Policy-makers guide to climate change

Just the thing for the new Coalition Government. Hot off the press from Marlo Lewis, one of my men in DC, located at the Center for Competitive Enterprise. Two days after the Presidential election in the corridor at the CEI a flying figure almost knocked me over on the way to the canteen. It was Myron Ebell literally running to get on with preparing the landing for the new administration. He was among the candidates for the top job at the EPA.

Here are five things you need to know:

1. Climate change is not a “planetary emergency.”

2. The climate catastrophe narrative is concocted out of overheated climate models, inflated emission scenarios, political hype, and unmerited pessimism about human adaptive capabilities.

3. All metrics of human well-being show the state of the world is improving; sustaining such progress requires greater access to affordable energy.

4. The very real costs of climate “solutions” hugely exceed their hypothetical benefits.

5. Citizens have more to fear from the climate policy agenda than from climate change itself.

The paper provides supporting evidence for those conclusions.

This entry was posted in Global warming and climate change policy, Rafe. Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Policy-makers guide to climate change

  1. egg_

    1. Climate change is not a “planetary emergency.”

    Aren’t we paying for ManBearPig to lecture us that it is?

  2. Mother Lode

    The paper provides supporting evidence for those conclusions.

    I don’t think there is anyone on the Climate Change gravy-train who is there because of science or evidence.

    Evidence will not make any difference.

    They are there because it is in the newspapers, because it gives them power over others, or because they receive money from producing nonsense papers.

    Climate Change will keep going until politicians are scared of defending it.

  3. Roger

    I don’t think there is anyone on the Climate Change gravy-train who is there because of science or evidence.

    “the Greta [Thunberg] phenomenon has also involved green lobbyists, PR hustlers, eco-academics, and a think-tank founded by a wealthy ex-minister in Sweden’s Social Democratic government with links to the country’s energy companies. These companies are preparing for the biggest bonanza of government contracts in history: the greening of the Western economies. Greta, whether she and her parents know it or not, is the face of their political strategy.” RTWT

  4. Mark M

    The last forty years have seen a massive and historically unprecedented decline in global poverty.

    Globalization and Poverty’s Unprecedented Decline

    In 1981, the year Ronald Reagan became America’s 40th President, 44.3 percent of the world lived in extreme poverty (i.e., less than $1.90 per person per day).
    Last year, it was 9.6 percent.
    That’s a decline of 78 percent.
    In East Asia, a region of the world that includes China, 80.6 percent of people lived in extreme poverty.
    Today, 4.1 percent do—a 95 percent reduction.
    Even in sub-Saharan Africa, a relatively under-performing region, the share of the population living on less than $1.9 per day dropped by 38 percent.

    https://humanprogress.org/article.php?p=462&fbclid=IwAR2XO-BwieHLBX1y6kXxiEFwzgXdiSYeAv3CEx514PxbI6cBckEqJi7GWsw

    Thank you, fossil fuels.

  5. Mark M

    These cities have the best quality of life …

    Australia has two in the top ten, the only country to do so:

    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/05/these-cities-have-the-best-quality-of-life

    Thank you, coal.

  6. Mark M

    Oops. President Trump’s USA gets two cities in there as well!

  7. John A

    3. All metrics of human well-being show the state of the world is improving; sustaining such progress requires greater access to affordable energy.

    Affordable, non-muscular, concentrated, energy.

    T,FTFY

    Concentrated = dense, not sparse (like the brains of our politicians who have swallowed the climate change KoolAid.)

Comments are closed.