.

  59. I couldn’t find a link to the Dating Site Ombudsman on Google. It’s probably somewhere in Nigeria.

    LOL

    Mr Paul Barrington Denning St John Esq can handle your proxy marriage fee for 782 GBP but it must be handled by Western Union and paid within five hours.

  60. Cardimona

    Excellent

    “Generac”, a company providing home generators that kick in when the mains power goes off and then turn themselves off again when it returns are advertising on Sky straight after Short Willy’s budget-in-reply speech.

    Beewwwdifull!

  61. cohenite

    Chris simply refers to the suggestion that extensive vegetation and a small population compared to land area might make Australia a nett absorber of CO2 as a religious fantasy.

    There is a study to that effect which shows Australia is a net sink:

    https://www.beefcentral.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Vegetation-Management-in-Queensland-Background-notes-for-State-MPs-Jan-2016-update.pdf

    When in doubt always refer to Figure 7.3 of AR4 which shows the minor CO2 emissions:

    https://scied.ucar.edu/imagecontent/carbon-cycle-diagram-ipcc

    As for nature being in balance before human emissions really tell him to get stuffed and look up Heinrich and Dansgaard–Oeschger Events which feature cooling and warming events respectively of up to 15C in 50 years; for instance the Younger Dryas 11000 years ago.

  62. cohenite

    When in doubt always refer to Figure 7.3 of AR4 which shows the minor CO2 emissions of humans compared with nature:

    https://scied.ucar.edu/imagecontent/carbon-cycle-diagram-ipcc

  63. jupes

    Has anyone else noticed the media have been strangely quiet about President Trump lately.

    The Mueller report was a big body-blow to the MSM.

  64. JC

    When in doubt always refer to Figure 7.3 of AR4 which shows the minor CO2 emissions of humans compared with nature:

    That’s a bullshit argument and not worthy of being posted here, cronkite. It’s not the small or large part of emissions created by humans that’s important. It is what effect said increased emissions have on the atmosphere.

    Stop posting junk science and get a fucking grip, you dildo.

    The argument is and has always been if human emissions have an impact on the “glimate”. According to the most accurate model, devised by the Russians, it has a small impact that could even be beneficial.

    Once you start peddling junk science like you’re attempting now or in the past, you end up looking like a dick.

  65. Boambee John

    Bruce and COM

    Thanks, good fun over there at the moment. I have just asked Stu if he is a “quiet sun” denier!

  66. JC

    Has anyone else noticed the media have been strangely quiet about President Trump lately.

    The Mueller report was a big body-blow to the MSM.

    They’re quiet because their regrouping with a new tryout.

    WSJ editorial.

    Trolling the Mueller Report
    Democrats lost on collusion. Now they’re inventing a coverup.

    Democrats are still reeling from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s conclusion that the Trump campaign did not collude with Russians in 2016. But they’ve now hit upon a political comeback strategy: Accuse Attorney General William Barr of a coverup.

    That’s the context for Wednesday’s decision by House Democrats to authorize subpoenas, on a partisan vote, demanding that Mr. Barr immediately hand over the entire Mueller report and its supporting evidence. This is intended to give the impression, abetted by a press corps that was fully invested in the collusion story, that Mr. Barr is somehow lying about Mr. Mueller’s real conclusions.

    That’s preposterous, since Mr. Barr’s four-page letter quotes directly from Mr. Mueller’s report. The AG surely understood on releasing the summary of conclusions last week that he would be open to contradiction by Mr. Mueller if he took such liberties. Mr. Barr also knew he’d be called to testify before Congress once the rest of the report is released.

    Mr. Barr has committed to releasing as much of the report as possible subject to Justice Department rules. He’s working with the special counsel’s office to make redactions required by grand-jury rules of secrecy, intelligence sources and methods, ongoing investigations, and “the personal privacy and reputational interests of peripheral third parties.”

    Under Justice rules relating to special counsels, Mr. Barr has no obligation to provide anything beyond notifying Congress when an investigation has started or concluded, and whether the AG overruled a special counsel’s decisions. Mr. Barr’s notice to Congress that Mr. Mueller had completed his investigation said Mr. Mueller was not overruled.

    Congress has no automatic right to more. The final subparagraph of DOJ’s rule governing special counsels reads: “The regulations in this part are not intended to, do not, and may not be relied upon to create any rights, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity, by any person or entity, in any matter, civil, criminal or administrative.”

    Mr. Barr has made clear that he appreciates the public interest in seeing as much of Mr. Mueller’s report as possible. Yet his categories of information for review aren’t frivolous or political inventions. The law protecting grand-jury secrecy is especially strict, as even Democrats admit.

    House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff recently tweeted that “Barr should seek court approval (just like in Watergate) to allow the release of grand jury material. Redactions are unacceptable.” This is an acknowledgment that the government must apply to a judge for permission to disclose grand-jury proceedings.

    A judge can grant release in certain circumstances—namely to government attorneys who need the information for their duties. None of the secrecy exceptions permit disclosure to Congress or the public. The purpose of this secrecy is to protect the innocent and encourage candor in grand-jury testimony.

    It’s true that in 1974 the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a federal judge’s decision to release a grand jury report to the House Judiciary Committee that was investigating Watergate. Such a sealed report—which juries can choose to produce—is different from raw grand-jury testimony, which is what Democrats are demanding now. The Supreme Court has never ruled on such a disclosure, so Democrats could be facing a long legal battle if Mr. Barr resists their subpoenas.

    Mr. Barr should release as much of the report as possible, and on close calls he should side with public disclosure. But no one should think that Democrats are really worried about a coverup. They want to see an unredacted version before the public does so they can leak selected bits that allow them to use friendly media outlets to claim there really was collusion, or to tarnish Trump officials.

    The nation is entitled to the Mueller facts in their proper context, not to selective leaks from Democrats trying to revive their dashed hopes of a collusion narrative that the Mueller probe found doesn’t exist.

    The D’rats are an organized crime racket and should be charged under RICO laws.

  67. John Constantine

    Careful about vegetation as carbon sinks.

    Yesterday Bill Shorten MP announced that Queensland’s atrocious vegetation management legislation will be National under his Government. Once again farmers will bear the cost of a nation’s emissions targets. How much do we have to bear?

    Rewilding means every tree is sacred. How long before individual treeguards are required to prevent livestock chewing on trees and compacting the dirt around the tree base?.

    Annual tree audit of all farms, by artificial intelligence off satellite photos, explain why a tree is missing since last year, in writing to the activist panel.

    The old trick of coating a tree in molasses to get it ringbarked, or injecting it with tordon or burning it out during burnoffs will not work for full audits.

    What if they get artificial intelligence good enough to go back twenty years of satellite records to check illegal clearing?.

    Their shortreich will meet paris targets through rewilding.

    Comrades.

  68. Roger

    Has anyone else noticed the media have been strangely quiet about President Trump lately.

    No, but I have noticed they are becoming more desperate, e.g., right after the Mueller fail:

    “Trump cheats at golf!”.

    And today in The Age: “Trump is unravelling before our eyes”.

    I couldn’t be bothered to click.

  69. Boambee John

    memoryvault
    #2979624, posted on April 4, 2019 at 8:20 pm
    http://joannenova.com.au/2014/05/australian-deserts-are-controlling-global-co2-levels/

    Neither Man nor “pollution” or deserts have anything to do with global (atmospheric) CO2 levels. Strictly in accordance with Henry’s Law, atmospheric CO2 levels rise and fall according to ocean surface temperatures. For the last 150 years ocean surface temperatures have been rising, and CO2 has been outgassing into the atmosphere.
    For the next 150 years the oceans will be cooling, solubility of CO2 will increase, and atmospheric CO2 levels will go down. And there’s absolutely fvck all humans can do about it in either direction

    Peter

    If you want some fun, hop over to donaitkin.com, and join the debate!

  70. Overburdened

    KD
    I wonder how many key stakeholders are here.

  71. areff

    old trick of coating a tree in molasses to get it ringbarked

    Please explain.

  72. Roger

    Why is Turkey, whose Islamist leader recently threatened to send Australian tourists home in boxes, still in NATO?

  73. zyconoclast

    Child [email protected] gangs can continue to rest easy.

    Revealed: More than 10,000 riot police from across UK are on stand-by in case No Deal Brexit sparks public disorder

    Currently 1,000 have received extra training so that they can be deployed to Northern Ireland if needed.

    The police there use armoured Land Rovers and water cannon, unlike their mainland counterparts.

    Forces are expected to cut down on ‘peripheral police activity’ like crime prevention work and to cancel training if needed.

  74. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    old trick of coating a tree in molasses to get it ringbarked

    Please explain.

    Sheep like the taste of molasses – they nibble at the bark to get the molasses and nibble the bark away. The tree dies..

  75. Stimpson J. Cat

    For a horrible moment i thought you were going to say “after I drop my trousers”.

    I would have said rampant glory.

  76. Roger

    Lost in moderation:

    Why is Turkey, whose religion of peace leader recently threatened to send innocent Australian tourists home in boxes, still in NATO?

  77. RobK

    What if they get artificial intelligence good enough to go back twenty years of satellite records to check illegal clearing?.
    John, that technology has been around for well over a decade, to go back to mid to early 90s. There’s a cost to recover the data. Old digital imagery has about 25m pixels, newer data is better. Aerial photography is good to 0.5m pixels (you can count sheep) is usually done on about 4yr cycles in WA.
    CSIRO has had a program to compare two and three dates for vegetation increase, or decrease. Recovering the data is the only (minor) barrier.

  78. dover_beach

    The British Parliament does not have the authority to unilaterally prevent a no-deal Brexit from happening.

    I think you’re right.

  79. memoryvault

    If you want some fun, hop over to donaitkin.com, and join the debate!

    There is NO debate, John. There are very few “Laws” in Physics and Chemistry, only “theories”. One set of LAWS are the four LAWS of Thermodynamics. Another example are the eight Noble Gas LAWS, of which Henry’s LAW (or Henry’s Constant) is one.

    Debating whether puny Man has any influence in these matters is as ridiculous as debating if unicorns fly backwards in the winter to keep the rain out of their eyes.

  80. Overburdened

    https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2019/04/03/rutgers-professor-brittany-cooper-concept-of-time-is-racist/

    More look over here fuckwittery.
    The learned professor is apparently unaware of the Egyptians, Chinese and other Asian nations, the Mayans and even the Maori as a short list.

    Apologies to any other group of humans on the planet that I did not mention.

    The Overburdened Theory on the Relativity of Time-

    Good times pass quickly.

    Bad times seem to drag on.

  81. Boambee John

    Yesterday Bill Shorten MP announced that Queensland’s atrocious vegetation management legislation will be National under his Government. Once again farmers will bear the cost of a nation’s emissions targets. How much do we have to bear?

    If he does this with Commonwealth legislation, the “just terms” section of the Constitution comes into play. That is why Howard got the states to legislate.

  82. Roger

    The British Parliament does not have the authority to unilaterally prevent a no-deal Brexit from happening.

    I think you’re right.

    Mmm…no, they do, but they’d be very foolish to do so.

  83. Roger

    There are very few “Laws” in Physics and Chemistry, only “theories”.

    Exactly so.

    Welcome back, mv. Hope you are well.

  84. jupes

    They’re quiet because their regrouping with a new tryout.

    No doubt. However they have had to pause which is unprecedented. I think the Barr cover-up strategy is doomed to fail. Barr can just wait until they are frothing at the mouth then release the stupid report to beclown the idiots yet again. Dems are seriously looking like the road runner these days.

    Also note that the Dems have started turning on each other. Biden is first and Beta will be next as they have already fired a couple of shots above his bows.

    Trump is destroying the fuckwits.

  85. Boambee John

    MV at 2107

    Peter

    Your knowledge of the subject is greater than mine, hop over and give them a serve!

  86. JC

    Trump is destroying the fuckwits.

    Trump doesn’t have to be hugely popular – although it helps. All he needs to do is be more popular than the D’rat, which shouldn’t be that hard.

  87. Confused Old Misfit

    The British Parliament does not have the authority to unilaterally prevent a no-deal Brexit from happening.

    Tthe European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Act 2017 empowering the prime minister to invoke Article 50 was enacted in March 2017.

    Invocation of Article 50 occurred on 29 March 2017, when Sir Tim Barrow, the Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom to the European Union, formally delivered by hand a letter signed by Prime Minister Theresa May to Donald Tusk, the President of the European Council in Brussels.

    Parliament would have to pass an Act reversing this decision.
    (I think)
    An Act would require Royal Assent.

  88. Oh come on

    If the EU turns down the UK’s offer for an extension to Article 50, there isn’t a damn thing Westminster can do to avoid leaving on WTO terms – except revoke Article 50 and cancel Brexit altogether. I realise the parliament is full of Euro quislings but I doubt even they would cancel Brexit. It’d be disastrous for the country, and possibly even lamp post time for Europhile MPs.

  89. egg_

    Tonight, Bill Shorten has outlined Labor’s vision for a fair go for all Australians.
    It is a vision that delivers tax cuts, properly funds health and education and boosts wages for working Australians.
    The election battle lines have been drawn and the difference between Labor and the Liberals and Nationals has never been so clear.

    Rather than pandering to the top end of town, Labor’s budget delivers a fair go for all Australians.
    We won’t starve the NDIS to reach a budget surplus. Instead, we’ll reach it by closing tax loopholes and making multi-nationals pay their fair share.
    We won’t ignore the most vulnerable in our society while giving an $11,000 tax cut to the wealthiest.
    Instead, Labor will take decisive policy steps to deliver a stronger Australian economy which works for all of us, not just the top end of town.
    Labor will:

    1. Put back every single dollar that the Liberals have cut from public schools and public hospitals;
    2. Invest an extra $2.3 billion into our Medicare Cancer Plan, including investing $600 million towards eliminating all out-of-pocket costs for life-saving scans, and provide three million free consultations with oncologists and surgeons for cancer patients;
    3. Guarantee that every drug recommended by independent experts will be listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme;
    4. Give 10 million working Australians the same or bigger tax cuts than they’ll get under the Liberals;
    5. Deliver real action on climate change, make Australia a global leader in clean technology and commit Australia to 50% renewable energy by 2030;
    5. Deliver our $1 billion plan for TAFE which will restore every single one of the $150,000 places lost and invest $200 million to rebuild and upgrade TAFE campuses across the country;
    6. Uncap university places;
    7. Deliver universal access to preschool and kinder for 3 and 4-year-olds;
    8. Re-invigorate wage growth and restore penalty rates within 100 days; and
    9. Fully restore funding to the ABC.
    This election is a referendum on wages, health and education. We’ll stand up for workers, invest in cleaner, cheaper energy, and build a strong economy.
    That’s the government that Bill Shorten and the Labor team is ready to lead.

  90. Oh come on

    Expecting the EU to refuse an extension is a dodgy proposition, however.

  91. memoryvault

    Welcome back, mv. Hope you are well.

    Traveling okay now, thanks Roger. But the first few weeks were very hard.
    After 40 years together it was a bit sad losing my lover, my partner, my wife, and my best friend all in one go, but the kids and grandkids have been a tremendous comfort.

  92. Can we see the ALP’s new policies yet or have they merely been “announced”? I suppose we will get “full costings” next week.

  93. jupes

    Trump doesn’t have to be hugely popular – although it helps. All he needs to do is be more popular than the D’rat, which shouldn’t be that hard.

    He’s having a ball. The other day he was pleading to his supporters not to destroy the Green New Deal so it lasts until the election.

  94. Confused Old Misfit

    the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Act 2017 empowering

    Too bad they didn’t do that instead of pledging that “there will be no carbon tax…” and knifing each other in the back whilst they had the political power (but not the will) to get that done.

  95. Oh come on

    I suspect the EU will push for a long extension and the swine in the Commons will fold.

  96. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Josh Frydenberg campaign posters hit with anti-Zemitic graffiti

    Remy Varga
    Reporter
    @RemyVarga
    2 hours ago April 4, 2019

    Campaign posters of Josh Frydenberg have been defaced with anti-Semitic graffiti.

    Vandals have drawn Hitler moustaches on images of Mr Frydenberg’s face as well as scrawling the words “right wing fascist” and drawing a pair of devil horns.

    My Frydenberg is Australia’s first J00ish Treasurer.

    The defaced posters were spotted on Auburn Road in the eastern Melbourne suburb of Hawthorn, which is where the Treasurer lives. It lies in his federal seat of Kooyong.

    Mr Frydenberg said the vandals should be ashamed of themselves.

    “Regardless of one’s political persuasion, vandalism is unacceptable,” he said. “These people should be ashamed of themselves.”

    From the Oz.

  97. Confused Old Misfit

    We won’t starve the NDIS to reach a budget surplus. Instead, we’ll reach it by closing tax loopholes and making multi-nationals pay their fair share.

    Was the quote to which that comment should have applied.
    Sorry!

  98. Oh come on

    Just post it all again, COM. I was wondering what the hell you were on about.

  99. C.L.

    Mark Dice says goodbye to Michael Avenatti …
    He includes several excerpts of various ‘news’ professionals touting him as the next President and the greatest lawyer since Perry Mason:

  100. Confused Old Misfit

    We won’t starve the NDIS to reach a budget surplus. Instead, we’ll reach it by closing tax loopholes and making multi-nationals pay their fair share.

    Too bad they didn’t do that instead of pledging that “there will be no carbon tax…” and knifing each other in the back whilst they had the political power (but not the will) to get that done.
    And I’m betting that Plibbers will gut the Shortfilth before any of that gets done.
    They (like most pollies) are in it for the power. Forget about the somewhat tarnished Glory.
    Most of that message seems to say only “They’re bad! We’re not them!”

  101. memoryvault

    Can we see the ALP’s new policies yet or have they merely been “announced”? I suppose we will get “full costings” next week.

    Does it make any difference, Frank? On the slim chance that the Liberals get re-elected they will just renege on all their promises on the grounds of the “unforeseen downturn in the economy”, which every man and his dog is aware is happening.

    In the more likely event of Labor winning, they will simply renege on all their promises because “the Liberals lied about the true state of the economy”.

    How often do you crowd have to fall for the same old BS every election before you wake up to the fact that NONE of the major parties give a sh1t about you? Isn’t 50 years long enough?

    How often do you folks have to be conned in the same old way before you finally start waking up to yourselves.

  102. Oh come on

    OK so I’m a bit down on Jordan Peterson these days but the following is absolute bullshit:

    Jordan Peterson struggles to answer cry for help

    “I need help. I just wanted to meet you. I’m unwell.”

    “I want to be well.”

    Takes a lot to rattle Jordan Peterson but the ’12 Rules for Life’ international speaker was visibly shaken after a young man stormed the stage at a Christian conference last week.

    Peterson was the featured guest at last Friday’s Liberty University Convocation, a weekly gathering of the 13,000 students and staff at the large conservative Christian university in Virginia, USA. About 21 minutes into Peterson’s on-stage interview by Liberty faculty, a man identified as “David” climbed on to the stage.

    Peterson responds: “I hope you find the help that you need.”

    (…)

    What followed drew a stark contrast between where Christians seek help and Peterson’s ‘self-help’ instructions

    No. That is a really really stupid take. Peterson is a clinical psychologist. He has never, to my knowledge, suggested that people with serious mental illnesses ought to use his philosophy in the place of professional care.

  103. C.L.

    Dice is also selling t-shirts with JFK wearing a Trump cap …
    Gold:

  104. How often do you crowd have to fall for the same old BS every election before you wake up to the fact that NONE of the major parties give a sh1t about you? Isn’t 50 years long enough?

    The problem is they live up to too many of the promises. It is going to make us a banana republic.

  105. memoryvault

    Your knowledge of the subject is greater than mine, hop over and give them a serve!

    Flattery will get you everywhere, John.
    I’ll check it out over the weekend, but I still say it is a waste of time.

  106. Oh come on

    How often do you crowd have to fall for the same old BS every election

    Silly old fool.

  107. Oh come on

    And it doesn’t take a lot to rattle Peterson. The guy weeps for the woes of the world all the bloody time.

  108. Confused Old Misfit

    About 21 minutes into Peterson’s on-stage interview by Liberty faculty, a man identified as “David” climbed on to the stage.
    Peterson responds: “I hope you find the help that you need.”

    Peterson is not an evangelistic faith healer. There would be no laying on of hands.
    The idiot author was expecting a public consultation right there on the stage?
    David is quoted“I need help. I just wanted to meet you. I’m unwell. I want to be well.”
    OK, one objective achieved. He met Peterson.
    With respect to the gentleman’s other objective and considering the context of the situation, Peterson wished the man the best he could wish for him.

  109. Knuckle Dragger

    Watched C.L.’s second Dice clip.

    My life will never, ever be complete now.

    Not without a T shirt with Reagan wearing a MAGA hat on it.

  110. Stimpson J. Cat

    Peterson responds: “I hope you find the help that you need.

    I can’t believe he forgot to tell him to clean his room.

    How the hell is the kid going to get better?

  111. memoryvault

    The problem is they live up to too many of the promises

    No they don’t Frank. They do exactly what they intended to do, regardless of whether anybody wants it or not, and regardless of whether it cops even a mention in the election or not. If some group comes along pushing for something that’s already on the political agenda, they go out of their way promoting as a good idea that they have decided to adopt, because “it’s what the public wants'”.

    Conversely, if some group campaigns for something not on the political agenda, they simply ignore it, no matter how much public support it has.

  112. No they don’t Frank.

    Nearly all of the time, they deliver, at least in name and with a lot of cash. Outcomes generally fail.

    Gough made free shit, Howard and Abbott kept on agreeing to ALP policies (NVA, NDIS).

    The promise they continually break is balanced budgets and meaningful tax cuts.

  113. Arky

    Stay away from the lawyer X thread.
    It’s a train wreck in a sewage works.

  114. Confused Old Misfit

    There’s a Lawyer X thread?
    Who knew!

  115. Knuckle Dragger

    Everyone go to the Lawyer X thread.

    It started off as a whine about decriminalising drugs by someone from Legal Aid, then descended into a slaughterhouse with Frank and Arky throwing hands over Al Capone and tax rates.

    Still going, last I looked.

  116. Stay away from the lawyer X thread.

    Everyone go to the Lawyer X thread.

    Hilarious.

  117. egg_

    Dice is also selling t-shirts with JFK wearing a Trump cap …

    LMFAO!

  118. Stimpson J. Cat

    Everyone on the Lawyer X thread knows it’s not Autism Awareness Day any more right?
    Just checking.
    😂

  119. Overburdened

    Oco
    Re Jordan Peterson episode.

    It’s called separation and Peterson knows his job.

    I haven’t seen the post you were responding to, but I’ll go out on a limb and say the comment came from a position of ignorance.

  120. Overburdened

    Oco

    Sorry should have added ‘good call’.

  121. Top Ender

    Interesting re modern and old aircraft.

    In spite of hyped stories over the years, the “three hours to London” ramjets and scramjets and so on have never eventuated.

    I always thought the acceleration would be an interesting part of the flight. How many passengers would like to be pushed hard back into their seats for any duration while the thing accelerated at 1.5 g’s or whatever?

  122. mh

    Ratings from Nielsen Media Research for 03/25-03/29:

    FOX News Tucker Carlson: 3,475,000 total viewers; 625,000 viewers in the 25-54 age demographic
    CNN Cooper: 810,000 total viewers; 203,000 viewers in the 25-54 age demographic
    CNN Cuomo: 875,000 total viewers; 217,000 viewers in the 25-54 age demographic
    CNN Lemon: 789,000 total viewers; 228,000 viewers in the 25-54 age demographic

  123. Stimpson J. Cat
    #2979725, posted on April 4, 2019 at 10:38 pm

    Everyone on the Lawyer X thread knows it’s not Autism Awareness Day any more right?
    Just checking.

    Did you know that 2% of boys are autistic?

    Another interesting but unrelated stat I saw was that 1% of people identify as libertarian.

  124. Overburdened

    It’s called a cluster in the medical world.

  125. JC

    Lol

    ACLU
    ‏Verified account @ACLU

    Girls who are trans are girls. PERIOD.

  126. mh

    calli
    #2979560, posted on April 4, 2019 at 6:47 pm
    Joe Biden is just a product of an older generation.

    Utter hogwash. He’s 76. Neither my Dad (87) nor my Beloved (66) would dream of creeping up behind any woman and touching her or sniffing her. It’s a form of creepiness that would result in a hard slap (Dad’s generation) or a swift kick (mine).

    That none of the women did this tells you volumes about the influence of this sick individual.

    So much for “strong women”.

    Creepy Joe appears to like doing this to women and children in a public setting, which means the victim doesn’t know how to react as they don’t want to make a scene in front of others.

  127. Steve trickler

    U tube you dimwits! Now i want to know more about Gemma O’Doherty.

    Gemma O’Doherty scares the gl0balists so much that Youtube wouldn’t allow me to upload this video with her name in the title!

    https://wtww.youtube.com/watch?v=FdBaNSvNBDY&t

    Like her not, Roseanne Barr linked a video to Polly…and kaboom! I reckon U tube will be spewing.

    Now we get to watch how they go after Polly. She’s exposed a lot of material that makes your jaw drop. The evil stuff.

  128. Stimpson J. Cat

    Girls who are trans are girls. PERIOD.

    Less.

  129. Steve trickler

    Like her or not, Roseanne Barr linked a video to Polly…and kaboom! I reckon U tube will be spewing.



  130. Steve trickler

    Nice camera work on the critters.



  131. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Seems, from the front page of the Oz, there’s another jihadi bride, in Syria, whose parents want Scott Morrison to bring her home…F.M.S.

  132. Oh come on

    Roseanne’s awesome. Crazy but awesome.

  133. mh

    Vice President Mike Pence

    @VP
    So good to see movie theaters across the country showing @UnplannedMovie — a deeply inspiring new pro-life film based on the best-selling book by @AbbyJohnson. More & more Americans are embracing the sanctity of life because of powerful stories like this one. #Unplanned

    1:36 AM – Apr 2, 2019

  134. JC

    Interesting pedigree.

    Olivia Newton-John, 70, is a four-time Grammy-winning singer-songwriter and an actress. Five of her 42 Billboard hits were No. 1, and she starred in more than 10 films, including “Grease.” She is the author of “Don’t Stop Believin’” (Gallery), a memoir. She spoke with Marc Myers.

    My mother’s father was Max Born, a physicist and mathematician who received a Nobel Prize for developing quantum mechanics. When my mother was little, Albert Einstein played violin in their home in Germany while Max played piano. Well, at least we have music in common.

    I was born in Cambridge, England. My mother, Irene, told me that when I was 3, I sang harmony in tune to songs like “Oh My Darling, Clementine.”

    My mother had a lovely singing voice and played cello. My father, Brin, had a beautiful deep baritone singing voice and played piano. They met in college at Cambridge after my mother heard him singing.
    Olivia Newton-John, at bottom, with her sister, Rona; mother, Irene; brother, Hugh; and father, Brin in Australia in the mid-1950s. Photo: Brin Newton-John

    My father was 6-foot-3 and had movie-star looks. He attended Cambridge on a scholarship. During World War II, he joined the Royal Air Force and became an intelligence officer. He worked at Bletchley Park cracking German codes.

    I was the family’s third child. My brother, Hugh, came first and then my sister, Rona. When I was 5, we all moved to Melbourne, Australia. My father accepted the prestigious job as master of Ormond College.

  135. Oh come on

    Netanyahu v Putin – two men enter a cage. Only one emerges upright. Which one??

  136. jupes

    Interesting pedigree.

    Far out!

  137. mh

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    ·
    5m
    There is nothing we can ever give to the Democrats that will make them happy. This is the highest level of Presidential Harassment in the history of our Country!

  138. jupes

    Netanyahu v Putin – two men enter a cage. Only one emerges upright. Which one??

    Bibi. Putin seemed somewhat nervous.

  139. Dr Faustus

    After 40 years together it was a bit sad losing my lover, my partner, my wife, and my best friend all in one go, but the kids and grandkids have been a tremendous comfort.

    FWIW, you may be surprised how quickly you can look back and remember the good things you had without being floored by sadness.

    Hope it works out that way for you.

  140. jupes

    How come 50% of AWFL players are lezzos but 100% of AFL players are straight?

  141. DrBeauGan

    That physics post was beautiful, Egg. I’m far too busy, but I watched it anyway. Absolutely incredible.

  142. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Probe after UK soldiers filmed shooting at picture of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn

    Jacquelin Magnay
    Foreign Correspondent
    @jacquelinmagnay
    6:05AM April 4, 2019
    Comments

    British Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn says he was shocked at footage showing a poster of his head being used for target practice in Afghanistan.

    Four British soldiers, believed to be paratroopers, were videoed during training firing at a series of blank targets, and a poster with a picture of the head of Mr Corbyn.

    Footage posted on social media showed members of the Parachute Regiment in Afghanistan shooting at an image of Corbyn, Britain’s main opposition leader. Corbyn, a veteran socialist, has often been critical of British military campaigns overseas.

    The camera then goes in closer to the picture showing that several of the soldiers had fired at the poster, hitting the target.

    Army chief Brigadier Nick Perry from the 16 Air assault Brigade, confirmed the footage was authentic and that an investigation was underway. Brigadier Perry said the matter was being taken extremely seriously.

    “The video shows totally unacceptable behaviour that falls far below the behaviour that we expect,” he said.

    Mr Corbyn said he was shocked. “I hope the Ministry of Defence will conduct an inquiry into it and find out what was going on and who did that.”

    Defence secretary Gavin Williamson said the video was ‘’troubling’’, while another Conservative MP, Tom Tugendhat, who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, said the video was “disgraceful”.

    From the Oz. A picture of Bill Shorten’s ugly mug, pinned to a figure 11……

  143. mh

    How come 50% of AWFL players are lezzos but 100% of AFL players are straight?

    75 percent of ALL players are quim hunters.

  144. RobK

    Ground breaking study.
    https://m.phys.org/news/2019-04-diversity-doesnt.html
    Sample:

    Study of diversity training suggests it doesn’t lead to much change.
    Diversity training has been in the news a lot lately—though it is not clear how well it works. At its core, diversity training involves classes meant to teach employees the rules involved in treatment of people that are different from them—how to not be racist or how to not treat women as second-class citizens, for example. In this new effort, the researchers sought to determine if diversity training actually results in changes in the workplace.

    The researchers designed their own diversity training program and sent it out to willing organizations —in all, they got 3,016 employees to volunteer for the training in 63 countries. The training was focused on highlighting stereotypes and how they can lead to certain behaviors, and ways employees could overcome biases. The researchers then followed up by measuring changes that resulted due to the training.

    The researchers found little evidence of behavior change in any of the organizations where employees had taken the diversity training program. In the program geared toward reducing biases against women, the researchers found that employees were willing to admit such biases, they just were not willing to do anything about them. 

    There’s more, for what its worth. Not sure who pays for this.

  145. jupes

    That physics post was beautiful, Egg.

    What about the image of Einstein and Born jamming in Olivia Newton John’s mum’s house?

  146. memoryvault

    Thanks, Dr Faustus.

    Yes, I don’t think I’ll ever get over the sense of loss, but I comfort myself with many happy memories of our life together. My little Irish Catholic Redhead with the kind, gentle, loving nature, who floored a few guys with her straight right to the jaw, in our time together.

    A skill perfected growing up as the only girl, with six brothers, all far bigger than her.

  147. jupes

    There’s more, for what its worth. Not sure who pays for this.

    What we can be sure of though, is that the recommendation will be that mere “training” is not enough and much more must be done to combat the rampant discrimination.

  148. OldOzzie

    Bill Shorten’s battlelines: target rich, buy off poor

    DENNIS SHANAHAN

    Bill Shorten has struck back against the Coalition’s budget in a big, bold and traditional Labor fashion: huge spending on healthcare to cut out-of-pocket expenses for cancer sufferers.

    The move underscores the ALP’s strength on Medicare.

    Hoping to neutralise the ­Coalition’s traditional strength on economic management and the $302 billion the government has offered in personal tax cuts, the Opposition Leader pledged last night to better Josh Frydenberg’s surplus and debt-reduction targets­, and offer more personal tax cuts in the short term for lower-income ­earners.

    In contrast to the Treasurer’s cautious budget approach — designed­ to be error-free and solid — Shorten’s speech was highly political, bold and declarative. He was not afraid to tweak the econo­mic facts here and there.

    It could have been a campaign launch speech, firing up the faithful and scoring political points at every turn.

    Shorten declared that, no matter­ how you vote in the upcoming election, middle-income earners on up to $120,000 will get the same tax relief come July, and those earning less than $40,000 will get more.

    Neutralising the budget went further, with Shorten taking up the Coalition’s challenge on budget surpluses and debt reduc­tion.

    The fundamental questions for voters are still “who do you trust?” to deliver on the economy and tax cuts and “who pays?”. But Labor Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen is offering voters an alternative with a bit of icing and a claim to be even more responsible.

    Not content with trying to match a Coalition strength, Shorten has pivoted with a $3bn spending boost on health and education — Labor’s acknowledged strengths.

    Typically quick on the politics, he has learned from the success of the “Mediscare” campaign against Malcolm Turnbull in 2016.

    “This is the most important reform to Medicare since it was introduced by Bob Hawke,” Shorten said last night. “Labor believes it should be your Medicare card, not your credit card, which guarantees access to quality healthcare in Australia.”

    Not only is Labor’s offer of free cancer treatment a headline-grabbing initiative, it is a bid to trump the Coalition’s extensive expansion of subsidised cancer drugs through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme — which is getting traction among voters.

    It also counters the Coalition campaign highlighting the fact that fiscal failure led Labor to cut cancer-fighting drugs when it was last in government.

    An extra $1bn promise for skills, TAFE and apprenticeships likewise taps into a Labor strong point and appeals to supporters who put health and education spending as their top priorities.

    Shorten’s intent is clear: match the Coalition where it is strongest and outbid it where the ALP is strongest. The bottom line remains that voters still have to choose between how those packages are paid for: the Coalition’s “economic plan” for growth or Labor’s $200bn in new taxes on business, investors and higher-income earners.

  149. OldOzzie

    Labor’s tax magic pudding feeds a spending splurge

    The Australian Editorial

    “That’s where the Magic comes in,” explained Bill. “The more you eats the more you gets. Cut-an’-come-again is his name, an’ cut, an’ come again, is his nature. Me an’ Sam has been eatin’ away at this Puddin’ for years, and there’s not a mark on him.”

    — The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay

    Last night Bill Shorten sounded a lot like Bill Barnacle, the sailor in Norman Lindsay’s classic children’s story. In his budget in reply, the Opposition Leader cut greedily into an enormous fiscal pudding — let’s call it Albert, the magical, high-yielding, $500 billion-a-year Australian taxation system — and in his telling, the surpluses just keep getting bigger. If he wins the coming election, Mr Shorten will provide higher tax cuts to 2.9 million low-income workers, mainly women, and 700,000 others at a cost of $1bn. Labor will also spend more on schools, preschools, TAFE, hospitals, cancer treatment, childcare, disability services, roads, electric vehicles, batteries, superannuation and housing than the Morrison government. It’s quite a list.

    And yet, Mr Shorten again claimed Labor’s budget surpluses will be larger than the Coalition’s, which are estimated to total $45bn over the next four years. In this way, Labor can defuse the “ticking debt bomb”it pins on the Coalition, but in truth has its roots in the Rudd and Gillard years. Mr Shorten claimed he can do this bit of fiscal magic because he will not spend as much on tax cuts for high-income earners. The Coalition’s stage-three tax cuts from 2024 — keeping the maximum tax rate at 30 per cent for workers earning between $45,000 and $200,000 — are worth $95bn. As well, Mr Shorten will have a few pudding slices left over from the $200bn Labor will raise from tax rises, such as banning cash refunds to investors for excess franking credits, doubling capitals gains tax, curbing negative gearing and a minimum tax of 30 per cent on discretionary trusts.

    Mr Shorten fought the 2016 election on health, with his Mediscare campaign against Malcolm Turnbull biting hard. His big play this time will be the largest ever cancer care package. The $2.3bn plan is geared to slash out-of-pocket costs, such as scans, consultations and medicine. It’s unlikely there is a family not touched by cancer; one in two Australians will be diagnosed with it by age 85. Mr Shorten claimed it would be the most important reform to Medicare since it was launched in 1984. Labor would fund the scheme by making multinationals pay their fair share and closing tax loopholes used by the “top end of town”. On Tuesday, Josh Frydenberg announced a $1bn crackdown by the Australian Taxation Office that he claims will yield $3.6bn.

    Mr Shorten’s tax-and-spend strategy is a throwback to the days of Gough Whitlam, when an ambitious social spending agenda enlarged the footprint of Canberra on the national economy forever. In a few short years, the spending side of the budget jumped from 18 per cent of gross domestic product to 24 per cent, where it has remained for more than four decades — except for the years after the global financial crisis, when Wayne Swan pushed the pedal to almost 26 per cent. The Coalition’s 10-year plan projects a steady fall in payments from today’s 25 per cent to 23.5 per cent in 2029-30. While the Coalition has a revenue cap that keeps a discipline on spending, Labor has no such target.

    Unsurprisingly, the key word in the Labor leader’s pitch to voters is fairness. Mr Shorten points out that under the Coalition’s tax plan — worth $302bn over 10 years — workers earning $200,000 a year will get a tax cut worth $11,640, while some others get nothing, particularly working women and young people. Yet a person earning $200,000 pays 10 times as much tax as someone on $45,000. Mr Shorten also claims working families will be slugged with higher taxes under the Coalition so that the higher-paid can be rewarded.

    In his address, Mr Shorten repeated his call that the coming election would be a “referendum on wages”. Labor’s plan is to restore penalty rates, change the industrial laws to favour the low-paid to ensure a “living wage”, and to end sham contracting. Labor rejects the flattening of the tax system, where 94 per cent of workers would pay at most 30c in the dollar. “We will not be signing up to the Liberals’ radical, right-wing, flat-tax experiment, way off in the future,” Mr Shorten declared, a plan that would force a nurse and surgeon to pay the same tax rate.

    That claim encapsulates Labor’s politics of envy versus the Coalition’s economics of aspiration. This will be a key battle during the election under the false guise of “inequality”. But in essence, as we argued here yesterday, the contest will be squarely on values. Mr Shorten appealed to a collective aspiration: Australians deserve the best. The path to that standard for Labor is Whitlamesque tax-and-spend statism. That approach failed miserably in the 1970s and it will fail again. The Magic Pudding is a comic fantasy, not a plan to grow a nation’s potential or prosperity.

  150. OldOzzie

    Electric vehicle rollout ‘threat to power grid’

    Ben Packham
    Political Reporter

    Labor’s electric vehicle plan could destabilise the nation’s power grid unless it is paired with major energ­y market reforms including “smart” network upgrades and a national rollout of time-of-use tariffs­ to ensure EV owners don’t charge their cars during peak deman­d periods.

    Energy Networks Australia warned in a submission to the Senate’s recent electric vehicle inquiry that growing numbers of EVs, combined with the nation’s flat energy pricing structure, could worsen energy peaks and exceed the capacity of low-voltage networks.

    “Australia’s distribution networks were not designed for any significant uptake of electric ­vehicles and the consequential demand­ for charging,” the peak energy network body said.

    “This raises concerns about ­potential impact of electric vehicle mass-charging events on energy security at a time when the system is susceptible to power outages during peak periods of energy demand­.”

    The energy network body said measures needed to be put in place to ensure the nation’s EV owners didn’t all plug in their cars to charge at the same time, especially on a hot summer day.

    “While prices and incentives for off-peak charging are a key first step, managed charging of electric vehicles will eventually need to be achieved through some level of orchestra­tion as vehicles begin to number in the millions,” it said.

    Infrastructure Partnerships Australia chief executive Adrian Dwyer said that with a smarter grid EVs could store cheap, off-peak renewable energy for use during periods of high energy deman­d. “It might be that you plug your car in and it starts drawing power from the grid or, potentially more likely, you plug your car in and it actually powers your house,” he said.

    Bill Shorten declared this week that, under Labor, EVs would make up 50 per cent of all vehicles sold by 2030. His environment spokesman, Mark Butler, said the impact of EVs on the grid was being considered by energy mar­ket­ agencies and the Council of Australian Governments Energy Council. “Labor will consult on agency and state views before making any decisions regarding these issues,” he said.

    Josh Frydenberg, who previously compared EVs to the advent­ of the iPhone and declared there would be one million of the cars on the road by 2030, said yesterday that Labor’s electric car policy was a case of “virtue signalling”.

    “What we have said is we will support the rollout of infrastructure with more stations where people can charge their electric vehicles­,” the Treasurer said.

    “And there are more vehicles coming onto the road. But effect­ively the Labor Party, when it comes to their energy policy, have not costed the impact of forcing such a change.”

    Mr Butler said the Treasurer, as the government’s biggest electric vehicle enthusiast, should get on board with Labor’s plan.

    “Now Labor has announced Australia’s first ever electric vehicl­e plan, Josh Frydenberg should hop in the car and support our plan instead of his own chaotic government, which has nothing to offer Australian motorists apart from a plan to have a plan and $500 higher petrol bills,” he said.

  151. OldOzzie

    Trolling the Mueller Report

    Democrats lost on collusion. Now they’re inventing a coverup.

    By The WSJ Editorial Board

    Democrats are still reeling from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s conclusion that the Trump campaign did not collude with Russians in 2016. But they’ve now hit upon a political comeback strategy: Accuse Attorney General William Barr of a coverup.

    That’s the context for Wednesday’s decision by House Democrats to authorize subpoenas, on a partisan vote, demanding that Mr. Barr immediately hand over the entire Mueller report and its supporting evidence. This is intended to give the impression, abetted by a press corps that was fully invested in the collusion story, that Mr. Barr is somehow lying about Mr. Mueller’s real conclusions.

    That’s preposterous, since Mr. Barr’s four-page letter quotes directly from Mr. Mueller’s report. The AG surely understood on releasing the summary of conclusions last week that he would be open to contradiction by Mr. Mueller if he took such liberties. Mr. Barr also knew he’d be called to testify before Congress once the rest of the report is released.

    Mr. Barr has committed to releasing as much of the report as possible subject to Justice Department rules. He’s working with the special counsel’s office to make redactions required by grand-jury rules of secrecy, intelligence sources and methods, ongoing investigations, and “the personal privacy and reputational interests of peripheral third parties.”

    Under Justice rules relating to special counsels, Mr. Barr has no obligation to provide anything beyond notifying Congress when an investigation has started or concluded, and whether the AG overruled a special counsel’s decisions. Mr. Barr’s notice to Congress that Mr. Mueller had completed his investigation said Mr. Mueller was not overruled.

    Congress has no automatic right to more. The final subparagraph of DOJ’s rule governing special counsels reads: “The regulations in this part are not intended to, do not, and may not be relied upon to create any rights, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity, by any person or entity, in any matter, civil, criminal or administrative.”

    Mr. Barr has made clear that he appreciates the public interest in seeing as much of Mr. Mueller’s report as possible. Yet his categories of information for review aren’t frivolous or political inventions. The law protecting grand-jury secrecy is especially strict, as even Democrats admit.

    House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff recently tweeted that “Barr should seek court approval (just like in Watergate) to allow the release of grand jury material. Redactions are unacceptable.” This is an acknowledgment that the government must apply to a judge for permission to disclose grand-jury proceedings.

    A judge can grant release in certain circumstances—namely to government attorneys who need the information for their duties. None of the secrecy exceptions permit disclosure to Congress or the public. The purpose of this secrecy is to protect the innocent and encourage candor in grand-jury testimony.

    It’s true that in 1974 the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a federal judge’s decision to release a grand jury report to the House Judiciary Committee that was investigating Watergate. Such a sealed report—which juries can choose to produce—is different from raw grand-jury testimony, which is what Democrats are demanding now. The Supreme Court has never ruled on such a disclosure, so Democrats could be facing a long legal battle if Mr. Barr resists their subpoenas.

    Mr. Barr should release as much of the report as possible, and on close calls he should side with public disclosure. But no one should think that Democrats are really worried about a coverup. They want to see an unredacted version before the public does so they can leak selected bits that allow them to use friendly media outlets to claim there really was collusion, or to tarnish Trump officials.

    The nation is entitled to the Mueller facts in their proper context, not to selective leaks from Democrats trying to revive their dashed hopes of a collusion narrative that the Mueller probe found doesn’t exist.

  152. OldOzzie

    Ethiopian Probe Initial Findings Blame 737 MAX Flight-Control System

    Preliminary report ratchets up pressure on Boeing to fix system

    ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia—Air accident investigators found the cockpit crew of a crashed 737 MAX followed approved emergency procedures in an attempt to save the plane, ratcheting up pressure on Boeing Co. to fix a flight-control system at the heart of several probes into two deadly crashes of the airliner.

    Ethiopian authorities, in a press conference Thursday disclosing findings from their preliminary crash probe, stopped short of drawing any firm conclusions about the causes of the crash. But they confirmed a flight-control system triggered repetitively during the six-minute flight, pushing the nose down. They recommended Boeing review the system, and said regulators should then test it before lifting a global grounding of the MAX fleet.

    A stall-prevention feature on the MAX, called MCAS, has been the subject of intense scrutiny since another deadly crash of a 737 MAX in Indonesia last year. In early findings into that crash, investigators found a faulty sensor caused the system to mistakenly push down the jet’s nose. A similar sequence of events unfolded in the Ethiopian Airlines accident that killed all 157 people aboard.

    The Indonesian probe also raised questions about maintenance of a sensor feeding the system, and about whether pilots followed Boeing guidance on how to respond to a fault. In the Ethiopian flight, no such issues were found—at least so far.

    The Wall Street Journal previously reported that MCAS, which stands for maneuvering characteristics augmentation system, had been activated on the Ethiopian Air flight, and that the pilots had followed Boeing’s primary emergency response step in trying to manually override the system. Investigators didn’t immediately detail on Thursday what steps the crew took to save the plane.

    Ethiopian Airlines Chief Executive Tewolde Gebremariam said “we are very proud of our pilots’ compliance, to follow the emergency procedures and high level of professional performances in such extremely difficult situations.”

    Ethiopian authorities declined to immediately make the preliminary report public, saying they had submitted the document to the International Civil Aviation Organization, the United Nation’s air safety arm. ICAO is the global repository for crash reports, though the decision on whether to make interim findings public is left to the country leading the probe.

    The findings—which can change in subsequent examinations—puts the ball in Boeing’s court in terms of next steps to fix the system and defend the future safety of the jet. The final report into the Indonesia crash is expected sometime this year. A final report into Ethiopian Flight 302 could take a year to complete.

    A Boeing spokesman has said the company will review the report’s findings and comment further later. The company since last year has been working on a fix to improve how MCAS operates. On Wednesday, Boeing Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg accompanied test pilots on a 737 MAX flight in which they tested the software update.

    “Experienced the MCAS software update performing safely in action,” he tweeted.

    Ethiopia is leading the probe, aided by international experts, including from the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board and Boeing. Ethiopian Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said all participants in the probe, including European representatives, agreed on the preliminary report’s findings, which were largely based on data from the plane’s so called black boxes.

    The Federal Aviation Administration, the principal regulator for the MAX plane, said it would “continue to work towards a full understanding of all aspects of this accident. As we learn more about the accident and findings become available, we will take appropriate action.”

    Similarities between a Lion Air crash in Indonesia and the Ethiopian Airlines flight, which crashed on March 10 after takeoff from Addis Ababa, led investigators to suspect early on an MCAS issue. Citing those similarities, authorities around the world grounded the plane.

    The Journal has also reported that accident investigators in Ethiopia had preliminarily concluded the MCAS was triggered by a faulty sensor. That caused the plane’s flight-control computer to erroneously believe the plane was at risk of stalling and pushed the jet’s nose down. Pilots turned off the system but turned it back on when they couldn’t regain control of the plane, investigators have found.

    Ethiopian lead crash investigator Amdye Andualem Thursday said there was no evidence of foreign object damage, which could have provided an outside cause for the sensor fault.

    A key question for investigators remains why the pilots’ action to circumvent the system didn’t work in preventing the crash. Boeing has said after the Indonesian crash, such actions would have worked.

    The initial sequence of events in the Ethiopia crash closely match the findings of Indonesian air accident investigators probing the Oct. 29 loss of another MAX that killed all 189 passengers and crew. In that accident, though, crew failed to disable to faulty anti-stall system that repeatedly pushed the plane’s nose down before the aircraft plunged at high speed into the Java Sea.

    The U.S. Department of Justice and others are investigating whether Boeing provided incomplete or misleading information to win the safety approval for the plane. Congress last week also kicked off hearings that will examine the scrutiny the Federal Aviation Administration gave the plane.

    The fallout from the two accidents less than five months apart has spread globally. Airlines have been forced to park their MAX planes, cancel flights and scramble for replacement aircraft. Indonesian flag carrier Garuda said it is seeking to cancel its order for 737 MAX planes because customers have lost confidence in the jet. Norwegian Air Shuttle ASA, one of Europe’s biggest customers of the plane, and LOT Polish Airlines are among those seeking compensation for losses linked to the grounding.

  153. Tintarella di Luna

    David Rowe’s drawing is really rubbish, would art classes help I wonder? I recognise Natalie but who are the nongs in the mankinis?

  154. Tintarella di Luna

    Thank you Tom.

  155. Leigh Lowe

    Thanks Tom.
    Branco today.
    Milking the dead collusion cow … uuurgh.

  156. Top Ender

    Meanwhile, in the Outback, something stirred….

    Fireys treating blaze at Tennant Creek High School as suspicious
    NT News

    A CRIME scene has been set up at Tennant Creek High School after a suspicious fire.

    Around 4am Thursday alarms alerted security who found two doors had been set alight and a considerable amount of smoke coming from the building.

    Classes remained in place for Friday and will continue to do so.

    Police and fire crews found two 90kg LPG cylinders damaged with evidence of attempts to ignite the cylinders.

  157. Tintarella di Luna

    Ratings from Nielsen Media Research for 03/25-03/29:

    FOX News Tucker Carlson: 3,475,000 total viewers; 625,000 viewers in the 25-54 age demographic
    CNN Cooper: 810,000 total viewers; 203,000 viewers in the 25-54 age demographic
    CNN Cuomo: 875,000 total viewers; 217,000 viewers in the 25-54 age demographic
    CNN Lemon: 789,000 total viewers; 228,000 viewers in the 25-54 age demographic

    No wonder they are trying to professionally assassinate him. I like watching Tucker Carlson he’s a bit squishy on some issues but very much down the line and what’s great he allows lunatics on there to spruik til they puke their lunacy for the entire world to see then quietly says “Thank for being with us tonight”

  158. Tintarella di Luna

    Did you know that 2% of boys are autistic?

    Did you know that 98% of all people who are autistic are boys? the 2% that are girls are so very very disabled it is crushing to see. I’m talking here severe autism not bad behaviour that can be ritalinised. I mean the full unable to speak, incontinent, hypersensitive to all sensory stimulation, to people, to environments the full sad spectrum.

    It is quite amazing that 40 years ago autism occurred at about 1:30,000 people – why are those stats now are at 1:160 in some stats it’s 1:66. What happened?

  159. Bruce of Newcastle

    Johannes Leak gets pride of place on the front page of the Oz this morning. Well done sir!

    The page is has the full cartoon, I can’t find a direct link that doesn’t have it truncated unfortunately.

  160. 2dogs

    How often do you crowd have to fall for the same old BS every election before you wake up to the fact that NONE of the major parties give a sh1t about you? Isn’t 50 years long enough?

    Progress is being made, mv. The share of the vote of the major parties is trending down.

  161. Tintarella di Luna

    Thank you steve trickler for the Amazing Polly link upthread — just listened to the whole thing — Gemma O’Doherty very courageous lady. We are living in scary times indeed.

  162. memoryvault

    Good morning World.
    Good morning Australia.
    Good morning Cats.

  163. memoryvault

    Thanks Tom and good morning.
    It’s been a while since I enjoyed your daily roundup.
    Still as good as ever.
    I’m looking forward to this Sunday’s “This Week in Pictures”.

  164. memoryvault

    Progress is being made, mv. The share of the vote of the major parties is trending down.

    Enjoy it while you can, 2dogs.
    Regardless of who wins the coming election, both parties have plans afoot to make it well nigh impossible for anybody but the majors to field candidates in future elections. This coming election is your last bite of that particular cherry, so savour it one last time.

  165. Mater

    An interesting 20 min video in which Jesse Peterson talks with Faith Goldy about the Christchurch Massacre, his motivation and the media response. It drags in a lot of different subjects around the one issue. Worth a watch.

    https://youtu.be/_GweiE6HmDQ

  166. Baldrick

    Thanks Tom. Branco for me this morning.

  167. John Constantine

    Their shortreich announces a lithium battery industry for Australia.

    Not a squeak of protest yet from their greens.

    Too dirty to have onshore has always been the protest.

    What would it cost to have a hysteria proof lithium industry in the Australian gulag?.

    Comrades.

  168. John Constantine

    Their shortreich announces mining exploration will make Australia rich.

    Not if the greens ban actual mining.

  169. stackja

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #2979816, posted on April 5, 2019 at 6:51 am

    My attempt

  170. Des Deskperson

    ‘David Rowe’s drawing is really rubbish, would art classes help I wonder? I recognise Natalie but who are the nongs in the tankinis?’

    I’ve no idea who ‘Natalie’ is – Di Natale?? – but his Chris Bowen is pretty good.

  171. calli

    Leak’s is a nice hat tip to his dad.

    Well done, junior!

  172. calli

    Natalie is Barnaby’s ripped and ready ex.

  173. Baldrick

    Stupid.Fucking.Liberals

    The Australian government is considering granting travel documents within a month to the orphaned children of Islamic State terrorist Khaled Sharrouf because his eldest daughter is in danger of dying in a Syrian refugee camp.
    Sharrouf’s 17-year-old daughter Zaynab is 33 weeks pregnant with her third child, has severe malnutrition and dehydration, and shrapnel wounds that are not healing, The Daily Telegraph can reveal.
    Prime Minister Scott Morrison has been adamant he will not “put one Australian life at risk” to extract the children of IS fighters, but it is understood if Sharrouf’s family can get out of Syria and to an Australian embassy, they will likely be given passports to get them home provided they pass all the usual security checks.
    All five of the children and grandchildren are Australian citizens but it is not known if the oldest still have passports.

  174. Mater

    There we go people. A website where ‘those who identify as white’ can assuage and make use of their white privilege and guilt.

    http://www.reparations.me

    I invite People of Color to ask for what we need to feel better, be happier, be more productive by posting in this space. These may be both material and immaterial requests.

    I invite people who identify as White to offer services or contributions to People of Color in need of time, energy, substantive care, and support.

    Who’d ‘identify as white’ in this day and age? It’s a hiding to nothing.

  175. memoryvault

    Not if the greens ban actual mining.

    The Greens have witlessly served their purpose John, and will now be encouraged to fade into oblivion, like the Democrats before them. If they refuse to take the hint and go quietly into the night they will be destroyed politically, also like the Democrats before them.

  176. John Constantine

    If shorten supports mining exploration, will he still blow up the adani mine?.

    Comrades.

  177. min

    Tanya Pliberserk today told Alan Jones that CO2 was the cause of global warming because all the reputable scientists say so . When asked what percentage of greenhouse gases is CO2 she had no idea. However she is evidently cannot be listening to our chief scientist who tells us that even if we shut down all emissions it would have no effect on temperature. Maybe he is not reputable.

  178. Mother Lode

    making multi-nationals pay their fair share.

    When they eventually get around to costing their policies, I wonder how they will calculate ‘fair’.

    I suppose that depends on definition.

    I would love Tits to provide such a definition.

  179. memoryvault

    Who’d ‘identify as white’ in this day and age?

    Who would identify with a website that can’t even spell “colour” correctly?

  180. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    It is quite amazing that 40 years ago autism occurred at about 1:30,000 people – why are those stats now are at 1:160 in some stats it’s 1:66. What happened?

    Tinta, those recent figures must relate to all stages of the Autism spectrum. Years ago Stage 1 Autism, the most common type I think, just wasn’t recognized; children simply failed at school, were regarded as naturally disruptive or ‘highly strung’ (the common term) and were picked up by families or saved by the opportunities that still existed for easy entry into low level jobs, opportunities that are no longer there. The problem could be shelved in a way it can’t be now. With increased attention to children’s education and higher expectations for them in general in the two-child family, and the increased funding of people on the alert for Autism, the deficit is all too apparent. Combine that with permissive teaching and parenting, which removed a lot of much-needed structured support from affected children, and especially more recently the denigration of normal boys’ behavior, then the increase is explained, partially at least.

    If the other types of more severe Autism are increasing at the same quick rate then I agree that there is a problem that needs investigation, and likely something to do with a maternal factor in utero. Who can tell though until more epidemiology is done on good biological hunches re aetiology? As in SIDS. And the diagnostic criteria currently being used, and perhaps selectively applied, also need to be carefully examined to see who gets into what category of Autism and for what reasons. The aim of getting more funding can skew results here too.

  181. No. The far left in the Greens are not the tool of the left in the ALP or “the” political elite.

    They are either part of the elite or far to the left and out of control. The links they have to unions is astroturfed and the CPA they evolved from were not part of the ALP.

    Or you can tell us who controls the Greens and name names.

    There are Marxists in the ALP but the idea that they “control” the Greens is pretty funny.

    “Ideally” the Greens or Socialist Alliance would form government in their own right, and tell their ALP “masters” to go and take a hike.

    Which is all pretty funny because Hawke and Keating were pretty much the most right leaning governments we had in Australia since Menzies.

    The last thing in Australia that the stevedores or electronics technicians in the mining or infrastructure industries want is equal wages for all workers.

    The Greens are crazy (commie) enough to demand that, however.

  182. Mother Lode

    Not without a T shirt with Reagan wearing a MAGA hat on it.

    Can you buy the shirt with Reagan riding a velociraptor firing a machine gun?

  183. OldOzzie

    Thanks Tom,

    Paul Zanetti Today

    Relevant to the Aricle I am posting following – specifically the comment following

  184. Des Deskperson

    ‘Natalie is Barnaby’s ripped and ready ex.’

    The character needs a label, and ‘needing a label’ is the key sign of mediocrity in a political satirical cartoonist.

    The point of the cartoon still escapes me. Rowe is generally good comic draughtsman, although he owes a considerable artistic debt to Spooner

  185. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I woke up this morning with electric cars on my mind. Don’t ask me why.

    I had a sudden vision of the M5 and similar Sydney arteries all held up daily by electric cars and trucks with flat batteries. I know you can get cars now which run on an electric/ICE (internal combustion engine) mix, which would fix that issue somewhat by turning over to the ICE when the battery ran flat, but given how running out of petrol is also a problem, I think it could be enhanced in a plug-in car world.

    How often does your phone run out of juice? A lot, amongst my friends and rellies.
    Their electric cars would be no different I suspect. 🙂

  186. stackja

    Electric cars just need long extension cords. As long as solar/wind power provides, of course.

  187. lotocoti

    If shorten supports mining exploration, will he still blow up the adani mine?.

    He’s OK with looking, but not touching.

  188. memoryvault

    Lizzie I like you, I really do. And I usually enjoy many of your posts.

    But the last thing Cats need is somebody to regurgitate AMA propaganda here, even if their husband is part of the medical fraternity.

    The AMA is big enough, and powerful enough, and rich enough, to peddle their own BS.

  189. calli

    They all struggle with Morrison, Des. Even Bill Leak had trouble with him. Is it the bland, everyman features? A character so uninteresting it’s impossible to pin down?

    While trawling through the interwebs to find a Leak Morrison, I found this gem from 2015.

    Oh, how we miss him.

  190. OldOzzie

    First home buyers can’t afford a house until their parents die

    Katy Hall
    April 3, 2019 7:00pm


    f you’re one of the few working-class millennial Australians still holding out hope to one day become a first-time homebuyer, it’s likely that Tuesday’s federal Budget came as quite the blow.

    Not because of any blatant favouritism shown, but more through its wilful twisting of the knife by completely ignoring the issue altogether.

    No grants, no additional funding, no savings measures, no policies to provide assistance for those hoping to secure an entry-level property.

    This constant inability to address what remains to be the single most pressing issue for many millennials has now left a huge cohort of people with two ridiculous options: either we win the Lotto or sit back and wait for our parents to die.

    Given the odds of the former, most young people are simply facing bleak facts and banking on the latter.

    Call it morbid, but for young people wanting to enter the real estate market, there is an increasing fear that unaffordability is here to stay. And unless your parents can provide a deposit or act as guarantor, the time frame in which the temporary market cool is predicted to last is nowhere near long enough for most to save the required amount.

    In December 2018, a survey conducted by home loan lender ME revealed that 77 per cent of aspiring buyers are worried that housing is increasingly out of reach for them

    And while no one wants their loved ones to die so that they can enter the housing market, the abysmal reality of circumstances is now that death, and the lump sum inheritance that often comes with it, is likely to be the only event that opens up the otherwise impenetrable market to aspiring homeowners like me.

    As it currently stands, my husband and I pay more in rent than we would on a mortgage by a relatively substantially amount.

    Were we to buy a similar property in a nearby area, we’d likely save around $400 a month after meeting our mortgage repayments. Many people within my age range are in the same position with no idea what to do.

    On a recent visit to my mother’s house I found myself wondering what the average house price in her suburb now is and doing the basic maths of what that minus some fees and divided by three kids would potentially leave me with.

    It felt dirty, greedy and like an outright betrayal.

    But what so many older Australians who cover their ears over this issue don’t seem to realise — while turning up their nose to the many studies that show millennials to be better savers than previous generations — is that the prospect of not getting into the housing market is an all-consuming issue that fills young people with a foreboding sense of hopelessness.

    Like many of my friends, I did everything right. I’ve been working in part-time and full-time jobs since I was in high school. I went to university. I paid off my near $40,000 university debt. I’ve saved money. I’ve built up a good credit rating. I’ve paid tax and developed a robust superannuation account.

    Yes, I’ve taken overseas holidays, ordered food from delivery service apps, and splurged on some nice clothes, but in no way do these combined purchases come close to totalling what is now required for a housing deposit in most Australian cities.

    It’s unbearably infuriating, but for as long as we can’t get ahead and the government remains deaf to this growing issue that refuses to go anywhere, we’re destined to remain on a hamster wheel fretting about our futures until invariably, someone we love dies.

    Now, to all the boomers feeling a desperate need to yell about how this is an imagined problem being raised by an over-entitled generation, kindly sod off. Or alternatively, feel free to add me to your will.

    From the Comments

    Something the Liberal/National Party should be hammering on all Social Media and Ads – Taking the UK Death Duries as an examlpe trnaslated to Australia

    GBP 375000 threshold then 40% Tax on the Estate –

    Translated to Sydney on $1.375 Million Parents Home Death Tax = at Least $400,000 – puts a Dent in the Waited for Inheritance – and one would assume as previously Death Tax would be based on all Assets in the Estate

    Geoff
    7 hours ago

    So to all millennials, you really, really DON’T want to vote for the Greens then?

    The Greens have death duties as a major policy of their current platform.

    Yes, you can support your favorite virtue signaler but at a cost of a future home.
    Go figure, hey?

  191. Lizzie, Tinta

    I made a dumb self-deprecating joke.

    Autism is course real and I feel for people who suffer from the intense forms of autism. It is not caused by vaccines, the Wakefield paper was absolutely piss poor.

    What I don’t like:

    Treating the autistic like they’re mentally retarded.
    People bragging about autism giving them super powers. Parents even brag about having autistic kiddies now. Then again, people brag about owning a dog or going for a bike ride.
    Treating each boy in the schooling system as autistic if they show any signs of independence, disagreeability or masculinity; that is, they are judged as defective girls; then medicating their vigour out of them.
    People using autism as an excuse for poor behaviour.
    “Everyone is on the spectrum” – no, everyone has a finite level of tolerance for bullshit or sensory overload unless they’re braindead.
    Lying about fertility: equating older fathers biologically with older mothers in terms of fitness for conception is simply lying; older mothers are causative. “Education” means older ages of conception, not that smart people are giving heritable traits.
    The lack of recognition that certain modern maladies were once evolutionary advantages.
    The fact that if people freak out in certain situations, that perhaps we should recognise that society is maladjusted, not the individual.
    Lazy teachers and parents who want a handout and can’t do their job properly; any behavioural problem, perhaps a lack of leadership or effort on their part, or dumb hippie ideology, ergo “the kid has autism”.
    Equating and conflating other “conditions”, real or imagined, with autism (such as simply being a child with lower faculties than an adult, actual (and not imagined ADD)).
    Telling children dumb presumptions “you don’t understand jokes” when they have another conflated problem or “mild” autism (which am sceptical of, rather than being a little boy).
    Being awkward, a loner or poor social skills are just that. They mght be indicative of autism, but they are not synonomous.

  192. The sum of government taxes and fees adds up to over 40% and sometimes over 45% of the price of a new home.

    Which is bought after you’ve paid income tax and paid GST on excise on some of your purchases.

    If people can’t work out how to make housing cheaper with this information you wonder why everyone in Australia is a property investing guru, just ask them.

  193. calli

    Now, to all the boomers feeling a desperate need to yell about how this is an imagined problem being raised by an over-entitled generation, kindly sod off. Or alternatively, feel free to add me to your will.

    No. And no.

    Oddly, my millenials have all bought homes with no help from me except child minding and a first class education.

    The difference between them and the writer of this piece is that they didn’t fritter their money away on overseas trips, the latest consumer gadgetry and did that amazingly amazing impossible thing – they saved up.

  194. memoryvault

    Or you can tell us who controls the Greens and name names.

    The Greens control the Greens.
    However, their future and their fate lie with the same clique who decide the same things for the Liberal Party. You can start with some of the outer circle, people like Michael Kroger and Mark Textor, or bone up on the technical brains of it all, Brian Loughnane.

    Brian, incidentally, is married to Peta Credlin. Yes, THAT Peta Credlin.

    It’s a small world after all.

  195. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    It is tremendously sad, but I think a lot of people with Stage 1 Autism are now shelved by society on Newstart. Witness how the Libs forgot all about Newstart strugglers in the great electricity bill handout. Never diagnosed, never assisted and totally incapable of normal functioning in a more complex world, often homeless and resorting to drug abuse to cope, these long-term unemployed are often the people who seem at first sight to be just victims of their own choices; but many of them are not. They drift around shunted from one to the other of Centrelink-mandated employment assistance ‘providers’ in a world of ‘never you’ as far as actually getting a job is concerned, let alone of ever keeping it.

    The closure of our psychiatric hospitals means that sheltered environments are no longer available to help these and other ‘undiagnosed’ people who are chronically mentally disabled or ill. The Disability Pension and its greater benefit of $100 weekly are denied to them as there is no documentation for their case; plus many actually resist going on it as they hate to be labelled disabled. They also tend to turn left, and blame ‘the system’ for what they cannot see is wrong with them. A sane world would equalize all welfare payments and let individuals find their own level to the extent that they could. And it would re-open a system of sheltered environments for the truly desperate.

    Think of all that next time one of them cleans your windscreen or otherwise asks for your help and hand over a dollar. I have intimate familial experience of some of these sad cases, as well as having dealt with many in voluntary (but trained) telephone counselling sessions. It could break your heart.

  196. Mother Lode

    I invite People of Color to ask for what we need to feel better, be happier, be more productive by posting in this space.

    The people who were slaves and suffered under it are long dead but the current fickle and shiftless generation, more than all preceding and succeeding generations, are the ones deserving compensation.

    Apparently.

  197. I could find ONE property for sale in Wentworthville under 400k Calli.

    The big banks want a 20% deposit. Saving for 80k in a short enough time to allow for a short enough loan essentially means a mid career income or being married.

    It wouldn’t be a problem if the environmental movement stopped white anting primary industries. Plenty of people could go west, young men and women, to new jobs in areas where land is dirt cheap and wages are necessarily high.

  198. Tintarella di Luna

    I am taller than Tinta!
    I doubt though that I pack such a punch. 🙂

    Fact check: true

    I am 60″ and shrinking it sounds better than 5ft nothing.

  199. The closure of our psychiatric hospitals means that sheltered environments are no longer available to help these and other ‘undiagnosed’ people who are chronically mentally disabled or ill.

    What has this got to do with low-key autism?

  200. bespoke

    Treating each boy in the schooling system as autistic if they show any signs of independence, disagreeability or masculinity; that is, they are judged as defective girls; then medicating their vigour out of them.

    I had a hell of a time with the school using Ritalin as magic bullet with my oldest two. I found out that they doubled the dose with out my permission at least once.

  201. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    ps the majority of these hopeless cases on Newstart are younger white males, all prone to suicide.

    Newstart of course also has on its books the people it is meant to serve, the temporarily unemployed who are very capable of getting and keeping a job once they get one or are assisted by training and help to do so.

  202. I had a hell of a time with the school using Ritalin as magic bullet with my oldest two. I found out that they doubled the dose with out my permission at least once.

    The school was medicating your kids without permission?

    Wow, just wow.

  203. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    What has this got to do with low-key autism?

    Look Tilehead, low-key autism is a chronic mental disability. Use your God-given brains and think about it a little. People with some of these symptoms (confusion, dislocation, inability to function, self-neglect, and hyper-sensitive to stimulation, perhaps with associated other pathologies such as delusional expectations) were often cared for quite competently in the old-style sheltered environment of psychiatric hospitals.

  204. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The school was medicating your kids without permission?

    They would not have been prescribing, probably just giving medication as per instructions. Many schools do this, and teachers are not nurses; they may double dose on occasions, either by accident, or more nastily, by design (in which case they are acting illegally).

  205. ps the majority of these hopeless cases on Newstart are younger white males, all prone to suicide.

    I see where you are coming from now.

    Men are discriminated against contrary to merit. Some capable men with high IQ can have autistic traits.

    What did we expect?

    We’re just engaging in more of this with whacky executive quotas.

    No one wants equality in the wastewater maintenance sector.

  206. bespoke

    They drift around shunted from one to the other of Centrelink-mandated employment assistance ‘providers’ in a world of ‘never you’ as far as actually getting a job is concerned, let alone of ever keeping it.

    That all are though, Lizzie. And to many blame mental health issues and no one points to life style changes as an alternative.

  207. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Jennifer and Sarah Hart drugged their kids before driving off California cliff
    Authorities say the lesbian mums who drove their six adopted kids over a cliff drugged themselves and their children.

  208. OldOzzie

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
    #2979585, posted on April 4, 2019 at 7:26 pm

    Rita Panahi on Bolt. She is so easy to like. Very feminine in the way she makes a very clear point. She’s a little girl, for a start, or so I think. Big girls are scary to little girls (the under 5’4″ crew) of whom I am representative of the higher range at 5’3″.

    calli
    #2979587, posted on April 4, 2019 at 7:28 pm

    I’m 5’3.5”

    Nah nah na nah nah!

    You two are now my instant best friends.

    Tintarella di Luna
    #2979863, posted on April 5, 2019 at 8:29 am

    I am taller than Tinta!
    I doubt though that I pack such a punch. 🙂

    Fact check: true

    I am 60″ and shrinking it sounds better than 5ft nothing.

    To you Ladies above, with a wife 5ft 1/2in, same as all her sisters, elder daughter 4ft 11in and youngest daughter 5ft 3in,

    I always say –

    “The Best Things come in Small Packages”

  209. Leigh Lowe

    I am 60″ …

    Shortarse!
    I am a towering one thousand, five hundred and thirty millimetres.

  210. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    It wouldn’t be a problem if the environmental movement stopped white anting primary industries. Plenty of people could go west, young men and women, to new jobs in areas where land is dirt cheap and wages are necessarily high.

    True. Agricultural work and its satisfying lifestyle used to be the saving factor for many Type 1 Autism sufferers in the past. I once helped a family member affected in this way to transfer to Orange, where he learned to drive a tractor and find somewhere affordable to live. These jobs are now disappearing, or taken by others far more capable of doing them as employment in regional areas becomes tighter to find.

  211. memoryvault

    I am 60″ and shrinking it sounds better than 5ft nothing.

    Believe it or not, Tinta and Calli, some of us big blokes actually prefer petite, feminine ladies.
    Same goes for breasts and some men’s fixation on huge, floppy mammeries. many men like smaller, firm, pert breasts.

    Or as my late father used to wisely say – “Any more than a mouthful is a waste”.

  212. OldOzzie

    America’s Amazing Job Market

    The NFIB March survey shows small businesses hiring at close to a record pace
    .
    By James Freeman

    U.S. small businesses continued their aggressive hunt for new workers and added employees at a near-record pace in March. That’s according to the latest employment report from the National Federation of Independent Business, due out later today.

    “Job creation was solid in March with a net addition of 0.50 workers per firm (including those making no change in employment), close to February’s record of 0.52, and up from 0.33 in January,” reports NFIB Chief Economist William Dunkelberg. “Owners are trying to hold on to the employees that they have due to a highly competitive labor market,” he adds.

    As in recent months, small firms are hiring a lot, but not as much as they’d like. According to Mr. Dunkelberg:

    Sixty percent reported hiring or trying to hire (up 3 points), but 54 percent (90 percent of those hiring or trying to hire) reported few or no qualified applicants for the positions they were trying to fill (up 5 points). “Qualified” includes having position-appropriate skills but also encompasses… appearance, attitude, social skills… wage expectations, and work history. Twenty-one percent of owners cited the difficulty of finding qualified workers as their Single Most Important Business Problem, only 4 points below the record high.

    Economics says that to solve a worker shortage, businesses of all sizes will have to start meeting more of those wage expectations. Adds the NFIB chief economist:

    Wage costs are rising as owners must pay more to attract and retain needed workers from a well-picked over pool of potential applicants. A net 33 percent reported higher compensation in March, up 2 points. Twenty percent (net) planned increases in the next few months (up 2 points), a good leading indicator of future compensation gains.

    Also encouraging in this latest NFIB survey is that owners report robust hiring plans. But Mr. Dunkelberg warns that fulfilling them may require more than wage increases:

    In construction for example, only 6 percent complain about the cost of labor but 34 percent lament about the lack of qualified workers.

    Still, he notes that the “strength in hiring plans and the record-high levels of job openings” add up to a “positive indicator for economic growth. Hiring a worker is an investment. The widespread willingness of small business owners to increase employment indicates that they see an economy that will be solid enough to deliver a return on their labor investment.”

    For employment across the economy as a whole, investors and workers will be watching Friday’s Labor Department report for March after a disappointing February increase of just 20,000 jobs.

    Also, next week will bring the latest government report on total open positions in the U.S. economy. The last report showed a new record high of 7.6 million job openings in January–compared to 6.5 million Americans classified as unemployed.

    A year ago this column called it the best time ever to look for a job. The data since then—including today’s NFIB report—show that it’s lately become even more of a seller’s market for labor and strongly suggest that workers can expect rising wages.

  213. Tintarella di Luna

    How often do you crowd have to fall for the same old BS every election before you wake up to the fact that NONE of the major parties give a sh1t about you? Isn’t 50 years long enough?

    Progress is being made, mv. The share of the vote of the major parties is trending down.

    Some very interesting comments from Jordan Peterson on gambling made in about 2013 on TVO in Canada a program called Agenda with Steve Paikin – Jordan Peterson rather fleshed out but still devastating in his arguments relating to Gambling and the “Gamble responsibly” shown at the end of ads for gambling. Like the government mandates that that exhortation be at the end of the ad because the government gives a toss about gamblers — yeah right.

  214. Leigh Lowe

    Everyone is roughly 4 cubits tall.

  215. Percy Popinjay

    the government gives a toss about gamblers — yeah right

    In the same way it gives a toss about smokers.

  216. Leigh Lowe

    I am four cubits in highness, and my BMI is 2 bushels (11 metric pints).

  217. OldOzzie

    First home buyers urge Bill Shorten to reconsider negative gearing plan

    It’s a policy Labor promised would make housing affordable for younger generations — but not all the Millennials trying to claw their way into the property market are a fan of the ALP’s proposed negative gearing reforms.

    Sisters Brooke and Jade Miller are fresh off buying their first home in the Penrith area and claim cuts to negative gearing would be “devastating”.

    The pair are planning to put their home up for rent next year to help take the sting off their repayments for a while, but the removal of the concession on January 1 as proposed by Labor would make a significant dent in their finances.

    “We work hard. We were hoping negative gearing would give us a leg up into the market,” older sister Brooke said.

    The 25-year-old added that buying their home was a challenge. She was only able to afford the purchase by working two jobs, one in a High School office and the other at ANZ stadium on the weekend

    The sisters also had to get help from their parents who went guarantor on the loan for their $510,000 house in Cambridge Park.

    They were planning to live with their parents when they temporarily rented out the home, but leasing out the property next year will mean they will miss the deadline for Labor’s proposed grandfathering of exsiting negative gearing arrangements and will not get the benefit.

    The pair’s selling agent Matthew Hall of Mooney Real Estate said it was common for property buyers to use these kinds of strategies to get into the market. “Gone are the days when most people could buy a property on their own.”

  218. stackja

    The NSW Richmond Report opened up much valuable ‘public’ real estate to ‘private’ development. Former ‘clients’ were moved to ‘public housing’ with little support given. Looked good on budget night.

  219. inability to function, self-neglect

    I would not call that low-key. If it is, then it proves my point that a lot of people are wrongly labelled as autistic.

  220. struth

    I had a hell of a time with the school using Ritalin as magic bullet with my oldest two. I found out that they doubled the dose with out my permission at least once.

    WTF?

    Good Moaning.

    Let me ask you, if the Greens party disbanded today, would the liberal party instantly leave Paris and declare it’s disbelief in Global warming?
    Would the Labor party?
    If not, why not?

  221. struth

    I had a hell of a time with the school using Ritalin as magic bullet with my oldest two. I found out that they doubled the dose with out my permission at least once.

    And again.

    WTFucketyF???????!!!!!!

  222. calli

    The 20% deposit is new, Dot. A result of the RC? The kids only had to stump up 10% (or less) a few years ago.

    A young bloke I know started buying property pretty much straight out of school. He’d save up a deposit on a cheapie, put tenants in and go on to the next, thus amassing quite a portfolio. Plumber, same age as my son.

    He lived with his parents for a few years then moved into one of his properties. It was do-able back in the noughties, before the boom. But there have always been booms that move property ownership out of reach for a time. I experienced one myself.

    Waiting for your parents to pop their clogs is a bit rich. I bet if I had a look at the writer’s spending history and expectations I could give them a few pointers.

  223. Percy Popinjay

    t’s a policy Labor promised would make housing affordable for younger generations

    Which will of course, result in the exact opposite – and you wouldn’t want to be renting in Sydney or Melbourne in six months time.

  224. stackja

    struth
    #2979887, posted on April 5, 2019 at 9:01 am

    How many voters still really believe in ‘AGW’?

  225. Tintarella di Luna

    If the other types of more severe Autism are increasing at the same quick rate then I agree that there is a problem that needs investigation, and likely something to do with a maternal factor in utero. Who can tell though until more epidemiology is done on good biological hunches re aetiology?

    Lizzie it does not appear to be the case that the incidence of the severest forms of autism are on the increase in fact the stats in relation to disability show there hasn’t been an increase in the general population though there are indications that the use of reproductive technology might be increasing the incidence of very rare genetically-linked disabilities, but it’s early days on those studies too.

    But you are right about the under the radar non-diagnosed in the past. Bear in mind too that the number of people who were consigned to institutions were in the tens of thousands here in Australia, perhaps it was to those institutions that the undiagnosed and unrecognised autists per given shelter but not much of a life, I guess the number of people who are now in our gaols might also have found a new institution. The incidence of homelessness too perhaps as the large institutions are closed.

    I don’t think the powers-that-be want to look too closely at the cause and effect of that – A terrifying statistic

  226. OldOzzie

    Ray Hadley: Scott Morrison must unplug Shorten’s electric dreams

    Ray Hadley, The Daily Telegraph
    April 4, 2019 4:50pm

    5. The Liberal leader who lost the unlosable election to Paul Keating, John Hewson, has been a champ­ion for renewable energy in recent times.

    He went to the launch of an electric car this week with Warringah candidate Zali Steggall and talked about supporting the Labor plan to go electric by 2030.

    Later in the week one of his former neighbours in the Southern Highlands told me Mr Hewson’s preferred daily drive was a 1989 Mercedes 420SEL sedan.

    Yesterday, Mr Hewson confirmed he did drive such a vehicle when he wasn’t on the train. Breathtaking hypocrisy.

    6. Mr Hewson is trotted out on various media platforms as some sort of political guru. He went into the 1993 election expected to win but Paul Keating emerged as PM with a 15-seat maj­ority. Mr Hewson should give lectures on how to lose elections, not win them.

  227. I don’t blame the boomers. I blame the politicians they elected; 40% – 45% tax on purchasing a new home, after you’ve paid income tax?

    It is just insane that this never gets brought up by the major parties in public discourse, of course, they’re addicted to the revenue.

    It is just mind blowing people my age and younger are so marinated in socialism through the school system they can’t fathom that a tax makes things more expensive.

  228. calli

    Another young fellow I know (motor mechanic) bought up cheap property in country towns because he couldn’t afford Sydney. Did it strategically in growth areas. Tenants paid them off. He too took advantage of historically low interest rates.

    These are the guys that Shorten hates. They made good without whingeing or handouts.

  229. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    And to many blame mental health issues and no one points to life style changes as an alternative.

    I would make required lifestyle changes mandatory to receiving ANY form of government assistance for those aged under 60 years, including those on Disability Pension as well as those on Newstart. These changes enhance self-esteem and encourage a positive approach to life’s problems. Excuse-making is the worst thing to encourage in people finding life hard. Life is hard. Grow up and recognise that should be the message. Free copy of 12 Rules for Life to all shirkers is my recipe.

    For many with low level autism though, such changes will not result in a job due to their other deficits. Some may improve sufficiently for the new positive approach and appearance to have income-earning or relationship-forming benefits. I’d offer free professional haircuts to young males, free disposable razors, and a ticket for some free quality St. Vincent de Paul clothing , not crap, as part of the deal. Tatt removal too where desired (wouldn’t enforce that, although removal of steel decorative items from face would be on my hit list). If recipients are in public housing I would offer tickets for decent charity-provided furniture, some how-to-clean lessons and equipment, and especially, a voucher for the installation of blinds to remove the stigma of tacked up carboard ‘curtains’. I would also come down very heavily on drug trading in public housing. It is endemic and disgusting and the police seem unable to act on complaints. Three complaints from different residents should see a warrant to inspect premises and to surveille them regularly for further dealing.

  230. OldOzzie

    stackja
    #2979891, posted on April 5, 2019 at 9:05 am

    struth
    #2979887, posted on April 5, 2019 at 9:01 am

    How many voters still really believe in ‘AGW’?

    From Jo Nova (site seems to be having trouble at the moment)

    New poll: 54% of Australians are still skeptics of man-made climate catastrophe

Comments are closed.