Tuesday Forum: July 2, 2019

This entry was posted in Open Forum. Bookmark the permalink.

2,059 Responses to Tuesday Forum: July 2, 2019

  1. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Haven’t had enough phone battery power left to play Steve’s video clips.

    Maybe missed something there.
    Turning it off now. Night all.

  2. Old School Conservative

    JB’s post about “The Lion of London Bridge” epitomises the surrender of England to the totalitarian left.
    Barehanded bloke takes on 3 knife wielding, murdering jihadists and now the cops can’t cut him a bit of slack.
    Get over there and see the UK before it disappears completely.
    See it before Enoch Powell’s warnings are totally vindicated.

    [Slightly edited. It is possible to make this very point without embellishment. Sinc]

  3. Cpt Seahawks

    Put that in your pipe when making deleterious references to seagull cruising.

    I second that.

  4. Rossini

    Late to the party……looks like every one has departed…….or sleeping soundly.

  5. Infidel Tiger

    Elizabeth Harrington
    @LizRNC
    “Pay hikes these past 3 years surged faster for the poorest quarter of workers (4.4%) than for the richest (3.2%)”

    “Blue-collar employment is also up big since January 2017: 657,000 new construction jobs and 484,000 more in manufacturing”

    Low taxes domestically and high tariffs against rogue states work.

  6. BrettW

    Seems Harry is a bit of a virtue signalling idiot :

    From Daily Express:

    Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have followed climate change activist Greta Thunberg, 16, on Instagram.

    The young woman rose to world fame when she inspired world-wide school strike movement.

    Greta is a Swedish teenager who protested outside of the country’s parliament last year.

    Since, she has inspired many to take up the cause of climate change.

  7. Cpt Seahawks

    Superman and Al Gore and Greta on a plane.

  8. JC

    Low taxes domestically and high tariffs against rogue states work.

    What works best is lower taxes and rogue states becoming unroguish.

  9. Notafan

    Yes well Tel.

    I suppose some of us have ways of discerning the sensible from the stupid.

  10. Notafan

    And I see Johanna thinks her one sortie overseas in the 70s makes her an expert on international travel and knocking others sensible advise shows what a worldly sophisticate she is.

    All my kids have travelled further, longer and more adventurously with my blessings than you, pet.

    And lots of the peeps here have lived and worked in places I would not go to under any circumstances. Was mostly those giving bg sagacious advise.

    KD you are right, there will be no sideways admissions.

  11. nb

    Confused Old Misfit, July 2, 2019 at 8:33 pm says:
    Madness of The University of Melbourne …
    is here: http://catallaxyfiles.com/2019/06/26/more-madness-from-the-university-of-melbourne/

    Thank you, but that is not it. It does not deal with the same subject matter and itself refers to the prior article in this sentence:
    ‘Then there was the post by Rafe on the Madness of The University of Melbourne.’

  12. DrBeauGan

    candy
    #3076878, posted on July 2, 2019 at 7:13 pm
    BG is on a seniors South Pacific cruise.

    He might be a bit vulnerable to pretty young Cuban girls, methinks. He may think the girl is in love with him, but it’s money the poor girl would want. Not a lover of senior years. Probably does not have a child at all either. Surely he would know that.
    There will be a pimp somewhere, and it sounds like he has been flashing money around.

    Candy, I’ve made a fool of myself over pretty girls many, many times. I’m fully aware that the source of my fatal fascination to Cuban chicks is that compared with them I am filthy rich.

    If we go to the beach I will meet the six year old daughter. Probably. As you all know, I am not big on simple faith,

    The theory that I am making it all up is very flattering to my literary skills. I should certainly not try to deny the possibility.😀😁😇

  13. Top Ender

    You guessed it – a lot of money needed:

    Inala health centre big step in closing the gap
    CHRISTOPHER PERRY

    It should shame us that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have such poor health outcomes. They die 10 years younger and have much higher death rates than non-indigenous people across all age groups and for all major causes of death.

    Heart disease, advanced cancer, diabetes and subsequent kidney failure, untreated blindness and childhood deafness are far too common. Cancer is diagnosed later and incomplete treatment is almost the norm. The rate of First Nations’ discharge against medical advice, an indicator of health systems’ successfully engaging patients, is eight times higher than for non-indigenous Australians. Despite employing Aboriginal ­liaison officers, hospitals are failing First Nations people.

    Health messages are being ignored: 39 per cent of indigenous people smoke daily compared with 14 per cent of the Australian population. Consequently, heart disease is eight times higher in middle-aged indigenous Australians. The commonest cancers in First Nations people are lung and head and neck (mouth and throat), both smoking-related. Diabetes is three times more prevalent and chronic renal failure, an indicator of poor diabetes management, is five times higher.

    Last year’s Australian Medical Association report card on Closing the Gap highlights that health systems are designed for “equity of outcome”. But something is wrong when First Nations people are 10 times less likely to be added to a kidney transplant waiting list and 30 per cent less likely to be ­offered cataract surgery.

    Health expenditure on those with greater needs should be higher. Combined public and private hospital costs of First Nations people with cancer and musculoskeletal disease (hip and knee replacements and so on) are lower than for non-indigenous Australians. The cost of mental and behavioural disorders, diabetes and injuries are higher.

    The lower cost of orthopaedic and musculoskeletal services but higher rates of obesity and injuries reflect the lack of access to public health services. The higher rates of cancer but lower spend on cancer services for First Nations people is ­disgraceful.

    We may pride ourselves on our multiculturalism, but “otherness” and pigeonholing are everywhere.

    Assumptions by staff that the indigenous patient will not turn up for an operation mean they often are not placed on theatre lists. The reasoning that remote indigenous people will not arrive when a matched kidney donor becomes available at necessarily short notice may explain the one-tenth rate of indigenous people ­offered a place on transplant lists.

    Indigenous people are slower to access medical services to investigate health complaints. The abdominal pain or rectal bleeding that signifies a possible bowel cancer is just too hard to investigate when you have to leave a safe environment and dependent children to travel many hours by car and then train or plane to a potentially unsafe hostel to be seen by white health professionals who don’t understand your thinking and culture.

    Then the assumption is often made that the appointments for investigations that may have long waiting lists and require other long journeys won’t be kept.

    Canada and the US have similar indigenous health issues, ­although not as bad. Each is building First Nations hospital ­networks run by indigenous ­organisations for indigenous patients. The hospital is “culturally safe” in design and staffing. Cancer investigations are expedited, as are ear and eye surgeries that are relatively cheap and simple.

    Diabetes and chronic renal failure with dialysis are treated in a sensitive environment that encourages engagement and participation. Indigenous hospitals can be training centres for indigenous employment from nursing to accounting and building maintenance. They can be places where non-indigenous health professionals are taught cultural sensitivity and about the health and emotional needs of our 800,000 First Australians.

    St Vincent’s Healthcare Australia has allocated funding from its inclusive health program to test the viability and business case of a First Nations hospital and health network proposed for Inala in Brisbane. Its steering committee is led by Noel Hayman, Queensland’s first Aboriginal doctor and specialist public health physician. He is director of the Inala Indigenous Health Service, which is associated with the University of Queensland. He is being advised by Kelvin Kong, Australia’s first Aboriginal and Torres Strait ­Islander surgeon, and other ­respected and senior specialists.

    There are 85,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders living in the neighbourhood of the Inala centre. That is the population of Bundaberg, which has a 240-bed public hospital with five operating theatres and an endoscopy suite, along with three private hospitals with 10 operating rooms and four theatres for ­endoscopies.

    It is envisaged the Inala health centre hospital will be a 23-hour hospital for indigenous patients to enable them to comfortably enter the hospital system. It will have the cancer surgeons and endoscopists to screen for the cancers that present in great numbers and are too advanced to cure.

    It will be a waiting list reduction hospital for non-indigenous people. It would be a culturally sensitive place with good, clean hostel accommodation next door. This Aboriginal hospital will screen for cancer of the lungs, bowel, throat and breast. Patients then can be referred directly to the major tertiary hospitals including Princess Alexandra, Logan and QEII, and the patients will be supported in that journey. The Inala First Nations hospital also can help patients in other areas where results are still poor — dental care, dialysis and palliative services.

    If a sustainable model of care for indigenous Australians can be built in Inala, other indigenous hospitals could be built elsewhere. We have to close the gap. Spare capacity in these indigenous hospitals could be filled with the overflowing non-indigenous waiting list patients. Everyone’s a winner.

    Planning for Inala makes the case that Australia can catch up with Canada and the US in addressing poor indigenous health outcomes with a well-funded indigenous hospital and health network. Now the community needs to face the challenge of funding the building and ensuring sustainable ongoing resourcing. We need equality of outcome in First Nations health to start to close the gap in education and economic outcomes. Today’s healthcare model fails them.

    Christopher Perry is an associate professor at the University of Queensland.

    My comment, awaiting approval, is:

    It’s a thoughtful article, but the idea is essentially flawed. The “remote community” idea is essentially flawed. People living in them should move to where the jobs are. This is what has happened in hundreds of societies across the world for thousands of years.

  14. JC

    Doc

    Did you bring over any cosmetics as I hear that junk works a treat there. 🙂

  15. DrBeauGan

    JC
    #3095834, posted on July 3, 2019 at 2:56 am
    Doc

    Did you bring over any cosmetics as I hear that junk works a treat there.

    No, I didn’t, JC. But I don’t seem to need it. Taking them out to posh (relatively) restaurants works just as well.

    Just got a phone call from Maria; she invited me back to her place for food. Of course this is when her pimp beats me up and steals all my money.

    But I shall go anyway.

  16. DrBeauGan

    PS. I feared that after the immodium cured my diarrhoea, I might get horribly constipated as a consequence.

    You will be glad to hear that I am not.

    I shall spare you the details.

    ,……

  17. Tom

    Warren Brown classic (Sydney Daily Telegraph), which sent the haters after him.

  18. DrBeauGan

    It must be time for Tom’s toons. It is two in the afternoon here, 31° and sunny. My ideal, pretty much.

    I am listening to one of the late Beethoven string quartets on the Bluetooth speaker, and smoking a cigar. Bliss! All it needs is the toons and it with be perfect.

  19. Tom

    Dean Alston (West Australian) marks the recent rugby league state of origin match at the new Perth stadium.

  20. Tom

    David Rowe (I assume the woman in President Xi’s pocket is the Hong Kong governor).

  21. Tom

    Unlike Australia (which has a collapsing economy), the USA has very few public holidays, so each one is eagerly anticipated – like one of the biggest, this Thursday’s Independence Day. Tom Stiglich.

  22. None

    BrettW

    #3095826, posted on July 3, 2019 at 12:55 am

    Seems Harry is a bit of a virtue signalling idiot 

    That he is and his wife is only going to make him worse. The important thing is that William does not follow suite although I’m not too sure what we do with Charles in the interim except hope that he develops a really bad drinking problem fast.

  23. None

    So I check-in for Tom’s cartoons and the next installment from our man in Havana and the Cuban renegade hasn’t even been to the beach yet.

  24. DrBeauGan

    None
    #3095851, posted on July 3, 2019 at 4:44 am
    So I check-in for Tom’s cartoons and the next installment from our man in Havana and the Cuban renegade hasn’t even been to the beach yet.

    Gimme a go. Last night was our first date. AND she’s invited me to her place for dinner.

    You mustn’t rush these thing

  25. None

    LOL Dr BG. I thought your next date was the beach and rush what? 😉

  26. JC

    I don’t want anyone getting upset and start lashing out at the screen antifa style. This is uncle George’s family office.. meaning investment office in Manhattan. As much as people despise the old Nazi collaborating fuckhead, you have to admit that it’s a really nice space..
    http://www.sheltonmindel.com/project/ny-family-office/

  27. DrBeauGan

    None
    #3095851, posted on July 3, 2019 at 4:44 am
    So I check-in for Tom’s cartoons and the next installment from our man in Havana and the Cuban renegade hasn’t even been to the beach yet.

    Gimme a go. Last night was our first date. AND she’s invited me to her place for dinner.

    You mustn’t rush these thing

    And I did keep you all informed about my bowel movements up thread. You can’t complain that I am omittiñg the important stuff.

    ….

  28. None

    So you took her to a restaurant that required a dose of Immodium. Well done BG. *snort*

  29. None

    So what did you have for dinner at the restaurant DrBeaugan?

  30. JC

    This was a Liar’s Party discount.

    House prices are poised for a 15 per cent rebound thanks to the ­Reserve Bank’s back-to-back cuts to the official interest rate, more than reversing the declines of the past two years.

    It’s not “thanks to the RBA” at all. Adam Creighton is an imbecile and ought to resign peddling this bullshit. There wasn’t anyone … not even in the homes of the mentally retarded… who didn’t know the RBA was on an easing monetary policy stance. The move back up in RE is purely and simply because those morons failed to win government and would have introduced laws to destroy values.

    Murdoch should fire this idiot.

  31. vr

    JC — Where is the trading floor? I am guessing everything has outsourced for others to manage.

  32. JC

    Doc

    Get the hell out of that Godless place. If you need a taste of Cuba/Scareface then go to Miami. which has become the real Cuba. Get out of there even on an inflated car tire if you have to. Take the gal with you, but leave the kid. 🙂

  33. None

    Nice views but the rest is bland and uninspiring IMHO JC. Imagine it staffed: the usual cluster of cubicle rats in the middlr and office bound ponces around the circumference. I was almost relieved to find some colour in some shots. That big light obstructing egg thing in the atroium what the hell is is it?

  34. DrBeauGan

    So you took her to a restaurant that required a dose of Immodium. Well done BG. *snort*

    You have not been following the saga closely, None. The dinner was way after the immodium.

    I had crema de mariscos soup and grilled fish with miscellaneous vegetables. Maria had something foreign involving sweet potato fritatas and a salad. She gave me some of the fritatas and they were good.

  35. JC

    vr

    I’m guessing “the floor’ is the open space area. These days I think the uncle invests most of his money with outside managers.

    These sorts of dudes don’t have a trading floor as such. They have execution desks and the decision makers are in their offices.

    I love Sheldon Mindel’s work and came across it that way… I take an occasional looksee to see the latest work they’ve done. Our apartment fit-out was done by people who used to work there. You could say we got the a Sheldon Mindel fit-out on the cheap…:-)

  36. JC

    None

    It’s a beautiful fit-out. Stop whining.

  37. JC

    That big light obstructing egg thing in the atroium what the hell is is it?

    I’m not certain, but I would say it’s something to do with light change/color and mood change. I guess if you want to feel like sex when you don’t, just get in the egg and change the light color to red? Dunno.

  38. vr

    JC — How do you like apartment in its final form?

  39. vr

    JC — Had to look up Sheldon Mindel. Looks like they design for Knoll.

  40. DrBeauGan

    Doc

    Get the hell out of that Godless place.

    It’s substantially less godless than I am, JC. There is a big, beautiful baroque church only a hundred metres away, and it was well attended last Sunday.

    I find Havana delightfull. People are friendly and helpful, even the cops. My apartment is very comfortable, and there is a park nearby. Actually, the Plaza de la Revolucion, but it’s a park.

  41. None

    You are correct BG, I’m not up to date with your bowel movements. I’m not sure if I want to be.

    *Catallaxy: come for the economics, stay for the stools*

  42. JC

    vr, beyond ecstatic. It’s just great. We took a yuge risk just forking out the cashola, letting the architect do the work, having little input and just showing up when it was done. But it worked out really well.

    Staying until next week. The big let down is the oppressive hot weather here. It’s not like Death Valley hot, but it’s really humid and disgusting. NYC is really a spring and autumn place.

  43. None

    A bit of floating timber flooring was about the only warmth and human touch in that soulless ‘fitout”, JC

  44. JC

    None

    True. They should have gone for a French provincial look. 🙂

  45. None

    So when do we get pictures of your apartment fit out JC?

  46. None

    Do you have an egg thing in your apartment fit out JC?

  47. JC

    Dunno, vr. They may have some association with Knoll. Here is their website.
    http://www.sheltonmindel.com/

  48. bespoke

    You’ve got people stoushing over you from Cuba DrBeauGan, good job. 😎

  49. JC

    No, there’s no egg thing in the apartment, none.

    It’s very beige with a tinge of grey.

    I haven’t bought a new tv for years. The one installed here is freaking incredible. I’m not suggesting it’s out of this world expensive or anything like that, but the pic that you get on a new TV these days is absolutely freaking amazing. The clarity is as close as eyesight I imagine. I’m stunned as I haven’t bought one for a while until now.

  50. DrBeauGan

    You’ve got people stoushing over you from Cuba DrBeauGan, good job.

    It’s one of my superpowers, bespoke. 😇

  51. vr

    JC — The same with Chicago. Fall and Spring are the best.

    Congratulations on your place. Have you been stalking your usual haunts?

  52. None

    Beige with a tinge of grey. I must admit JC that just sounds so…. hope it’s better than it sounds. Do you live in New York permanently now?

  53. None

    All cities like New York and Chicago are pretty woeful in summer and winter. Summers are oppressive with all the heat bouncing off edges of concrete and glass, a giant microwave. In winter they turn into wind tunnels.

  54. Top Ender

    Mmmm…might be worth moving to Europe.

    Just bought six cans of Pilsener beer for E3.24. That’s $5.23.

  55. Bruce of Newcastle

    Johannes Leak does Philip Lowe head of the RBA.
    You can restart a dead camel with jumper leads.

  56. bespoke

    Scott Adams over thinks it. Of course the politics is just an excuse just like black/brown shirts in the thirty’s and I bet people excused there violence too. History repeating itself, stooped human cycle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpEQ7S8k9Is

  57. Bruce of Newcastle

    Can’t not can. Too early in the morning, I haven’t been jump started yet.

  58. bespoke

    Reluctant to make new laws but egging, spitting, milk shaking or any physical contact should have minim federal sentience. But SoMo will end jailing people for memes.

  59. DrBeauGan

    It’s just possible that Maria’s circle has been telling her about what wicked, deceitful people gringos are. She hasn’t believed them.

  60. Mater

    Scott Adams over thinks it.

    Quite the opposite, I think. That is a horrendous take on the situation.
    If you label any group as ‘neo-nazis’, it’s ok (or at least just sport) to kick the shit out of them?
    They should have expected a counter protest, consequently, they knew what they were getting into?
    There is so many holes in his line of thinking, it’s hard to know where to start.

    Bottom line: if they target a particular political group for their ‘sport’, it becomes political.

  61. Knuckle Dragger

    Harry, the last remaining royal with any vestige of testosterone at all, wouldn’t be allowed to have social media accounts of his own.

    The Saxe-Coburg PR department, however, will have one with the cutesy ‘Harry and Megan’ handle.

  62. bespoke

    It’s one of my superpowers, bespoke. 😇

    I have one too, making frightbat’s shut up by not falling for there BS.

    #crybully

  63. Eyrie

    Regarding the teaching of reading: “She said universities could not cram everything into four years.”
    Seems you can learn what you really need to teach in 3 days.

    Used to be primary teaching was a two year course at teacher training college. Another solved problem we’ve unsolved.

  64. Knuckle Dragger

    That terrorist-attacking bloke in Pomland should be lionised along with the airport worker in Scotland who started laying the boot into burning moohoosleys.

    ‘I’m fecking Millwall’. That right there should inspire generations of actual Poms (as opposed to people living in England) to stop being snivelling, pasty, kipper-eating poofs and get stuck in.

    And as for being ‘under surveillance’, I’m going to make the assumption that that’s code for the cops bringing him a couple of bottles of Scotch per week.

  65. JC

    vr

    A few places. Been to a couple of steak houses with old buddies.. We’re basically in the same neighborhood we lived in. NYC has become an expensive city since the GFC, which is also magnified by the fact that the Aussie is now smouldering at around 70 cents. I’m shocked how dirty and empty Soho has become. I used to love the vibe down there, but it’s dirty and every second store is empty. Upper Eastside is the same as we left it.. a tad on the boring side, but then, eventually, you begin to appreciate boring.

    None.

    No, planning to live here a couple of months a year.

  66. JC

    We walked into an art gallery on Madison Ave a while ago. They have a Cubism exhibition going and wifey thought it may be interesting to look through. It was, but a funny thing happened on the way out. There’s a Picasso sitting on its lonesome on the ground floor close to the door gal.

    If you like cubanism it’s a masterpiece. Even me, who hates that art period really liked this painting. I asked the door gal the selling price. She nonchalantly replied it was selling $18 million. 🙂

  67. Pete of Perth

    Let’s start the day with a list

  68. JC

    We walked into an art gallery on Madison Ave a while ago. They have a Cubism exhibition going and wifey thought it may be interesting to look through. It was, but a funny thing happened on the way out. There’s a Picasso sitting on its lonesome on the ground floor close to the door gal.

    If you like cubanism it’s a masterpiece. Even me, who hates that art period really liked this painting. I asked the door gal the selling price. She nonchalantly replied it was selling for $18 million. 🙂

    Across the road there’s the Gagosian art gallery. They currently have a stock of Steve Martin’s aboriginal art collection. It really is magnificent. Apparently the fucker is frequently in Australia, touring the outback areas or wherever and buying aboriginal art. The curator dude at the door reckons he really has a soft spot for them.

  69. Mater

    No, planning to live here a couple of months a year.

    Everyone needs an escape plan.
    In five years time, coming home for a period will give you the same experience Dr BG is now having in Cuba…except for Maria, of course.
    Australian women will want to up their game if they are to compete on the world stage in regards to sex tourism. They need to remember, Dr BG is not attracted to the tattoos and piercings. He can get that in spades, at home.
    😉

  70. Knuckle Dragger

    Top Ender, night time;

    ‘Heart disease, advanced cancer, diabetes and subsequent kidney failure, untreated blindness and childhood deafness are far too common.’

    They could also be justly described as ‘far too common’ in non-indigenous people.

    ‘Cancer is diagnosed later and incomplete treatment is almost the norm. The rate of First Nations’ discharge against medical advice, an indicator of health systems’ successfully engaging patients, is eight times higher than for non-indigenous Australians.’ That paragraph goes on to say that hospitals have failed indigenous people.

    Cancer treatment is incomplete because the patients get bored with it and, hankering for a bit of a social drink, piss off to rejoin their mates in the long grass and never come back. The discharge against advice is a quite reasonable move by hospitals to cover their arse when the patients are inevitably found days, weeks or months later with varying rates of breathing.

    I am, of course, talking about fullblood blackfellas. I’m wondering how many fullbloods will turn up to the new Inala Apartheid Hospital, as opposed to the fauxboriginal uni students who can now wander in and get a scan or X ray straightaway without having to sit amongst their smelly inferiors.

  71. JC

    They need to remember, Dr BG is not attracted to the tattoos and piercings. He can get that in spades, at home.
    😉

    He should then avoid Italy. I’ve never seen anything like it. Every Italian woman below the age of 60 is tramp stamped.

  72. Knuckle Dragger

    Excellent.

    Sri Lanka’s police chief and a high-level pollie have been arrested over the Easter bombings.

    Not for carrying them out, but for failing to heed security warnings that they were imminent. There is said to be talk they could be charged with moida.

  73. JC

    Found it. This the Picasso selling for 18 biggies..

    https://www.hellynahmadgallery.com/

  74. Leigh Lowe

    Pete of Perth

    #3095901, posted on July 3, 2019 at 6:57 am

    Let’s start the day with a list

    Almost always a good idea.
    Except if you are on a ship.

  75. Entropy

    Is that little list like Arya’s?

  76. Spider

    Steve trickler
    #3095751, posted on July 2, 2019 at 8:43 pm
    You learn something new everyday.

    Regarding the India Pakistan border video.

    It’s a pity he wasn’t closer to the border gate as I was so he missed capturing the Ministry Of Silly Walks match off between the India and Pakistan troops. Seriously one of most surreal and funniest things I’ve ever seen.

    The pre match entertainment included a one legged dervish dancer on the Pakistani side break dancing. Truly demented.

    Highly recommend to anyone who visits Amritsar in the Punjab.

  77. Knuckle Dragger

    Cracker Night – postscript:

    Background: The Darwin Ski Club is a very nice establishment. Tasty little outdoorsy bar, backpacker barmaids equally tasty, and sits next to one of the beaches.

    ….

    Daryl Gilbert, a six foot four undertaker was at the Ski Club with a bunch of mates who’d flown in for the Cracker Night festivities. Well lubricated, some of the mates went to the beach (about 40m away from the bar) to set off some fireworks.

    One of his mates set off a firework that went horizontally instead of vertically. The pyrotechnic fanged straight for a bunch of ladees and kids in the outdoor restaurant bit. Mr Gilbert did the big ‘Nooooo’ diving across thing and wore the firework directly on the cock.

    “I actually thought it was damaged – so I snuck off and had a bit of a look and all good, apart from the walnut and the mandarin. They were purple.”

    Straya!

    (NT News. Of course.)

  78. Fisky:

    Graduates from Murdoch and Curtin universities said they also did not feel prepared to teach children how to read, despite four years of study and a $30,000 debt.
    They said they learnt more about teaching reading in three days from a course run by ECU associate professor Lorraine Hammond, left, with the backing of the Fogarty Foundation.

    The intellectuals at Edith Cowan Uni will be searching through their class files to find the saboteur who suffers from wrongthink. And there will be no more three day courses run by Prof Lorraine.
    Comrades.

  79. Geriatric Mayfly:

    I have an invitation to a NAIDOC bunfight coming up. I can “yarn with the elders”, take part in a “smoking ceremony” and help build a “mia mia.”

    Yes. But what’s on the menu?

    Waitperson: “The menu? That’d be week old gravy.”
    *Wipes Menu Briskly* ”
    “Oh. I see – yes – it’s Green Dream, Lady in Boat, and Tallisker Whiskey with Fanta Ice Cubes. Very popular, that one, Mr GM.”
    GM: “In separate glasses, one would hope?”
    Waitperson: “Ha Ha. Good one, Centurion. Buckets, Sir, Buckets.”

  80. Mater

    Winston,
    This is the real story in that article:

    The graduate, who cannot be named because it could jeopardise her new job, said concerns about teacher training were not confined to one institution or to WA.

    Anyone would think that the teaching profession doesn’t like constructive feedback and isn’t committed to the pursuit of excellence.

  81. Bruce of Newcastle

    Graduates from Murdoch and Curtin universities said they also did not feel prepared to teach children how to read, despite four years of study and a $30,000 debt.

    Obviously they need to do PhDs to be able to teach kids how to read.
    By 2030 all preschool teachers will need DScs, and by they’ll require 2050 Nobel prizes.

  82. Bruce of Newcastle

    Argh still too early in the morning. Someone should legislate to ban winter.

  83. Leigh Lowe

    Graduates from Murdoch and Curtin universities said they also did not feel prepared to teach children how to read, despite four years of study and a $30,000 debt.

    And cue the Spud in 3 …. 2 …. 1
    .
    .
    On teaching, student debt and ‘nam.

  84. Woolfe

    NAIDOC week , oh no, un edible food at the mess. Ffs.

  85. Leigh Lowe

    Graduates from Murdoch and Curtin universities said they also did not feel prepared to teach children how to read, despite four years of study and a $30,000 debt.

    Sodom has an alleged literary festival called “Words in Winter”.
    The last promo on Fb was riddled with spelling and grammar crimes and misdemeanours.

  86. C.L.

    As only he can, Tim Blair brings the header of the year:

    MAKE BUDDHISM GREAT AGAIN

  87. Woolfe

    Hey Dr B where did you get your apartment, assume Airbnb not allowed? And cucs (six) are they $us?

    Buy the kid and here man mountain boyfriend a ice cream at the beach.

  88. The intellectuals at Edith Cowan Uni will be searching through their class files to find the saboteur who suffers from wrongthink.

    Of all the never-ending stream of crap daily posted here, this phonics non-issue takes the cake.
    Every single early years classroom in the country uses phonics.
    Take a look inside a classroom – you might just notice the phonics charts on the walls.
    What is really reflected here is the insanity of conservatives.
    Because their kids aren’t using exactly the same programmes they did back in the day, they get all twitchy and neurotic.
    BTW, the average reading score of Australian children has improved during the last ten years.
    Best ignore that small fact, it removes something to bitch at teachers about.

  89. Zippy:

    So I had my first dose of NMN today.

    I missed that – Got a link?

  90. Mater

    Of all the never-ending stream of crap daily posted here, this phonics non-issue takes the cake.

    The phonics argument is just a symptom of a larger, more insidious issue.
    Why would a teaching graduate be afraid that raising concerns “could jeopardise her job”?

  91. feelthebern

    JC have you seen some of the redevelopments in the Hudson Yards district.
    Some just awful.
    Some just magnificent.

  92. Leigh Lowe

    For some reason I am reminded of the ’80’s movie Shirley Valentine.
    Shirley is a pasty Pom in her mid 40’s who goes to Greece for a holiday.
    She gets swept up in the womance of it all and hooks up with local Grik who owns a restaurant on the beach.
    As she is about to catch the plane back home she decides to toss it all in and return to the beach.
    When she unexpectedly arrives back at the restaurant she finds the Grik reprising his romantic pitch to another newly arrived pasty Pom.
    The only stolen goods in this story was Shirley’s heart.

  93. C.L.

    Limits latest + Buts watch:

    Israel Folau, religious freedom and the limits of toleration.

    I’ve read it so you don’t have to. The limits the author, Patrick Emerton (Associate Professor of Law at Monash University), envisages are – of course – on Christianity.

    No doubt Folau’s views are sincerely held, and his adherence to his conception of the good is deep and genuine. But the lives of gay and lesbian people are lived sincerely and genuinely also. Their conceptions of the good go just as deep. Religious freedom has a special place in explaining the origins of liberal thought. But it does not have a special priority, today, that would allow some conceptions of the good to be ranked over others…

    … I’ve already pointed out, there are other things that are also important underpinnings of political participation. A sense of meeting as equals, grounded in a stable relationship of mutual respect, is one of these. Is this really possible in a society where some must go about their lives being openly and publicly condemned to hell by others?

    Christianity must shut up – or be forcibly changed:

    Just as religion had to change to make genuine freedom of religion possible, so it seems likely that religion will have to change further to fully accommodate other forms of pluralism, including with respect to sexuality. It’s legitimate, I think, for liberals to call for such changes. Ultimately, however, those changes will have to emerge from within particular religious traditions, in accordance with their own theological, philosophical and social conceptions. It therefore makes sense for liberals to identify and work with leaders within those traditions, who have the social and cultural power to make the necessary changes; and perhaps to criticise those leaders who refuse to engage meaningfully with the demands of pluralism, and to point out the hypocrisy of doing so while appealing to religious freedom as if it were some self-standing principle of human affairs.

  94. Leigh Lowe

    Why would a teaching graduate be afraid that raising concerns “could jeopardise her job”?

    Because the bureacracy is loaded with vindictive Spud tyoes looking to run that 12 month process one more time before they retire on our taxes.

  95. C.L.

    The government’s radicalism buy-back is working well:

    ‘Wannabe ISIS warrior’ was part of deradicalisation program.

    A 20-year-old man arrested over the alleged terror plot to attack Sydney landmarks had been involved in a deradicalisation program just last year.

    Isaak el Matari and a 23-year-old associate were arrested by counter-terrorism police in raids across the city’s west and southwest on Tuesday.

    The pair were allegedly planning to travel to Afghanistan where they would pledge allegiance to the jihadis.

    It has been revealed that Matari had undergone a deradicalisation program after he was deported from Lebanon in June 2018, The Daily Telegraph reported.

  96. feelthebern

    US ladies make the world cup final.
    Beating the dental patients 2-1.
    The US ladies keep their shape up & down the park.
    Gives them more space than any other team.
    Space = time.

  97. C.L.

    The government’s radicalism buy-back is working well:

    ‘Wannabe ISIS warrior’ was part of deradicalisation program.

    A 20-year-old man arrested over the alleged terror plot to attack Sydney landmarks had been involved in a deradicalisation program just last year.

    Isaak el Matari and a 23-year-old associate were arrested by counter-terrorism police in raids across the city’s west and southwest on Tuesday.

    The pair were allegedly planning to travel to Afghanistan where they would pledge allegiance to the jee-hadi1z

    It has been revealed that Matari had undergone a deradicalisation program after he was deported from Lebanon in June 2018, The Daily Telegraph reported.

  98. Leigh Lowe

    Crickit.
    IT guys win.
    Bangers are mash.
    Tonight it is sheep-shaggers vs Her Majesty’s Whingers.
    Pakis looking to pinch 4th spot from Perfidious Albions.

  99. JC

    Bern

    No, haven’t been that way.

  100. feelthebern

    The government’s radicalism buy-back is working well:

    Working well for the likes of Anne Aly & other terrorism “experts”.

  101. Diogenes

    Re the reading thing, what’s worse is the whole lack of ‘classroom management’ training. Academics seem to think that engaging lesson is all it takes to stop kids misbehaving, but totally misses the point of what else is going on in kid’s lives… Little Mary in year 8 has just broken up with little Johnny and is sooooo upset, and her girl friends are all upset … meanwhile in the corner of the class little Freddie drank 2 cans of Red Bull during lunch instead of buying a ‘real’ lunch and is a s hyper as hell, and is about to have lights punched out by Jayden, because Jayden thinks Freddie stole his earphones

  102. feelthebern

    Google it JC.
    Also, are you smoking more considering the price cigarettes are next to nothing?

  103. C.L.

    No-nonsense police in Auburn are un-masking Antifa terrorists.
    And my, aren’t they suddenly sheepish.

  104. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    I missed that – Got a link?

  105. Mater

    Because the bureacracy is loaded with vindictive Spud tyoes looking to run that 12 month process one more time before they retire on our taxes.

    I don’t get concerned about those teachers who are in the last twelve months of their careers.
    You rarely see them. They typically use the opportunity to ‘burn’ all their built up sick leave.
    I’m more concerned that the kids unlucky enough to be in their class waste a vital year bouncing between substitutes, colouring in and learning bugger all.
    And, yes. I speak from experience.

  106. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    But the lives of gay and lesbian people are lived sincerely and genuinely also.

    I mean who doesn’t enjoy anonymous chem-sex in dark cubicles of bath-houses.

  107. JB of Sydney/Shanghai

    Quote from Thomas Sowell on Helping the Poor. “It was Thomas Edison who brought us electricity, not the Sierra Club. It was the Wright brothers who got us off the ground, not the Federal Aviation Administration. It was Henry Ford who ended the isolation of millions of Americans by making the automobile affordable, not Ralph Nader.
    Those who have helped the poor the most have not been those who have gone around loudly expressing “compassion” for the poor, but those who found ways to make industry more productive and distribution more efficient, so that the poor of today can afford things that the affluent of yesterday could only dream about

  108. C.L.

    He was “sharing” her brains out:

    Hunter Biden started dating brother’s widow right after crack binge.

    Hunter Biden began dating his brother’s widow while recovering from a week spent buying crack from a homeless encampment in Los Angeles, according to a new report.

    In a candid New Yorker interview with Democratic presidential front-runner Joe Biden’s troubled son, the 49-year-old lawyer explained the origins of his affair with brother Beau’s widow, Hallie, and the rock-bottom drug binge that came beforehand.

    Hunter — who had already moved out of his marital home with estranged wife Kathleen over his failure to stay sober — says he became close with Hallie after a 2016 trip with her to the Hamptons and began spending most nights at her house while “sharing a very specific grief” over Beau’s 2015 death.

  109. stackja

    Nike and Kaepernick Back in Culture Wars After ‘Betsy Ross Flag …
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/02/business/betsy-ross-shoe-kaepernick-nike.html
    7 hours ago – The decision to pull the shoes, which came after the Nike brand … Ross flag had been co-opted by groups espousing racist ideologies, the .

  110. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    No-nonsense police in Auburn are un-masking Antifa terrorists.
    And my, aren’t they suddenly sheepish.

    Love that big laconic gum-chewing Alabama cop. And the rest of them.
    Antifa finally getting the exposure it deserves.

  111. dover_beach

    Limits latest + Buts watch

    I’ve been saying that for a long while now that liberalism is not neutral at all.

    But the lives of gay and lesbian people are lived sincerely and genuinely also. Their conceptions of the good go just as deep

    What ‘conceptions of the good’ do gay and lesbian people have and in what sense can they be said to be as ‘deep’ as the Christian conception of the good?

    Is this really possible in a society where some must go about their lives being openly and publicly condemned to hell by others?

    Firstly, that is not what he did, and secondly, if we live in a society in which genuine moral disagreement occurs then it will be commonplace for people to be accused of actually being complicit in or having themselves committed murder, violence, cruelty, etc. Or of being misogynist, homophobes, transphobes, racist, ableist, and the like.

    and perhaps to criticise those leaders who refuse to engage meaningfully with the demands of pluralism, and to point out the hypocrisy of doing so while appealing to religious freedom as if it were some self-standing principle of human affairs.

    Hang on, is pluralism a self-standing principle, and why must Christianity change in order to conform to the spectacle of politicized homosexuality if there is no special priority under liberal pluralism? Because the claim re pluralism is a load of cobblers.

  112. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Karlie Kloss has no regrets about ditching her Victoria’s Secret Angel wings.

    According to the New York Post, the model and Project Runway host, 26, who is married to Josh Kushner — brother to Ivanka Trump’s husband, Jared — has moved well beyond the fashion industry in recent years and actually studied feminist theory at New York University in 2015.

    It was then that Kloss decided not to renew her contract with Victoria’s Secret, where she was an Angel for three years.

  113. P

    Archbishop’s letter weighs into Folau saga
    The Catholic Weekly, July 3 :

    In an open letter to the people and pastors of Sydney after the bishops’ Ad Limina to the Vatican, Archbishop Fisher also made his first public comments on the Israel Folau saga. The archbishop said that the “heavy-handed treatment” of Israel and his wife Maria illustrates some of the concerns and challenges faced by all people of faith.

    In the letter to all Sydney Catholics, the archbishop slammed corporates who use their power to narrow the space for freedom of belief and speech.

    “No one should have to raise millions to vindicate their rights against such corporate power,” he said. “It seems to me that there has been a very heavy-handed targeting of Israel and Maria Folau for daring to express unfashionable religious views.

  114. Mother Lode

    Seems Harry is a bit of a virtue signalling idiot :

    From Daily Express:

    Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have followed climate change activist Greta Thunberg, 16, on Instagram.

    I truly think the Monarchy is edging toward terminal decline.

    Meghan and Harry being emblematic and symptomatic. Once they were dignified, gracious and refined, embodying what the British felt made them British. They once sat at the apex of an entire social order.

    But that world, and their place in it, is gone.

    Now the royals have reduced themselves to the same level as TV personalities. They are indistinguishable from the sickening discharge of nobody personalities that thickly ooze down the right hand panel of the Daily Mail site until they drip off the end and forgotten.

    It will soon become more awe inspiring to keep the castles and regalia and ditch TV people. Or, if the decay of dignity continues as it has, they will vote people to be monarch for a year the same way they vote for big brother – and thus totally obliterate even the tradition.

  115. Spider

    Second man in terrorism round up in Sydney charged with fraudulently accepting unemployment benefits.

    Quell surprise. Who would have thought.

    I’m willing to bet that a significant number of fighters or their families are in receipt of unemployment or disability benefits.

  116. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Little Mary in year 8 has just broken up with little Johnny and is sooooo upset, and her girl friends are all upset … meanwhile in the corner of the class little Freddie drank 2 cans of Red Bull during lunch instead of buying a ‘real’ lunch and is a s hyper as hell, and is about to have lights punched out by Jayden, because Jayden thinks Freddie stole his earphones

    Words of wisdom from a well-blooded trouper there. Onya Diogenes.

  117. Mother Lode

    Once they were dignified, gracious and refined, embodying what the British felt made them British.

    They being the Royals, not the Prince and the actress.

    Once Royals were more than happy to have flings with actresses, but they knew that they were too far above the actress to bring them into polite society.

    Now we have princes who think so low that they admit actresses into the family.

  118. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have followed climate change activist Greta Thunberg, 16, on Instagram.

    Influence of Prince Charles (our future King) showing badly there.

    I hope in their brief chat, when Charles apparently mentioned the deaf of the planet, that The Donald put him right about this being a completely political issue, and thus Charles should butt out on it.

  119. Indolent

    Seems Harry is a bit of a virtue signalling idiot

    He’s a gullible idiot. Or perhaps stupid is a better word.

  120. thefrollickingmole

    ‘Lion of London Bridge’ who was stabbed eight times as he confronted terrorist attackers ‘is put on anti-terror watch list after far-right extremists contacted him

    So you can get put on a watch list for “naughty” people contacting you after a high profile incident?

    Sad
    It appears the only thing worse than “the white mans burden” is losing an empire.

  121. Notafan

    Since when was gay and lesbian a religion?

    Oh wait.

  122. Geriatric Mayfly

    Another good one to add to Tom’s daily collection is at lucianne.com
    Dumb Donkey Gnashers and Fauxcahontas in conversation.

  123. Notafan

    Harry and Meagan are just vacuous nobs.

    Neither of them worry about paying the electricity bill or having enough money to put petrol in the car.

    Just about the entire climate change lobby are the same.

    You can bet Bob Brown didn’t take his three month trip around Australia in a Tesla and Dick Christmas still drives his gas guzzler and runs his diesel generators down in the Otways.

  124. Mater:

    The graduate, who cannot be named because it could jeopardise her new job, said concerns about teacher training were not confined to one institution or to WA.

    Yep, Got that.
    The Dictatorship of the Bureaucracy.
    “Thou shall have no other Gods but Me.”
    No mercy to those who fail to kneel at the alter.

  125. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    while appealing to religious freedom as if it were some self-standing principle of human affairs.

    What an extraordinarily ahistorical statement.
    Pilgrim Fathers should have sunk the Mayflower.
    What about Cromwell, warts and all?
    Elizabeth 1 should have flung open that window on men’s souls.
    Diocletian was a right-on sort of chappie.
    The death of Christ was just another meaningless event.
    Boudicca was fighting for feminism not the All-Father.
    And so much more over thousands of years.

    All freedom is certainly hard won and easily lost. Religious freedom too.

  126. Notafan

    What is harmful or damaging about referring to cruising as seagulling?

    Six hours in port is not intrepid adventuring.

  127. Mater:

    The phonics argument is just a symptom of a larger, more insidious issue.
    Why would a teaching graduate be afraid that raising concerns “could jeopardise her job”?

    Eggzakkerly.
    And the smartest teacher in the room totally misses it.

  128. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Since when was gay and lesbian a religion?
    Oh wait.

    Climate change is even further along that track.
    St. Greta of Sweden is making converts all across Europe and the US.
    She’s doing well amongst Australian schoolchildren too.

  129. Notafan

    I think LL was referring to performance review processes run by spuddish teaching administrators.

  130. P

    Read Archbishop Anthony Fisher’s pastoral message from the Ad Limina
    By Archbishop Anthony Fisher OP – July 2, 2019

    Excerpt:
    You don’t have to agree with all Mr Folau says or the way he says it to be troubled by the determination of some to destroy him and his family, and also to be concerned about what this means for freedom of speech and belief for ordinary Australians.

    The Australia we all know and love has, for the most part, been good at giving people the space to believe different things, to express them in free speech, to try to persuade others of their beliefs, and to practise what they preach. But now we are seeing sporting organisations, airlines, websites, financial institutions and health insurers using their corporate power to narrow that space and punish those whose views they disapprove. No one should have to raise millions to vindicate their rights against such corporate power.

  131. Tel

    The website has had a facelift

    https://australiandebtclock.com.au/

    Looks nice, although errr …

    0,000 Thousands
    0,000,000,000 Millions
    0,000,000,000,000 Billions
    0,000,000,000,000,000 Trillions

    Bit of a worry … Aussie kids might see this!

  132. Notafan

    I am pleased Archbishop Fisher has spoken, corporations like Qantas and ANZ are stepping way beyond what ordinary shareholders would agree is their remit.

    I guess part of the problem is too many industry super funds run by like-minded urban bugmen are ‘shareholders’ now.

    None of them represent the alleged real shareholders.

  133. Roger

    But the lives of gay and lesbian people are lived sincerely and genuinely also.

    Yes, let’s make sincerity the touchstone of truth!

    What a dimwit.

  134. dover_beach

    so it seems likely that religion will have to change further to fully accommodate other forms of pluralism, including with respect to sexuality.

    What people need to keep aware of is that the claim that ‘religion’ must change is couched in the language of needing to maintain civility and respect under pluralism, what they in fact mean is that ‘religion’ must adopt the liberal view of sex and sexuality or else.

  135. Tel

    She’s doing well amongst Australian schoolchildren too.

    We would have laughed and laughed about someone like that when we were schoolkids.

  136. feelthebern

    Zali to become an Lib before the next election according to the Oz.
    What.
    A.
    Mole.
    Q&A cancels her invitations for the next 3 years.

  137. Notafan

    That dumb ass professor would never say that about the religion that keeps trying to blow up Australians and tosses gays off tall buildings.

    Still Christianity has been persecuted more or less throughout its entire existence, though people who despise it pretend it had always been the persecutor, but the Church had remained intact so good luck with the rewrite of Christ’s message regarding sin and redemption.

  138. Notafan

    Zali?

    Really?

    Exactly as predicted!

  139. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Labor fails to change tax cuts timetable

    Geoff Chambers
    Federal Political Correspondent
    @Chambersgc
    12:00AM July 3, 2019
    146 Comments

    Scott Morrison’s $158 billion ­income tax cuts legislation is on track to pass the Senate after Labor attempts to speed up infrastructure spending and fast-track stage two of the government’s package failed in the lower house last night.

    Negotiations with key crossbenchers Jacqui Lambie and Centre Alliance senators Rex Patrick and Stirling Griff will continue today, with the government confident of securing four of the six upper house votes it needs to win support for its full tax package.

    Speaking in parliament after tabling the tax cuts legislation, Josh Frydenberg said the government plan would “lower taxes for hardworking Australians”.

    “It puts more money in their pockets, it strengthens the economy, it rewards aspiration and it should be supported by this parliament,” the Treasurer said.

    “Our tax plan was carefully developed and it was detailed comprehensively in this year’s budget before being put to the Australian people at the election just six weeks ago.

    “Our tax cuts provide both short-term relief and long-term reform. Australians earning up to $126,000 a year will receive up to $1080 with more than 10 million Australians better off.”

    From the Oz. Go, Scomo, go! Leave Labor and the Greens bawling in your wake!

  140. Roger

    …what they in fact mean is that ‘religion’ must adopt the liberal view of sex and sexuality or else.

    If you want a vision of the future, imagine a transgender’s stiletto heel stamping on a human face – forever.

  141. Roger

    Go, Scomo, go! Leave Labor and the Greens bawling in your wake!

    How about cutting red and green tape to attract some productive investment?

    You can’t build a vigorous economy by creating jobs only in the public sector and coffee shops.

  142. mh:
    The website has had a facelift

    https://australiandebtclock.com.au/
    Anyone care to have a punt on when the ADC arrives at the magic 1 Trillion mark for Government debt?
    I pick 17 January 2021.

  143. Frank

    But the lives of gay and lesbian people are lived sincerely and genuinely also.

    I mean who doesn’t enjoy anonymous chem-sex in dark cubicles of bath-houses.

    I believe the currently accepted term for the destination where anonymous chem-sex is performed is “palais du mist”.

  144. Notafan

    It is a well known fact that people are really nice, sincere and genuine when you are paying for everything.

  145. Old School Conservative

    Zali wants to “restore faith in the political system,” by not ruling out a switch to the LNP.
    Even though she campaigned against the LNP.
    I’ll bet she can’t even spell hypocrite.

  146. thefrollickingmole

    So the public sphere is to be reduced to “Muh feelz”.

    Chestertons fence, I bet none of them can describe why certain taboos & restrictions are in place.

    In the matter of reforming things, as distinct from deforming them, there is one plain and simple principle; a principle which will probably be called a paradox. There exists in such a case a certain institution or law; let us say, for the sake of simplicity, a fence or gate erected across a road. The more modern type of reformer goes gaily up to it and says, “I don’t see the use of this; let us clear it away.” To which the more intelligent type of reformer will do well to answer: “If you don’t see the use of it, I certainly won’t let you clear it away. Go away and think. Then, when you can come back and tell me that you do see the use of it, I may allow you to destroy it.”

    Why would society discourage prostitution & sexual incontinence in nearly every civilization which has risen above the primitive?

    Id love to get a few of the more slippery sophists and pin them down on topics like this.

  147. Old School Conservative

    Anyone care to have a punt on when the ADC arrives at the magic 1 Trillion mark for Government debt?

    I admit to a quick search on DDG for the definitions of billion and trillion.
    It appears we will be using trillion quite a lot.

    To try and answer your question, I subtracted Total Government Debt from 1 trillion on my phone’s calculator.
    Now my phone is on the fritz.

  148. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘but the lives of gay and lesbian people are lived sincerely and genuinely also’

    As long as the pooves and thick-fingered goblins live those lives without impinging on others like the rest of society, sure.

    But when you have to escort your kids to public dunnies in parks because the flamers and the business types insist on re-sleeving each other in them 24 hours a day, then they’re making it my business.

    Which, to make a considerable understatement, irritates me somewhat.

  149. thefrollickingmole

    This is a funny and apparently true story.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobra_effect

    Vietnamese rat bounty example
    A similar incident occurred in Hanoi, Vietnam, under French colonial rule. The colonial regime created a bounty program that paid a reward for each rat killed.[3] To obtain the bounty, people would provide the severed rat tail.

    Colonial officials, however, began noticing rats in Hanoi with no tails. The Vietnamese rat catchers would capture rats, sever their tails, and then release them back into the sewers so that they could procreate and produce more rats, thereby increasing the rat catchers’ revenue.[5] Historian Michael Vann argues that the cobra example from British India cannot be proven, but that the rats in Vietnam case can be proven, so the term could be changed to the “rat effect”.

  150. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    What is harmful or damaging about referring to cruising as seagulling?

    Nothing at all, of course. But it should not stand signal to a whole lived life and become a proxy for an unadventurous existence.

    As for recounting experiences in some form of personal narrative, an interesting albeit debatable article is found at Aeon about the ‘narrative’ view of life.

    ‘Each of us constructs and lives a “narrative”,’ wrote the British neurologist Oliver Sacks, ‘this narrative is us’. Likewise the American cognitive psychologist Jerome Bruner: ‘Self is a perpetually rewritten story.’ And: ‘In the end, we become the autobiographical narratives by which we “tell about” our lives.’ Or a fellow American psychologist, Dan P McAdams: ‘We are all storytellers, and we are the stories we tell.’ And here’s the American moral philosopher J David Velleman: ‘We invent ourselves… but we really are the characters we invent.’ And, for good measure, another American philosopher, Daniel Dennett: ‘we are all virtuoso novelists, who find ourselves engaged in all sorts of behaviour… and we always put the best “faces” on it we can. We try to make all of our material cohere into a single good story. And that story is our autobiography. The chief fictional character at the centre of that autobiography is one’s self.’

    So say the narrativists. We story ourselves and we are our stories. There’s a remarkably robust consensus about this claim, not only in the humanities but also in psychotherapy. It’s standardly linked with the idea that self-narration is a good thing, necessary for a full human life. I think it’s false – false that everyone stories themselves, and false that it’s always a good thing. These are not universal human truths – even when we confine our attention to human beings who count as psychologically normal, as I will here.

    They’re not universal human truths even if they’re true of some people, or even many, or most. The narrativists are, at best, generalising from their own case, in an all-too-human way. At best: I doubt that what they say is an accurate description even of themselves. What exactly do they mean? It’s extremely unclear. Nevertheless, it does seem that there are some deeply Narrative types among us, where to be Narrative with a capital ‘N’ is (here I offer a definition) to be naturally disposed to experience or conceive of one’s life, one’s existence in time, oneself, in a narrative way, as having the form of a story, or perhaps a collection of stories, and – in some manner – to live in and through this conception. The popularity of the narrativist view is prima facie evidence that there are such people.

    Perhaps. But many of us aren’t Narrative in this sense. We’re naturally – deeply – non-Narrative. We’re anti-Narrative by fundamental constitution. It’s not just that the deliverances of memory are, for us, hopelessly piecemeal and disordered, even when we’re trying to remember a temporally extended sequence of events. The point is more general. It concerns all parts of life, life’s ‘great shambles’, in the American novelist Henry James’s expression. This seems a much better characterisation of the large-scale structure of human existence as we find it. Life simply never assumes a story-like shape for us. And neither, from a moral point of view, should it.

    The tendency to attribute control to self is, as the American social psychologist Dan Wegner says, a personality trait, possessed by some and not others. There’s an experimentally well-attested distinction between human beings who have what he calls the ‘emotion of authorship’ with respect to their thoughts, and those who, like myself, have no such emotion, and feel that their thoughts are things that just happen. This could track the distinction between those who experience themselves as self-constituting and those who don’t but, whether it does or not, the experience of self-constituting self-authorship seems real enough. When it comes to the actual existence of self-authorship, however – the reality of some process of self-determination in or through life as life-writing – I’m skeptical.

    In the past 20 years, the American philosopher Marya Schechtman has given increasingly sophisticated accounts of what it is to be Narrative and to ‘constitute one’s identity’ through self-narration. She now stresses the point that one’s self-narration can be very largely implicit and unconscious. That’s an important concession. According to her original view, one ‘must be in possession of a full and explicit narrative [of one’s life] to develop fully as a person’. The new version seems more defensible. And it puts her in a position to say that people like myself might be Narrative and just not know it or admit it.

    Does a life’s narrative have to be integrated? That is the question, for both personality and for art. For an individual psyche, perhaps yes, I think. Nevertheless, one can look back and draw meaning from experience with all the known imperfections of memory without committing to it in one’s current self. Nevertheless, we must unavoidably see that the ‘thin thread’ of memory is all that holds us to our past, a past lost when we become dementing, so the past is obviously a central constituent of each one of us.

    My first husband, The Lefty Philosopher, sent me this link to Aeon (leftiness there) after I sent him my ‘On Becoming Elizabeth’ piece published in Quadrant and Quadrant Online. As a near-autist in some aspects of self, he sees himself as of the non-narrative fragmenting type. In contrast, Hairy, an internationally renowned researcher in arcane computer networking, as well as a herder of cats and sheep and proven tamer of lions, possibly too a hot-dog salesman, has a bio-engineering metaphor for existence and remembrance of things past.

    A practical man with a deeply emotional core. An atheist who attends midnight mass at Christmas. 🙂

  151. C.L.

    … what they in fact mean is that ‘religion’ must adopt the liberal view of sex and sexuality or else.

    The only amusing thing is they believe these are new ideas.
    We saw off Attila the Hun in the 400s. We’re not trembling about Alan Joyce.
    The so-called Loyalists (communists) threatened liberalise or else in the 1930s.
    Franco took them at their word.

  152. John64

    Zali wants to “restore faith in the political system,” by not ruling out a switch to the LNP.
    Even though she campaigned against the LNP.
    I’ll bet she can’t even spell hypocrite.

    And is on public record as stating that she has never voted for the Liberal Party, at least federally.

    The perfect opportunity for ScoMo to state that this climate alarmist froot-loop would be granted membership of the Liberal party over his dead body. Odds?

  153. Helen

    Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have followed climate change activist Greta Thunberg, 16, on Instagram.

    I used to think Harry was alright and would have made a good manly King, but he is well and truly pussy whipped. He has had to stop smoking, give up meat several days a week, (on the way to veganism no doubt) chose between his brother and his wife in pathetic huffiness (Kate has more class in her little finger than Meghan in a life time) .

    I wonder if he will ever wake up.

  154. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Hairy….. possibly too a hot-dog salesman’

    Pfft.

    Hairy may well be quite the accomplished figure in his fields of endeavour, but let’s not go nuts here.

  155. DrBeauGan

    Woolfe
    #3095924, posted on July 3, 2019 at 7:54 am
    Hey Dr B where did you get your apartment, assume Airbnb not allowed? And cucs (six) are they $us?

    Buy the kid and here man mountain boyfriend a ice cream at the beach.

    I got the apartment via a taxi driver who was found for me by a kind lady from the Havana airport business class lounge for Iberia, Woolfe. He had a friend with an apartment to let, the friend being Osbel. I made the deal that night.

    The cuc, pronounced “kook” is the convertible peso, pegged at the US dollar. I pay 1.03 when getting cucs from an ATM.

    I haven’t seen the boyfriend again. He wasn’t her pimp, he was obviously under her thumb, body language tells a lot. She was the brains, he was the muscle.

    I shall certainly buy an ice-cream for Maria and her daughter. A huge ice-cream in a cone costs three cuc. Very nice, too.

  156. C.L.

    Colonial officials, however, began noticing rats in Hanoi with no tails. The Vietnamese rat catchers would capture rats, sever their tails, and then release them back into the sewers so that they could procreate and produce more rats, thereby increasing the rat catchers’ revenue.

    This is a perfect metaphor for the Keynesian corporate state and its clients.

  157. Knuckle Dragger

    Harry had to give up smoking for his wife? And he did?

    Cheesedick.

    The sooner Nana gives Megan the Diana treatment, the better.

  158. dover_beach

    The so-called Loyalists (communists) threatened liberalise or else in the 1930s.
    Franco took them at their word.

    I also take them at their word. It would be uncharitable to do otherwise.

  159. Notafan

    I think I was suggesting that the word ‘deleterious’ didn’t seem to fit.

  160. Eyrie

    “As long as the pooves and thick-fingered goblins live those lives without impinging on others like the rest of society, sure.”
    You aren’t allowed to advertise smokes and booze on TV and it is restricted otherwise. How about we do the same for minority deviant lifestyles?
    Also:
    “We saw off Attila the Hun in the 400s. We’re not trembling about Alan Joyce.
    The so-called Loyalists (communists) threatened liberalise or else in the 1930s.
    Franco took them at their word.”

    Dear homosexuals – it isn’t homophobia, defined as fear of it/you. We aren’t afraid of you because we outnumber you 60 to 1 and we can fix the problem any time we are motivated enough. Crawl back in to the closet and stop flaunting yourselves in public. It isn’t a good look and can have bad effects on children and might one day just lead to us being motivated enough.

  161. Notafan

    I recall a story about an atheist who took communion at Christmas, challenged by CL, the story became Anglican communion.

    Saccharin.

  162. Roger

    The perfect opportunity for ScoMo to state that this climate alarmist froot-loop would be granted membership of the Liberal party over his dead body. Odds?

    About the same as Alan Joyce undergoing conversion therapy.

  163. C.L.

    I recall a story about an atheist who took communion at Christmas, challenged by CL, the story became Anglican communion.

    Que?

  164. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The Vietnamese rat catchers would capture rats, sever their tails, and then release them back into the sewers so that they could procreate and produce more rats, thereby increasing the rat catchers’ revenue.

    Sounds just like renooables to me. Kill coal-fired power and increase the need for solar and wind. The more coal you kill the richer you will become because solar and wind comes with a bounty.

    Luckily, no Lamarckian evolutionists were around those rats. That would have improved the pitch by suggesting another reason for taillessness.

  165. Johno

    Stirling Griff . That is the name of the S.A. senator.

    Tim Blair said to make up a South Australian name you took the name of the street you lived in as a child and the name of your first pet.

    Mine is Otway Terry. Has a certain ring to it,no?

  166. Leigh Lowe

    Notafan

    #3095976, posted on July 3, 2019 at 9:04 am

    I think LL was referring to performance review processes run by spuddish teaching administrators.

    Yes.
    The opening line of questioning:-

    “Your letter to the Daily Bugle seems to question your qualifications and capabilities to teach reading.
    Are you comfortable continuing in the classroom in those circumstances?”

  167. Helen

    Re the new Hospital for indigines, they do a bit of smoke and mirrors there with the stats, no doubt, comparing remote aboriginie health outcomes with city health outcomes for non aboriginals. How about comparing like with like, that is rural non aboriginal with remote aboriginal? Jesse would have a good idea of these.

    Then they say a city of 240,000 or somehting has a big hospital, but I bet it’s feed area is a lot more than the city limits – how about some honsety there.

    Re kidney transplants – this involoves taking anti rejection medication for life afterward, I am not saying that this is beyond aborigines or that they should not be given the chance, but I feel that the outcomes for a transplant would not be as good by a country mile as for people who are committed to their medication, even if they were living in close proximity to actually recieve a transplant. You cant keep the thing on ice while aunty takes three days to get to town after being found.

    Finally, what were the disease rates in people on a non western diet? Captain often speaks of the tall stong musclar men he had in his stock camp years ago – where are they now? Dying in a river of chips, coke and grog. My aborignal sister (family connections) wasa nurse heavily involved in diabetes treatment for aboriginies and she put it down to chips and coke.

    So much of this diesease of today (in all of us) is self inflicted – like the deafness reported in the report – which comes from not blowing noses as a child. A few communities up north made great inroads into that by having well maintained swimming pools – all the snot would end up in the pool, but the health was much improved.

    Those of us wise to reality know this will be a failure in reducing actual disease rates and helping people to stay with their treatment. Sad that these indigenous will also have to see a dreaded whitey for their oncologist … unless some indigenous doctors are fast tracked.

    Just a bigger bandaid, I’m afraid, but it will make all the less wise feel good, and virtuous.

  168. Notafan

    Ages ago CL,

    Lizzie said her husband took himself off to midnight mass and received the eucharist.

    You said that was the wrong thing to do so Lizzie said it must have been an Anglican midnight mass.

    Why would an atheist receive communion?

    Because he had a ‘deeply emotional core’

    Apparently.

  169. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Anglican communion.

    Hairy’s father was an Anglican, and Hairy underwent Anglican Confirmation at school.
    He is merely a listener only, these days, even at Christmas, not an active communicant.
    Neither of us do that, as it would seem hypocritical to us, even though no-one would know.

  170. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Dear homosexuals – it isn’t homophobia, defined as fear of it/you.

    it’s actually just plain disgust, except for lipstick lesbians of course.

  171. Bruce of Newcastle

    Zali wants to “restore faith in the political system,”

    A great way for Zali to start would be for her to call out the climate scam and push for coal fired power stations to lower electricity prices for ordinary voters.

  172. Cactus

    I can see the Liberal Party HQ in NSW trying to woo Steggle. They fit right in with her view of the world as wet lettuce lefties.

    The rank and file that don’t matter will be incensed.

  173. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Hugh Laurie and Rowan Atkinson are among the stars to appear in a planned reboot of Blackadder
    The SunNews Corp Australia Network
    June 30, 2019 9:46PM
    Topics
    News

    Plans have hatched to bring the 1980s cult comedy Blackadder back to television screens.

    British comedian Rowan Atkinson had told pals he is “extremely excited” about a planned return of cult comedy Blackadder, according to The Sun.
    A source said Rowan could not wait to team up again with his Blackadder co-stars including Stephen Fry, Hugh Laurie.
    A source said Rowan could not wait to team up again with his Blackadder co-stars including Stephen Fry,

    Atkinson, 64, is set to team up again with co-stars including Tony Robinson, Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie.

    It had been reported they would consider a one-off show, but sources said a full fifth series was being considered.
    Hugh Laurie was in the original cast of Blackadder in the 80s.

    The BBC show ran for four seasons from 1983 to 1989, with each set in a different period of history.

    The new instalment would be set in the modern era.

    Edmund Blackadder — accompanied again by dogsbody Baldrick, played by Robinson, 72 — would be a university lecturer.

  174. Leigh Lowe

    Tim Blair said to make up a South Australian name you took the name of the street you lived in as a child and the name of your first pet.

    Another variation is:-
    First name = street name of the hospital you were born in.
    Hyphenated family name = name of your High School English teacher + brand of ciggies your dad smoked.
    I think a regular poster here – Nelson Kidd-Players – uses that formula.

  175. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Neither of us do that, as it would seem hypocritical to us, even though no-one would know.

    He may have taken it once and told me; can’t recall. These Christmas trysts are always alone.
    When we are together, neither of us are ‘communicants’.

    I don’t own the man’s soul.

  176. You rarely see them. They typically use the opportunity to ‘burn’ all their built up sick leave.

    I checked my sick leave balance the day I retired in 2017.
    I had eighteen months on full pay available.
    In 49 years I never took a “sickie”.
    Not every teacher entertains the cynical and acquisitive world view available daily on display on Catallaxy.
    Some of us actually enjoy the job.

    “Most of us end up with no more than five or six people who remember us. Teachers have thousands of people who remember them for the rest of their lives”. (Andy Rooney).

  177. C.L.

    In 49 years I never took a “sickie”.

    That’s impressive.

  178. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Edmund Blackadder — accompanied again by dogsbody Baldrick, played by Robinson, 72 — would be a university lecturer.

    If they want some good non-PC storylines, then I am available. 😀

  179. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    “No one should have to raise millions to vindicate their rights against such corporate power,” he said.

    SJW infested bureaucracies, homosexuals and wyminsus in positions of corporate power, wielding millions in sponsorships, what could possibly go wrong?

  180. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Teachers have thousands of people who remember them for the rest of their lives

    Why do youse think I am not on Facebook. 🙂

  181. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    A great way for Zali to start would be for her to call out the climate scam and push for coal fired power stations to lower electricity prices for ordinary voters.

    Yep. Warringah looks nice.

  182. mh

    Hugh Laurie and Rowan Atkinson are among the stars to appear in a planned reboot of Blackadder

    Doesn’t say if it is written by Ben Elton.

    Ben Elton is someone I detest, but I have always confessed that Blackadder Series 1 was hilarious. Then someone pointed out that series 1 wasn’t written by Elton. Doh!

  183. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Gimme a go. Last night was our first date. AND she’s invited me to her place for dinner.

    and where is daddy/hubby/boyfriend/pimp during all this intercontinental diplomacy?

  184. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Teachers have thousands of people who remember them for the rest of their lives.’

    That wasn’t a compliment, Four Leaf.

  185. Old School Conservative

    Cactus
    #3096030, posted on July 3, 2019 at 10:07 am
    I can see the Liberal Party HQ in NSW trying to woo Steggle

    The cynic in me says that wooing was done a long time ago when HQ wanted Abbott gone.

  186. Knuckle Dragger

    South Australian names.

    Johno’s method: Clifford Defa.

    LL’s method: Lyle Krause-Jackson.

  187. Rossini

    JC
    #3095859, posted on July 3, 2019 at 5:12 am
    +1

  188. duncanm

    Blackadder is a masterpiece in places, a little flawed in others.

    The final WW-I scene where they’re about to go over the trenches is surprisingly moving. And one musn’t forget the procedure for stepping on a mine.

  189. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    “Your letter to the Daily Bugle seems to question your qualifications and capabilities to teach reading.
    Are you comfortable continuing in the classroom in those circumstances?”

    “An appointment has been made for you next Tuesday to discuss this situation with an Exit-Teaching Career Counsellor in Room 101 of the Re-Education Authority. I am authorized to inform you that your Classroom Teaching Permit has now been revoked, from today’s date. Any personal items may be collected from the Principal’s Office within five days, after which they will be destroyed.”

  190. Mater

    In 49 years I never took a “sickie”.
    Not every teacher entertains the cynical and acquisitive world view available daily on display on Catallaxy.

    Undoubtedly true, but you miss the point.
    Such upstanding and virtuous individuals would undoubtedly raise concerns about such behaviour and the negative impact it has on children…if only it didn’t “jeopardise” their jobs.

    Your flawless morals aside, have you never seen an individual teacher obviously whittling away their sick leave in preparation for retirement?

  191. C.L.

    I always found Blackadder a one-joke bore.
    He was stupendously mean to Baldrick.
    Yeah, got it the first time.

  192. johanna

    TheirABC continues the crusade for even more money to be spent on special facilities for Aboriginal patients, despite citing zero evidence that it is worth it.

    The latest salvo is about the death of Bran Nue Day creator Jimmy Chi:

    Deputy State Coroner Barry King is holding two days of hearings at the Broome Courthouse examining the death of the 69-year-old, who wrote the landmark musicals Bran Nue Dae and Corrugation Road.

    Prior to his death in 2017, Mr Chi spent years living as an involuntary inpatient at the Mabu Liyan mental health unit in Broome where he received treatment for bipolar disorder that the court heard caused severe bouts of mania.

    Bipolar effective disorder had been a challenge for Mr Chi since a car accident left him with serious head injuries in 1969.

    In the years leading up to his death, Mr Chi’s physical health was also in significant decline with serious heart and lung disease, as well as type 2 diabetes.

    So, he made it to 69 despite having been a very sick man for years, and being cared for full time in a mental health unit at public excpense. But, according to the lobbyists, it was not good enough, because it didn’t take care of his unique spiritual and cultural needs.

    And I love this bit:

    Mr Chi recieved regular visits from family members and was often brought traditional foods to lift his spirits.

    “He loved fish soup and rice,” Ms Gray said.

    “We would bring traditional foods back to him, cooked in the hot coals.”

    As his name suggests, Mr Chi was part Chinese, and the ‘traditional foods’ are Chinese, unless rice is a hitherto undiscovered ingredient of the diet of nomadic Aborigines.

    These people are having a lend.

  193. Andreas

    I always found Blackadder a one-joke bore.
    He was stupendously mean to Baldrick.
    Yeah, got it the first time.

    Agreed. I much preferred the first series where it was Blackadder who was the idiot and Baldrick was the smart one.

  194. Leigh Lowe

    Knuckle Dragger
    #3096046, posted on July 3, 2019 at 10:21 am
    South Australian names.
    Johno’s method: Clifford Defa.
    LL’s method: Lyle Krause-Jackson.

    I am Alfred Winston-Marlborough.

  195. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Notafan, as an Anglo-Catholic, Hairy has also attended midnight Christmas Mass at Catholic churches. He spreads himself around in his religiously-inclined moments. Hopes the singing and liturgy is good, I guess. He was once a chorister in one of Britain’s most famous choirs.

    Hairy’s always said if he was to turn religious it would be as a Catholic, although also notes that Judaism would get a good run too in the consideration stakes. Meanwhile, The Lefty Philosopher has turned rather Buddhist. My old dad used to say that if he ever wrote of his life he would call it “The Twisty Road to Nowhere”. That, certainly, is where it led, and he did get religion, of a sort, living as an old bushie hermit in a derelict caravan in the country, till rescued by Big Sis and the kindly religious folk at Autumn Rest.

  196. Roger

    Aren’t most TV comedies built on one joke?

  197. feelthebern

    There is no way Zali is that smart to hatch that plan.
    If she takes it up, she will be the Warringah member, untroubled for as long as she wants the job.
    She’d also be the Turd’s wrecker in the Liberal party.
    Another one, I should say.

  198. egg_

    It’s like watching Van Gogh decide to start painting with his bum half way through a masterpiece.

    An @rseterpiece?

  199. old bloke

    Colonial officials, however, began noticing rats in Hanoi with no tails. The Vietnamese rat catchers would capture rats, sever their tails, and then release them back into the sewers so that they could procreate and produce more rats, thereby increasing the rat catchers’ revenue.

    I was reading recently of the American occupation of Borneo in the last days of WWII. The Japanese defenders moved inland and took up defensive positions in the jungle waiting for the Allied onslaught, which never came. Instead, the Americans told the Dayaks that they would give them a bag of rice for every Japanese ear they brought to the US bases on the coast. The rivers were soon clogged with the native canoes as the Dayaks paddled downstream to collect their rice, carrying strings of Japanese ears.

  200. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Just for today I am Aethelflaed Boudicca-Bennet.

    You may, however, still call me Lizzie. 🙂

  201. RobK

    I am Alfred Winston-Marlborough.
    Anton Wright-LuckyStrike here.

  202. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    The rivers were soon clogged with the native canoes as the Dayaks paddled downstream to collect their rice, carrying strings of Japanese ears.

    Goodness. One hopes there were no unwanted Dayak ears in amongst that lot.

  203. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    It’s like watching Van Gogh decide to start painting with his bum half way through a masterpiece.
    An @rseterpiece?

    I’ll pay that one, Egg.

  204. egg_

    Booking.com

    Osvel & Mileydis Apartment

    Misspelled “Osbel” in some places

  205. thefrollickingmole

    Private is angry again.

  206. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Anyone ever read Zola’s ‘The Masterpiece’?
    They took art very seriously in those days.

  207. stackja

    Gatty, Harold Charles (1903–1957)
    by Alan Warden
    This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 8, (MUP), 1981

    Despite his refusal of American citizenship, Gatty in 1931-34 served in the United States Army Air Corps as senior air navigation engineer.

    From 1942 he served in Java, Australia and New Guinea as director of air transport for the United States Army Air Corps in the South West Pacific and was honorary group captain with the Royal Australian Air Force until May 1943 when he began work on polar navigation with the United States Navy. That year he published, privately, a safety manual, The raft book, which explained the zenith star navigation methods of the ancient Polynesians. The book, an immediate best-seller, was standard equipment in U.S. Army Air Force life rafts. Soon after the end of the war Gatty returned to Pan American Airways as South Pacific regional manager. He bought the beautiful Fiji island of Katafanga, where he worked a copra plantation. In 1948 he started a tuna fishing industry, South Sea Marine Products Ltd, at Suva, but losses forced its closure. On 1 September 1951 he founded Fiji Airways Ltd, a successful three-plane airline operating out of Nadi among the inhabited islands.

  208. Mother Lode

    Zali to become an Lib before the next election according to the Oz.

    And they are just stupid enough to let her in.

    Clearly she realises her position is untenable and that a Liberal candidate will likely wipe her out, so she wishes to become that Liberal candidate.

    For the Libs it means they will be fielding a candidate not as good as the one that would have defeated her, and also diminish the Liberal brand in the electorate – after all she did to ditch Abbott who had been and would have continued to be a better MP for Warringah than her.

    Anyway, she won’t fit in any of the photographs – that head tilt has become permanent I believe.

  209. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Being a girl, I used to smoke Alpines. No fond memories there.
    Like smoking Butter Menthols.

  210. Johno:

    Tim Blair said to make up a South Australian name you took the name of the street you lived in as a child and the name of your first pet.

    Mine is Otway Terry. Has a certain ring to it,no?

    Stuart Fatso is NOT a good name.

  211. Leigh Lowe

    Roger
    #3096063, posted on July 3, 2019 at 10:53 am
    Aren’t most TV comedies built on one joke?

    I’m freeeee!!!

  212. Ellie

    My old dad used to say that if he ever wrote of his life he would call it …

    The title of my book is ‘The Cougar Years’.
    As a single person with no dependents, the cougar years are alive and sparking!
    🙃

  213. Ellie

    It’s ‘hump day’. That must be an Australian saying. Never heard it said in NZ. When I heard it for the first time I thought it was a pick up line. I blushed. 😊

  214. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Private is angry again.

    It’s Woden’s Day. Warrior’s Day.
    Valhalla calls.

    Poor old Spudpeeler. Missed the bus on that one.

  215. DrBeauGan

    Misspelled “Osbel” in some places

    Just as Havana becomes Habana on cigar boxes.

    That’s the one, egg.

    ……

  216. Helen:

    Re kidney transplants – this involoves taking anti rejection medication for life afterward, I am not saying that this is beyond aborigines or that they should not be given the chance, but I feel that the outcomes for a transplant would not be as good by a country mile as for people who are committed to their medication, even if they were living in close proximity to actually recieve a transplant. You cant keep the thing on ice while aunty takes three days to get to town after being found.

    Worked in a Renal/Liver Transplant Unit for 18 months, received my heart transplant 2014ish.
    Being committed to the medication regime and taking care of yourself are the main predictors for transplant success. Thinking that you can miss a couple of doses of medication – especially for kidneys – is foolish. The problem is that the first or second time is a not noticeable problem.
    Coronary/Renal/Hepatic dysfunction is not readily apparent.
    It takes time for the damage to show. And this is where the non committed come unstuck.

  217. Bruce in WA

    Hubert Richter-Winfield

    Rather like that.

  218. Bruce of Newcastle:

    A great way for Zali to start would be for her to call out the climate scam and push for coal fired power stations to lower electricity prices for ordinary voters.

    Another good way for her to become ‘woke’ is to drag her along to the funeral of an elderly person who died from pneumonia secondary to inability to afford to heat their house.

  219. Roger

    It’s ‘hump day’. That must be an Australian saying.

    It’s an Americanism.

  220. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Ellie, I think it’s from an old British saying. My Sainted Mother used to speak of days when she ‘had the hump’, i.e. felt down in the dumps. I’ve got the hump, she would say and you’d know to just leave her alone to get on with it, and to do anything that needed doing yourself. Mid-week Wednesday might well have been that sort of day, the half-way point to the weekend for many an old Aussie worker. In Bernard Cornwall’s ‘The Last Kingdom’ series of books, ‘humping’ is unequivocally a word for the glorious human endeavor known as sexual intercourse, as also is ‘tupping’, both from a male perspective as one might expect of the pillagers and [email protected] of those days.

  221. None

    Numbers given how often you’re here telling us about your job, telling us about how wonderful a teacher you were etc etcn why did you retire? Clearly you weren’t ready to and so now you just hang around here annoying people. And frankly some of us would prefer to remember our teachers rather than your teaching career. And those of us who have teachers in the family a sort of really happy to have a break from it.

  222. Leigh Lowe

    Zali to become an Lib before the next election according to the Oz.

    Steady on.
    We are in “would not rule out” territory.
    Let me speculate a little here.
    Zali is an attention whore.
    She was hoping to win Warringah in a hung Parliament or, at worse, an ALP majority, where she would be fed a little oxygen from time-to-time.
    The purple cheer squad has dispersed and the office phone in Canberra hasn’t rung since she got there.
    A Liberal majority is her worst nightmare and she knows that she needs to grab the spotlight frequently or she is toast in 2022.
    Where do you think the media question about flipping to the Libs came from?
    Some journo plucked it out of their arese?
    Or Zali planted it?
    .
    Here’s how the Libs should play it:-
    Hint that it is a distinct possibility and throw out hints that she would need to demonstrate her Liberal credentials.
    Keep her on a string until the third year of this term.
    Once she has blown up her far left base through voting for tax reductions and by supporting, say, tough migration laws, give her the big “yeah, nah” and pre-select someone else.

    Zali doesn’t want to be a one-term wonder

  223. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    As a single person with no dependents, the cougar years are alive and sparking!
    🙃

    Good on you Ellie. Nothing like a younger man to keep a girl sparking on all six, or even eight!

    Whatever happened to cylinders? Do cars still have them? Or spark plugs? A mystery to me.

  224. John64

    Roger
    #3096063, posted on July 3, 2019 at 10:53 am
    Aren’t most TV comedies built on one joke?
    I’m freeeee!!!

    C’mon there were two jokes – something about Mrs Slocombe’s cat if I remember rightly?

  225. Leigh Lowe

    Hubert Richter-Winfield

    Very Adelaide.
    Nice touch of the Kraut there with Richter.

  226. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘I’m freeee!’

    Oh, for the days where you could make series upon series of a comeday about stuffy English aristocrats, poofery and pussy-related double entendres.

    ‘Squinters’ by that upper-class, hairy up-himself mascara-wearing flog Minchin pales in comparison.

  227. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Zali doesn’t want to be a one-term wonder

    Unless she admits coal into her life she will be once the blackouts set in.
    She’s a climate change loon and over-reacher.
    Libs do not need any more of these inside the tent.

  228. Leigh Lowe

    Are we seriously spending a whole day in Parliament lining up to eulogise the RMB Billionaire, R. J. Hawke?

  229. Leigh Lowe:

    Hint that it is a distinct possibility and throw out hints that she would need to demonstrate her Liberal credentials.
    Keep her on a string until the third year of this term.
    Once she has blown up her far left base through voting for tax reductions and by supporting, say, tough migration laws, give her the big “yeah, nah” and pre-select someone else.

    I like the way you think.

  230. C.L.

    Being a girl, I used to smoke Alpines. No fond memories there.

    All of the menthols were horrible. Ugh. Just the memory …
    Extremely popular amongst African-American males to this day, though, strangely.
    Denzell smokes Kools in Training Day.

  231. Leigh Lowe

    Oh, for the days where you could make series upon series of a comeday about stuffy English aristocrats, poofery and pussy-related double entendres.

    No double entendres.
    She was referring exclusively to her vagina.
    Her only pet was a goldfish.

  232. Ellie

    Re Zali:

    How can you let someone into the Liberal party who knocked off a former PM with one of the dirtiest, branch-stacking sleazebag campaigns of all time.

  233. John64

    It can get complicated. Gotta go for the triple barrel:

    Elanor Kelly-Peter-Stuyvesant 🙂

  234. johanna

    I can’t do the 3 level name generator, because I don’t have the information.

    But, using the 2 level approach, I am Miss Carramar-Blackie, which would go well in a Sherlock Holmes story or a 1930s golden era murder mystery.

    Sadly, I could well be the victim in either of these scenarios. 🙁

  235. areff

    Being a girl, I used to smoke Alpines. No fond memories there.

    I started smoking Alpine as a kid, Consulate too, and Marlboro green. I wasn’t a girl the last time I looked.

  236. Ellie

    Sadly, I could well be the victim in either of these scenarios. 

    I don’t see you as a victim, Johanna.

Comments are closed.