Remember, remember the fourth of June

Chinese navy personnel stand guard aboard one of the warships docked at Garden Island in Sydney yesterday. Picture: AAP

OK, so it doesn’t rhyme, but we should remember the date all the same. Here’s the story from today, fourth of June even: Storm over surprise warship visit.

Defence experts said it was ­important there was transparency about engagement with China, ­arguing the decision not to form­ally announce the arrival of the biggest Chinese naval taskforce to Australia in years was “a bad look”.

It is a bad look, a very bad look. And here’s the context which, long though it may be, you should read from start to end if you want to understand the Great Game of the era in which you live: Much More Than a Trade War with China. Here’s a bit.

Chinese actions today mirror those dating back 4,000 years, when the Shang Dynasty—China’s first major dynasty—rose to prominence thanks to totalitarianism and imperialism. By assessing these basic patterns over the course of thousands of years, then, one can see how China has identified the United States as a major threat to be toppled. And, it is also why the United States cannot compromise with China in the ongoing trade war—no matter what Beijing offers. For, if the Trump Administration makes a deal, the Chinese will continue their aggressive assault on the American economy—moving from the manufacturing sector to the higher-paying innovation sectors (they already are).

Unlike the United States, China desires to not merely exist as a preeminent power in an anarchic international system. Instead, they view the United States as the hegemonic global power. Such a global power threatens Chinese state security and, as such, China’s leadership cadre believes that they will only be safe if the American hegemon is dismantled and eventually replaced by themselves.

No more surprise visits! We are part of the free, democratic West and want to stay that way.

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38 Responses to Remember, remember the fourth of June

  1. stackja

    Mao lives on in Xi. I believe Deng ordered the massacre.

  2. And where would the US (and I guess the world) be under a full Democrat run government?

  3. I read this piece by Steve and then I scrolled down and clicked the link on the mock Al Gore piece which led to the SMH. Here’s a small quote from the article:

    Bureau of Meteorology forecaster Zhi-Weng Chua said the worst winds, which gusted up to almost 90km/h about 1pm at the airport, had probably passed for the day in Sydney.

    I reckon the Chinese navy has simply come home.

  4. Roger

    Our authorities were also ill prepared the last time a major Asian power dispatched vessels into Sydney harbour.

    How long will our luck last?

  5. Wilrex

    All part of the Middle Kingdom twenty six dash line of influence.

  6. Sinclair Davidson

    Not clear to me who was surprised. We the population were not informed by our government of an impending vistit? or the Australian government was surprised too?

  7. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Left the Middle Kingdom this Monday afternoon and flew to Canada where it is still Monday. Went Air Canada and we were surprised to see the flight was mainly Chinese (unusual to see a National Carrier with not many original Nationals on it) and announcements were made in Chinese as well as the usual French and English. Some Vancouver Airport signage was also in Chinese As in Australia, lots of Chinese people now live in Canada. Comedian on TV show on the plane joked against America (PC comedy) that Canada didn’t need a wall because ‘we have Winter’. Didn’t seem to be deterring anyone I could see.

    Planes don’t mind winter.

  8. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    As with many other National groups, I like the Chinese. They are industrious and make good citizens. As with any other National group though, too sudden an influx can change both the culture and geo-political situation of a country in ways not particularly harmonious. Hasten slowly with immigration. I hope ScoMo got that message.

  9. thefrollickingmole

    3 scenarios.

    1: The government knew, and also surmised that someone would point out hosting a visit like this on the anniversary of Tienanmen was a bad look so kept it hush hush.

    2: The government was presented with “we will be coming” and kept it quiet out of the desire not to generate a diplomatic incident.

    3: It was a surprise visit and the government is not wanting to look stupid…

    Id be betting money on number 2.

  10. Not Uh oh

    Are the guys with the guns there to keep people off the boats or on them?

  11. duncanm

    Seems like a perfect opportunity to run a string of mines across the heads. Oopsie, were you leaving today?

  12. Woolfe

    4. The Government had not heard of Tienanmen square

  13. Tel

    https://www.reddit.com/r/UnethicalLifeProTips/comments/b3f0d1/ulpt_if_youre_ever_doing_business_with_a_chinese/

    There’s a kind of low key protest you can do by including “triggering” phrases in all sorts of subtle places. For example JPEG images have a comment block where you can drop in a little message. PDF files usually have a non-displayed section at the end which contains notes on how the PDF was put together, you can tuck a message into that. And just plop it into your favorite blog post.

    六四天安門事件

    That should keep us safely on the “freedom” side of the firewall.

  14. Percy Popinjay

    or the Australian government was surprised too?

    Beryl Gladyschlocklian was unawares. Probably too busy hearing from her braindead millennial “policy advisors” about the many, many positives of foisting the latest stupid greenfilth brainfart on an unwitting populace.

  15. Des Deskperson

    ‘Not clear to me who was surprised. We the population were not informed by our government of an impending vistit? or the Australian government was surprised too?’

    Well, as Top Ender pointed out on an earlier thread, a naval visit of that size requires a good deal of forward planning. This would normally have required approval in advance by the Minister for Defence after consultation with DFAT and PM&C, including by the Ministers of those Departments if there were issues of sensitivity or controversy

    In my day it was, and presumably still is, standard practice, unless the warship involved was small and the visit was low key and routine, for the Department of Defence to issue a media release about the visit a reasonable time in advance.

    Foreign governments do not normally make formal requests for warship visits unless they are very confident that the request will be granted. To me, this was all worked out a long time ago – possibly when HMAS Melbourne visited China – with the Chinese aware that Australia would no more refuse a Chinese visit than it would an American .

    Anyway, the secrecy, whatever its purpose, has only made thing considerably worse. Did the government seriously believe that noone would notice some large grey vessels with red flags in Sydney harbour. A PR release a few days before the visit probably wouldn’t have assuaged everyone, but it would haven a much better look.

  16. We sell them all our assets, like ports, farms and mines (worlds biggest tin mine Renison in Tassie owned by China) so that we can pay for all the cheap junk we buy from them.
    If in the future we change our laws regarding these assets (to favour ourselves), the Chinese will send a flotilla to the South Pacific, essentially saying “Oi! Leave our assets alone or the koala gets it”.

    Under the guise of a ‘friendly visit’ by a trading partner, the Chinese are surveying our coast line and deep waters.
    Trump will not be happy. He was recently asked about placing tariffs on Australia during one of his White House lawn pressers. He said not at the moment because Australia was a good friend.
    Stunts like this visit will change his opinion very quickly.

    Get set for a recession within 2 years.

    p.s. How do the “free movement of people and goods” libertarians feel about the “free movement” of the Chinese navy through our waters?

  17. rickw

    So those Chicom fuckers can stand on the vessel, armed with assault rifles, and the Australian Government approves.

    Whilst that same Australian Government prohibits Australian Citizens from access to the same.

    There is a lot that is horribly wrong with this picture.

  18. BrettW

    Australian ships have visited Chinese ports so the problem is it then becomes hard for Australia to say no to visits by their ships.

  19. rickw

    Not clear to me who was surprised. We the population were not informed by our government of an impending vistit? or the Australian government was surprised too?

    I think the real story is probably close to the Chicoms having just done a freedom of navigation exercise right into Sydney Harbour.

  20. Lizzie:

    As with many other National groups, I like the Chinese. They are industrious and make good citizens.

    That remains to be seen, Lizzie.
    Good citizens don’t protect criminal gangs, nor do they adopt a separate cultural state within the state. Nor do they allow their own to deliberately swing elections as we saw several years ago by policing their own to vote a particular way by exerting pressure on families back in the Old Country.

  21. The BigBlueCat

    I wonder what these Chinese combat soldiers were expecting? They weren’t arriving at Tiananmen Square were they? Perhaps they are here to protect Chinese interests ….

  22. The protesters appear to be overwhelmingly male.
    Also appears to be execution type headshots.
    No. Not linking – search for them yourselves. I don’t want to be associated with killthrill photos.

  23. rickw

    As with many other National groups, I like the Chinese. They are industrious and make good citizens.

    They will get hundreds of people on buses to Canberra to protest at short notice, when Beijing says to.

    Model Citizens, but not of Australia.

  24. Des Deskperson

    ‘I wonder what these Chinese combat soldiers were expecting? ‘

    If you mean the dudes in the picture above, I think they are Chinese Marines.

    Does anyone know RAN procedures for guarding its warships in foreign ports?

  25. Chris M

    And Google has a fancy [email protected] pride graphic and article set up on their home page today.

    But you knew that [email protected] s3x and associated STD’s are so much more important than actual human freedom.

  26. Chris M

    I’m waiting for President Trump to troll the Chicoms about it, even obliquely. I’m feeling it, he just wants to do it!

  27. The BigBlueCat

    Des Deskperson
    #3034591, posted on June 4, 2019 at 5:16 pm
    ‘I wonder what these Chinese combat soldiers were expecting? ‘

    If you mean the dudes in the picture above, I think they are Chinese Marines.

    All marines are soldiers (they are naval infantry, and infantry are “soldiers marching or fighting on foot; foot soldiers collectively.”), but not all soldiers are marines. Certainly US Marines don’t like being called soldiers, even if that’s what they are. But US Army infantry aren’t Marines. Frankly, I couldn’t care less what Chinese Marines prefer to be called ….

  28. Well there’s one thing, BigBlueCat, they are allowed “automatic assault rifles” on Australian territory and I’m not.

  29. Fat Tony

    Winston Smith
    #3034607, posted on June 4, 2019 at 5:35 pm
    Well there’s one thing, BigBlueCat, they are allowed “automatic assault rifles” on Australian territory and I’m not.

    Winston, at least you know where we stand in importance with regard to the Chinese by “our” government.

  30. Des Deskperson

    ‘Well there’s one thing, BigBlueCat, they are allowed “automatic assault rifles” on Australian territory and I’m not.’

    Winston, according to its website, the RAN uses several automatic small arms, including the EF 88 Austeyr assault rifle and the F89A1 Minimi LMG.

    I’m assuming, unless advised otherwise by an authoritative source:

    that RAN vessels deployed overseas carry these weapons.

    that they are routinely used for guarding RAN vessels docked in foreign ports.

  31. rickw

    I’m assuming, unless advised otherwise by an authoritative source:

    that RAN vessels deployed overseas carry these weapons.

    that they are routinely used for guarding RAN vessels docked in foreign ports.

    Des, they would certainly carry these weapons.

    But run armed guard duty while docked in a Chinese Port in the same way the Chicoms are doing here?!

    They would get chastised by the Chicoms for being culturally insensitive and would quickly stuff them back in the armoury.

  32. Fisky

    p.s. How do the “free movement of people and goods” libertarians feel about the “free movement” of the Chinese navy through our waters?

    Nothing excites “libertarians” more than a future occupation regime making unannounced visits in our ports. They imagine a future for themselves as colonial advisors to the CCP.

  33. Mitchell Porter

    Steve mentions the Great Game of geopolitics and links to an essay proposing a kind of Eternal China theory, in which China is always a centralized dictatorship trying to subordinate the world to itself. The quoted passage draws a distinction between America, which merely desires to be “a preeminent power” in an “anarchic” world, and China, which believes America is a “hegemon” whose place atop the world order must be “replaced by themselves”.

    The Great Game is not just about wars and supply lines, it is also about image versus reality. Rival great powers have their own conceptions of the world and their own place in history. They have pundits and ideologues who explain why their civilization is the best, regardless of what its current status may be, and who explain why their actions are about defending or extending that civilization.

    The essay above proposes a particular pro-American and anti-Chinese interpretation of events. To a naive reader it may seem, at the very least, strange or hypocritical to go on about the relentless Chinese will to power, when it’s the USA that has bases all over the world, the biggest military, the biggest spy networks, and all of that. But of course all that can be excused. America had to save the world from German fascism and Japanese imperialism, and then from Russian communism, and then from Al Qaeda terrorism, and besides, if America is a kind of hegemon, that’s just because of the virtues of American civilization rather than its vices; America’s strengths have simply won out in the marketplace of great power competition, etc.

    I don’t particularly want to argue the anti-American case, despite great personal reservations about simply assenting to American strategic designs and American civilizational narratives. There is much about America that I appreciate. I just don’t believe the hype here, that says America is good and China is bad and that’s it. So as a corrective, I think it’s useful to see another recent essay, which takes exactly the opposite position.

    It’s a glimpse – just a glimpse – of how the world looks from the opposite corner: America is the power that wants to rule the world, and intrudes everywhere with whatever rationale can be devised. It is a corrupt collapsing empire, from which China must now disengage, while it seeks allies for protection and assistance in building a new and better world. And so forth.

    Neither of these essays has any official government endorsement. But I think that taking them together, provides a picture of what is ahead, if the antagonism continues to grow.

  34. candy

    It is a bad look, a very bad look.

    The secrecy by PM Morrison and his foreign affairs minister is simply weird and on that basis troubling. Why not just inform the public ahead of time?
    Very odd.

  35. The BigBlueCat

    Winston Smith
    #3034607, posted on June 4, 2019 at 5:35 pm
    Well there’s one thing, BigBlueCat, they are allowed “automatic assault rifles” on Australian territory and I’m not.

    Try boarding said Chinese vessel and telling them they’re in Australian territory – they may take a different view since you’d be on their boat! I suspect there are “rules” when it comes to foreign military vessels in Australian ports and whether or not assault weapons can be carried and/or displayed whilst on the vessel. Google isn’t helping me here ….

  36. One Vegan doesn’t make a Salad

    Before we allow them to dock we need to know their position on nuclear power, renewable energy, gender fluidity, use of offending symbols during combat, ..you know all that sh!t we made our defence force some sign up for. Where are all our brave antifa and other protestors? Still waiting.

  37. Chris M

    It is a corrupt collapsing empire, from which China must now disengage, while it seeks allies for protection and assistance

    1) Few empires more corrupt than China.
    2) It’s engaging, not disengaging.
    3) China has no friends, no other country trust them even those next door. Neither has it sort out allies.
    4) It doesn’t seek protection and the only assistance sort is coerced.

    Seems like a whopper of an article, only a doofus or a journalist would believe any of it.

  38. Des deskperson:

    Winston, according to its website, the RAN uses several automatic small arms, including the EF 88 Austeyr assault rifle and the F89A1 Minimi LMG.

    Sure, Des, but that’s not the point I’m trying to make.
    In an Australian port (Yes I understand the vessel itself is considered Chinese territory) a member of a nation that we do have have no defence treaties with, is carrying a weapon to secure his own safety and the safety of his vessel, and I am not allowed to do the same?

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