Monday Forum: April 22, 2019

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2,962 Responses to Monday Forum: April 22, 2019

  1. Mark A

    Overburdened
    #2994932, posted on April 22, 2019 at 8:03 pm

    Hate to be a wet blanket about the death tax issue

    they die to provide progressively less to the Government

    When did governments think long term?

  2. BrettW

    Just drove into a BP petrol station in Brisbane and wife went in to pay.

    As she was paying a guy entered to pay for his petrol. My wife had heard a strange noise from what she believes is a licence plate scanner. The staff member then straight away told the guy his car was unlicensed and he should not be driving it. Guy told him none of his business and should not be saying it in front of others.

    If all petrol stations are doing this could be very useful for the cops as wouid presumably pick up wanted vehicles.

  3. bespoke

    Hope you all had a good weekend. Spent mine in the bush drinking playing pool and no internet.

    How’s things JC?

  4. John Constantine

    https://hallandwilcox.com.au/what-happens-if-you-are-from-the-uk-or-own-assets-in-the-uk-beware-of-the-dreaded-inheritance-tax-and-changes-to-it-from-april-2017/

    Your domicile status rather than residence status will usually determine your liability to IHT, as the UK imposes IHT at 40% on the value of your estate above your available nil rate band (currently £325,000, but with the potential to transfer this to your spouse if unused to have a combined £650,000 and possibly an additional £125,000 each (for 2018/19), for a main residence nil rate band). Transfers between spouses are exempt provided they have the same domicile status. However, transfers to a non UK domiciled spouse (for example, to an Australian spouse), from a UK domiciled spouse are only exempt up to £325,000 (in addition to your nil-rate band).

  5. stackja

    Zulu – ALP death duties will be federal. And only hit middle income like in the past. ALP don’t care. Voters have choices.

  6. Armadillo

    My wife had heard a strange noise from what she believes is a licence plate scanner.

    What does it sound like?

  7. Easter Sunday brought record-breaking rainfall to the Upper Western and Riverina regions of far western NSW as a trough and front duo move across the state.

    Amazing eh egg_ ?

    It is almost like there is a natural cycle and the catastrophicists only look at the downside.

  8. John Constantine

    Australian capital gains tax could be called death duties by stealth.

    Australian aged care fees can also be called duth duties by stealth.

    Comrades.

  9. Infidel Tiger
    #2994878, posted on April 22, 2019 at 7:12 pm

    Tyler Cowan?

    Isn’t he the crank from Zerohedge that has been wrong about everything?

    Good lord. LOL!

  10. Infidel Tiger

    stackja
    #2994742, posted on April 22, 2019 at 4:42 pm

    Who created IS? BO/HRC?

    GWB and the neo-cons.

  11. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Bruce of Newcastle, #2994783, posted on April 22, 2019 at 5:30 pm

    Earth Day today!

    The Wikipedia page on Earth Day does not even mention Ira Einhorn. Old articles at Time magazine about the extradition of Einhorn don’t even mention Earth Day. That’s probably because there is no evidence anywhere that he was a cofounder of it, as he is the only person to claim so. Even the article you cite merely says “Einhorn was only the master of ceremonies at the first Earth Day event” and the title of the article has been altered since it was first written to retract the claim of being a co-founder. Looks like you’ve fallen for fake news by MSNBC.

    What is strange is that the original date proposed and agreed to at the UN for an Earth Day was 21 March back in 1970, but we’re supposed to believe the USA got it moved to 22 April by a wilderness conservationist Democrat senator simply because it was exactly 1 month after the UN date and not at all because it’s also the anniversary of Vladimir Lenin’s birth. Not suspicious at all. Nyet.

  12. Clearly this death tax thing is just like having government thugs hold down and beat your elders for money when you haven’t got the conviction or capacity to do it yourself.

    Really, it is just elder abuse; Gen X and the millennials will demand it (“clearly this was a stupid law…”) be repealed when enough of the (‘fuckin!) Boomers kick the bucket.

  13. So when Bowen announces the unexpected “Sledge hammer to revenues” forces him to implement McMannus’ Death Duties and discovers a trillion dollars in reverse mortgages written in May 2024, whats he got left?

  14. John Constantine

    Watching tomorrows auctionsplus to see the impact of the nsw grazing division autumn break on sheep prices.

    https://auctionsplus.com.au/auctionV2/New/#/catalogue/12252

  15. Colonel: Einhorn IS Finkle. Finkle IS Einhorn.

    This is the kind of thing when you realise that we’re in the middle of the Crying Game Election ((TM), ARR Calli Corp (TM)) campaign.

  16. Helen

    At the last ALP National conference (no link)

    The inheritance tax was voted by the majoity of candidates as being a Labor objective within the next term of government. The ACTU proudly suppports this initiative.

    They must have spring cleaned the internets again.

  17. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Zulu – ALP death duties will be federal. And only hit middle income like in the past. ALP don’t care. Voters have choices.

    It’s going to present all the “Bollinger Bolsheviks” – the likes of Paul Keating, Bob Hawke, Whining William – with an interesting moral dilemma. Do you hand back the forty percent of your estate to the State, as required by the legislation, or do you structure your affairs so that that you pay little, if any, death duties?

  18. Leigh Lowe

    cohenite

    #2994913, posted on April 22, 2019 at 7:43 pm

    Leigh Lowe

    #2994911, posted on April 22, 2019 at 7:41 pm

    That’s funny but I don’t think you can under-estimate the stupidity of young folk, blinded as they often are by being part of a cause.

    Yes, it is kind of funny, but a yuuuge vein of truth runs through it.
    Currently it is being presented as an abstraction … “tax da rich”.
    Of course, the average Gen Y doesn’t see mum and dad’s house as particularly opulent, nor do they think their parents have excessive savings.

    Yes, yes … a threshold of $2 m to $3 m sounds right. Dude, we’d be made if we had, like, half that.”

    OK, so mum and dad own a house in inner city Melbourne ($1.5 to $2.0 m minimum) and they have super equivalent to an annuity which would deliver the old age pension plus benefits (say, $800k to $1m)
    Gosh, there’s your $2.5m to $3.0m, right there.
    And if there is one thing Boomers hate it is paying tax.
    Once their trusted Financial Adviser tells them that saving is futile and they may as well sell and spend, standby for some intergenerational-interfamily tensions.

  19. Knuckle Dragger

    Boambee, 7.25pm;

    I really don’t know if I have that heritage or not.

    I’m a helmet guy, not a beanie guy though.

    Does that help?

  20. Knuckle Dragger

    OB,

    I am guided by St. Quentin in all things.

    Ezekiel 25:17 refers.

  21. Boambee John

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #2994953, posted on April 22, 2019 at 8:20 pm
    Zulu – ALP death duties will be federal. And only hit middle income like in the past. ALP don’t care. Voters have choices.

    It’s going to present all the “Bollinger Bolsheviks” – the likes of Paul Keating, Bob Hawke, Whining William – with an interesting moral dilemma. Do you hand back the forty percent of your estate to the State, as required by the legislation, or do you structure your affairs so that that you pay little, if any, death duties?

    Oh, I don’t think they will see any moral dilemma at all. The law is only for the proles, not the nomenklatura.

  22. Boambee John

    KD

    It was an idle question, more to expand my knowledge of the Torah than a serious question about you.

    Still, helmet …

  23. Knuckle Dragger

    Nota,

    You weren’t there either, and nor was I. These are credible reports from allegedly humanitarian organisations, and entirely consistent with that way of life for these cretins – and have been for 1400 years.

    But sure – bring the damaged goods here. It’s like only bringing ‘a little bit’ of foot and mouth onto a cattle station. I’m not an advocate of killing them where they stand in Syria or Turkey, although that’s no doubt an option for some but I’m damned if I’m going to approve of them being brought back into this country alongside normal people on their pinky promise of not doing it again.

    Or worse, just be apathetic about it. ‘They’ll come whether we like it or not’ – no worries, throw in the towel now and then bitch about it when the inevitable happens.

    Go ahead, St.Nota. Buy that taipan as a pet and see what happens.

  24. Knuckle Dragger

    Mark A, earlier;

    The first five books in the OT are also the Torah?

    Man, I just keep learning stuff here.

  25. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Frank Walker from National Tiles
    #2994951, posted on April 22, 2019 at 8:16 pm

    Einhorn IS Finkle. Finkle IS Einhorn.

    I’m required to vote in this election…
    …and I’m looking for a clean pair of shorts.

  26. C.L.

    Purchased today …
    In this month’s Women’s Weekly: Inside The Shame of George Pell.
    by Louise Milligan

    I was raised a devoted Catholic.

    LOL. Hi Alan.

    SPECIAL REPORT: the rise and fall of Cardinal George Pell
    Television reporter Louise Milligan spent three years investigating George Pell and the Catholic Church and what she discovered has made her question her church and the justice system.
    The Australian Women’s Weekly 25 Mar 2019

    I was raised a devoted Catholic. Mass every Sunday, confession, giving up sweets for Lent. At school we recited Hail Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy and at lunchtime didn’t step on lines on the pavement lest it be declared that we loved the devil. It’s perhaps that upbringing that, in 2015, drew me to cover the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Abuse for ABC’s 7.30 program. That year, I met a woman, Julie Stewart, who was the same age as me. Julie had been raised in a parish across Melbourne from where I grew up. I’ll never forget seeing her First Communion photo – eyes cast to the heavens, her starchy white dress, veil and stiff crown of artificial flowers, her frilly socks and little patent leather shoes. Julie’s photo was just like mine from when I was eight. It reminded me of the innocent hope we all grew up with.

    Julie had all of that hope and innocence dashed when she was abused in the confessional by a thoroughly horrible human called Father Peter Searson, a Brylcreemed paedophile priest who carried a gun around the parish school at Doveton, in Melbourne’s south-east, where he terrorised the children.

    Many years later, when he was giving evidence to the Victorian Parliamentary Inquiry into child abuse, Cardinal George Pell denied knowing about sexual abuse at Doveton, saying only “there might be victims”. But as we discovered for our program, in 1998 Pell, then Archbishop of Melbourne, had sent Julie a letter apologising for the abuse and paying her a confidential settlement through his Melbourne Response scheme. It made me think two things: First, I should investigate this man more because I had serious questions about whether he was a truth-teller.

    Second, that I could so easily have been that little Catholic girl whose trust was betrayed.

    I by no means thought Pell himself was an abuser until early 2016. From February that year, I began to meet men who made extremely concerning allegations about the Cardinal, going back decades.

    I kept an open mind about Pell’s guilt. In fact, when a newspaper first ran an unsourced story that there was a police investigation into Pell, I found it very hard to believe that if it was true, it would not have come out by that point, given the Cardinal’s huge presence in the Australian cultural and political landscape.

    But since then, I have spent countless hours researching Royal Commission archives. I have learned that it takes an average of 25.7 years for survivors of child sexual abuse to come forward. In the case of the young man who was the key witness in the trial that resulted in Pell being convicted on December 11 (and finally reportable last month), it had only been 19 years since he was, the jury found, sexually abused by Pell. The other young man who was with him, who tragically died of a drug overdose without making a complaint, was also well inside that time frame.

    Survivors talk about the shame and embarrassment of coming forward. Imagine how much more difficult that would be when you are talking about a prince of the Catholic Church – the third most senior person in the Vatican. It’s a daunting ask of anyone, not least a victim of childhood trauma.

    There was nothing in the men whom I began to meet (and whose stories I told in my book, Cardinal, The Rise and Fall of George Pell) that made me think that any of them were not telling the truth. Quite the reverse: it was abundantly clear they had nothing to gain from coming forward and everything to lose. I worried the strain of it would see them give up.

    Being a complainant in a sexual crime trial is a terrible ordeal. In this case, it took nearly four years from the complaints being made to police to the news that Pell was guilty. In that time, they had to undergo brutal cross-examination from a QC who would later describe oral rape of a child as “vanilla sexual penetration”. All of that happened behind closed doors. I think you would have to have a florid mental illness to endure that if it hadn’t happened. And while these men have suffered from posttraumatic stress, they do not have florid mental illnesses.

    Like everyone else in Australia, I did wonder about Pell’s decision not to fly to Australia in late 2015 because of a heart condition. One of the fascinating things I discovered when researching my book was that Pell’s sick note had been written by a Vatican doctor who is responsible for declaring medical miracles, which mean that a person gets the tick of approval for being a saint. I thought that was a telling choice of person to make the decision that Pell was too ill to fly. On the eve of my book launch, Pell was photographed at Heathrow in London after coming off a plane from Rome.

    That photo and that evening is etched in my brain because releasing my book was a leap of faith into shark-infested waters. The Cardinal has always used and sought out power and powerful friendships. Even now, as a convicted p–dophile, he enjoys support from friends in high places. Nonetheless, the response has been 99.9 per cent positive. I have had dozens and dozens of messages from people around the country and internationally, many of them ordinary lay Catholics or religious like nuns and priests, who are pleased that a light has been shone on this very dark place.

    A loud and shouty minority has insisted Pell is innocent. The fact that the defenders of a now-convicted paedophile include two former Prime Ministers floors me. I understand that people have friendships and political alliances with Pell. They have gone in to battle with him in the culture wars. But their comments have shown, in my view, an extraordinary lack of empathy for victims and their

    families who are hurting. A jury which was in possession of all the facts has convicted. The pundits sit in their armchairs with no such appreciation of all of those facts.

    But a dawn of change is sweeping through parishes and schools. The institutional denial of previous years has, among ordinary Catholics who correspond with me at least, been replaced with disgust, embarrassment and anger. The fact that the man at the top of the tree was involved leaves them reeling.

    I have heard from parents and student alumni, livid that schools in Sydney and Melbourne have circulated a newspaper article by Jesuit priest and commentator, Father Frank Brennan, which seeks to undermine the guilty verdict.

    The most surprising example of this was St Kevin’s College in Melbourne. That’s where the two choirboys who were victims of Pell won scholarships.

    The jury has found that Pell committed shocking crimes against those two boys in 1996. One became a heroin user, at just 14, the year after the abuse took place. He was addicted for the rest of his life until he had an overdose at age 30. Both boys lost their scholarships to the prestigious St Kevin’s because they lost their places in the choir after the abuse.

    The parents who contacted me cannot believe that the school would be sending material like Brennan’s piece, given that heart-breaking history. They feel it was a profoundly insensitive thing for the school to do.

    From what I have seen, there is a lot of disquiet about how the institutional Catholic educational hierarchy is dealing with this issue. And it is at odds with the feelings of many ordinary Catholics.

    The courage of the young man at the centre of this crime is incredibly admirable. He is an intensely private person and I do not speak for him and this has been an absolute ordeal, but he has managed to convince a jury he is telling the truth under the most trying of circumstances. He has overcome an expensive and brutal legal team acting for George Pell. I cannot imagine the strain he has been under and also how difficult it would have been for him to have to relive his childhood trauma under those circumstances. He ought to be commended.

    Then, of course, there is the family of the boy who died. They now know their son went through this and never felt that he could disclose it. That instead, he anaesthetised his pain with heroin from the age of 14.

    Again, this is a depressingly familiar trajectory too often told to the Royal Commission. Holding onto a terrible secret hurts a young person. Drugs dull that. As Professor Carolyn Quadrio, a psychiatrist who is a specialist in childhood sexual abuse, particularly by clergy, told me, prisons are full of people who have been sexually abused as children.

    I look at my own children and it saddens me to think of what those boys went through. I remember when we started shooting a reenactment of a game being played by George Pell and some eight-yearold boys at a swimming pool for our ABC story. We used my son and my neighbour’s boy for that scene. They enjoyed playing the game. It brought home to myself and my friend the horrible loss of trust that children who are victims of sexual abuse by clergy suffer. For if a person who is meant to represent all that is good in the world can’t be trusted, who can? We sat there in nauseated silence.

    And what of when these traumatised little children, later broken adults, find the courage in themselves to report to police? They are met with a process that I found, first-hand, to be unnecessarily harsh. We had a five-year Royal Commission which made all sorts of recommendations about how the criminal justice process ought better be done. But from what I witnessed, there is still much to be achieved and I don’t think some of the players in the system have heeded that message at all.

    I felt utterly brutalised in the Committal Proceedings courtroom in the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court. I felt like I had been hit by a truck. This was nothing compared to how those vulnerable men felt.

    As a fellow witness, I wasn’t allowed to speak to them during that time and it was enormously difficult not to be able to reach out and say, ‘I hope you are okay, I’m thinking of you’. I am enormously grateful to these men for trusting me, for coming forward, for having the fortitude to keep going.

    We have to do better, otherwise I fear that the incentive for people to disclose to police will remain very low. That’s a bad thing for justice.

    And what does that mean, in practical terms? It means the people who destroy little children’s lives will get away with it.

    She admits the “victim” is mentally ill. So that’s something.
    She airbrushes the failed first trial and fails to mention that the second “victim” said the whole story was bullshit. She also fails to mention that Searson – long protected by homosexual weasel Frank Little – was booted when Pell became archbishop.

  27. C.L.

    Purchased today …
    In this month’s Women’s Weekly: Inside The Shame of George Pell.
    by Louise Milligan

    I was raised a devoted Catholic.

    LOL. Hi Alan.

    SPECIAL REPORT: the rise and fall of Cardinal George Pell
    Television reporter Louise Milligan spent three years investigating George Pell and the Catholic Church and what she discovered has made her question her church and the justice system.
    The Australian Women’s Weekly 25 Mar 2019

    I was raised a devoted Catholic. Mass every Sunday, confession, giving up sweets for Lent. At school we recited Hail Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy and at lunchtime didn’t step on lines on the pavement lest it be declared that we loved the devil. It’s perhaps that upbringing that, in 2015, drew me to cover the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Abuse for ABC’s 7.30 program. That year, I met a woman, Julie Stewart, who was the same age as me. Julie had been raised in a parish across Melbourne from where I grew up. I’ll never forget seeing her First Communion photo – eyes cast to the heavens, her starchy white dress, veil and stiff crown of artificial flowers, her frilly socks and little patent leather shoes. Julie’s photo was just like mine from when I was eight. It reminded me of the innocent hope we all grew up with.

    Julie had all of that hope and innocence dashed when she was abused in the confessional by a thoroughly horrible human called Father Peter Searson, a Brylcreemed p–doph1le priest who carried a gun around the parish school at Doveton, in Melbourne’s south-east, where he terrorised the children.

    Many years later, when he was giving evidence to the Victorian Parliamentary Inquiry into child abuse, Cardinal George Pell denied knowing about sexual abuse at Doveton, saying only “there might be victims”. But as we discovered for our program, in 1998 Pell, then Archbishop of Melbourne, had sent Julie a letter apologising for the abuse and paying her a confidential settlement through his Melbourne Response scheme. It made me think two things: First, I should investigate this man more because I had serious questions about whether he was a truth-teller.

    Second, that I could so easily have been that little Catholic girl whose trust was betrayed.

    I by no means thought Pell himself was an abuser until early 2016. From February that year, I began to meet men who made extremely concerning allegations about the Cardinal, going back decades.

    I kept an open mind about Pell’s guilt. In fact, when a newspaper first ran an unsourced story that there was a police investigation into Pell, I found it very hard to believe that if it was true, it would not have come out by that point, given the Cardinal’s huge presence in the Australian cultural and political landscape.

    But since then, I have spent countless hours researching Royal Commission archives. I have learned that it takes an average of 25.7 years for survivors of child sexual abuse to come forward. In the case of the young man who was the key witness in the trial that resulted in Pell being convicted on December 11 (and finally reportable last month), it had only been 19 years since he was, the jury found, sexually abused by Pell. The other young man who was with him, who tragically died of a drug overdose without making a complaint, was also well inside that time frame.

    Survivors talk about the shame and embarrassment of coming forward. Imagine how much more difficult that would be when you are talking about a prince of the Catholic Church – the third most senior person in the Vatican. It’s a daunting ask of anyone, not least a victim of childhood trauma.

    There was nothing in the men whom I began to meet (and whose stories I told in my book, Cardinal, The Rise and Fall of George Pell) that made me think that any of them were not telling the truth. Quite the reverse: it was abundantly clear they had nothing to gain from coming forward and everything to lose. I worried the strain of it would see them give up.

    Being a complainant in a sexual crime trial is a terrible ordeal. In this case, it took nearly four years from the complaints being made to police to the news that Pell was guilty. In that time, they had to undergo brutal cross-examination from a QC who would later describe oral rape of a child as “vanilla sexual penetration”. All of that happened behind closed doors. I think you would have to have a florid mental illness to endure that if it hadn’t happened. And while these men have suffered from posttraumatic stress, they do not have florid mental illnesses.

    Like everyone else in Australia, I did wonder about Pell’s decision not to fly to Australia in late 2015 because of a heart condition. One of the fascinating things I discovered when researching my book was that Pell’s sick note had been written by a Vatican doctor who is responsible for declaring medical miracles, which mean that a person gets the tick of approval for being a saint. I thought that was a telling choice of person to make the decision that Pell was too ill to fly. On the eve of my book launch, Pell was photographed at Heathrow in London after coming off a plane from Rome.

    That photo and that evening is etched in my brain because releasing my book was a leap of faith into shark-infested waters. The Cardinal has always used and sought out power and powerful friendships. Even now, as a convicted p–dophile, he enjoys support from friends in high places. Nonetheless, the response has been 99.9 per cent positive. I have had dozens and dozens of messages from people around the country and internationally, many of them ordinary lay Catholics or religious like nuns and priests, who are pleased that a light has been shone on this very dark place.

    A loud and shouty minority has insisted Pell is innocent. The fact that the defenders of a now-convicted paedophile include two former Prime Ministers floors me. I understand that people have friendships and political alliances with Pell. They have gone in to battle with him in the culture wars. But their comments have shown, in my view, an extraordinary lack of empathy for victims and their

    families who are hurting. A jury which was in possession of all the facts has convicted. The pundits sit in their armchairs with no such appreciation of all of those facts.

    But a dawn of change is sweeping through parishes and schools. The institutional denial of previous years has, among ordinary Catholics who correspond with me at least, been replaced with disgust, embarrassment and anger. The fact that the man at the top of the tree was involved leaves them reeling.

    I have heard from parents and student alumni, livid that schools in Sydney and Melbourne have circulated a newspaper article by Jesuit priest and commentator, Father Frank Brennan, which seeks to undermine the guilty verdict.

    The most surprising example of this was St Kevin’s College in Melbourne. That’s where the two choirboys who were victims of Pell won scholarships.

    The jury has found that Pell committed shocking crimes against those two boys in 1996. One became a heroin user, at just 14, the year after the abuse took place. He was addicted for the rest of his life until he had an overdose at age 30. Both boys lost their scholarships to the prestigious St Kevin’s because they lost their places in the choir after the abuse.

    The parents who contacted me cannot believe that the school would be sending material like Brennan’s piece, given that heart-breaking history. They feel it was a profoundly insensitive thing for the school to do.

    From what I have seen, there is a lot of disquiet about how the institutional Catholic educational hierarchy is dealing with this issue. And it is at odds with the feelings of many ordinary Catholics.

    The courage of the young man at the centre of this crime is incredibly admirable. He is an intensely private person and I do not speak for him and this has been an absolute ordeal, but he has managed to convince a jury he is telling the truth under the most trying of circumstances. He has overcome an expensive and brutal legal team acting for George Pell. I cannot imagine the strain he has been under and also how difficult it would have been for him to have to relive his childhood trauma under those circumstances. He ought to be commended.

    Then, of course, there is the family of the boy who died. They now know their son went through this and never felt that he could disclose it. That instead, he anaesthetised his pain with heroin from the age of 14.

    Again, this is a depressingly familiar trajectory too often told to the Royal Commission. Holding onto a terrible secret hurts a young person. Drugs dull that. As Professor Carolyn Quadrio, a psychiatrist who is a specialist in childhood sexual abuse, particularly by clergy, told me, prisons are full of people who have been sexually abused as children.

    I look at my own children and it saddens me to think of what those boys went through. I remember when we started shooting a reenactment of a game being played by George Pell and some eight-yearold boys at a swimming pool for our ABC story. We used my son and my neighbour’s boy for that scene. They enjoyed playing the game. It brought home to myself and my friend the horrible loss of trust that children who are victims of sexual abuse by clergy suffer. For if a person who is meant to represent all that is good in the world can’t be trusted, who can? We sat there in nauseated silence.

    And what of when these traumatised little children, later broken adults, find the courage in themselves to report to police? They are met with a process that I found, first-hand, to be unnecessarily harsh. We had a five-year Royal Commission which made all sorts of recommendations about how the criminal justice process ought better be done. But from what I witnessed, there is still much to be achieved and I don’t think some of the players in the system have heeded that message at all.

    I felt utterly brutalised in the Committal Proceedings courtroom in the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court. I felt like I had been hit by a truck. This was nothing compared to how those vulnerable men felt.

    As a fellow witness, I wasn’t allowed to speak to them during that time and it was enormously difficult not to be able to reach out and say, ‘I hope you are okay, I’m thinking of you’. I am enormously grateful to these men for trusting me, for coming forward, for having the fortitude to keep going.

    We have to do better, otherwise I fear that the incentive for people to disclose to police will remain very low. That’s a bad thing for justice.

    And what does that mean, in practical terms? It means the people who destroy little children’s lives will get away with it.

    She admits the “victim” is mentally ill. So that’s something.
    She airbrushes the failed first trial and fails to mention that the second “victim” said the whole story was bullshit. She also fails to mention that Searson – long protected by homosexual weasel Frank Little – was booted when Pell became archbishop.

  28. Leigh Lowe

    JC

    #2994835, posted on April 22, 2019 at 6:33 pm

    To be fair, I think ScoMo’s visit to the Buddhist synagogue was scheduled a while ago.

    He never came to ours.

    He might have.
    You were prolly on your phone to your broker.

  29. C.L.

    Purchased today …
    In this month’s Women’s Weekly: Inside The Shame of George Pell.
    by Louise Milligan

    I was raised a devoted Catholic.

    LOL. Hi Alan.

    SPECIAL REPORT: the rise and fall of Cardinal George Pell
    Television reporter Louise Milligan spent three years investigating George Pell and the Catholic Church and what she discovered has made her question her church and the justice system.
    The Australian Women’s Weekly 25 Mar 2019

    I was raised a devoted Catholic. Mass every Sunday, confession, giving up sweets for Lent. At school we recited Hail Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy and at lunchtime didn’t step on lines on the pavement lest it be declared that we loved the devil. It’s perhaps that upbringing that, in 2015, drew me to cover the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Abuse for ABC’s 7.30 program. That year, I met a woman, Julie Stewart, who was the same age as me. Julie had been raised in a parish across Melbourne from where I grew up. I’ll never forget seeing her First Communion photo – eyes cast to the heavens, her starchy white dress, veil and stiff crown of artificial flowers, her frilly socks and little patent leather shoes. Julie’s photo was just like mine from when I was eight. It reminded me of the innocent hope we all grew up with.

    Julie had all of that hope and innocence dashed when she was abused in the confessional by a thoroughly horrible human called Father Peter Searson, a Brylcreemed p–doph1le priest who carried a gun around the parish school at Doveton, in Melbourne’s south-east, where he terrorised the children.

    Many years later, when he was giving evidence to the Victorian Parliamentary Inquiry into child abuse, Cardinal George Pell denied knowing about sexual abuse at Doveton, saying only “there might be victims”. But as we discovered for our program, in 1998 Pell, then Archbishop of Melbourne, had sent Julie a letter apologising for the abuse and paying her a confidential settlement through his Melbourne Response scheme. It made me think two things: First, I should investigate this man more because I had serious questions about whether he was a truth-teller.

    Second, that I could so easily have been that little Catholic girl whose trust was betrayed.

    I by no means thought Pell himself was an abuser until early 2016. From February that year, I began to meet men who made extremely concerning allegations about the Cardinal, going back decades.

    I kept an open mind about Pell’s guilt. In fact, when a newspaper first ran an unsourced story that there was a police investigation into Pell, I found it very hard to believe that if it was true, it would not have come out by that point, given the Cardinal’s huge presence in the Australian cultural and political landscape.

    But since then, I have spent countless hours researching Royal Commission archives. I have learned that it takes an average of 25.7 years for survivors of child sexual abuse to come forward. In the case of the young man who was the key witness in the trial that resulted in Pell being convicted on December 11 (and finally reportable last month), it had only been 19 years since he was, the jury found, sexually abused by Pell. The other young man who was with him, who tragically died of a drug overdose without making a complaint, was also well inside that time frame.

    Survivors talk about the shame and embarrassment of coming forward. Imagine how much more difficult that would be when you are talking about a prince of the Catholic Church – the third most senior person in the Vatican. It’s a daunting ask of anyone, not least a victim of childhood trauma.

    There was nothing in the men whom I began to meet (and whose stories I told in my book, Cardinal, The Rise and Fall of George Pell) that made me think that any of them were not telling the truth. Quite the reverse: it was abundantly clear they had nothing to gain from coming forward and everything to lose. I worried the strain of it would see them give up.

    Being a complainant in a sexual crime trial is a terrible ordeal. In this case, it took nearly four years from the complaints being made to police to the news that Pell was guilty. In that time, they had to undergo brutal cross-examination from a QC who would later describe oral rape of a child as “vanilla sexual penetration”. All of that happened behind closed doors. I think you would have to have a florid mental illness to endure that if it hadn’t happened. And while these men have suffered from posttraumatic stress, they do not have florid mental illnesses.

    Like everyone else in Australia, I did wonder about Pell’s decision not to fly to Australia in late 2015 because of a heart condition. One of the fascinating things I discovered when researching my book was that Pell’s sick note had been written by a Vatican doctor who is responsible for declaring medical miracles, which mean that a person gets the tick of approval for being a saint. I thought that was a telling choice of person to make the decision that Pell was too ill to fly. On the eve of my book launch, Pell was photographed at Heathrow in London after coming off a plane from Rome.

    That photo and that evening is etched in my brain because releasing my book was a leap of faith into shark-infested waters. The Cardinal has always used and sought out power and powerful friendships. Even now, as a convicted p–dophile, he enjoys support from friends in high places. Nonetheless, the response has been 99.9 per cent positive. I have had dozens and dozens of messages from people around the country and internationally, many of them ordinary lay Catholics or religious like nuns and priests, who are pleased that a light has been shone on this very dark place.

    A loud and shouty minority has insisted Pell is innocent. The fact that the defenders of a now-convicted p–doph1le include two former Prime Ministers floors me. I understand that people have friendships and political alliances with Pell. They have gone in to battle with him in the culture wars. But their comments have shown, in my view, an extraordinary lack of empathy for victims and their

    families who are hurting. A jury which was in possession of all the facts has convicted. The pundits sit in their armchairs with no such appreciation of all of those facts.

    But a dawn of change is sweeping through parishes and schools. The institutional denial of previous years has, among ordinary Catholics who correspond with me at least, been replaced with disgust, embarrassment and anger. The fact that the man at the top of the tree was involved leaves them reeling.

    I have heard from parents and student alumni, livid that schools in Sydney and Melbourne have circulated a newspaper article by Jesuit priest and commentator, Father Frank Brennan, which seeks to undermine the guilty verdict.

    The most surprising example of this was St Kevin’s College in Melbourne. That’s where the two choirboys who were victims of Pell won scholarships.

    The jury has found that Pell committed shocking crimes against those two boys in 1996. One became a heroin user, at just 14, the year after the abuse took place. He was addicted for the rest of his life until he had an overdose at age 30. Both boys lost their scholarships to the prestigious St Kevin’s because they lost their places in the choir after the abuse.

    The parents who contacted me cannot believe that the school would be sending material like Brennan’s piece, given that heart-breaking history. They feel it was a profoundly insensitive thing for the school to do.

    From what I have seen, there is a lot of disquiet about how the institutional Catholic educational hierarchy is dealing with this issue. And it is at odds with the feelings of many ordinary Catholics.

    The courage of the young man at the centre of this crime is incredibly admirable. He is an intensely private person and I do not speak for him and this has been an absolute ordeal, but he has managed to convince a jury he is telling the truth under the most trying of circumstances. He has overcome an expensive and brutal legal team acting for George Pell. I cannot imagine the strain he has been under and also how difficult it would have been for him to have to relive his childhood trauma under those circumstances. He ought to be commended.

    Then, of course, there is the family of the boy who died. They now know their son went through this and never felt that he could disclose it. That instead, he anaesthetised his pain with heroin from the age of 14.

    Again, this is a depressingly familiar trajectory too often told to the Royal Commission. Holding onto a terrible secret hurts a young person. Drugs dull that. As Professor Carolyn Quadrio, a psychiatrist who is a specialist in childhood sexual abuse, particularly by clergy, told me, prisons are full of people who have been sexually abused as children.

    I look at my own children and it saddens me to think of what those boys went through. I remember when we started shooting a reenactment of a game being played by George Pell and some eight-yearold boys at a swimming pool for our ABC story. We used my son and my neighbour’s boy for that scene. They enjoyed playing the game. It brought home to myself and my friend the horrible loss of trust that children who are victims of sexual abuse by clergy suffer. For if a person who is meant to represent all that is good in the world can’t be trusted, who can? We sat there in nauseated silence.

    And what of when these traumatised little children, later broken adults, find the courage in themselves to report to police? They are met with a process that I found, first-hand, to be unnecessarily harsh. We had a five-year Royal Commission which made all sorts of recommendations about how the criminal justice process ought better be done. But from what I witnessed, there is still much to be achieved and I don’t think some of the players in the system have heeded that message at all.

    I felt utterly brutalised in the Committal Proceedings courtroom in the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court. I felt like I had been hit by a truck. This was nothing compared to how those vulnerable men felt.

    As a fellow witness, I wasn’t allowed to speak to them during that time and it was enormously difficult not to be able to reach out and say, ‘I hope you are okay, I’m thinking of you’. I am enormously grateful to these men for trusting me, for coming forward, for having the fortitude to keep going.

    We have to do better, otherwise I fear that the incentive for people to disclose to police will remain very low. That’s a bad thing for justice.

    And what does that mean, in practical terms? It means the people who destroy little children’s lives will get away with it.

    She admits the “victim” is mentally ill. So that’s something.
    She airbrushes the failed first trial and fails to mention that the second “victim” said the whole story was bullshit. She also fails to mention that Searson – long protected by homosexual weasel Frank Little – was booted when Pell became archbishop.

  30. Bruce of Newcastle

    Colonel – I haven’t ever looked up Einhorn, just seen the story from time to time. But the usual suspects have been airbrushing inconvenient party members lately, particularly Patrick Moore.

    It’d be even more amusing if Einhorn is a fake founder of a fake celebration of a fake movement to solve the fake problem of global warming. Compost all the way down.

  31. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘I just don’t believe a 17 y0 girl could be a threat’

    And that right there, St.Nota, is how demarcated you are from the real world.

    These 17 year old, and 16 year old girls are not Great Gatsby characters, sitting on swings under large oak trees on manicured lawns outside the conservatory, with bonnets and parasols discussing the benefits of potential marriage to that swine of a second son of Lord Ponsonby-Smythe.

    There is a reason the elite shock troops of every armed force for the last 200 years have been aged from 17 to 20. There are very fit, obey orders without question and because their minds have yet to fully function are easily moulded to ideologies and/or causes.

    Christ, my 14 yo son is six foot one and weighs almost 80kg. He can drive, he can use a knife, he can shoot and he can use the Internet. Should he become a devotee of a certain faith, would you also consider him not a threat because of his age?

    If you want, you can move the net zero benefit to society ‘non-threat’ into your joint, and see how quickly you’ll be doing all the housework with no reward and giving her, and her spawn, all your stuff. You know, like slavery.

    Buy that taipan, St.Nota. Buy that taipan.

  32. Leigh Lowe

    Knuckle Dragger

    #2994799, posted on April 22, 2019 at 5:51 pm

    Hawthorn fans booing Garry Ablett Jnr this afternoon.

    From this I have deduced that all Hawthorn fans are thieves and adulterers.

    I didn’t immediately join the dots on why he would be copping the boos.
    What a bunch of xunts.
    Still, their coach is a renowned coward punch sniper, so, yeah, why not.

  33. C.L.

    I think you would have to have a florid mental illness to endure that if it hadn’t happened. And while these men have suffered from posttraumatic stress, they do not have florid mental illnesses.

    I’m not sure what a “florid” mental illness might be but I’m pretty sure Milligan isn’t trained to judge. There are, in fact, endless examples of apparently credible people who make up complete bullshit stories and pursue them through innumerable processes and court proceedings.

  34. Helen

    It is funny isnt it? Rotherham girls of 12 who are being groomed and passed around if not nailed to the table are called young women. 17 year 0ld mother of 2.5 is called a child.

    I dont want them back. They would have cult status back here, be heros and heronines of the worst order, snakes in the den, spreading their venom to create more like them.

    One, just one, person who dies or is maimed through this, let God’s mercy be the only mercy you feel.

  35. C.L.

    Any word about what Bolta reported earlier today, re: blabbed about phone conversations taped together at the wrong date?

  36. C.L.

    That subject will be disappeared, Dot.
    Victoria Police has clearly been caught out illegally shopping wiretaps to Fairfax.
    They are trying to shirtfront the appeals court.

  37. Knuckle Dragger

    Helen, 8.54pm;

    Love it. Very accurate. They’re like the mouthy drunken cellulite-infested pub skanks that cause 90% of pub dust ups and then scream bloody murder when the wallopers turn up, but the second they’re in the back of the van becoming become snivelling, mascara streaked victims.

  38. Victoria Police has clearly been caught out illegally shopping wiretaps to Fairfax

    This and the 600+ serious criminal convictions at risk ion Victoria because of the lawyer X scandal?

    It would not be an extreme course of action to rebuild the VICPOL anew as a completely separate organsiation. You probably want to sack and lock up some of the judges and prosecutors as well.

    Not to mention the perjurers and outright fabulists.

  39. ion –> in

    I blame a retired bird loving R&D chemist.

  40. Knuckle Dragger

    Surveilling someone via phone, without a warrant, is one of the most illegal of things you can do.

    The relevant legislation is federal, and requires all sorts of very significant hurdles and hoops to navigate before you get near approval for this sort of thing, and even then it’s given only by a very senior judge or the chair of the AAT. Investigators are very, very careful with these applications, as the penalties are harsh beyond belief.

    No, I don’t know all of the intricate details behind this, but from what’s on display so far I will say that if even half of what Bolt reports is true, AND it becomes the subject of a competent investigation then some very senior VicPol people are in for the high jump.

    Expect a few early retirements due to ‘personal reasons’.

  41. Frank Walker:

    It would not be an extreme course of action to rebuild the VICPOL anew as a completely separate organsiation. You probably want to sack and lock up some of the judges and prosecutors as well.

    Bring on the Purges!

  42. Top Ender

    Watching Victoria on Foxtel.

    What started off a few years back as quite an entertaining series has become tiresome. The Social Justice Warriors have got to, or are, the writers. They are taking every opportunity to paint the British overlords of society as evil bastards. Prince Albert and Vicky are determined to fix up the ills of the class-bound tyranny they have inherited.

    This results in ridiculous scenarios. Her Maj has confidential advice from those below stairs; and is placed coincidentally where she can see evil tyrannical things happening in society. The placing of modern values – or the lack of them – creates a historical depiction that is 20% skewed from reality.

  43. Knuckle Dragger

    Ha!

    Jonathan Brown calls Melbourne soft during On the Couch.

    Lyon and Roosy burring up.

  44. No way in hell Queen Vic looked like Jenna Coleman.

  45. Bring on the Purges!

    “Hockey mask time”, as it is known to aficionados.

  46. No way in hell Queen Vic looked like Jenna Coleman.

    Although I have just seen Dr Suzannah Lipscomb say “sugar nuts, oh that’s naughty”, so maybe our fantasies have some basis in reality.

  47. rafiki redux

    Even a Shorten Labor government might baulk at a death tax in the next parliament. This however is not something the LNP would wish to say. The sign on the truck I saw on the Federal Highway suggests that they might plan a major and sustained attack on Labor and the Greens which at least insinuates that such a tax will be passed into law if Labor forms government. Have they gone too early with their scare campaign? Perhaps they had no choice and feel that they had to try something to turn the polls in their favour.

    On a different topic, I had the opportunity to put to Sophie York – the AC Senate #1 candidate in NSW – that AC should pick say 3 issues on which AC might be seen to have a distinctive platform, and that a policy of at least taking nuclear power as a serious option was one them. She seemed to respond positively, and given that a couple of days later ScoMo backed away, the opportunity to pick up votes based on this policy remains. AusCon supporters should appreciate that we are not aiming at government, but in getting up a Senator and, like the Greens can pitch our appeal to a clear minority of voters. Sophis also noted that the Bernardi adverts will be on screen soon.

  48. Nick

    Sophis also noted that the Bernardi adverts will be on screen soon.

    That’s good. I’m a Conservative in NSW and I’ve never heard of Sophie.

  49. Bruce of Newcastle

    Dot – I like critters too! My brushtail hasn’t arrived yet this evening for her carrot but the following was a nice story today:

    Goodfellow’s tree kangaroo Kimbe gives Australian Reptile Park a breeding pair of endangered species

    Tree kangas are much nicer than their niche-mates the sloths.

  50. C.L.

    Milligan:

    One of the fascinating things I discovered when researching my book was that Pell’s sick note had been written by a Vatican doctor who is responsible for declaring medical miracles, which mean that a person gets the tick of approval for being a saint. I thought that was a telling choice of person to make the decision that Pell was too ill to fly.

    This is another outright lie by Milligan. There is not – nor has there ever been – “a Vatican doctor” who declares medical miracles. Rather

    To even be considered, a potentially miraculous cure must be instantaneous or sudden, complete and permanent, and without apparent scientific explanation. When reviewing such cures, the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, the Vatican office that oversees sainthood applications, first turns potential miracles over to the Consulta Medica. This board, established by the Vatican in the mid-1900s, is made up of about 100 renowned Italian (and Catholic) physicians. Traditionally, a panel of five Consulta Medicadoctors will review the putative miracle, examining any available CT scans, X-rays, and medical reports. At least three of the five must agree that the hand of God has prevailed where science faltered.

    Her casual mockery of some of the finest medical minds in the world tells you what a lightweight and what a malicious arsehole Milligan is. She is saying that any doctor involved in investigating miracles must, ipso facto, be a fraud and a liar. She finds that easy to believe even as she defends a mentally ill “victim” recruited by Victoria Police as not being a fraud and a liar.

  51. None

    If anyone is mentally ill it is Milligan and that Marrs chick. Fancy trying to make your name by making stuff up about people you have never spoken to, nor even bothered to fact check with. Natural justice? Hell no. actually not even an attempt to verify the story. Just print whatever salacious smears and gossip you can find, They both remind me of the incompetent women you would find in corporatopia who only survived by malice and usually populated HR departments. I would suggest a bit of digging would reveal both those women have serious daddy issues. You know something like: she spread her legs to every Johnny come lately and got shitty she didn’t get whole hearted approval by the local parish priest at confession. So now she’s gonna reform the entire church. Augh. They ooze hubris and mental instability. With apologies to the good Catholics here but nothing more odious -and malicious- than collapsed Catholics, especially the female variety.

  52. mh

    Sri Lanka on edge after local Isl amic militant group blamed for Easter Sunday attacks: report

    Sri Lanka took drastic steps Monday to crack down on new potential terror threats by blocking social media and arresting more than a dozen after a series of suicide bombings allegedly carried out by a domestic radical Isl amic group ripped through its capital on Easter Sunday.

    The country’s health minister said the attacks, which killed at least 290 and injured more than 500, were carried out by seven suicide bombers from a local militant group named National Thowheed Jamath. Experts cited by The New York Times said the group promotes an Isl amic terrorist ideology. Police said 13 suspects in connection with the bombings have been arrested.

    “These attacks appear to be quite different and look as if they came right out of the ISIS, Al Qaeda, global militant jihadist playbook, as these are attacks fomenting religious hatred by attacking multiple churches on a high religious holiday,” Anne Speckhard, the director of the International Center for the Study of Violent Extremism, told the Times.

    All of the bombers were Sri Lankan citizens, but authorities suspect foreign links, Health Minister Rajitha Senaratne said at a news conference…

    https://www.foxnews.com/world/7-suicide-attackers-behind-sri-lankan-bombings-13-suspects-in-custody-authorities-say

  53. None

    There you go again, C.L. another fact that Milligan couldn’t be arsed checking. The Vatican run a press office and respond to questions like these.

  54. feelthebern

    Eddie Betts seems like a champion.
    Just saw what he & his brother in law got up to.
    That’s a role model.

  55. I’m not fuckin’ surprised.

    https://www.9news.com.au/road-toll

    I drove on a major highway today to visit family, I can attest that 95% of drivers today were out of their fucking brain pans.

    Each time I got overtaken by a heap of cars it was because some malicious arsehole cut me off.

    Driving back ONTO the highway near a service centre NO ONE would indicate to let me in, I had to WAIT for a minute on the ACTUAL HIGHWAY and NO ONE was obeying the speed limit.

    90%+ of the drivers did not follow at a safe distance, overtake safely or courteously etc.

    There was 3 separate occasions I (as “party *A*”) took evasive measures to prevent other parties (B, C, D & so on) from having accidents – before I drove a mere 200 km on the outbound leg.

    No fucking way am I driving in peak holiday season again.

    Coming home, at least three trucks (B-doubles) and two (SUVs) fucking nearly fell asleep at the wheel and veered into my lane ahead of me.

    Fucking madness.

    The only cops I saw were near a petrol station doing RBTs (WTF?)!

  56. Knuckle Dragger

    I have not read Milligan’s book. Obviously. Although I noted stacks of it in the back corner of the airport newsagency yesterday morning, while dropping off the manboy.

    I did read, however, C.L.’s thoughtfully provided excerpt upthread.

    Jesus wept. Her prose is almost Fitzsimons-like in its statuesque stupidity.

  57. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I drove on a major highway today to visit family, I can attest that 95% of drivers today were out of their fucking brain pans.

    I drive a firetruck, with the local volunteer brigade. The amount of brain dead morons, who think that you are on the road with the blue lights going, simply for the fun of it, has to be seen to be believed.

    The classic was two silly bints, driving at 60 Km per hour, in a 110 Km per hour speed limit – it subsequently emerged that they were eating lunch…

  58. Bruce of Newcastle

    I drove on a major highway today to visit family, I can attest that 95% of drivers today were out of their fucking brain pans.

    Dot – Seven news dinner time reported 3 road fatalities since Thursday. Then a later story reported five fatal overdoses at music festivals in the same period. So your hyperbolic comment may actually have a tiny bit of truth in it.

    Also they reported over 5,000 speeding fines since Thursday. Kaaa-ching!

  59. stackja

    Sri Lanka attacks likely the work of Islam1st militants: experts
    Kanupriya Kapoor, Joe Brock

    JAKARTA/SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Coordinated Easter Sunday bombings at churches and hotels in Sri Lanka bore the hallmarks of militant groups Islam1c State or al Qaeda, security experts said on Monday, citing the level of sophistication of the attacks.

    Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena’s office said intelligence reports indicated foreign terrorist organisations were behind Sri Lankan militants and asked for help from foreign nations.

  60. Infidel Tiger

    I hope Eddie Betts can help other Aboriginal boys get on the straight and narrow.

    He was a degenerate gambler, drinker and troublemaker and is now a happily married father and all time legend of the game.

  61. Leigh Lowe

    Knuckle Dragger

    #2994981, posted on April 22, 2019 at 9:15 pm

    Ha!

    Jonathan Brown calls Melbourne soft during On the Couch.

    Lyon and Roosy burring up.

    Bwah, ha, ha, ha.
    Two things going on there:-
    1. Roos “left them in excellent shape.” … not.
    2. Lyon normally laps up shit Melbourne performances because it inevitably leads to pleas for the greatest coach who has never coached to return and save them. Great boost to his ego, but even he knows they are a basket case.

  62. Knuckle Dragger

    Jussie Smollett’s brother reveals that this generation’s answer to Fairlie Arrow is suffering ‘night terrors’ over the reported attack by MAGA hat wearers.

    Jussie’s brother’s name is JoJo. Jussie and JoJo Smollett.

    The allegation would have been more credible if the attackers were their parents.

  63. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger

    #2995006, posted on April 22, 2019 at 10:01 pm

    I hope Eddie Betts can help other Aboriginal boys get on the straight and narrow.

    He was a degenerate gambler, drinker and troublemaker and is now a happily married father and all time legend of the game.

    Any chance he could sort Adam Goodes out?

  64. Nick

    Lyon gives me the shits. Wasn’t he on Channel 9? Oh hang on.

  65. Knuckle Dragger

    There is apparently a panic in Britain, as Easter temperatures of a scorching 24 degrees have caused traffic jams, fires and panic buying in supermarkets.

    How this pack of pasty, kipper eating light blue simpletons conquered at least 25% of this planet escapes me.

  66. feelthebern

    How this pack of pasty, kipper eating light blue simpletons conquered at least 25% of this planet escapes me.

    English Breakfast tea.

  67. Top Ender

    If you weren’t a brain-dead moron driving for 10 hours out of Sydney in the Easter break, you’d be one by the time you drove back in four days later.

    We used to live at the naval base HMAS Creswell, about two hours south of the city, and within the national park area around Jervis Bay.

    It was like the legendary lemming rush every year. Starting around the Wednesday before Easter, thousands of cars would start pouring south. (And north and west too actually.) By Thursday afternoon it was nose to tail at 60 kph. If they were lucky. Accidents plentiful.

    All of this to occupy a small tent space, alongside thousands of others. The descent on the local shops of Hyams Beach, Nowra, Huskisson and so on was ridiculous. We learnt in our first year to stockpile for the duration, and not to put our noses outside the base.

    Needless to say, our friends noticed soon enough that the naval base was a jewel in the crown, and the requests to come and stay got earlier and earlier every year.

    Paul Keating reckoned if you weren’t living in Sydney you were essentially camping out, but big cities come with a set of disadvantages living-wise.

  68. Mitch M.

    I drove on a major highway today to visit family, I can attest that 95% of drivers today were out of their fucking brain pans.

    Even 50 years ago if you rode a motorcycle and didn’t assume most drivers were hopeless you were asking for death.

  69. feelthebern

    I won’t go into detail, but GoT tonight was one of the worst episodes ever.
    It’s turned into the last season of the Soprano’s, just wrap it up already.

  70. Top Ender

    If you weren’t a brain-dead moron driving for 10 hours out of Sydney in the Easter break, you’d be one by the time you drove back in four days later.

    We used to live at the naval base HMAS Creswell, about two hours south of the city, and within the national park area around Jervis Bay.

    It was like the legendary lemming rush every year. Starting around the Wednesday before Easter, thousands of cars would start pouring south. (And north and west too actually.) By Thursday afternoon it was nose to tail at 60 kph. If they were lucky. Accidents plentiful.

    All of this to occupy a small tent space, alongside thousands of others. The descent on the local shops of Hyams Beach, Nowra, Huskisson and so on was ridiculous. We learnt in our first year to stockpile for the duration, and not to put our noses outside the base.

    Needless to say, our friends noticed soon enough that the naval base was a je wel in the crown, and the requests to come and stay got earlier and earlier every year.

    Paul Keating reckoned if you weren’t living in Sydney you were essentially camping out, but big cities come with a set of disadvantages living-wise.

  71. Leigh Lowe

    I am pretty sure that the AFL and footy media take a very dim view of players being booed merely because of their culture and beliefs.
    So, I assume Gillon McPolo-Pony will be apologising to Gary Ablett first thing tomorrow.

  72. KD

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-48003585

    WTF?

    24 degrees? Sick horses?

    I think Cardiff has actually only been at 20 deg C.

  73. feelthebern

    I don’t understand why people leave Sydney on the Easter long weekend.
    Everything is open.
    Traffic is a breeze.
    There’s a million things on.
    Sydney at Easter time is one of the best times of the year.

  74. Knuckle Dragger

    Frank,

    That’s terrific!

    Wales – where if your horse faints you go to jail.

    They didn’t say how the horse got to the animal sanctuary though. Hopefully the passers-by vets got it going enough to re-strap it to the cart and drove it there.

    There’s an untapped market for Welsh equine ice vests.

  75. Knuckle Dragger

    ftb,

    What I don’t understand is why, every year, they go back.

  76. Frank

    How this pack of pasty, kipper eating light blue simpletons conquered at least 25% of this planet escapes me.

    It was the maxim gun wasn’t it?

  77. JC

    How this pack of pasty, kipper eating light blue simpletons conquered at least 25% of this planet escapes me.

    It’s all relative.

  78. feelthebern

    news.com.au tells me glitter boobs are a thing.
    I’m conflicted.
    I hate glitter.
    But I love boobs.
    What’s a man to do?

  79. rickw

    Frank Walker:

    It would not be an extreme course of action to rebuild the VICPOL anew as a completely separate organsiation. You probably want to sack and lock up some of the judges and prosecutors as well.

    Bring on the Purges!

    How about we just permanently DIY policing given that the only consistent theme in Vicpol’s history is corruption.

  80. Nick

    Bern,
    Close your eyes and just feel
    That will be $80 thanks.

  81. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Kingmaker: huge spending campaign hits pay dirt

    exclusive
    Simon Benson
    NATIONAL AFFAIRS EDITOR
    19 minutes ago April 22, 2019
    No Comments

    A surge in support for Clive Palmer on the back of a $30 million ­advertising campaign has given the billionaire the power to act as kingmaker in marginal seats, as the Coalition closes in on Labor in at least two of those electorates.

    An exclusive Newspoll of four marginal seats across the country, conducted for The Australian, shows the divisive Queensland businessman and former failed MP could also be on track to hold the balance of power in the Senate.

    The poll found the four seats — Herbert in north Queensland, Lindsay in western Sydney, ­Deakin in outer Melbourne and Pearce on Perth’s outskirts — rest on a knife edge, with preference flows from minor parties set to ­determine the outcome.

    The Australian understands senior Liberals are in advanced discussions with Mr Palmer’s team in a bid to secure a preference deal.

    The surprise return of Mr Palmer as a political force four years after his previous party’s collapse comes as Bill Shorten struggles to win over voters. Almost twice as many people polled in the four seats believed Scott Morrison would be a better prime minister.

    Mr Morrison leads Mr Shorten as preferred prime minister 49 to 27 per cent in Herbert, 53-33 in Lindsay, 51-37 in Deakin and 53-26 in Pearce.

    The poll found Liberal MP ­Michael Sukkar was almost ­assured of retaining Deakin but the LNP was in an arm-wrestle to wrest back Herbert from Labor. Labor is threatening in Attorney-General Christian Porter’s Liberal heartland seat of Pearce while the Liberals are in the game to win back Lindsay, which has changed hands four times since 1996.

    From the Oz. Suffering Christ, not this moron back again?

  82. Steve trickler

    rickw
    #2995026, posted on April 22, 2019 at 10:20 pm
    The most magnificent sight and sound:

    Thank you.

  83. Top Ender

    The surprise return of Mr Palmer as a political farce four years after his previous party’s collapse…

    There you go. Fixed.

  84. None

    How this pack of pasty, kipper eating light blue simpletons conquered at least 25% of this planet escapes me.

    Never underestimate the power of stupid people in very large groups.

  85. Farmer Gez

    I have heard from parents and student alumni, livid that schools in Sydney and Melbourne have circulated a newspaper article by Jesuit priest and commentator, Father Frank Brennan, which seeks to undermine the guilty verdict.

    Milligan is seriously trying to paint the erudite, mild and legally trained Brennan as some kind of Machiavellian pedophile defender.
    Out of her tiny little mind!
    Nobody that has seen or heard Brennan over his long career could possibly support her vile taint on his reputation.

  86. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    How this pack of pasty, kipper eating light blue simpletons conquered at least 25% of this planet escapes me.

    Rum, sodomy and the lash.

  87. Ubique

    While the ABC is busy working out how the Sri Lanka mass murders can be pinned on white supremicists or at least climate change deniers, the Wall St Journal is actually attempting to provide accurate reporting.

  88. Knuckle Dragger

    KD’s Life Hack for Blokes

    1. Go to Bunnings.
    2. Buy $200 worth of shit you may conceivably need over the next decade. Particularly chain. Anyone with a penis who thinks he has enough chain can stop calling himself a man.
    3. Get 2.5′ x 2′ x 2′ cardboard box to put shit in at checkout. Get sausage, go home.
    4. Empty out box, and place next to your favourite chair. This works for both indoor and outdoor chairs.
    5. Use box as a bin and fill with stubbies, dog food cans, cigarette packets, random bits of plastic, excess shopping bags and other detritus of life.
    6. When full, take out the front and dump in the wheelie bin of your smoking hot neighbour who rejected your advances four years ago but now has a bald, bearded hipster boyfriend with enough money to buy a new VW ute but is wondering what to do now she’s, er, starting to spread.
    7. Go to Bunnings.
    8. Live happily ever after.

    Don’t thank me. It’s a gift. Could have happened to anyone.

  89. mh

    The Australian mother and daughter who were killed when a bomb went off at church in the predominantly Catholic city of Negombo on Easter Sunday morning.

    https://www.theage.com.au/national/australian-mother-and-daughter-killed-in-sri-lankan-bombings-20190422-p51g9w.html

  90. Leigh Lowe

    Tragic story of the two lifesavers (father and son) from Port Campbell who drowned trying to save someone at Sherbrooke river.
    How do surf life-savers get into such strife?
    Well, Port Campbell is a sheltered cove with a short beach, albeit with a bit of a drop off into deep water.
    Sherbrooke river is outside the cove, 3 to 4 kms East with steep cliffs, rock shelfs and rock stacks (twelve apostles).
    Even in the most benign weather, a set of waves that we are known to get at Easter can turn the water within 50 – 100 metres of the cliffs into a washing machine.
    I doubt we will see SLSC volunteers venturing outside the cove to save suicidal tourists again.
    And nor should they.

  91. None

    Milligan breathlessly declaring she spent ages researching the Royal Commission archives. Sort of like a vulture looking for still warm flesh among dead bodies and not an original piece of research or journalism in sight. Dear God what did we women do to deserve such foul representation in the public eye?

  92. Mitch M.

    This is a surprising finding. Killing of senescent cells is important but at present options are very limited. If this holds true a good way forward.

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-11-antibiotics-senescent-cells-ageing.html

    At a single low-dosage, Azithromycin was shown to effectively kill and eliminate the senescent cells, with an efficiency of 97 percent.

  93. None

    lots of parents and children killed in Sri Lanka. An English man Ben Nicholson lost his wife and two kids. He survived with scratches. Howw do you absorb that? Rich Dane loses 3 of 4 kids. he would be inconsolable. Countless others – locals at church. Not to mention grieving families of the three commandos killed armed only with a firearm and a ladder. No armour. Yep I want the fuckers found and punished without mercy, too.

  94. Knuckle Dragger

    Surf lifesavers.

    One of the groups of people who I will concede in a heartbeat are better men than me.

    I swim like a housebrick, and always have. There’s a wave pool in Darwin, and I’m flat out staying alive in that, let alone being competent in it, let alone being competent in the ocean next to a pile of rocks, and let alone having that expertise and mental strength to save other people doing it.

    I heard about the drowning, but to my shame haven’t read about it carefully. I don’t know if the stupid tourist survived, but by Christ if it did he/she should be selling every single possession it has and giving the proceeds to the lifesavers’ family.

    Vale, you blokes.

  95. Entropy

    elthebern
    #2995029, posted on April 22, 2019 at 10:23 pm
    news.com.au tells me glitter boobs are a thing.
    I’m conflicted.
    I hate glitter.
    But I love boobs.
    What’s a man to do

    What’s a man to do?

    Try not to stare.

    Or if you don’t give a shit: ogle away.

  96. Memoryvault

    I’m conflicted.
    I hate glitter.
    But I love boobs.
    What’s a man to do

    You’re a generation too late, Bern.
    “Glitter” on boobs first became a fashion statement (that I am aware of) back in the early Seventies.
    Only today’s plastic “glitter” didn’t exist back then. Instead girls oiled their attributes with glycerin and then sprinkled Sparkles (a cake decoration) over the top.

    A guy then simply had to lick his way down to the main course. It made an interesting corollary to strip poker, and strip “spin the bottle”, two popular party games back then.

  97. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Vale, you blokes.

    What Knuckle Dragger said.

    Rest in Peace.

  98. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    A guy then simply had to lick his way down to the main course. It made an interesting corollary to strip poker, and strip “spin the bottle”, two popular party games back then.

    Memory Vault, when you get around to writing your memoirs, put me down for a signed copy, will you?

  99. Frank

    What’s a man to do?

    Try not to stare.

    Mirrored aviators are your friend, also with the added benefit of allowing one to engage in another favourite pastime. Smirking.

  100. Knuckle Dragger

    Stare away at boobs, I say. Glittered or not.

    ‘Excuse me, my face is up here.’

    ‘I know. That’s why I’m looking elsewhere.’

  101. Memoryvault

    Strip indoor cricket was the best, Zulu.
    Some girls just loved playing with the bats and balls.

  102. Memoryvault

    You’re kidding, Doomlord?
    A two line joke about indoor cricket?
    In moderation?

  103. Knuckle Dragger

    Indoor cricket is a pastime, not a sport, and played by poseurs.

    Warner probably played it.

  104. Knuckle Dragger

    A priest, a rabbi and a dog walk into an indoor cricket centre…..

  105. Knuckle Dragger

    Bet it was about those small round things you play indoor cricket with MV.

    Banned, you know.

  106. Indoor cricket is dodging high speed missiles in a closed room.
    Not fun at all.
    Not remotely sport.
    It is pure survival.

  107. Memoryvault

    Banned, you know.

    What? Small spherical objects you play cricket with?
    Banned?

    This place is definitely going to the dogs.

  108. Knuckle Dragger

    Watching 30 Rock.

    One character called another ‘gayer than the volley#all scene in Top Gun’.

    That’s pretty gay.

  109. Knuckle Dragger

    Banned, MV.

    As banned as two banned things tied together in a banned shop for saying banned words.

    Also gay.

  110. Memoryvault

    Not fun at all.

    The way we played it, it was.

    Not remotely sport.

    True.
    More of a mating ritual.

    It is pure survival.

    Actually, I would have said endurance.
    Getting bowled three or four times in an evening was quite tiring.

  111. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘a mating ritual’

    Well it’s sweaty enough, I’ll give you that.

  112. One of my lead men is quite worried. His girlfriend, who he’s booked leave to go home to marry next month, she never misses a Sunday service at St. Anthony’s in Colombo.
    He’s heard nothing from her or her family in 2 days.

  113. Plenty of the Sri Lankan staff at my place are very experienced in shooty/explodey stuff. They all swear it has to be ISIS.
    They won’t even entertain for a second that it was Tamil Tigers. Not because the Tamil Tigers couldn’t organise something so complex (they couldn’t) but because they know the Tamil Tigers are all dead.
    And the whole thing has the fingerprints of ISIS all over it.
    They’re super pissed-off at the government back there for allowing this to happen.

  114. Knuckle Dragger

    SATP,

    From all reports the SL govt was warned 10 days prior of both the presence of a relatively new terror group in the country, that an attack was imminent and that it involved churches and the like.

    People bag the SLs (good cricketers, bad taxi drivers, 7/11 workers, IT guys etc etc) but the civil war over there was one of the most unreported and bloodthirsty in recent history. Made the Balkans look like an afternoon at the Spearmint Rhino with free grog.

    I say you underestimate these punters at your peril, and woe betide their government if these reports are anywhere accurate.

  115. KD, I don’t know if the information “my” Sri Lankans are getting is any better than what the rest of us are receiving.
    They say they’re getting their information from the news reports.
    Provided you can read Lanka.net & the like.. which looks like circular squiggles to me.
    They’re saying the warning was well known, & can’t understand why the stupid farqing govt ignored it.

    Most of ’em, including the girls & the younger ones, all know what a pile of body parts & dead people look like. They’re very matter-of-fact with the stories of “how scared I was the day the Tigers blew up the lobby of the hotel I worked in, there were so many dead people… .blah blah blah..”
    or.. .”The day the loose body parts were piled up in the school playground, we weren’t allowed to play on the swings until all the blown off arms & legs were taken away – so yeah, I’ve been inconvenienced by bombings”
    That sort of stuff.

  116. From the Sri Lankans I’ve employed, I’m surprised their army was organised enough to get it’s pants on, never mind beat anybody.
    My most repeated comment in the workplace is “John Howard just saved your life!”

  117. Knuckle Dragger

    Yup.

    I said to someone earlier that on the whole we’re probably better informed about these sorts of things than ever before, but it’ll take time before all the machinations are known.

    Still reckon they’d make pretty cranky units, even sans pants.

  118. Mitch M.

    From the Sri Lankans I’ve employed, I’m surprised their army was organised enough to get it’s pants on, never mind beat anybody.

    Is it possible the army had no particular interest in addressing the threat and has hidden sentiments favouring the assholes who did this?

  119. BrettW

    Zulu mentioned earlier that Tony Sheldon was top of the Labor Senate ticket in NSW.

    That would be the same guy who was shown to have inflated his TWU membership by almost double. Such false numbers helping him get more power at Labor conference etc. Hopefully the Coalition keep bringing it up.

    He will be the new Doug Cameron.

  120. Still reckon they’d make pretty cranky units, even sans pants.

    Agreed.
    They handled…er sorted.. the Tigers the only sane way.
    We’d do well to take a leaf from their book.

  121. BrettW

    The Alec Baldwin character in 30 Rock was a classic.

  122. Is it possible the army had no particular interest in addressing the threat and has hidden sentiments favouring the assholes who did this?

    The crew don’t think so.
    Their view is the government are a bunch of stupid lefty (my word, not theirs) softcox who really are as dumb as a greens voter & actually did not believe, or were unable to comprehend a threat.

    Disclaimer: This is the collective opinion of a bunch of waiters, stewards, knucklemen, accountants & their wives.

  123. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘collective opinion of a bunch of waiters, stewards, knucklemen, accountants & their wives’

    An excellent cross-section of society.

  124. Zatara

    Looks like Trump is finally letting his dogs loose in the lawfare game. It’s about time.

    Trump Organization Sues House Oversight Chair Elijah Cummings to Block Subpoena

    President Donald Trump’s legal team has sued House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings (D-MD) to block a subpoena for financial records from an accounting firm used by the Trump Organization.

    In a lawsuit filed Monday in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, President Trump’s attorneys write the subpoena “lacks any legitimate legislative purpose, is an abuse of power, and is just another example of overreach by the president’s political opponents.

    In a statement to NBC News, Trump lawyer Jay Sekulow said of the lawsuit: “We will not allow congressional presidential harassment to go unanswered.”

    I love it, he is suing Cummings personally. This will be fun to watch.

  125. Knuckle Dragger

    Zatara,

    Are you sure? Isn’t Trump in jail after his impeachment trial?

    Did President Clinton pardon him?

    God. There are people here who will FREAK if what you’re saying’s true.

  126. Mitch M.

    Indonesia.

    Gunung Padang: The Oldest Pyramid On Earth

    That society was simply papering over the work of another civilization, this one dating back to 4,700 BCE. Their work is buried some four or five meters below the surface.

  127. Knuckle Dragger:

    Love it. Very accurate. They’re like the mouthy drunken cellulite-infested pub skanks that cause 90% of pub dust ups and then scream bloody murder when the wallopers turn up, but the second they’re in the back of the van becoming become snivelling, mascara streaked victims.

    …and then when they discover they’ve broken a fingernail, demand to be taken to the nearest A&E where they arc up again…

  128. Zatara:

    I love it, he is suing Cummings personally. This will be fun to watch.

    Trump is Godlike.

  129. Tom

    Steve Bright (London Sun) just loves drawing Nigel Farage.

  130. DrBeauGan

    Thanks Tom. Some good stuff there.

  131. DrBeauGan

    The pity of it is, that the best artist Australia has is Rowe, and he’s off his head. But I have hopes of J. Leak.

  132. Herodotus

    “That’s good. I’m a Conservative in NSW and I’ve never heard of Sophie.“

    Nick, you can’t be very interested in politics. Sophie York and Riccardo Bosi are the AC senate candidates for NSW.

  133. pete m

    The tragedy in SA was a bit close to home in terms of spending yesterday doing a patrol. One of our guys was on dawn patrol and helped with locating the poor fellow who drowned in a nearby creek.

    Then we hear of 2 people drowning taking a photo including a 5 yr old girl. Just aweful.

    Most patrols I have kids give me a wave or parents say thanks which is nice. We also get yobbos who think they are good swimmers heading into a rip refusing our directions to come back to the flags – they don’t realise they encourage poorer swimmers into thinking water is safe where they are.

    The SA incident is a little hard to figure as they would have been wearing life jackets but apparently the rib of the irb broke, meaning they got tangled or hit by debris and held under waves, so sad. A jet boat or jet ski would have been a safer option there, but funding it is the issue.

    All I can say is pls don’t go near big waves just to catch a picture.

  134. Crossie

    Thank you, Tom. A bit of levity to get me off to work and sadness to recall how poorly we are lead and governed.

  135. None

    Andy West retard just condoned the murder of 300 trillion kids especially the Christians
    https://mobile.twitter.com/AndyWestTV/status/1119898964772446210

  136. None

    Today’s is a brilliant Farage by Bright.

  137. Bruce of Newcastle

    Hehe, a day is a long time in climate politics. Yesterday I said a few more exploding Teslas and no one will park their car next to a Tesla ever again. Today:

    It’s Contagious: NIO Electric Car Spontaneously Catches Fire In China

    “Tesla self-ignites” was one of the most popular hashtags on Weibo on Monday, racking up over 20 million clicks, according to Reuters. And, as we said yesterday, before the videos are written off as big oil conspiracy FUD, we should note that the Twitter user also has his own YouTube channel, which appears to mostly be positive content toward Tesla and electric vehicles.

    “One lesson I learnt from the Shanghai self-exploding Tesla: Don’t park your car next to a Tesla,” said one Weibo user.

    Poor Tesla owners are going to be the new lepers.

  138. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Rowe must be a homosexual, he needs psychiatric help.

  139. calli

    Yes, that one of Farage is chuckleworthy. Excellent draughtsmanship, and the beer is a nice touch.

    I presume the tie is MCC.

  140. Leigh Lowe

    Steve Kelley # 2 for me today.
    .
    .

    DrBeauGan

    #2995105, posted on April 23, 2019 at 4:26 am

    The pity of it is, that the best artist Australia has is Rowe, and he’s off his head. 

    He is a fair to middling caricaturist (he has to caption his subjects far to often to rate him better than that).
    But to describe him as “the best artist in Australia” is a tiny bit of a stretch.

  141. calli

    One lesson I learnt from the Shanghai self-exploding Tesla: Don’t park your car next to a Tesla,” said one Weibo user.

    Lesson 2: don’t park your Tesla in your garage.

  142. Notafan

    Oh for goodness sake KD etc

    We were talking about how old they were when there were slaves around

    Clearly referring to 2015 when sharouff and Elomar were slave holders.

    That would make them 13 and 12 at the time, not adults. The surviving boy would have been 4.

    Elomar died in 2015, Tara in 2016 and raccqa was a constantly bombed hellhole and all six of the sharouff’s slaves escaped well before may 2015. Did he acquire more? Don’t know but seems unlikely, we do know he was in trouble with the emirs for trying to leave Syria.

    They may represent a risk but they are perhaps not as bad as others, simply because they have a non Isla mic grandmother.

    I’m pretty sick of this sins of the parents stuff.

    There are pretty of radicalised moldemortians itching to kill born and bred and never left the country here already, and these young people did not go to Syria of their own volition.

    Humans are not snakes, and people can reject evil ideologies, and there are innumerable examples of those that have, Abby Johnson for one, after being involved in the slaughter of thousands of innocents.

    In any case I am not influential in any government decision to allow them to return, and they as Roger suggested could legally live in Lebanon where there are elomars and sharouffs aplenty in Tripoli but without being legally blocked from returning I don’t see how they can be stopped.

    And yes I feel sorry for them, no-one gets to pick their parents.

  143. Leigh Lowe

    Lesson 2: don’t park your Tesla in your garage

    I wonder how long before house insurers start asking that question.

  144. feelthebern

    numbers will be here shortly to say how good Rowe is….after he cleans up 4-5 days worth of….stuff…

  145. Knuckle Dragger

    A couple of gentle enquiries this morning in relation to Mr Rowe’s artwork.

    Does Rowe ever caricaturise any polly from the other side of the House?; and

    Who the hell is that sitting in the bath next to Barnaby?

    I’m only going on the assumption that it is Barnaby because of the hat btw.

  146. Farmer Gez

    Heaven help us, these media girls are thick.
    Laura Jayes points out how experienced the Labor front bench are.
    They were part of one of the biggest train wreck Labor ministries of all time. If that’s experience Laura, I’ll take an apprentice every time.
    Laura now using the term “no brainer”. The Ironing.

  147. mh

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #2995118, posted on April 23, 2019 at 7:28 am
    Rowe must be a homosexual, he needs psychiatric help.

    Bobby Numbers will love it!

  148. feelthebern

    I have bought & sold high security & temporary water licences.
    I have participated in a government buy-back.
    Yes, I was a nasty speculator who has never farmed in his life.
    The total lack of understanding by the media how it all works is just astounding.
    Of the 2 seconds I saw of Janine Perrett discussing it on PM Live last night, she has less than zero idea.
    & she’s meant to be a business journalist.

  149. bespoke

    Just finished this . All to ominous with murderous mobs getting riled up with envy and the state exploiting kids to denouncing family. The farmers federation etc should show it to there members.

  150. feelthebern

    Biggest news today, but will get zero coverage.
    Too complicated.
    Too scary.

    Social Security Trust Fund to Be Depleted in 2035, Trustees Say

    The Social Security program’s costs will exceed its income in 2020 for the first time since 1982—two years later than officials projected last year—forcing the program to dip into its nearly $3 trillion trust fund to cover benefits.
    But by 2035, those reserves will be depleted and Social Security will no longer be able to pay its full scheduled benefits, according to the latest annual report by the trustees of Social Security and Medicare.

    A footnote in the Gingrich government shut down in the 90’s was to address social security.
    A chunk of Clinton.
    All of GWB.
    All of BHO.
    Now Trump.
    If I was a yank, why would I pay into Social Security if I knew I wouldn’t be getting anything back?

  151. Knuckle Dragger

    Actually, St.Nota, we were talking about the spawn of Messrs Sharrouf and Elomar returning to this fair land with their own spawn.

    Someone added that the 17 yo had slaves, which you have since seized on.

    You can be sick of the ‘sins of the parents’ stuff all you like but it doesn’t change reality.

    Your ‘they’ll come whether we like it or not’ attitude is stunning, and not in a good way. You clearly do not have school age children, or any children that go to open crowded spaces or any type of religious places. Like CHURCHES.

    I could even understand your position from a purely religious point of view, but your ‘meh’ attitude smacks of flat out surrender. Which by the way, these people are banking on.

    I stand by every single comment on the matter I made yesterday.

    Buy that taipan, St. Nota.

  152. Tom

    Behind the Herald Sun paywall, so here’s a radio rewrite: Trumpy has been invited to attend December’s Presidents Cup at Royal Melbourne.

    Someone needs to brief his people that the local police force will not protect him because it is an arm of the communist state government and Melbourne will be swarming with hooded Antifa fascists protected by the police.

    But it would be good for Trumpy to get on-the-ground experience of what an unreliable ally the banana republic Down Under will be under its new federal government.

  153. OldOzzie

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #2994847, posted on April 22, 2019 at 6:43 pm

    Thanks Pedro, Zulu, I will escalate!

    Helen, you’d be surprised how many Australians don’t know Australia did have death duties, the consequences in the forced sales of farms and businesses, and why they were abolished in the first place.

    Yes We paid Death Duties Tax in 1970s

    the Australian rates were not phased down prior to abolition. Indeed, the inheritance tax rates and thresholds had remained largely unchanged from 1941 to 1979, despite the fact that inflation had substantially reduced the real value of the thresholds.

    Prior to abolition, the rates prevailing on Australian estates operated on a sliding
    scale (Commissioner of Taxation 1979).

    3 Estates worth less than $100,000 were tax exempt if passing to non-family members, and estates worth less than $200,000 were exempt if passing to family members.

    4 The highest rate was 27.9 percent, which applied
    to estates worth $1 million or more.

    5 Figure 1 shows the inheritance tax rate schedule

    See Page 2 of 8 for Figure 1 – http://www.andrewleigh.org/pdf/DeathAndTaxes.pdf

    And Helen re Greens

    Julian Burnside backs Greens on death duties and drugs in battle for Kooyong

  154. calli

    That’s a really good question, KD.

    So I Googled Rowe Cartoons and hit Images. Reams of them. And only a couple with (I think) the Peanut. Rowe doesn’t draw him particularly well, so I’m never quite sure.

    Waaay down the page was this. Not bad. Not bad at all.

  155. Notafan

    As thought, the fact that they were raiding safe houses immediately after the bombings indicated they knew they were.

    the failures of the government of Sri Lanka a very disappointing and there should be consequences but nevertheless responsibility should be slated home to those Sri Lankan citizens who embraced Is lam and murdered innocents.

    they even knew about weapons been stockpiled as far back as January so it appears to be your normal everyday Is lamic jihad mayhem and murder.

    Sri Lanka should take a leaf out of Israel’s book and demolish the houses and mosques of all those directly involved.

    but bungling incompetent jealous government

  156. Leigh Lowe

    Tom

    #2995135, posted on April 23, 2019 at 7:50 am

    Behind the Herald Sun paywall, so here’s a radio rewrite: Trumpy has been invited to attend December’s Presidents Cup at Royal Melbourne.

    I do hope Fatty Ashton sends President Trump a bill for security.
    The response would be something to behold.

  157. calli

    Any Backlash™ mentioned yet? Vengeful Christians going on the warpath it SL?

    No. Thought not.

  158. Knuckle Dragger

    calli,

    Have a look at SATP’s comments last night. Plenty of unrest in our hospitality industry.

  159. Notafan

    But Calli ask that journalist on twitter, religions are responsible for all bad stuff.

    Interesting no they didn’t target the Buddhist majority, no doubt because they knew they would definitely gotten backlash

  160. calli

    I do hope Fatty Ashton sends President Trump a bill for security.

    Chuckle. Did you catch Bill Thompson’s video yesterday of Biden’s motorcade?

    I bet his bill was yuuuuuge.

  161. Notafan

    By the by it is bad form to make conversion a condition of assistance in a disaster.

    Provide the Christian charity and then if people later choose to convert so be it.

    Of course the fellow complaining only saw a teeny tiny proportion of those providing assistance.

    Just because those few it doesn’t mean they all did it.

  162. calli

    Yes. But “super pissed off” in Australia doesn’t equate to going all splodey stabby in SL.

    But we will see.

    The SL government needs to show leadership. So far they’ve been Keystone Cops. Shutting down social media is as weak as water.

  163. OldOzzie

    OldOzzie
    #2995136, posted on April 23, 2019 at 7:51 am

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #2994847, posted on April 22, 2019 at 6:43 pm

    Thanks Pedro, Zulu, I will escalate!

    Helen, you’d be surprised how many Australians don’t know Australia did have death duties, the consequences in the forced sales of farms and businesses, and why they were abolished in the first place.

    Yes We paid Death Duties Tax in 1970s

    Helen,

    you will also note from Figure 1 (page 3 of 8) that at $250,000 the rate was around 28% and remember the Death Taxes were on all assets in the Estate – Cars, Jewels, Art, Furniture etc and you had to get valuations

    Millenials looking for Mum and Dads money won’t know what hit them and still they vote Labor/Greens

    Dumb – How to self harm – spread the message

    Di Natlie, Leader of the Greens says he will control Bill Shorten and Labor

    So Death Duties Cometh

  164. Notafan

    Not to mention that there is no evidence that Socrates at the pubs sample group are all Christians.

  165. calli

    Conversion doesn’t happen by accepting charity from Christians.

    If Christians are making “conversion” a condition of providing help, they are sinful d*cks and need to repent their shameful behaviour pronto. Any “conversions” coerced in this way are worthless.

    This is basic stuff.

  166. calli

    Lol. Looks like we’re tag teaming, Saint Nota. 😄

  167. OldOzzie

    Sorry re Death Duties in Australia 1970s

    See Page 3 of 8

    See Page 2 of 8 for Figure 1 – http://www.andrewleigh.org/pdf/DeathAndTaxes.pdf

    and as you can see at $250,000 value rate is around 26% slowly going up t9 27.9%

  168. bespoke

    Lol. Looks like we’re tag teaming, Saint Nota

    err careful its KD remember.

  169. Leigh Lowe

    Firstly, the “journalist” claiming conditional conversions is an ex Big Brother UK fag attention whore.
    Secondly, he produced precisely zero evidence that such a thing happened.
    Thirdly, his posts are virulently anti-Christian.
    Soooo … ignore as lies.

  170. stackja

    Donald Trump invited to Melbourne for President’s Cup
    PETER ROLFE, sports affairs reporter, Herald Sun
    April 22, 2019 8:00pm
    Subscriber only

    Donald Trump and every living US leader will been invited to Melbourne for this year’s President’s Cup.

    Golf loving President Trump will tee off one of the biggest security operations in Victoria’s history if he accepts an offer to cheer Tiger Woods and the US at Royal Melbourne.

    Organisers hope Mr Trump will draw the eyes of the world to an event already likely to be attended by A-list celebrities and heads of state from around the globe.

    Former Presidents Barack Obama, George W Bush and Bill Clinton have also been invited to the biggest golf event staged in Australia this decade.

    US PGA spokesman Chris Reimer confirmed Air Force One could touch down in Melbourne for December’s major event.

    “As has been customary with past Presidents Cup events, all past honorary chairpersons will be invited to attend the 2019 event,’’ he said.

    “Invitations will be sent in the coming months’’

    Mr Trump was expected to visit Australia during a tour of South-East Asia last November but instead sent Vice-President Mike Pence.

  171. Knuckle Dragger

    Now hang on a tic there bespoke.

    Let’s just see where this goes……

  172. stackja

    Senior magistrate calls for all bibles to be removed from courtrooms in Victoria
    Genevieve Alison, Exclusive, Herald Sun
    April 22, 2019 8:16pm
    Subscriber only

    A senior magistrate is calling for all Bibles to be removed from courtrooms in Victoria, labelling them relics that belong in a museum.

    The well-known Melbourne magistrate likened the Bible and Koran to the “gavel, the wig, quill and ink” — objects he says have no place in a modern courtroom.

    The proposal, appearing in an email chain seen by the Herald Sun, was prompted by an incident in which a Bible could not be found for a witness who was giving evidence via remote video link.

    Witnesses who wish to swear on oath to tell the truth, rather than simply affirm they will do so, may take the oath while holding a Bible or Koran or other religious text, depending on their religion, but are not legally required to do so.

    The email, which was sent to all Victorian magistrates and judicial registrars, encouraged others to weigh in on the proposed change.

    It read: “I have asked (a court registrar) to consider removing all the Bibles, Korans, etcetera from the courts. In my opinion they are relics from another time and like the gavel, the wig and the quill and ink, they belong in a museum, not a modern court. Am curious about what others think.”

    The push to remove the religious texts follows legislation introduced last year, which took effect last month, updating Victoria’s laws relating to oaths, affidavits, and statutory declarations.

    Last year the then Attorney-General, Martin Pakula, said the changes would make the legal system “fairer and more equal” and ensure that people were not discouraged from giving evidence by the formal wording of an oath or affirmation.

    “This is an important step towards modernising and clarifying processes affecting thousands of Victorians who have previously had to struggle with some confusing and antiquated laws,” he said.

    ‘confusing and antiquated laws’ that provided safety in the streets?

  173. Eyrie

    The problem with electing AC senators is that they will be trying to make the next government WORK.
    Bad idea. We need a bunch of fractious types from the Mos Eisely cantina who will prevent it from working.

  174. Leigh Lowe

    Donald Trump and every living US leader will been (sic) invited to Melbourne for this year’s President’s Cup.

    .

    Golf loving President Trump will tee off one of the biggest security operations in Victoria’s history if he accepts …

    .

    Organisers hope Mr Trump will draw the eyes of the world to an event …

    .

    US PGA spokesman Chris Reimer confirmed Air Force One could touch down in Melbourne …

    So, that’s a “No” then.

  175. Knuckle Dragger

    Oh man.

    That magistrate nearly got preselected for every seat contested by the Greens in the country.

    But noooooo.

    Had to mention the K word. Now it’s fatwa time.

  176. stackja

    The Protective Mission

    The Secret Service is recognized for the physical protection it provides to the nation’s highest elected leaders, visiting foreign dignitaries, facilities and major events. In order to ensure a secure environment for protectees, the Secret Service integrates a variety of innovative technologies and maintains a highly skilled and motivated workforce.

    Using advanced countermeasures, the Secret Service executes security operations that deter, minimize and decisively respond to identified threats and vulnerabilities. The protective environment is enhanced by specialized resources within the Secret Service, including: the Airspace Security Branch; the Counter Sniper Team; the Emergency Response Team; the Counter Surveillance Unit; the Counter Assault Team; the Hazardous Agent Mitigation and Medical Emergency Response Team; and the Magnetometer Operations Unit. Other specialized resources also serve to provide protection from threats, including chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear materials and explosive devices.

    Vic Pol wouldn’t know about ‘security operations that deter, minimize and decisively respond to identified threats and vulnerabilities. The protective environment is enhanced by specialized resources’

  177. OldOzzie

    Labor’s parent visa plan risks grey migrant flow

    Ben Packham
    Political Reporter


    Labor’s pledge to introduce an uncapped long-stay parents’ visa could open the door to a wave of elderly migrants, as nearly 100,000 ­applicants for hard-to-obtain ­permanent parents’ visas seek to reunite with adult children in Australia.

    In a pitch for the migrant vote in key marginal seats, Labor has revealed its proposed three- and five-year sponsored parents’ visas would cost $1250 and $2500 per entrant — a quarter of the cost of the Coalition’s parents’ visas — and would be available to an unlimited number of applicants.

    Labor would also allow a single household to sponsor up to four parents at a time — compared with two under the Coalition — and enable visa-holders to renew their visa in Australia for a second three- or five-year term.

    Demographers warned that the backlog of 97,000 ­applicants for permanent parents’ visas could be expected to apply under Labor’s policy, unleashing a 1980s-level surge in migration that would place additional strain on cities and ­services.

    The Coalition’s parents’ visa, due to start on July 1, would be ­restricted to 15,000 people, cost $5000 for three years and $10,000 for five, and require holders to go overseas for a renewal.

    Labor has campaigned hard in Sydney seats such as Reid, Banks and Bennelong, and Chisholm in Melbourne — all of which elected Liberal MPs in 2016 and have high proportions of overseas-born voters — over the government’s delay in delivering a long-stay parents’ visa promised before the last election.

    Immigration Minister David Coleman, whose seat of Banks is one of Australia’s most multi-­cultural, said Labor’s uncapped visa proposal showed “a complete lack of regard for sensible immigration and population planning”.

    “Under Labor’s new visa, there is absolutely no limit to the number of people who can enter the country for up to 10 years,” Mr Coleman said.

    “This is no way to run a sensible immigration program, or population policy. These programs are carefully managed to ensure that the number of visas granted are sustainable for the Australian economy and population growth.”

    Labor frontbencher Chris Bowen, about half of whose constituents in his Sydney seat of ­McMahon speak a language other than English, said the new visa was a fair, compassionate way to help migrants reunite with elderly parents.

    “Many elderly parents want to reunite with their families but have to travel to Australia as tourists — proving costly, frustrating, disruptive and exhausting as they ferry between countries,” he said. Mr Bowen said Labor’s pledge was in stark contrast to the ­Coalition’s “heartless, callous and cruel” policy that would force families to choose which parents they sponsored.

    Under Labor’s and the Coalition’s policies, applicants would have to obtain health insurance and any debts they incurred during their stay would have to be guaranteed by sponsors.

    Demographer Bob Birrell said the uncapped nature of Labor’s policy could drive up demand for hospital beds and doctors. “It is highly likely that demand for particularly health services will grow because of the high incidence of health problems for older people,” he said.

    “The question then becomes — if these parents do pay for these services, are they going to out-compete locals seeking the same service?”

    Min Zhu, a Sydney property analyst who lives in Eastwood, in the seat of Bennelong, paid more than $30,000 for his parents’ visas when they moved to Australia. He thinks Mr Shorten’s promise of a $2500 visa is not balanced. “If it’s so much cheaper there will be a lot of people moving over, and the elderly people need to use our ­facilities and it affects our budget — we need to think about the economy as well,” Mr Zhu said. “A lot of elderly parents can’t speak the language as well and that makes it difficult for them to live here.”

    Unveiling his own pitch for the migrant vote, Scott Morrison yesterday announced a $5 million commitment to a “self-starter ­accelerator program” to help overseas-born Australians get new businesses off the ground.

    The Coalition would also spend an extra $10m to help migrant communities supporting culturally diverse and linguistically diverse communities navigate the aged care system, he said.

    Bill Shorten sought to engage with Chinese voters earlier in the campaign in a live WeChat social media appearance, in which he distanced himself from former NSW Labor leader Michael Daley’s anti-Asian comments that helped sink the party’s state election chances last month.

    Mr Morrison also used WeChat to talk about the Coalition’s support for a “diverse and harmonious society”.

  178. calli

    I refuse to Google alternative definitions of “tag teaming”.

    You people! [taps foot]

  179. C.L.

    The real tragedy of the Sri Lanka massacre of Catholics identified:

    The Washington [email protected]

    Analysis: Sri Lanka church bombings stoke far-right anger in the West

  180. mh

    Trump won’t be going to Melbourne.

    What a preposterous idea! 😆

  181. stackja

    Three bus crash teen girls fighting for life: Police probe how car hit stopped coach
    Mitchell Van Homrigh, The Daily Telegraph
    April 23, 2019 5:21am
    Subscriber only

    Three teenagers are critically injured in hospital after a freak crash where their hatchback smashed into a broken down coach in Sydney’s southwest.

    The red Mazda was travelling east on the M5 when it crashed into the back of the bus in a breakdown lane at 6.25pm on Sunday.

    Shalaney Velasquez, Faith Patolo-Vitale and Lisa Aitoa are fighting for their lives. Picture: Instagram

    Ms Patolo-Vitale’s brother, Aliamanu Patolo-Vitale, 18, was sitting in the front seat of the car. He was assessed by paramedics before being taken to St George Hospital with his older sister.

    Back seat passengers Shalaney Velasquez, 19, and Lisa Aitoa, 18, sustained severe injuries when the car hit the rear of the coach.

    Both of the women were taken to Liverpool Hospital where they are fighting for their lives.

    Staff at Liverpool Hospital told The Daily Telegraph both women were in critical conditions last night.

  182. Geriatric Mayfly

    Sri Lanka carnage slipping away into the media forgettory already. After the Christchurch massacre, I imagine that news gatherers and presenters are simply worn out.

  183. mh

    Has Wally from The Project shed any tears yet for the 300 dead Christians killed by Isl amic jihadis?

  184. Bruce of Newcastle

    Fun headline…

    My warning to petulant Veruca Salt liberals screaming to impeach President Trump: Oompa Loompas always have the last laugh Daily Mail (UK), by Piers Morgan

    Bad orange man has orange army! I love the mental picture of Hillary being taken away by Oompa Loompas to be squeezed for everything she knows.

  185. stackja

    Geriatric Mayfly
    #2995168, posted on April 23, 2019 at 8:31 am
    Sri Lanka carnage slipping away into the media forgettory already. After the Christchurch massacre, I imagine that news gatherers and presenters are simply worn out.

    MSM waiting for the next ‘appropriate’ event.

  186. C.L.

    Woman to be canonised:

    ‘A beacon of tolerance, love and peace’: Jacinda Ardern mural to be painted on Brunswick silos

    A silo in Brunswick will feature a large mural of New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern hugging a woman in the aftermath of the Christchurch mosque shootings.

    More than $11,000 was crowdfunded in just over a day for a street artist to paint the Tinning Street silos with a photo of the leader wearing a hijab and the Arabic word for peace written underneath.

  187. RobK

    Trump won’t be going to Melbourne.
    He might if we offered to buy $50 billion worth of submarines of him.

  188. stackja

    None
    #2995113, posted on April 23, 2019 at 6:52 am

    Andy West needs ‘conversion therapy’.

  189. Bruce of Newcastle

    I refuse to Google alternative definitions of “tag teaming”.

    LOL. I just now found out about the alternative definitions of “Oompa Loompas”. Quite amusing.

  190. cohenite

    Back in the real world, a sample of headlines today:

    If an Australian PM did 1/10th of Trump’s alleged acts, he’d be out of office: Kevin Rudd: fairfucks smh.

    Celebrity Environmentalists: Famous people with an eco-conscience: entertainment today.

    Comment: The Australian court ban on reporting George P.ll’s trial was bound to fail. the guardian

    and my favourite:

    Among the carnage of the Sri Lankan Easter bombing attacks the community’s solidarity is still visible the abc

  191. twostix

    We also get yobbos who think they are good swimmers heading into a rip refusing our directions to come back to the flags – they don’t realise they encourage poorer swimmers into thinking water is safe where they are.

    All I can say is pls don’t go near big waves just to catch a picture.

    How about fuck off?

    There is nothing worse than fruity volunteer organisations staffed by teenagers and 60 year old retirees starting to think of themselves as superior owners and police of the area they took it upon themselves to ‘rescue’.

  192. dover_beach

    An Ardern mural, reports of several related church massacres on Easter Sunday and hardly any mention of Catholics or even Christians or even the Muslim perpetrators, and so on.

    Welcome to life under the boot of the urban bugman.

  193. dover_beach

    An Ardern mural, reports of several related church massacres on Easter Sunday and hardly any mention of Catholics or even Christians or even the M#$lim perpetrators, and so on.

    Welcome to life under the boot of the urban bugman.

  194. Bruce of Newcastle

    A silo in Brunswick will feature a large mural of New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern

    Just completed.
    Oh wait, that is in Merriwa.

  195. Geriatric Mayfly

    Has Wally from The Project shed any tears yet for the 300 dead Christians killed by Isl amic jihadis?

    Wally very busy. He’s won the election night gig on one of the commercials. Odd thing that he is to pontificate on the democratic process in action, and not one country under sway of the Prophet (PBUH) can boast anything like free and fair elections.

  196. OldOzzie

    AlphaGo Zero: Learning from scratch

    The paper introduces AlphaGo Zero, the latest evolution of AlphaGo, the first computer program to defeat a world champion at the ancient Chinese game of Go. Zero is even more powerful and is arguably the strongest Go player in history.

    Previous versions of AlphaGo initially trained on thousands of human amateur and professional games to learn how to play Go. AlphaGo Zero skips this step and learns to play simply by playing games against itself, starting from completely random play. In doing so, it quickly surpassed human level of play and defeated the previously published champion-defeating version of AlphaGo by 100 games to 0

  197. Zatara

    If an Australian PM did 1/10th of Trump’s alleged acts, he’d be out of office: Kevin Rudd

    Indeed, if Trump had done 1/10th of the things he is alleged to have done he’d be out of office as well.

  198. OldOzzie

    Liberals face decline amid shifting public priorities

    Michael Sexton

    The Liberals’ narrow victory in the NSW election has tended to mask the long-term problems the party has, particularly at the national level. If they lose the federal election on May 18, they will be in opposition at the national level and in three states and both territories. They have razor-thin majorities in the NSW and South Australian lower houses and govern in Tasmania only with the vote of an independent Speaker.

    There have been, of course, postwar electoral cycles of boom and bust for both major parties. At the national level the Liberals have been in power for almost two-thirds of that time (although much of that imbalance was due to Labor’s split in 1955, which cost it the next five elections). But the Liberals now face a very different political landscape and confront a series of problems that will make it difficult for them to remain the force they have been for the past 70 years. These problems are more severe at the federal level but also exist at the state level.

    Their first major problem is they are a centre party — they have never been a centre-right party — facing what is now largely a centre-left electorate. This does not mean most voters are particularly ideological but they believe in ever-increasing government expenditure and are happy to accept ever-increasing government regulation. So do the Liberals — which is why they are not a centre-right party — but they can never out-promise or outspend Labor and the Greens in these areas. In normal circumstances, therefore, the Liberals will struggle in any given election.

    This is exacerbated by the fact that good economic management — one of the Liberals’ traditional electoral strengths — has ceased to be an election issue after three decades of sustained economic growth. Most voters cannot imagine a recession, let alone a depression. This is not to say that Liberals will not win future elections at the national and state level, but it will become increasingly more difficult and less likely.

    The second major problem for the Liberals is they have comprehensively lost the culture wars in Australia. The politically correct class, which is almost uniformly hostile to the Liberals on such questions as climate change, border protection and freedom of speech, has taken control of almost all public institutions, including schools and universities, and many private bodies, including most of the media and the boards of many large corporations. Most voters are not, of course, members of the politically correct class but the disproportionate influence of this group in so many areas of public opinion has had some impact on the general community.

    The result has been something of a reversal of the position in the 1950s and 60s, when the Liberals were the respectable party and Labor slightly disreputable. Now Labor and the Greens are the more glamorous side of politics and the Liberals are seen, especially by young people, as old-fashioned and unexciting. This is reflected in the fact that in order to form government, the Liberals generally have to win an absolute majority of seats in the lower house, as almost all independents tend to support Labor if neither of the two major parties has a majority in its own right.

    Even those parts of the business sector that have not succumbed to political correctness are of little benefit now to the Liberals. They are frightened of the unions and Labor governments and so are reluctant to make any public statements in support of the Liberals. In any event, they do not have the funds available to the union movement to make political donations.

    The contribution of the unions to Labor is, of course, not just financial. They supply large numbers of campaign workers on the ground in marginal seats. So do a range of other organisations, most particularly GetUp, that target Liberal candidates like Tony Abbott and Peter Dutton. The idea of a Labor member being targeted for removal by community groups is hard to imagine. GetUp has spent $10 million on political campaigns in the last financial year. The Liberals have no comparable support groups in the community and are simply outnumbered — as well as outspent — in most election campaigns.

    Ultimately most governments self-destruct and the opposition takes office. No doubt this will result in the election of some Liberal administrations over the next decade but the party’s long-term prospects look far from attractive. The party may not be over but it faces a real challenge to maintain the role it has played to date in Australian political history.

  199. 132andBush

    If an Australian PM did 1/10th of Trump’s alleged acts, he’d be out of office: Kevin Rudd

    KRudd the discarded “do-all multitool” of Australian politics.

  200. twostix

    If an Australian PM did 1/10th of Trump’s alleged acts, he’d be out of office: Kevin Rudd

    Does Rudd set himself for this stuff?

  201. Bruce of Newcastle

    Socialist utopia news.

    In Venezuela, life has gone from bad to worse. And the world has quit noticing (21 Apr, vial Lucianne)

    Things have been hard for years here, and Venezuelans have gotten used to power disruptions, food shortages and other systemic problems. But lately it’s been much, much worse.

    Power outages now last anywhere from 10 hours to five days, and affect critical facilities. The other day somebody from a nearby hospital reached out to me on social media so I could let listeners know that the power at their facility was down. “Thank God nobody was attached to a life-saving machine or in surgery when the power went out,” the message said.

    The only thing the MSM now writes about Venezuela, aside from this LA Times article, are hit pieces on Trump whenever he suggests doing something to try to fix it.

  202. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Candidate keen to kill off death tax history

    Alice Workman
    Political Reporter
    @workmanalice
    12:00AM April 23, 2019
    92 Comments

    The No 2 on Labor’s Senate ticket in NSW, former union boss Tim Ayres, once proposed a death tax to fund handouts for young people to buy houses.

    In a 2017 speech, Mr Ayres ­argued Australia should introduce an inheritance tax for estates valued over $10 million, based on policies in the US and Europe.

    “I support Thomas Piketty’s proposal to use an inheritance tax to fund a one-off capital grant for every citizen at the age of 25,” Mr Ayres said in a speech to the NSW Fabians.

    “According to the Community Council of Australia, a 35 per cent estate duty on all estates over $10m would raise at least $3.5 billion in government revenue, while affecting only a fraction of the top 1 per cent of Australians.”

    Under Mr Ayres plan, the money raised would be given to Australians when they turned 25 to pay off their uni fees, start a business or use as a deposit to buy their first home.

    “It may be bold but politics as usual doesn’t offer the scale of policy that is required to genuinely tackle regional and intergenerational inequality,” Mr Ayres said.

    When he made the speech two years ago, Mr Ayres was the NSW secretary of the Australian Manufacturing Workers Union and a paid Labor member.

    “I’m saying as a leader of one of our trade unions, as an activist in the Labor movement, it’s time to step up and have the big debate about big ideas for the tax system,” Mr Ayres told the ABC.

    “The twin engines of inequality for young people are the tax system and the housing market.”

    Mr Ayes yesterday told The Australian he no longer supported an inheritance tax and Labor didn’t have a policy to introduce one. Opposition Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen yesterday ruled out any death tax under Labor.

    From the Oz. Too late Comrades, too many people remember the Capital Gains fiasco, and the carbon tax.

  203. calli

    Mr Ayes yesterday told The Australian he no longer supported an inheritance tax and Labor didn’t have a policy to introduce one. Opposition Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen yesterday ruled out any death tax under Labor.

    Yeah. Right. Gotcha.

    Now tell the truth, kiddies. It’s very naughty to lie.

  204. rickw

    to paint the Tinning Street silos with a photo of the leader wearing a hijab and the Arabic word for peace written underneath

    This country makes me want to puke.

  205. Knuckle Dragger

    Attractive young ladeee on Sky just said that if elected, Labor will ban gay conversion therapy.

    Is that really still a thing in this country? Really?

  206. calli

    A more appropriate silo mural is at the top of this page.

  207. Nick

    “That’s good. I’m a Conservative in NSW and I’ve never heard of Sophie.“

    Nick, you can’t be very interested in politics. Sophie York and Riccardo Bosi are the AC senate candidates for NSW.

    This is my point. I am interested, I’m Conservative and even reading the Cat, didn’t know who she was.
    If that is a litmus test, good luck getting votes.

  208. Mother Lode

    I love it, he is suing Cummings personally.

    Ha ha ha ha haa!

    The Dimocrats were and are just so unprepared for Trump.

    They are like a species that had established itself the consummate predator in its own niche. Perfectly attuned to its environs, their domain’s features and their own senses so perfectly fitted you could not tell where the one started and the other ended.

    They were able to run both campaign in an election, control the issues, the narratives (that is their own verbiage of course), they could make sure that even if they didn’t win the Presidency, they at least made sure the President was tame and docile.

    But this specialisation was at the expense of adaptability and intelligence surplus to it.

    Trump has them bamboozled. Their instincts are all wrong. Their reflexes miss. Each thrust and swing find nothing but air. Their response to Trump’s reinvigorating middle America has been to stagger backwards, further to the Left. By comparison, Obama was a moderate.

    There will surely be a few calmer heads in the party, more mentally disciplined and patient, who will be working out how to take Trump on. They may bring forward their own candidate, or they may co-opt an existing one. But the sight of Pelosi Pelosing, Waters Watersing, Cortez Cortezing will not let them win.

    Now the American Right has gathered its spirit together and is defiant it will not be shamed with false guilt into doing what they are ‘supposed’ to, not prostrate before grievance gods begging forgiveness, I suspect that henceforth a diversity hire like Obama would not be elected.

    /rant

  209. Geriatric Mayfly

    Now tell the truth, kiddies. It’s very naughty to lie.

    There will be no death tax under a Government I lead.

  210. Shy Ted

    Greetings from Miami. if you think Americans are weird on TV or in other media it’s nothing compared to the real thing. Staying in a poor neighbourhood with mucho Latinos and evangelical knee grows and just wondering round is a real eye opener. Made my way to Walmart and can confirm none of those pictures are fake. I miss you cats because you’re mostly normal. More revelations on my return.

  211. bespoke

    Nick

    AC has been discussed may time on the Cat, I’m surprised you did’t look them up your self.

  212. Tel

    There will be no death tax under a Government I lead.

    Ahh that hoary old chestnut … but you see what we legislated was more of a tax on death than an actual death tax. You can’t say it’s a broken promise. Why? Because we will stop you from saying anything, that’s why.

  213. Knuckle Dragger

    How could you NOT ban gay conversion therapy? It’s insane.

    Anyone that tries to convert me into Alan Joyce or Bob Brown is in for a nasty surprise, I can tell you.

  214. Nick

    AC has been discussed may time on the Cat, I’m surprised you did’t look them up your self.

    You miss my point. Why do I need to go to the extent of looking them up ? If it’s come to that, they will fail.

  215. Leigh Lowe

    It won’t be a death tax.
    Oh, no.
    But there is a distinct possibility that they will inyroduce LDL.

  216. thefrollickingmole

    Indoor cricket is dodging high speed missiles in a closed room.
    Not fun at all.
    Not remotely sport.
    It is pure survival.

    Been KO,d playing indoor cricket.
    The bosses hot daughter was running towards me and we were going to collide so i opened my arms to absorb the impact.
    She responded by thrusting out the handle of the bat in the classic “Running onto a bayonet/tent peg” maneuver right between my eyes.
    Apparently i was out for a good 5 minutes and made interesting snoring noises.

  217. Nick

    It won’t be a death tax.

    Post Mortem Surcharge or PMS.

  218. Notafan
    #2995148, posted on April 23, 2019 at 8:05 am
    Not to mention that there is no evidence that Socrates at the pubs sample group are all Christians.

    Every one of them is a Buddhist.

  219. Eyrie

    Scene: The Oval office.
    Aide comes in: ” Sir will you be going to the golf match in Melbourne?”
    PDT: “Melbourne? That’s in Florida, right? Can’t be too far from Mar a Largo”
    “No Sir, Melbourne, Australia”
    “Australia? oh yeah my pal Greg comes from there but even he is smart enough to live in the US nowadays. Make that a No”

  220. A very poignant documentary I have posted here before. A brilliant but very sad documentary.

    Soldiers in Hiding(1985) – Tragic first hand accounts of Vietnam veterans who abandoned society entirely to live in the wilderness, unable to cope with the effects of their traumatic war experiences.

  221. pete m

    twostix self identifies as a yobbo nicely.

    We don’t police the water – only requests are made. Council lifeguards can get tougher and call police backup but volunteer lifesavers do not.

    We don’t force anyone to do anything. It is always a request.

    No-one is rescued without their consent, or if unconscious, then we have statutory consent to rescue.

    By all means carry on with your activities and I’ll do mine for those that want it.

  222. stackja

    Riverside Oaks masterplan: 150-room hotel, 300 homes, 60-room lodging
    Jake McCallum, Urban Affairs Reporter, Hills Shire Times
    8 minutes ago
    Subscriber only
    A masterplan for hundreds of homes and a hotel at the Riverside Oaks has been submitted to The Hills Shire Council this week — following 30 years of redevelopment plans for the prestigious golf course.

    The concept development application for the Riverside Oaks Golf Resort in Cattai includes four residential precincts accommodating up to 300 homes with a minimum lot size of 450sq m, alongside a 150-room hotel, five golf resort lodges including 60 rooms in total as well as internal roads and conservation areas.

    Nanshan Holdings general manager Tony Wu failed to respond to The Times requests for comment.

    Shenzhen New Nanshan Holding (Group) Co., Ltd, formerly YAHGEE MODULAR HOUSE (GROUP) CO., LTD, is a China-based company principally engaged in the development and sale of real estates. The Company is also involved in modular house and marine outfitting businesses. The Company’s main products include residential buildings, commercial real estates, industrial real estates, activity rooms, packing cases, modular spaces, special containers, ancillary products, marine supporting rock wool boards, cabin fireproof doors, marine hygiene units and ship spaces, among others. The Company distributes its products in domestic market and to overseas markets.

  223. DrBeauGan

    Steve Kelley # 2 for me today.
    .
    .

    DrBeauGan

    #2995105, posted on April 23, 2019 at 4:26 am

    The pity of it is, that the best artist Australia has is Rowe, and he’s off his head.

    He is a fair to middling caricaturist (he has to caption his subjects far to often to rate him better than that).
    But to describe him as “the best artist in Australia” is a tiny bit of a stretch.

    I was implicitly confining myself to cartoonists, LL. And I’ll stick with that.

  224. stackja

    Video message accepted as legitimate will by Supreme Court
    Kay Dibben, Court reporter, The Courier-Mail
    April 23, 2019 12:00am
    Subscriber only

    A VIDEO recording on a mobile phone, made four years before a man died, has been accepted by a court as his final will, although it could not be accessed from his phone.

    A copy of the video, found on the hard drive of Leslie Wayne Quinn’s computer, synchronised from his iPhone, was presented to the Supreme Court as evidence of his final will.

    Leanne Quinn, his wife of 20 years, who had separated from him two years before his death, told the court her late husband showed her the iPhone recording soon after making it.

    At the time he told her he intended it to be his will and no other will was found after his death.

    Justice Lyons declared the video recording made on the iPhone, as contained in the CD copy, constituted Mr Quinn’s will and ordered a grant of letters of administration be made to Mrs Quinn.

  225. calli

    Hey, Shy Ted.
    Not fake?

    That’s a relief.

  226. mh

    Not an attack on Christians:

    Barack Obama

    @BarackObama
    The attacks on tourists and Easter worshippers in Sri Lanka are an attack on humanity. On a day devoted to love, redemption, and renewal, we pray for the victims and stand with the people of Sri Lanka.

    Hillary Clinton

    @HillaryClinton
    On this holy weekend for many faiths, we must stand united against hatred and violence. I’m praying for everyone affected by today’s horrific attacks on Easter worshippers and travelers in Sri Lanka.

    Julián Castro

    @JulianCastro
    On a day of redemption and hope, the evil of these attacks on Easter worshippers and tourists in Sri Lanka is deeply saddening. My prayers today are with the dead and injured, and their families. May we find grace.

    Jared Polis

    @GovofCO
    Heartbreaking to learn about the attacks on tourists and Easter worshippers in Sri Lanka. Colorado stands with the people of Sri Lanka during this very tragic day and we grieve for those affected by these acts of violence.

    Ami Bera, M.D.

    @RepBera
    I am deeply saddened over the horrific acts of violence against Easter worshippers and tourists in Sri Lanka. I send my deepest condolences to the victims and their families. We stand united with the people of Sri Lanka.

  227. feelthebern

    South Park re-enacts numbers after a David Rowe viewing.

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