Tuesday Forum: August 27, 2019

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2,209 Responses to Tuesday Forum: August 27, 2019

  1. Tintarella di Luna

    I think he has gone quiet because he is preparing for the “Day of the Doxing”.

    What would that entail? Does it have anything to do with sheep?

  2. Knuckle Dragger

    Just making sure the poltroon’s not brown bread, Mark.

    We’re helping.

    Ourselves.

    To taking the piss out of him while he’s not around to flail and threaten to come down off his cross and…. do something.

  3. MatrixTransform

    Numpty has withdrawn his advertising

  4. Black Ball

    A book for the All Australian team:
    Backs Hurn, Andrews, Grimes
    HB Houli, McGovern, Sheppard
    C Treloar, Dangerfield, Whitfield
    HF Walters, Darling, Bontempelli
    F Charlie Cameron, Jeremy Cameron, Zurhaar
    Ruck Grundy, Cripps, Neale
    Interchange Gawn, Pendlebury, Boak, Ben Brown
    Have at it gentle readership.

  5. MatrixTransform

    He refuses to grace us with his pestilence

  6. Leigh Lowe

    SBS running a panel show about the evils of wrongful convictions.
    Aussie guy reckons jury members arrive loaded with biases and prejudices.
    Black American complains he was railroaded by a jury in 13 minutes on the back of a … solitary prosecution witness … [audible gasp].
    The curious case of George didn’t get a run whilst I was watching.

  7. Black Ball

    Actually get Whitfield to the bench, take Boak out and get Dusty in

  8. MatrixTransform

    the Richmond one…not the other fucker

  9. Knuckle Dragger

    Rioli. No way.

    The bloke would have to be 55 or 60, at least.

  10. Leigh Lowe

    Knuckle Dragger

    #3142270, posted on August 27, 2019 at 9:41 pm

    Crash Craddock, The Back Page replay:

    ‘Joel Wilson is the world’s worst crickit Test umpire.’

    Diversity hire.
    I thought it was Stevie Wonder under the hat after that LB.
    At least Stevie would have referred it to his labrador.

  11. Leigh Lowe

    Dean Rioli?
    What about Derek Kickett?

  12. Knuckle Dragger

    The Bitey Brothers.

    Oh, and Jimmy Krakouer.

  13. Leigh Lowe

    Jimmy can only play every second weekend.

  14. dover_beach

    SBS running a panel show about the evils of wrongful convictions.
    Aussie guy reckons jury members arrive loaded with biases and prejudices.
    Black American complains he was railroaded by a jury in 13 minutes on the back of a … solitary prosecution witness … [audible gasp].
    The curious case of George didn’t get a run whilst I was watching.

    Move along, move along, nothing to see here.

  15. MatrixTransform

    Daniel Rioli … FFS

    and de Goey … but too many forwards

  16. Black Ball

    Couldn’t squeeze Tony Lockett in. Although Mike Sheahan now has a doco on John Coleman. Over 5 goals a game. What a superstar he must have been.

  17. John Constantine

    Nice line from General Mattis:

    “Politicians are naturally responsive to activism”.

    In australia, our politicals are either “Instinctively responsive to activism” or worse,

    “Pavlovian in their response to activism.”

    [ worse thing about australian politicals is their natural responsiveness to the corrupt offer of a shiny new Huwei phone and a shifty fifty in bribes.]

    “…Like other flashpoints in the culture wars, a very vocal minority is the driving force behind political leaders’ efforts to use the military as a tool for social change.

    Because politicians are “naturally responsive to activism, we could be moving toward a military that is more responsive to the values of the 5 percent of very liberal Americans than those of the vast majority of our fellow citizens, liberal and conservative,” Mattis warned.

    Allowing these ideologues to set military policy would “force the military to sacrifice practices it perpetuates not for reasons of social conservatism but for reasons of military practicality and battlefield success.”

    President Obama apparently did not welcome General Mattis’s opinions. As CENTCOM commander, Mattis had forcefully advocated a more muscular approach to Iran when the administration was seeking a nuclear deal at all costs.

    In January 2013, the renowned general was fired without the courtesy of a phone call. A report by the House Intelligence Committee later concluded that removing Mattis, whose vaunted military career spanned four decades of impressive service, had itself reduced CENTCOM’s effectiveness.

  18. Knuckle Dragger

    Micky Conlan.

    Bring that bastard back.

  19. Infidel Tiger

    Rioli. No way.

    The bloke would have to be 55 or 60, at least.

    If he wasn’t dead.

  20. Leigh Lowe

    Liven it up.
    All Australian side of blokes who been locked up.
    Jimmy Krakouer and Ben Cousins for starters.
    J Nicholls maybe.
    R Muir.
    Des Tuddenham (receiving was it?)
    Fred C(r)ook.
    .
    Nearly had Nicky Winmar available for selection recently, and Bomber Thompson just missed the cut too.

  21. John Constantine

    https://www.australianmining.com.au/oil-gas/news-oil-gas/strike-energy-discovers-gas-in-staggering-find/

    With West Erregulla-2 now being one of the deepest wells ever drilled onshore Australia and finding such excellent quality sandstone reservoirs, the subsurface paradigms of the Perth Basin are shifting,” Nicholls said.

    Adelaide-based Strike believes it has unveiled a new conventional gas fairway, with initial results validating its geological model.

    Early this month, the Strike-Warrego JV made another gas discovery in the Wagina sandstone in the Perth Basin.

    “With gas discoveries in the Wagina and now the Kingia sandstones the West Erregulla campaign is company-changing for Strike,” Nicholls said.

    “With the well drilling ahead to the High Cliff sandstones which show an even better anomaly than the Kingia at West Erregulla, the chance of adding a further material discovery looks promising.”

    Huge depth, huge find.

    While their craven andrewsville quislings kowtow to their instructions to ban victorian gas exploration and build a gas import plant instead.

    Comrades.

  22. Black Ball

    Set parameters Leigh Lowe, could be interesting. If you mean by locked up, I suspect half the VFL squad during the 80s would have been waking up in a cell of a Sunday morning.

  23. John Constantine

    https://www.australianmining.com.au/news/economic-fears-push-aussie-gold-price-to-new-heights/

    Gold isn’t rising, old joke is that gold is a currency where an ounce of gold is worth exactly one ounce of gold.

    The australian fiat ponxi dollar is falling against that ounce of gold, and what policy will pull it back?.

  24. Leigh Lowe

    I don’t mean a Saturday night D&D.
    A proper trial, conviction, go to jail.

  25. jupes

    Kennards Hire

    One of the companies that’s boycotting Alan Jones.

    Is anyone shocked that the boss of a company that caves to the censorious left ran for the LDP?

  26. Black Ball

    Coach is Chris Fagan too for the AA side

  27. Leigh Lowe

    Wayne Harmes.
    September 1979.
    Grand larceny.

  28. jupes

    Jimmy Krakouer and Ben Cousins for starters.

    Andrew Krakouer and Daniel Kerr are another couple.

    Gee, we’ll end up with a pretty good team here.

  29. Leigh Lowe

    Andrew Krakouer and Daniel Kerr are another couple.

    Gee, we’ll end up with a pretty good team here.

    14 half foward flankers, 1 ruckman and 7 back pocket pickpockets.

  30. Cassie of Sydney

    “jupes
    #3142301, posted on August 27, 2019 at 10:17 pm
    Kennards Hire

    One of the companies that’s boycotting Alan Jones.

    Is anyone shocked that the boss of a company that caves to the censorious left ran for the LDP?”

    Jupes….this is not Sam Kennard from Kennard’s Self Storage who was also a LDP candidate….there is NO way that Sam Kennard would succumb to that bullying…..I am pretty sure that Kennard’s Hire and Kennard’s Self Storage are two separate companies. Happy to be corrected.

  31. Knuckle Dragger

    Captain Obvious.

    Cousins.

  32. MatrixTransform

    the boss of a company that caves to the censorious left

    he works fer kennard.

    ht … the two ronnies

  33. Leigh Lowe

    Black Ball

    #3142295, posted on August 27, 2019 at 10:12 pm

    Danny Southern

    People happily throw the term “choker” around in sport all the time.
    Nobody said it to Danny much after that incident in Perth.

  34. jupes

    Speaking of the Frogs (on the other thread), I get the Daily Mail for my morning coffee read. Interesting that when they refer to Frogland they still refer to it in headlines as “The Old Enemy”.

    And who can blame them?

  35. Leigh Lowe

    Cousins first picked upthread.

  36. Leigh Lowe

    Does Leigh Mathews have a conviction for panel-beating Neville Bruns?
    No jail, but.
    Pity.

  37. Leigh Lowe

    Pants Millane would have definitely gone to jail if he had killed someone else with his car.

  38. Morsie

    Two Kennard brothers now two families.One ran the hire business one runs the storage business.

  39. jupes

    Cassie,

    The Kennards family has a strong reputation for business innovation and originality. With foundations with Walter Kennard and his establishment of the highly regarded Kennards Hire in 1947, the family has since succeeded his enterprise to expand in many ways. Walter’s two sons, Neville and Andrew took Kennards to a level he would not imagine.

    In 1973, this included establishing Australia’s first Self Storage Centre in the Kennards Hire branch at Moorebank. Neville and his son Sam, now independently own the Kennards Self Storage Company. Kennards Hire now has no commercial relationship to Kennards self Storage.

    So same family but different company. I stand corrected.

  40. Pedro the Ignorant

    Snuck in for a quick look at the Cat and no bilious tripe from that decrepit old fool in Toowoomba seen after a scroll.

    Has the Doomlord finally wielded the Hammer of Doom on the fuckwit?

    Reassure me, peeps.

  41. areff

    Couldn’t squeeze Tony Lockett in. Although Mike Sheahan now has a doco on John Coleman. Over 5 goals a game. What a superstar he must have been.

    It was a Friday and Coleman was laid out in preparation room at the funeral homeColeman’s back — scarred from hips to shoulder. Each one a memento of a full-back’s stops.

    “This is what they did to our John,” the mortician is reputed to have cried. Like Don Corleone over Sonny’s body.

    Coleman hated umpires for not protecting forwards, especially him. At the Brownlow do one year he spied an ump standing at the urinal and chased him out and down the hallway while yelling, “You blokes sit down to piss. Go to the ladies where you belong.”

    And Coleman wondered yet why umpires didn’t like him.

  42. areff

    Apologies for typos. In bed and typing sideways. Also pissed, which doesn’t help.

  43. jupes

    Coleman hated umpires for not protecting forwards, especially him. At the Brownlow do one year he spied an ump standing at the urinal and chased him out and down the hallway while yelling, “You blokes sit down to piss. Go to the ladies where you belong.”

    And now they have lady umpires.

  44. Black Ball

    Southern was a mad bastard for sure.

  45. Black Ball

    Coleman finished at 25, dead at 44. Do you think the young blokes of today have an iota of history of the game they play?

  46. Steve trickler

    Respect, to the History Guy and Girl.



  47. max

    China hitting it out of the ball park.

    Detaining an ‘Aussie spy’.

    Sending 23kg of fentanyl through Mexico to the US.

    Honkers.

    Pork riots shown on twitter.

    Currency dropping like a stone.

  48. Knuckle Dragger

    G’day Pedro.

    We were just talking about cruise ships.

  49. areff

    i WANT wESTERN oVAL BACK! Yarraville Eagles are no more and the hallowed ground by Mount Mistake entertains nothing but the odd ladies match., with some very odd ladies. The worst thing that happened to footy was centralising it at Docklands and MCG.

    It’s asacred site, tribal ground, and I should be able to get 87 relatives on the payroll to promote its UN Heritage listing.

    Always was, always will be red,white and blue great serpent land.

    No money. no peace.

  50. Bruce in WA

    I don’t think numbers was smote, just advised to cool it for a while.

    I hope that’s the case and not that something dire has happened to his wife. That would be way beyond any contempt I feel for what he posts here.

  51. Knuckle Dragger

    areff,

    Mate of mine and former colleague has the (I think) Railway Hotel in your patch. Mad, mad Dogs man to boot. There’s no such thing as the Western Bulldogs, according to him.

    Just Footscray.

  52. cohenite

    Women are increasingly opting out of heterosexuality because it is “the bedrock of their global oppression,” NBC News asserted in a bizarre opinion piece this week.

    “Men need heterosexuality to maintain their societal dominance over women,” writes Marcie Bianco for the NBC News website. “Women, on the other hand, are increasingly realizing not only that they don’t need heterosexuality, but that it also is often the bedrock of their global oppression.”

  53. Black Ball

    Turning serious, did I see that an Oklahoma court smacked Johnson and Johnson for half a Billion for allowing people to consume opioids rather than wean those people off it?

  54. max

    The G7 – a complete waste of everyone’s time.

  55. Fat Tony

    Pedro the Ignorant
    #3142318, posted on August 27, 2019 at 10:30 pm
    Snuck in for a quick look at the Cat and no bilious tripe from that decrepit old fool in Toowoomba seen after a scroll.

    Has the Doomlord finally wielded the Hammer of Doom on the fuckwit?

    Reassure me, peeps.

    Err…are you referring to me? 🙁

  56. areff

    Footy trivia fact: The Yarraville Eagles (VFA; now extinct} were known during WWII and immediately prior as The Villains.

    When Western Oval became a tent city for GIs, the Bulldogs refused to play at Yarraville until the Villains tag was scuttled.

    That’s the sort of moral, upright club we have here in the West. Fewer tattoos per square inch of epidermis than any club. What more proof is needed of good sense and aesthetic restraint?

  57. Knuckle Dragger

    Yep. Looked it up.

    The Railway Hotel in Anderson Street, Yarraville.

    My very good friend painted it red white and blue when he got it.

  58. JC

    “Men need heterosexuality to maintain their societal dominance over women,” writes Marcie Bianco

    Well no man needs her. Get a load of her and the Tatts.

  59. areff

    I took Mum for dinner tonight at Altona RSL, where the talk was ‘can we repeat 2016?’

    Not once did i hear ‘Western Bulldogs” pass a son (or daughter) of the West’s lips.

    It was either ‘Doggies” or “Footascray”

    The more cosmopolitan amongst us defer to Franco Cozzo and pronounce it “foot-a-scray”

  60. zyconoclast

    Child pr3dator George Nader visited White House at least 13 times to meet with Steve Bannon

    Convicted child s3x offender George Nader visited the White House at least 13 times to meet with President Trump’s then-chief strategist Steve Bannon, records indicate, raising questions about possible gaps in security and judgment.

    Nader first visited Bannon in the White House in February 2017. His dozen subsequent visits stretched through August, when Bannon was fired after seven months on the job. It’s unclear if Nader visited the White House after Bannon left.

  61. John Constantine

    Chinese farmers have lost 300 million to 350 million pigs to ASF so far in 2019 through either disease-related deaths or such emergency containment efforts as targeted culls. “We currently estimate 40% of the herd has already been lost, and more than 50% of the herd could be eliminated by year-end,” Christine McCracken, a senior analyst at RaboResearch, the research arm of Dutch investment bank Rabobank, told Fortune. “This loss would account for more pigs than are raised in an entire year by the EU and U.S.”

    RaboResearch projects that ASF will wipe out roughly one-quarter of the global pig supply this year, and that it could take up to five years for impacted countries to replenish their domestic stocks. And there are signs export prices, which have already begun to climb, will soar and remain high for the foreseeable future.

    https://fortune.com/2019/08/22/china-trade-pig-ebola-bacon-prices/

    If only fentanyl cured pig plague.

  62. Maybe he’s just away at the funeral he mentioned.

    IIRC the funeral was Tuesday.
    Today was Tuesday.

  63. zyconoclast

    Elite girls’ school is banning BINS and telling its 1,300 students to take their rubbish home with them instead

    Melbourne Girls’ College in Richmond told its 1,300 students they will be responsible for removing their own waste, in a effort to cut costs.

    ‘Similar to entering a National Park in Australia, the waste you take in, you will also be responsible for taking out. The proposal is that there will be no more rubbish bins at MGC,’ principal Karen Money told parents.

  64. John Constantine

    https://www.summary.com/magazine/an-economist-walks-into-a-brothel-by-allison-schrager/?fbclid=IwAR30OI7X3KUTFGltHtaoh005t6byKtjezFIWl-1hfMEPcdYCQCv4RUGJbDU

    The playful title carries a serious message––the commerce of brothels carries high personal risk for both buyers and sellers. Visiting four legal brothels in Nevada as part of the field research for the book, the author finds that the girls were willing to hand over fifty percent of their earnings to the management company for full security protection. In financial terms, they are hedging––giving-up potential earnings in return for risk reduction.

    No Risk No Reward

    Understanding that risk is inevitable in any choice is Schrager’s first rule of risk management. Where most people fail in this area is either by underestimating the level of risk, or ignoring it altogether. Measuring the type and amount of risk in advance helps you to decide whether the reward is ultimately worth it.

    Irrationality

    In an interview with World Poker Champion Phil Hellmuth, Schrager highlights the role that emotions can play in our assessment of risk. By his own admission, Hellmuth is emotional and irrational––he didn’t get the title Poker Brat by chance. However, he succeeds by recognizing these impulses and learning to channel them into outrageous behavior at the poker table rather than poor decision making at the turn of a card.

  65. feelthebern

    I bought Bob & Blanche’s dining table tonight.
    650 bucks.
    I was online trying to buy something I hoped no one knew what it was worth.
    While I was waiting the dining table lot popped up & a bid & that was that.

  66. feelthebern

    The thing I was trying to buy on the cheap went for 4k (not the few hundred I hoped it would go for).

  67. areff

    I waited many an houras kid on the steps of the Railway to fetch Uncle Cyril and Uncle Pat home for tea.

    “Gran says…”

    “Just wait a bit. Ettie won’t won’t mind.”

    then a hand would appear with a lemon squash and I’d watch the sun send shadows up the ANZ bank’s wall on the opposite corner for the next 20 minutes.

    There might well be another lemon squash, perhaps two

    Of course Granma Ettie did mind that dinner was delayed. I’d sit in the corner of the kitchen and watch the to and fro’ (“it was only a drink’) and wait for theinevitable and loving reproachment at about the same time the canned peaches and Sennitt’s icecream hit the table.

    I know quite a few decent single mums who’ve done a good job with their kids. But no matter how good, there’s no substitute for what a full cast of family characters does to open the mind, observational abilities and a lot of other things.

  68. Robert Mc

    “jupes #3142301, posted on August 27, 2019 at 10:17 pm
    Kennards Hire

    One of the companies that’s boycotting Alan Jones.

    Is anyone shocked that the boss of a company that caves to the censorious left ran for the LDP?”

    Jupes….this is not Sam Kennard from Kennard’s Self Storage who was also a LDP candidate….there is NO way that Sam Kennard would succumb to that bullying…..I am pretty sure that Kennard’s Hire and Kennard’s Self Storage are two separate companies. Happy to be corrected.

    Kennards Hire and Kennards Self Storage are both part of the Kennard Family group. See my comment on page 1 if Sinc chooses to unmoderate it.

  69. areff

    If anyone wants to nominat me for the Order of Australia on the strength of the few typos in that last post, it woudl be desreved

  70. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    In bed and typing sideways. Also pissed, which doesn’t help.

    Better than being in bed and drinking sideways because you are reading propped in a comfortable but odd angle, areff, which is sometimes my problem. The number of nighties I have ruined with red wine stains doesn’t bear thinking on.

  71. Knuckle Dragger

    Bern,

    Don’t eat on that thing. You don’t know what’s been on it.

  72. Infidel Tiger

    Melbourne Girls’ College in Richmond told its 1,300 students they will be responsible for removing their own waste, in a effort to cut costs.

    ‘Similar to entering a National Park in Australia, the waste you take in, you will also be responsible for taking out. The proposal is that there will be no more rubbish bins at MGC,’ principal Karen Money told parents.

    Going to be a lot of clogged toilets.

  73. Black Ball

    Head to North Bendigo areff. Bulldogs colours but you were an outcast if you didn’t have a tattoo. Twas called the zoo from those BFL toffs, Sandhurst, Golden Square et al. A powerhouse now in the Heathcote league.

  74. areff

    DEar me, Lizzie, you do inflame the imagination.

    Were the Hirsute Hibernian not about, I’d be pressing my case to soil your nightie with something more potent than red.

  75. Lazlo

    JC: you were correct last night about central banks. I should have been more nuanced.

    Yes, central banks can wreck you, like any other top-down government regulator. Ridley’s point is that they are in no way essential, things could continue just fine without them, and he provides plenty of historical evidence.

    But I still contend that they are much less influential on economic outcomes than they used to be, and thus less macro relevant, if not micro.

  76. John Constantine

    Hawkie was a seminal political influence.

    https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2011/08/why-does-semen-glow-in-the-dark.html

    Betcha shorten bid on all bob’s second hand footy socks.

  77. Mark A

    Infidel Tiger
    #3142356, posted on August 27, 2019 at 11:15 pm

    Melbourne Girls’ College in Richmond told its 1,300 students they will be responsible for removing their own waste, in a effort to cut costs.
    Going to be a lot of clogged toilets.

    Funny thing is, it takes only one parent to pull their daughter out and all that saving is down the tube.
    Not saying it will happen but it could.

  78. areff

    Shorten is a semenal effluence. The fact that the arch wanker was taken as a serious contender says everything about the debased, humbled, prospect-free Australia in which we are consigned to live.

    Small population. Huge resources. Energy on tap.

    What do we get? looming blackouts, obscene electricity and petrol prices, vestigal industries, the ABC, treacherous bitches who don’t understand ‘karma’, and pig ignorant, post-literate generations produced by an education system designed to make the retard with the chalk look intelligent.

  79. Steve trickler

    If it was scripted, you’d be happy with the outcome of the footage. It ain’t.



  80. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    there’s no substitute for what a full cast of family characters does to open the mind

    I wrote an email letter today to my sixteen year old grandson, one of those letters recognizing that he is turning into an adult and yet has to face all of the problems of still only being sixteen, so some paragraphs here of words of advice re his parents now he was old enough to know, and that Honor Thy Father and Thy Mother was still a very necessary commandment, that patriotism was a virtue when we lived in this lucky country, and did his girlfriend’s parents know he was sleeping together with her at his mother’s place, and was this young lady or he himself (I can fund you for condoms if needed) using adequate contraception should there be anything going on of the sort that I suspect was going on??? Many apologies for being an embarrassingly enquiring grandma on such matters but it is unlikely that anyone else in his world has been so (his parental situation being what it is). I also said that I admired him very much and was so proud of him in many ways, and why did he miss school on Friday, please explain as he is close to being suspended, and remember that diligence at school can solve many problems at home. He wrote a wonderfully adult letter back, thanking me politely for my concern, telling me he loved me very much indeed, hugs offered for when we next meet, soon he hopes, explaining his school had made a mistake as he was present (confirmed by the school), and gently reminding me that I had got his girlfriend’s name wrong.

    Back in your box, Grandma. 😀

  81. Mark A

    Steve trickler
    #3142363, posted on August 27, 2019 at 11:32 pm

    Us who pay attention, even if disliking it.
    IT’S a repeat of a repeat posting, FGS. find somet new.

  82. areff

    Fifteen minutes early. The greatest song ever written.

  83. Mark A

    Steve trickler
    #3142363, posted on August 27, 2019 at 11:32 pm

    PS
    On the other hand carry on regardless.

  84. Steve trickler

    Mark A.

    Will you go and watch Tom Cruise in the Cinema?



  85. Old School Conservative

    Selecting the best all time Rugby crims is an exercise that has been addressed on a rugby blog I enjoy.
    The entire front row are murderers.
    Reserve front rower is Tim Bristow, who was banned from rugby for life in 1962 for knocking out 8 opposing players.
    Reserve half back is Mark Catchpole; busted for dealing drugs.
    Off-field team includes Israel Folau as team social media manager, and Quade Cooper who is the laptop analyst.

    In an international field Aussies hold their own.

  86. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    pig ignorant, post-literate generations produced by an education system designed to make the retard with the chalk look intelligent.

    Quite up-cheering tonight to hear Mark Latham expounding about a public school in Liverpool that has a program of regular boot camps, strong uniforms, a knock-back on PC nonsense and which is suggesting to kids from backgrounds like my grandson’s that the world doesn’t owe them a living.

    Not all is bad everywhere areff, and karma is as karma does. Best to forget about that and move on.
    Our trip to the skin doctor has produced a worrying pathology result for Hairy and he has been recalled, so be glad you are healthy and look on the bright side. We do. It may be nothing. Have to see Friday.

    Swords of Damocles all over the place. A warm bed and a good book sounds like heaven, and I’m headed off there now.

  87. Mark A

    Steve trickler
    #3142370, posted on August 27, 2019 at 11:44 pm

    Mark A.

    Will you go and watch Tom Cruise in the Cinema?

    That wimp?
    Not a bl..y chance.
    And I like flying and aryplanes an all, have license to pierce the air with machinery myself .

  88. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    there’s no substitute for what a full cast of family characters does to open the mind

    Well said. From my maternal grandfather, I learned how to manage money, and how to run a farm in a marginal area. From my paternal grandfather, I learned the art of surviving in the military (He was a World War Two veteran.) “Keep your mouth shut, and your ears open. Never volunteer for anything. Never let your mates down.”

  89. areff

    Sleep tight, Lizzie. And apologies for ungentlemanly designs on your nightie

  90. jupes

    The entire front row are murderers.

    LOL

  91. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    We grandmas are forgiving sorts, areff. 🙂

  92. areff

    and for a change of pace

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86_vnQc1oBE

    yeah, they’re :Led Zep imitators, but they really good Lep Zep imitators.

  93. areff

    I don’t know who said it, but true beyond words: All Led Zep songs are about elves or not getting laid.

    ()Lucky my neighbour is deaf

  94. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I am currently reading a book by Alistair Moffett about meandering around the area of Bamburgh and Lindisfarne. A review of it is in this week’s Spectator. Moffett is 67 and feeling his age, moaning about his sore back, and worrying that he maybe shouldn’t have left a safe job in the BBC 20 years ago to write some books about the history and romance of the Scottish Borders, and more recently, about the sea lanes of the Western Isles. I’ve enjoyed his books, including his first one, about King Arthur, whom he sees as a warlord of the Gododdin. He is wrong about that, of course, only partly correct, but all of his books are redolent with musings on the life of the past and the concept of locating oneself in time and space.

    He’s 67 and worrying too much about it all, I think to myself. Same age as Hairy, who doesn’t worry existentially at all (well, not much, anyway) in spite of a bad year health wise. How lucky am I? I’m 77 and still frisky! The very nice Mr. Moffett needs a letter from Grandma imho.

    And now I’ve left it too late for a read in bed if I am to arise in time for my dance class tomorrow. 🙂

  95. Steve trickler

    Mark A.

    If you are a pilot. Respect. All the best.

  96. Mark A

    areff
    #3142383, posted on August 28, 2019 at 12:08 am

    That refusal or whatever it was that you mentioned last night, must have hit you harder than you think.
    Remedy?
    An other bottle of what you had before.

  97. Mark A

    Steve trickler
    #3142386, posted on August 28, 2019 at 12:12 am

    Mark A.

    If you are a pilot. Respect. All the best.

    Nothing of the big boys kind Stickler, only twin and instrument night rating.

  98. areff

    Lizzie,
    I’m 64 and still feel 18. My back doesn’t bother me, yet all my schoolmates from the first XI and XvII are diseased, crippled or dead. Eschew exercise. that’s advice to last a longer lifetime. What I hate most about myself is that still want to believe — believe there’s something greater than the sum of human imperfections shaping the future and hobbling potential.

    There isn’t, of course. Decency, rationality, logic, sincerity — so low-valued theyre not even worth offerring before the altars of vanity.

    The motto for today: friends are those who haven’t yet betrayed you.

  99. Mark A

    areff
    #3142389, posted on August 28, 2019 at 12:23 am

    The motto for today: friends are those who haven’t yet betrayed you.

    Get rid of them dark thoughts.

  100. Steve trickler

    Cheers Mark.

    Another show here without Tom Cruise.



  101. areff

    Another rippr: Black 47, Green Suede Shoes

  102. areff

    apologies. Not that feminist whinebag but this: Green Suede Shoes

  103. C.L.

    Can I cadge an article from a subscriber, please?

    All suffer when faith’s degraded
    We cannot allow the courts to determine matters regarding religion.

    PAUL KELLY

  104. Mark A

    Not a sub, bit here goes.

    In recent weeks Liberal backbencher Julian Leeser has conducted soundings with faith-based leaders across his Sydney electorate in preparation for the religious discrimination debate in parliament, and reports that “I was told things I never believed I would hear expressed in this country”.

    Leeser says: “I never thought that Christians in Australia — and I am not a Christian — would find they could not express their faith in the way they had before. I had always felt the expression of religious faith was something that was axiomatic in Australia. But Christians are concerned about how they now operate in general, secular Australian society, from workplaces to schools, in professing their Christianity, and fear this threat will only ­become greater in the future.

    “Anti-Semitism is sadly on the rise in this country, with a 60 per cent increase in attacks on Jews in Australia over the last 12 months. When I have consulted Muslims, Sikhs and Buddhists in my electorate about their religious freedom, they have told me of people in public and private contexts asking them to remove ­articles of clothing that denote their religious devotion and of public libraries not wanting to stock their holy books. While there are fewer physical threats against Christians, there is a cultural and existential threat to Christianity as people are ­trying to de-legitimise the place of Christ­ianity in the public square and force it off the national stage.”
    Read Next

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    Leeser gave an address to the St Thomas More Society last Thursday that documented the feedback obtained from his seat of Berowa in northwest Sydney. Asked if he felt other MPs shared similar sentiments, he said: “I think there is a reasonable acceptance among MPs that this is a problem and a challenge for our society.”

    Leeser’s remarks are measured and nuanced but his main point is unequivocal: Australia is changing in fundamental ways because of anti-faith and anti-religious sentiments and campaigns. This has the potential to touch many people and many lives precisely because faith, to a greater or lesser extent, remains pivotal to the identity and purpose of so many ­individuals.

    He speaks as a Jewish Australian, a lawyer turned politician who seeks not to promote the views of any religious community but who ­believes “the maintenance of religion and ­religious institutions is vital to the moral ecology of our nation”. His recent soundings have involved all faiths but on August 12 Leeser ­convened a meeting of Christian representatives to test their views on the proposed ­religious discrimination bill, which he supports with serious reservations.

    He found eight specific concerns from that consultation. Christian leaders worried about their freedom to quote the Bible; their ability to preach and share the message of Jesus; what their children are being taught about gender and sexuality; what they will be allowed to teach about gender and sexuality to the next generation; the right of employees to follow their conscience and object to work-based ­corporate social ­responsibility programs without finding their jobs are threatened; the ­attacks on the right of church institutions to preach, teach, employ (or not employ) and ­provide (or not provide) services in ­accord­ance with their faith; the use of discrimination law in the name of human rights as a weapon against Christians; the media culture and in particular the ABC bias against Christians and Christian leaders.

    Leeser concedes that some of the decline in the standing of churches is self-inflicted. In this context he nominates failures of leadership, moral corruption and the systematic perpetration and cover-up of child sexual abuse as ventilated by the royal commission. But he says the public standing of Christianity has been weakened by a decline in religious literacy and empathy for religion.

    He says: “At the heart of this is the growing hostility, at first in radical circles but increas­ingly in broader circles, to the holistic view that Christians have of marriage, life and family. Properly presented, Christian teachings are not threatening but they are at odds with the zeitgeist. Today those teachings are attacked by people with a different view, some of whom have hostility to organised religion and Christianity in particular.”

    Implicit in Leeser’s critique is that the growing hostility towards religion comes from elites, from people who have organisational power and are willing to use that power, from politics to business to the law, to infringe freedom of ­religion. Once this sentiment is given legitimacy then it spreads to the local and neighbourhood level in decisions by public officials.

    “Now increasingly there is a legislative ­attack on freedom of conscience,” he says. “Laws are currently being debated in Victoria which will force priests to violate the seal of the confessional. Many priests, including the Archbishop of Melbourne, have indicated that they will go to jail rather than violate the confessional seal.”

    This law is not just an attack on religious freedom but counter-productive as a public policy measure. It typifies, however, today’s ideology and its willingness to suspend rationality. Obviously under the proposed law no child sex offender would go to a priest to confess their crimes — the end result, Leeser said, being the state acting “to compromise a fundamental feature of the Christian faith for no practical secular benefit”.

    He nominates the provision in the proposed NSW abortion bill that forces a doctor, nurse or midwife with a conscientious objection to abortion to recommend another practitioner as a ­violation of conscience. Describing this provision as “anathema to everything I stand for as a Liberal”, Leeser calls for its removal.

    The debate about religion is heading in a dangerous direction that, unless reversed, will leave permanent schisms in society and create serious problems for multiculturalism. Leeser’s central message is that the public discussion of religion must be reset. The task, he says, is “how we can live together with differences” creating a “shared space for everyone”.

    The Ruddock review recommended a religi­ous discrimination act given the inadequacy of existing commonwealth law. Attorney-General Christian Porter will soon release the draft for public discussion. But Leeser warns church and faith groups to be careful. Such a law “will inevitably hand more power to the courts”, and that means a surrender of sorts to the grip of international human rights law. This is a risky path.

    Leeser says people who work in the human rights industry seek “to use the law as a political weapon” by “bypassing the democratic process and achieving their goals through the courts or international bodies”. The idea of human rights originated in the Judaeo-Christian idea of human dignity but “the corruption of that idea by the human rights industry” is ­another story. “No one should assume that judges and the human rights commission will be any more sympathetic to issues of concern for faith communities than the parliament is.”

    While accepting the RDA with serious reservations, Leeser flatly rejects the notion of a religi­ous freedom act as recommended by some churches. This would be “a backdoor bill of rights which ­religious communities have always been right to oppose”. It would give judges a power over religion to make decisions now the ­domain of bishops, clergy, imams and rabbis. Leeser says that once churches demand special protection then other interests will ­demand the same, witness talk of a media freedom act.

    Leeser warns the issue ultimately transcends law and goes to culture: “An Australia where Chris­tianity no longer has an ­important role to play is an Australia whose future is bleak.” Many feel this way, including non-­religious people.

    While much of the media declares itself to be clueless about this entire issue, the political class is about to be plunged into this ­debate. What will be fundamental are the policies and principles MPs advocate. The roots of our civilisation lie in Judaeo-Christian traditions and the issue is the respect secular society accords this tradition or whether, under the guise of “ethics” and competing rights, it authorises the campaign against faith and religion with all the consequences this may encompass.

  105. Mark A

    Posted but under mods, must be a forbidden word in there somewhere, Sorry CL

  106. areff

    No, none of that sooky-wooky-woo moaning and whining about bring abandoned by cwuel, wishious men Meant to post this and advise to turn volume up to nine (11 would be excessive)

  107. Mark A

    Oh, heaps of unwelcome words.
    No wonder, I will take more care next time.
    Apologies.

  108. areff

    When Sylvia Plath gassed herself, she very nearly killed the bus conductor who lived underneath.

    No one spares a thought for the poor bugger.

    Think about that.

  109. Mark A

    See if this goes through?

    In recent weeks Liberal backbencher Julian Leeser has conducted soundings with faith-based leaders across his Sydney electorate in preparation for the religious discrimination debate in parliament, and reports that “I was told things I never believed I would hear expressed in this country”.

    Leeser says: “I never thought that Christians in Australia — and I am not a Christian — would find they could not express their faith in the way they had before. I had always felt the expression of religious faith was something that was axiomatic in Australia. But Christians are concerned about how they now operate in general, secular Australian society, from workplaces to schools, in professing their Christianity, and fear this threat will only ­become greater in the future.

    “Anti-Semitism is sadly on the rise in this country, with a 60 per cent increase in attacks on Jews in Australia over the last 12 months. When I have consulted M….sm, Sikhs and Buddhists in my electorate about their religious freedom, they have told me of people in public and private contexts asking them to remove ­articles of clothing that denote their religious devotion and of public libraries not wanting to stock their holy books. While there are fewer physical threats against Christians, there is a cultural and existential threat to Christianity as people are ­trying to de-legitimise the place of Christ­ianity in the public square and force it off the national stage.”

    Leeser gave an address to the St Thomas More Society last Thursday that documented the feedback obtained from his seat of Berowa in northwest Sydney. Asked if he felt other MPs shared similar sentiments, he said: “I think there is a reasonable acceptance among MPs that this is a problem and a challenge for our society.”

    Leeser’s remarks are measured and nuanced but his main point is unequivocal: Australia is changing in fundamental ways because of anti-faith and anti-religious sentiments and campaigns. This has the potential to touch many people and many lives precisely because faith, to a greater or lesser extent, remains pivotal to the identity and purpose of so many ­individuals.

    He speaks as a J….sh Australian, a lawyer turned politician who seeks not to promote the views of any religious community but who ­believes “the maintenance of religion and ­religious institutions is vital to the moral ecology of our nation”. His recent soundings have involved all faiths but on August 12 Leeser ­convened a meeting of Christian representatives to test their views on the proposed ­religious discrimination bill, which he supports with serious reservations.

    He found eight specific concerns from that consultation. Christian leaders worried about their freedom to quote the Bible; their ability to preach and share the message of Jesus; what their children are being taught about gender and sexuality; what they will be allowed to teach about gender and sexuality to the next generation; the right of employees to follow their conscience and object to work-based ­corporate social ­responsibility programs without finding their jobs are threatened; the ­attacks on the right of church institutions to preach, teach, employ (or not employ) and ­provide (or not provide) services in ­accord­ance with their faith; the use of discrimination law in the name of human rights as a weapon against Christians; the media culture and in particular the ABC bias against Christians and Christian leaders.

    Leeser concedes that some of the decline in the standing of churches is self-inflicted. In this context he nominates failures of leadership, moral corruption and the systematic perpetration and cover-up of child sexual abuse as ventilated by the royal commission. But he says the public standing of Christianity has been weakened by a decline in religious literacy and empathy for religion.

    He says: “At the heart of this is the growing hostility, at first in radical circles but increas­ingly in broader circles, to the holistic view that Christians have of marriage, life and family. Properly presented, Christian teachings are not threatening but they are at odds with the zeitgeist. Today those teachings are attacked by people with a different view, some of whom have hostility to organised religion and Christianity in particular.”

    Implicit in Leeser’s critique is that the growing hostility towards religion comes from elites, from people who have organisational power and are willing to use that power, from politics to business to the law, to infringe freedom of ­religion. Once this sentiment is given legitimacy then it spreads to the local and neighbourhood level in decisions by public officials.

    “Now increasingly there is a legislative ­attack on freedom of conscience,” he says. “Laws are currently being debated in Victoria which will force priests to violate the seal of the confessional. Many priests, including the Archbishop of Melbourne, have indicated that they will go to jail rather than violate the confessional seal.”

    This law is not just an attack on religious freedom but counter-productive as a public policy measure. It typifies, however, today’s ideology and its willingness to suspend rationality. Obviously under the proposed law no child sex offender would go to a priest to confess their crimes — the end result, Leeser said, being the state acting “to compromise a fundamental feature of the Christian faith for no practical secular benefit”.

    He nominates the provision in the proposed NSW abortion bill that forces a doctor, nurse or midwife with a conscientious objection to abortion to recommend another practitioner as a ­violation of conscience. Describing this provision as “anathema to everything I stand for as a Liberal”, Leeser calls for its removal.

    The debate about religion is heading in a dangerous direction that, unless reversed, will leave permanent schisms in society and create serious problems for multiculturalism. Leeser’s central message is that the public discussion of religion must be reset. The task, he says, is “how we can live together with differences” creating a “shared space for everyone”.

    The Ruddock review recommended a religi­ous discrimination act given the inadequacy of existing commonwealth law. Attorney-General Christian Porter will soon release the draft for public discussion. But Leeser warns church and faith groups to be careful. Such a law “will inevitably hand more power to the courts”, and that means a surrender of sorts to the grip of international human rights law. This is a risky path.

    Leeser says people who work in the human rights industry seek “to use the law as a political weapon” by “bypassing the democratic process and achieving their goals through the courts or international bodies”. The idea of human rights originated in the J….deo-Christian idea of human dignity but “the corruption of that idea by the human rights industry” is ­another story. “No one should assume that judges and the human rights commission will be any more sympathetic to issues of concern for faith communities than the parliament is.”

    While accepting the RDA with serious reservations, Leeser flatly rejects the notion of a religi­ous freedom act as recommended by some churches. This would be “a backdoor bill of rights which ­religious communities have always been right to oppose”. It would give judges a power over religion to make decisions now the ­domain of bishops, clergy, imams and rabbis. Leeser says that once churches demand special protection then other interests will ­demand the same, witness talk of a media freedom act.

    Leeser warns the issue ultimately transcends law and goes to culture: “An Australia where Chris­tianity no longer has an ­important role to play is an Australia whose future is bleak.” Many feel this way, including non-­religious people.

    While much of the media declares itself to be clueless about this entire issue, the political class is about to be plunged into this ­debate. What will be fundamental are the policies and principles MPs advocate. The roots of our civilisation lie in J….deo-Christian traditions and the issue is the respect secular society accords this tradition or whether, under the guise of “ethics” and competing rights, it authorises the campaign against faith and religion with all the consequences this may encompass.

  110. areff

    Good nigth, all.

    Since even i dont know what to think about ylvia Plath’s bus confuctor, its time for slumber-wumber=woo

  111. Tintarella di Luna

    here you g C.L I haven’t taken out the extraneous stuff:

    In recent weeks Liberal backbencher Julian Leeser has conducted soundings with faith-based leaders across his Sydney electorate in preparation for the religious discrimination debate in parliament, and reports that “I was told things I never believed I would hear expressed in this country”.

    Leeser says: “I never thought that Christians in Australia — and I am not a Christian — would find they could not express their faith in the way they had before. I had always felt the expression of religious faith was something that was axiomatic in Australia. But Christians are concerned about how they now operate in general, secular Australian society, from workplaces to schools, in professing their Christianity, and fear this threat will only ­become greater in the future.

    “Anti-Semitism is sadly on the rise in this country, with a 60 per cent increase in attacks on Jews in Australia over the last 12 months. When I have consulted Muslims, Sikhs and Buddhists in my electorate about their religious freedom, they have told me of people in public and private contexts asking them to remove ­articles of clothing that denote their religious devotion and of public libraries not wanting to stock their holy books. While there are fewer physical threats against Christians, there is a cultural and existential threat to Christianity as people are ­trying to de-legitimise the place of Christ­ianity in the public square and force it off the national stage.”

    READ NEXT

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    BEN PACKHAM
    Leeser gave an address to the St Thomas More Society last Thursday that documented the feedback obtained from his seat of Berowa in northwest Sydney. Asked if he felt other MPs shared similar sentiments, he said: “I think there is a reasonable acceptance among MPs that this is a problem and a challenge for our society.”

    Leeser’s remarks are measured and nuanced but his main point is unequivocal: Australia is changing in fundamental ways because of anti-faith and anti-religious sentiments and campaigns. This has the potential to touch many people and many lives precisely because faith, to a greater or lesser extent, remains pivotal to the identity and purpose of so many ­individuals.

    He speaks as a Jewish Australian, a lawyer turned politician who seeks not to promote the views of any religious community but who ­believes “the maintenance of religion and ­religious institutions is vital to the moral ecology of our nation”. His recent soundings have involved all faiths but on August 12 Leeser ­convened a meeting of Christian representatives to test their views on the proposed ­religious discrimination bill, which he supports with serious reservations.

    He found eight specific concerns from that consultation. Christian leaders worried about their freedom to quote the Bible; their ability to preach and share the message of Jesus; what their children are being taught about gender and sexuality; what they will be allowed to teach about gender and sexuality to the next generation; the right of employees to follow their conscience and object to work-based ­corporate social ­responsibility programs without finding their jobs are threatened; the ­attacks on the right of church institutions to preach, teach, employ (or not employ) and ­provide (or not provide) services in ­accord­ance with their faith; the use of discrimination law in the name of human rights as a weapon against Christians; the media culture and in particular the ABC bias against Christians and Christian leaders.

    Leeser concedes that some of the decline in the standing of churches is self-inflicted. In this context he nominates failures of leadership, moral corruption and the systematic perpetration and cover-up of child sexual abuse as ventilated by the royal commission. But he says the public standing of Christianity has been weakened by a decline in religious literacy and empathy for religion.

    He says: “At the heart of this is the growing hostility, at first in radical circles but increas­ingly in broader circles, to the holistic view that Christians have of marriage, life and family. Properly presented, Christian teachings are not threatening but they are at odds with the zeitgeist. Today those teachings are attacked by people with a different view, some of whom have hostility to organised religion and Christianity in particular.”

    Implicit in Leeser’s critique is that the growing hostility towards religion comes from elites, from people who have organisational power and are willing to use that power, from politics to business to the law, to infringe freedom of ­religion. Once this sentiment is given legitimacy then it spreads to the local and neighbourhood level in decisions by public officials.

    “Now increasingly there is a legislative ­attack on freedom of conscience,” he says. “Laws are currently being debated in Victoria which will force priests to violate the seal of the confessional. Many priests, including the Archbishop of Melbourne, have indicated that they will go to jail rather than violate the confessional seal.”

    This law is not just an attack on religious freedom but counter-productive as a public policy measure. It typifies, however, today’s ideology and its willingness to suspend rationality. Obviously under the proposed law no child sex offender would go to a priest to confess their crimes — the end result, Leeser said, being the state acting “to compromise a fundamental feature of the Christian faith for no practical secular benefit”.

    He nominates the provision in the proposed NSW abortion bill that forces a doctor, nurse or midwife with a conscientious objection to abortion to recommend another practitioner as a ­violation of conscience. Describing this provision as “anathema to everything I stand for as a Liberal”, Leeser calls for its removal.

    The debate about religion is heading in a dangerous direction that, unless reversed, will leave permanent schisms in society and create serious problems for multiculturalism. Leeser’s central message is that the public discussion of religion must be reset. The task, he says, is “how we can live together with differences” creating a “shared space for everyone”.

    The Ruddock review recommended a religi­ous discrimination act given the inadequacy of existing commonwealth law. Attorney-General Christian Porter will soon release the draft for public discussion. But Leeser warns church and faith groups to be careful. Such a law “will inevitably hand more power to the courts”, and that means a surrender of sorts to the grip of international human rights law. This is a risky path.

    Leeser says people who work in the human rights industry seek “to use the law as a political weapon” by “bypassing the democratic process and achieving their goals through the courts or international bodies”. The idea of human rights originated in the Judaeo-Christian idea of human dignity but “the corruption of that idea by the human rights industry” is ­another story. “No one should assume that judges and the human rights commission will be any more sympathetic to issues of concern for faith communities than the parliament is.”

    While accepting the RDA with serious reservations, Leeser flatly rejects the notion of a religi­ous freedom act as recommended by some churches. This would be “a backdoor bill of rights which ­religious communities have always been right to oppose”. It would give judges a power over religion to make decisions now the ­domain of bishops, clergy, imams and rabbis. Leeser says that once churches demand special protection then other interests will ­demand the same, witness talk of a media freedom act.

    Leeser warns the issue ultimately transcends law and goes to culture: “An Australia where Chris­tianity no longer has an ­important role to play is an Australia whose future is bleak.” Many feel this way, including non-­religious people.

    While much of the media declares itself to be clueless about this entire issue, the political class is about to be plunged into this ­debate. What will be fundamental are the policies and principles MPs advocate. The roots of our civilisation lie in Judaeo-Christian traditions and the issue is the respect secular society accords this tradition or whether, under the guise of “ethics” and competing rights, it authorises the campaign against faith and religion with all the consequences this may encompass.

    PAUL KELLY

  112. Mark A

    Dr BG, tell us about your daily adventures.
    This blog is dead at this time of day and my wife took to the local TV soapies with a vengeance, (subs) driving me out of the lounge room. I should never have agreed to take over the the furniture and stuff when we bought the place.

  113. Tom

    David Rowe has noticed people have noticed his all-consuming TDS, so quickly draws another
    hated Tory.

  114. DrBeauGan

    Thanks Tom. Internet connection is very shaky here. So reports on my adventures may be delayed.

    There’s always a silver lining.

  115. DrBeauGan

    I have been having trouble sending emails to Spiky. Some arrived after two weeks delay and some haven’t got there at all.

    My favourite theory is that either the Cuban government is monitoring me on suspicion of being a spy for the CIA, or the CIA is monitoring me on suspicion that I’m working for the Cuban government. Or, quite possibly, both. It’s also possible Google is keeping a close watch on me for signs of political incorrectness, which would be fair enough.

    The last four pix I sent from WiP haven’t got there, the first one being Darth Cat. This is intelligible on the spy theory. There are millions of ways of encoding a message in an image, and it can take a long time to find it, especially if it isn’t there.

    My paranoia is residue of the suggestions made here yonks ago that I am a double agent and Maria is the honey trap. I shall have to check out the place for spy cameras. I gather they can make them very small these days. If they are too small to find, this will implicate the CIA..

  116. bespoke

    Mark A
    #3142241, posted on August 27, 2019 at 9:18 pm
    Long time no action,

    Ease up mate, Arky gets told that every day.

  117. DrBeauGan

    My cleaning lady stole my yucca. I had left some boiled yucca to fry up for breakfast in a saucepan and after she’d gone, I checked and it had vanished.

    I don’t know if this counts as a First World problem or a Third World problem.

  118. Twostix

    Seems like a large amount of non citizens for such a small population.

    10% of the people living here are economic mercenaries here purely to devour the fat of the land while the good times roll with a clear mind to go home once the going isn’t so good.

    The next step in abolishing us is to give these foreigners ‘permanent residents’ – who already the same standing in this coutry as a native born citizen except for one thing: the power to vote, the “right” to do that.

  119. Twostix

    Imagine giving foreign citizens squatting in your country with no interest in joining it, the power to vote.

    It’s bad enough these people have full access to our government’s services (often whole also naking use of theirs on too).

    Only the most malevolent class of people would dream of such a thing.

  120. Mater

    Imagine giving foreign citizens squatting in your country with no interest in joining it, the power to vote.

    No, no, no, twostix.
    In this country, we’d FORCE them to vote!

  121. bespoke

    Permanent residents don’t have to vote unless they register.

  122. notafan

    Maybe she didnt ‘steal’ it, maybe she threw it out, assuming it was food waste.

  123. Old School Conservative

    C.L.
    #3142395, posted on August 28, 2019 at 12:44 am
    Can I cadge an article from a subscriber, please?

    All suffer when faith degraded

    In recent weeks Liberal backbencher Julian Leeser has conducted soundings with faith-based leaders across his Sydney electorate in preparation for the religious discrimination debate in parliament, and reports that “I was told things I never believed I would hear expressed in this country”.

    Leeser says: “I never thought that Christians in Australia — and I am not a Christian — would find they could not express their faith in the way they had before. I had always felt the expression of religious faith was something that was axiomatic in Australia. But Christians are concerned about how they now operate in general, secular Australian society, from workplaces to schools, in professing their Christianity, and fear this threat will only ­become greater in the future.

    “Anti-Semitism is sadly on the rise in this country, with a 60 per cent increase in attacks on Jews in Australia over the last 12 months. When I have consulted Muslims, Sikhs and Buddhists in my electorate about their religious freedom, they have told me of people in public and private contexts asking them to remove ­articles of clothing that denote their religious devotion and of public libraries not wanting to stock their holy books. While there are fewer physical threats against Christians, there is a cultural and existential threat to Christianity as people are ­trying to de-legitimise the place of Christ­ianity in the public square and force it off the national stage.”

    Leeser gave an address to the St Thomas More Society last Thursday that documented the feedback obtained from his seat of Berowa in northwest Sydney. Asked if he felt other MPs shared similar sentiments, he said: “I think there is a reasonable acceptance among MPs that this is a problem and a challenge for our society.”

    Leeser’s remarks are measured and nuanced but his main point is unequivocal: Australia is changing in fundamental ways because of anti-faith and anti-religious sentiments and campaigns. This has the potential to touch many people and many lives precisely because faith, to a greater or lesser extent, remains pivotal to the identity and purpose of so many ­individuals.

    He speaks as a Jewish Australian, a lawyer turned politician who seeks not to promote the views of any religious community but who ­believes “the maintenance of religion and ­religious institutions is vital to the moral ecology of our nation”. His recent soundings have involved all faiths but on August 12 Leeser ­convened a meeting of Christian representatives to test their views on the proposed ­religious discrimination bill, which he supports with serious reservations.

    He found eight specific concerns from that consultation. Christian leaders worried about their freedom to quote the Bible; their ability to preach and share the message of Jesus; what their children are being taught about gender and sexuality; what they will be allowed to teach about gender and sexuality to the next generation; the right of employees to follow their conscience and object to work-based ­corporate social ­responsibility programs without finding their jobs are threatened; the ­attacks on the right of church institutions to preach, teach, employ (or not employ) and ­provide (or not provide) services in ­accord­ance with their faith; the use of discrimination law in the name of human rights as a weapon against Christians; the media culture and in particular the ABC bias against Christians and Christian leaders.

    Leeser concedes that some of the decline in the standing of churches is self-inflicted. In this context he nominates failures of leadership, moral corruption and the systematic perpetration and cover-up of child sexual abuse as ventilated by the royal commission. But he says the public standing of Christianity has been weakened by a decline in religious literacy and empathy for religion.

    He says: “At the heart of this is the growing hostility, at first in radical circles but increas­ingly in broader circles, to the holistic view that Christians have of marriage, life and family. Properly presented, Christian teachings are not threatening but they are at odds with the zeitgeist. Today those teachings are attacked by people with a different view, some of whom have hostility to organised religion and Christianity in particular.”

    Implicit in Leeser’s critique is that the growing hostility towards religion comes from elites, from people who have organisational power and are willing to use that power, from politics to business to the law, to infringe freedom of ­religion. Once this sentiment is given legitimacy then it spreads to the local and neighbourhood level in decisions by public officials.

    “Now increasingly there is a legislative ­attack on freedom of conscience,” he says. “Laws are currently being debated in Victoria which will force priests to violate the seal of the confessional. Many priests, including the Archbishop of Melbourne, have indicated that they will go to jail rather than violate the confessional seal.”

    This law is not just an attack on religious freedom but counter-productive as a public policy measure. It typifies, however, today’s ideology and its willingness to suspend rationality. Obviously under the proposed law no child sex offender would go to a priest to confess their crimes — the end result, Leeser said, being the state acting “to compromise a fundamental feature of the Christian faith for no practical secular benefit”.

    He nominates the provision in the proposed NSW abortion bill that forces a doctor, nurse or midwife with a conscientious objection to abortion to recommend another practitioner as a ­violation of conscience. Describing this provision as “anathema to everything I stand for as a Liberal”, Leeser calls for its removal.

    The debate about religion is heading in a dangerous direction that, unless reversed, will leave permanent schisms in society and create serious problems for multiculturalism. Leeser’s central message is that the public discussion of religion must be reset. The task, he says, is “how we can live together with differences” creating a “shared space for everyone”.

    The Ruddock review recommended a religi­ous discrimination act given the inadequacy of existing commonwealth law. Attorney-General Christian Porter will soon release the draft for public discussion. But Leeser warns church and faith groups to be careful. Such a law “will inevitably hand more power to the courts”, and that means a surrender of sorts to the grip of international human rights law. This is a risky path.

    Leeser says people who work in the human rights industry seek “to use the law as a political weapon” by “bypassing the democratic process and achieving their goals through the courts or international bodies”. The idea of human rights originated in the Judaeo-Christian idea of human dignity but “the corruption of that idea by the human rights industry” is ­another story. “No one should assume that judges and the human rights commission will be any more sympathetic to issues of concern for faith communities than the parliament is.”

    While accepting the RDA with serious reservations, Leeser flatly rejects the notion of a religi­ous freedom act as recommended by some churches. This would be “a backdoor bill of rights which ­religious communities have always been right to oppose”. It would give judges a power over religion to make decisions now the ­domain of bishops, clergy, imams and rabbis. Leeser says that once churches demand special protection then other interests will ­demand the same, witness talk of a media freedom act.

    Leeser warns the issue ultimately transcends law and goes to culture: “An Australia where Chris­tianity no longer has an ­important role to play is an Australia whose future is bleak.” Many feel this way, including non-­religious people.

    While much of the media declares itself to be clueless about this entire issue, the political class is about to be plunged into this ­debate. What will be fundamental are the policies and principles MPs advocate. The roots of our civilisation lie in Judaeo-Christian traditions and the issue is the respect secular society accords this tradition or whether, under the guise of “ethics” and competing rights, it authorises the campaign against faith and religion with all the consequences this may encompass.

  124. notafan

    Melbourne girl’s college is a public school so there will be no savings if someone leaves.

    Maybe they have rat problems with discarded food.

    School rubbish bins are just overnight rat feeding stations.

    My children’s primary school made the news many years ago after a similar statement.

    Scraps home in lunch box, not a big deal.

    The kindergarten also got rid of the oh so environmentally aware compost bin for the same reason, it was just rat paradise where they waited for food scraps to drop in.

  125. Old School Conservative

    C.L.
    #3142395, posted on August 28, 2019 at 12:44 am
    Can I cadge an article from a subscriber, please?

    Tried posting the whole (long) article but went into moderation.
    Here is the concluding paragraph.
    While much of the media declares itself to be clueless about this entire issue, the political class is about to be plunged into this ­debate. What will be fundamental are the policies and principles MPs advocate. The roots of our civilisation lie in Judaeo-Christian traditions and the issue is the respect secular society accords this tradition or whether, under the guise of “ethics” and competing rights, it authorises the campaign against faith and religion with all the consequences this may encompass.

  126. stackja

    All suffer when faith degraded PAUL KELLY
    12:00AM AUGUST 28, 2019
    In recent weeks Liberal backbencher Julian Leeser has conducted soundings with faith-based leaders across his Sydney electorate in preparation for the religious discrimination debate in parliament, and reports that “I was told things I never believed I would hear expressed in this country”.

    Leeser says: “I never thought that Christians in Australia — and I am not a Christian — would find they could not express their faith in the way they had before. I had always felt the expression of religious faith was something that was axiomatic in Australia. But Christians are concerned about how they now operate in general, secular Australian society, from workplaces to schools, in professing their Christianity, and fear this threat will only ­become greater in the future.

    “Anti-Semism is sadly on the rise in this country, with a 60 per cent increase in attacks on Joos in Australia over the last 12 months. When I have consulted Moos, Sikhs and Buddhists in my electorate about their religious freedom, they have told me of people in public and private contexts asking them to remove ­articles of clothing that denote their religious devotion and of public libraries not wanting to stock their holy books. While there are fewer physical threats against Christians, there is a cultural and existential threat to Christianity as people are ­trying to de-legitimise the place of Christ­ianity in the public square and force it off the national stage.”

    Leeser gave an address to the St Thomas More Society last Thursday that documented the feedback obtained from his seat of Berowa in northwest Sydney. Asked if he felt other MPs shared similar sentiments, he said: “I think there is a reasonable acceptance among MPs that this is a problem and a challenge for our society.”

    Leeser’s remarks are measured and nuanced but his main point is unequivocal: Australia is changing in fundamental ways because of anti-faith and anti-religious sentiments and campaigns. This has the potential to touch many people and many lives precisely because faith, to a greater or lesser extent, remains pivotal to the identity and purpose of so many ­individuals.

    He speaks as a Jooish Australian, a lawyer turned politician who seeks not to promote the views of any religious community but who ­believes “the maintenance of religion and ­religious institutions is vital to the moral ecology of our nation”. His recent soundings have involved all faiths but on August 12 Leeser ­convened a meeting of Christian representatives to test their views on the proposed ­religious discrimination bill, which he supports with serious reservations.

    He found eight specific concerns from that consultation. Christian leaders worried about their freedom to quote the Bible; their ability to preach and share the message of Jesus; what their children are being taught about gender and sexuality; what they will be allowed to teach about gender and sexuality to the next generation; the right of employees to follow their conscience and object to work-based ­corporate social ­responsibility programs without finding their jobs are threatened; the ­attacks on the right of church institutions to preach, teach, employ (or not employ) and ­provide (or not provide) services in ­accord­ance with their faith; the use of discrimination law in the name of human rights as a weapon against Christians; the media culture and in particular the ABC bias against Christians and Christian leaders.

    Leeser concedes that some of the decline in the standing of churches is self-inflicted. In this context he nominates failures of leadership, moral corruption and the systematic perpetration and cover-up of child sexual abuse as ventilated by the royal commission. But he says the public standing of Christianity has been weakened by a decline in religious literacy and empathy for religion.

    He says: “At the heart of this is the growing hostility, at first in radical circles but increas­ingly in broader circles, to the holistic view that Christians have of marriage, life and family. Properly presented, Christian teachings are not threatening but they are at odds with the zeitgeist. Today those teachings are attacked by people with a different view, some of whom have hostility to organised religion and Christianity in particular.”

    Implicit in Leeser’s critique is that the growing hostility towards religion comes from elites, from people who have organisational power and are willing to use that power, from politics to business to the law, to infringe freedom of ­religion. Once this sentiment is given legitimacy then it spreads to the local and neighbourhood level in decisions by public officials.

    “Now increasingly there is a legislative ­attack on freedom of conscience,” he says. “Laws are currently being debated in Victoria which will force priests to violate the seal of the confessional. Many priests, including the Archbishop of Melbourne, have indicated that they will go to jail rather than violate the confessional seal.”

    This law is not just an attack on religious freedom but counter-productive as a public policy measure. It typifies, however, today’s ideology and its willingness to suspend rationality. Obviously under the proposed law no child sex offender would go to a priest to confess their crimes — the end result, Leeser said, being the state acting “to compromise a fundamental feature of the Christian faith for no practical secular benefit”.

    He nominates the provision in the proposed NSW abortion bill that forces a doctor, nurse or midwife with a conscientious objection to abortion to recommend another practitioner as a ­violation of conscience. Describing this provision as “anathema to everything I stand for as a Liberal”, Leeser calls for its removal.

    The debate about religion is heading in a dangerous direction that, unless reversed, will leave permanent schisms in society and create serious problems for multiculturalism. Leeser’s central message is that the public discussion of religion must be reset. The task, he says, is “how we can live together with differences” creating a “shared space for everyone”.

    The Ruddock review recommended a religi­ous discrimination act given the inadequacy of existing commonwealth law. Attorney-General Christian Porter will soon release the draft for public discussion. But Leeser warns church and faith groups to be careful. Such a law “will inevitably hand more power to the courts”, and that means a surrender of sorts to the grip of international human rights law. This is a risky path.

    Leeser says people who work in the human rights industry seek “to use the law as a political weapon” by “bypassing the democratic process and achieving their goals through the courts or international bodies”. The idea of human rights originated in the Judaeo-Christian idea of human dignity but “the corruption of that idea by the human rights industry” is ­another story. “No one should assume that judges and the human rights commission will be any more sympathetic to issues of concern for faith communities than the parliament is.”

    While accepting the RDA with serious reservations, Leeser flatly rejects the notion of a religi­ous freedom act as recommended by some churches. This would be “a backdoor bill of rights which ­religious communities have always been right to oppose”. It would give judges a power over religion to make decisions now the ­domain of bishops, clergy, imams and rabbis. Leeser says that once churches demand special protection then other interests will ­demand the same, witness talk of a media freedom act.

    Leeser warns the issue ultimately transcends law and goes to culture: “An Australia where Chris­tianity no longer has an ­important role to play is an Australia whose future is bleak.” Many feel this way, including non-­religious people.

    While much of the media declares itself to be clueless about this entire issue, the political class is about to be plunged into this ­debate. What will be fundamental are the policies and principles MPs advocate. The roots of our civilisation lie in Joodaeo-Christian traditions and the issue is the respect secular society accords this tradition or whether, under the guise of “ethics” and competing rights, it authorises the campaign against faith and religion with all the consequences this may encompass.

    PAUL KELLY EDITOR-AT-LARGE
    Paul Kelly is Editor-at-Large on The Australian. He was previously Editor-in-Chief of the paper and he writes on Australian politics, public policy and international affairs.

  127. notafan

    Is lesbian women referenced up thread claiming lesbianicity is a personal choice?

    Heretic!

  128. DrBeauGan

    Maria made a date for two o’clock. At two o’clock she changed it to four o’clock. At two minutes to five, she txted to say they were on the way. I guess she might be here by six o’clock if she takes a taxi, and by seven if she comes by bus.

    I don’t understand the Cuban concept of time. I don’t think she’s messing me around as policy, I think it’s more that clock time doesn’t rate very highly compared to the internal sense of urgency. I think she does nothing much until the urge to move comes upon her.

    You can’t trust people like that to get anything right. All along o’ doin’ things neither more nor less.

  129. mh

    San Fransicko is the theme of the toons today.

    Garrison by a rat’s whisker.

  130. Top Ender

    Routine behaviour with the parents’ knowledge and consent, but of course they are sueing:

    According to the school report, the boy tried to kick, hit, bite and scratch staff while being “carried” to the “withdrawal room”.

    The report said staff told him to sit on a mat if he wanted to return to class, but that when he “climbed the door … climbed onto the louvres” they restrained him.

    “This continued for approximately 40 minutes with him being restrained for 5-10 minutes before being let go and then he would start behaviours that put him at risk and we would restrain again,” the report noted.

    It said the boy tried to stab one staff member in the leg with the screw from a door stopper before it was taken off him.

    “He was restrained for a short time … and let go as he did not struggle,” it said.

    “At one time he did a small vomit and said his chest hurt, so we cleaned up the small amount of vomit … and left him but he shortly got up and climbed the window again.”

    “We left the room, he climbed, putting himself at risk, and we would go in, restrain, and he would not fight. We would leave.”

    The report said staff continued to restrain him while they waited for his parents to collect him.

    “In total, [he] needed to be intermittently restrained for approximately two hours,” the report said.

    “Whenever we thought he was calm enough to let go, he would start to hit or kick out at staff.”

    Why you would stay on staff is beyond me.

    Link

  131. Leigh Lowe

    Imagine giving foreign citizens squatting in your country with no interest in joining it, the power to vote.

    Chinese students need a “voice to Parliament”.

  132. mh

    I think some traditional Somali Islamic justice is required for Omar!

    Divorce Filing: Wife Says Democrat Consultant Had Affair with Ilhan Omar

    https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/08/27/divorce-filing-wife-says-democrat-consultant-had-affair-with-ilhan-omar/

  133. mh

    I think some traditional Somali Isl amic justice is required for Omar!

    Divorce Filing: Wife Says Democrat Consultant Had Affair with Ilhan Omar

    https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/08/27/divorce-filing-wife-says-democrat-consultant-had-affair-with-ilhan-omar/

  134. notafan

    It’s just amazing that those heading the witch hunt against the Catholic church insisting it is synonymous with child abuse are the same people sexualising childhood, the same people who in the sixties and seventies would make sex with children legal. The same people advocating same sex marriage. The same people telling Christianity to shut up, about everything.

    These elites are naked in their hatred of Christianity. I’m not fearful of them though. Let them at it.

    Though it is dreadful that isl amic hate books are not stocked in libraries.

    Those books are expensive!

  135. Mater

    Maybe they have rat problems with discarded food.

    Nota,
    Our public school has also been told to take all rubbish home, ostensibly due to the cost of disposal.
    Any rubbish that wasn’t produced by school provided materials, is to return home with the kids (except food waste). They are still running compost bins for scraps, as that’s ‘environmentally friendly’.
    The rubbish bins are audited daily for compliance (by the Principal, no less)
    It’s really just an anti-plastic campaign, pro Gaia brain washing exercise.

  136. Woolfe

    Permanent residents don’t have to vote unless they register.

    Errr no, you must be a citizen.

  137. notafan

    Maybe when there is no compelling reason to do anything time is not important.

    Or maybe when life is an endless cycle of queuing and waiting and cancellations time is not important
    Or

    Maybe people who are kept waiting are people who are not importante.

    Or maybe there is a puppet on a string.

  138. mh

    Kamala Harris

    @KamalaHarris
    Colorful. Vibrant. Joyful. Unapologetic. Powerful. How could you not love @lizzo?
    https://twitter.com/KamalaHarris/status/1166326733286629376?s=20

    Lizzo is a fatty performing with other fatties in front of a giant inflatable twerking ass.

  139. Cassie of Sydney

    “It’s just amazing that those heading the witch hunt against the Catholic church insisting it is synonymous with child abuse are the same people sexualising childhood, the same people who in the sixties and seventies would make sex with children legal. The same people advocating same sex marriage. The same people telling Christianity to shut up, about everything.”

    Yes Nota…and it is the same people who are silent or make apologies for FGM, for child marriage, for mass rape of Yazidi women….all because the practitioners of these barbaric crimes are NOT Christians.

  140. notafan

    I forgot about evil plastic Mater.

    My sister-in-law is a teacher; last year she was giving people solid hair shampoo wrapped in paper for Christmas because trying to reduce plastics.

    Next time I’m at their place I shall do a plastics audit 🙂

  141. calli

    I’ll need to take one of the crates with me next time I go up to the shops.

    The orange one. Open carry.

  142. bespoke

    Woolfe
    #3142448, posted on August 28, 2019 at 7:25 am
    Permanent residents don’t have to vote unless they register.

    Errr no, you must be a citizen.

    Thanks. Only going on what iv been told and should have checked.

  143. notafan

    You are right Cassie (fgm it’s not that bad! Respect the culture!)

    The same people wishing Tongans were back in their free love with children, human sacrificing pre Christian state instead of ruining everything with their Christian slogans!

  144. Leigh LoweITI

    Following on from IT’s link at 12:01 is this review of Dave Chappelle’s Netflix show including this:-

    . In the midst of stories about himself, he tells the crowd about the unwritten rule of showbusiness that says: “No matter what you do as your artistic expression, you are never ever allowed to upset the alphabet people.”

    In case it wasn’t clear who the “alphabet people” are, Chappelle explained, “You know who I mean. Those people who took 20% of the alphabet for themselves. I’d say the letters, but I don’t want to conjure their anger.” Of course, Chappelle being Chappelle, he said the letters LGBT, which propelled him into addressing the transgender community’s anger with him. After telling the audience that he has friends across the spectrum of sexuality, he proudly declared, “But the T’s hate my f*****g guts.”

  145. Mater

    My sister-in-law is a teacher; last year she was giving people solid hair shampoo wrapped in paper for Christmas because trying to reduce plastics.

    So…she handed out bars of soap? I hope they had rope attached.

    My Grandmother used to tell us tales of hardship, emphasising that she’d only ever get a bar of soap for Christmas…if she was lucky. My oh my, how every old is new again. And they call themselves ‘Progressives’.

  146. calli

    Next time I’m at their place I shall do a plastics audit

    Does excema cream come in paper wrap? 😁

  147. Mother Lode

    Thanks for your response on the Fire Philip Lowe thread, Frank Walker.

    I post it here in case you don’t go back to the other thread.

  148. calli

    Remember these, loaded with the remains of the Palmolive and Camay?

    They’re back, baby!

  149. notafan

    I love getting fancy soap for Christmas (not weird shampoo stuff though), much better than photo frames or indoor plants.

    Your grandma got Christmas soap?

    Luxury.

    During the depression my dad and his siblings got a pencil for Christmas, one each though, not one between the seven of them.

  150. Leigh Lowe

    Following on from IT’s link at 12:01 is this review of Dave Chappelle’s Netflix show including this:-

    In the midst of stories about himself, he tells the crowd about the unwritten rule of showbusiness that says: “No matter what you do as your artistic expression, you are never ever allowed to upset the alphabet people.”

    In case it wasn’t clear who the “alphabet people” are, Chappelle explained, “You know who I mean. Those people who took 20% of the alphabet for themselves. I’d say the letters, but I don’t want to conjure their anger.” Of course, Chappelle being Chappelle, he said the letters LGBT, which propelled him into addressing the transgender community’s anger with him. After telling the audience that he has friends across the spectrum of sexuality, he proudly declared, “But the T’s hate my f*****g guts.

    This might be the only thing worth watching on TV this year.

  151. stackja

    Tram strike Melbourne: Plans to reduce public transport chaos as union rejects 12 per cent pay rise

    Melbourne’s entire tram network will be shut down for four hours on Friday after the RTBU confirmed it will take industrial action over a sour pay deal. Here’s what you need to know if you’re planning on catching a tram.
    Matt Johnston and Kieran Rooney, Herald Sun
    Subscriber only

    August 27, 2019 7:45pm

    Buses will start replacing trams from 9am on Friday due to a union strike that operators have described as “totally unnecessary”.

    And tourism-friendly City Circle trams won’t be running until the end of the week due to other Rail, Tram and Bus Union work bans.

    Negotiations between Yarra Trams and the RTBU for a new workplace deal continued yesterday, but an impasse over pay and part-time work remains.

    The union has planned industrial action between 10am-2pm strike on Friday, and is now flagging further action unless expensive demands are met.

  152. stackja

    Darwin council votes to see cats kept on leashes in the new suburb of Muirhead

    DARWIN council has voted in favour of alderman Robin Knox’s proposal to only allow cats out on streets on a leash or in a cage
    WILL ZWAR, NT News
    Subscriber only

    August 28, 2019 12:57am

    UPDATE: Darwin council has voted in favour of alderman Robin Knox’s cat containment strategy, which would see existing laws enforced in the developing suburb of Muirhead.

    The laws prohibit cats from being outside their property unless they are held on a leash or are in a cage.

    While a suggestion was made the policy should take place over the entire municipality, alderman Knox said it was important to educate people moving into council’s area and jurisdiction.

    “I have chosen to state new developments because I do feel it may be confusing for people who already live in other suburbs,” she said.

    “Initially I’m asking for it to be applied (in Muirhead) … in future we can educate further suburbs.”

    EARLIER: CATS could only be allowed out on the streets on a leash or in a cage in Muirhead if one Darwin alderman has her way.

    Alderman Robin Knox will propose a “cat containment policy” at Tuesday night’s council meeting, saying the introduction of a new suburb is the perfect time to do so.

  153. Dave in Marybrook

    On the verge of buying the lady doctor a new(ish) car.
    Narrowing down to a Kia Sorento, Hyundai Santa Fe or Rodr Territory as outsider.
    Any thoughts, cats? Dammned if I’m spending another day in Perth.

  154. Leigh Lowe

    Regarding food scraps you need to go FOGO.
    Don’t get FOGO FOMO.
    Go FOGO.

  155. Leigh Lowe

    During the depression my dad and his siblings got a pencil for Christmas, one each though, not one between the seven of them.

    My dad used to get an IOU for a pencil stub.

  156. Mother Lode

    In case anyone has the time.

  157. notafan

    My mum is in hospital ATM.

    Everything that can be disposable is disposable.

    I assume the main driver is infection control but I’m sure the high cost of sterilizing reusables plays a part.

    13 million tonnes of waste in Victoristan a year.

    Btw wonder if Yarra council just did a massive hike on rubbish collection fees at Melbourne Girl’s college?

    Now the Chinese won’t take it they have nowhere to put it, apparently.

  158. notafan

    That wouldn’t have been a written IOU, obviously.

  159. Mater

    Dave,
    Hard to beat the modern KIAs for quality, cost and warranty. I’ve been exceptionally happy with the car and their customer service. I’d be a return customer.
    I don’t have the Sorento, but my brother bought one not long ago. He’s also been pleasantly surprised and is very happy with it.
    I’d recommend at least a test drive.

  160. pete m

    Dave, we went for the Mazda cx8 base model but a couple of self paid upgrades like leather seats.

    Also check holdens new range of suv as some nice stuff there

    We had a Nissan x trail for 14 years and loved it as boot was huge and new ones looked ok but we wanted comfy 7 seater

    Diesel too 🤗

  161. calli

    My dad used to get an IOU for a pencil stub.

    Paper to write on? Looxury!

  162. custard

    I’d go the Santa Fe Dave. Diesel preferably.

  163. bespoke

    My concern is what ever that come up with will be used to protect religion from criticism. And no one can say there aren’t Catholics and Christens who would love that. Plus it would be used selectively like other anti-vilification laws.

  164. calli

    CX3. Sporty Spice version.

    Reject anything Kraut.

  165. jupes

    Now the Chinese won’t take it they have nowhere to put it, apparently.

    Yeah Australia is too small to find space to dig a hole and bury it.

  166. Entropy

    Anything Holden is dead man walking. It gets no love from GM.
    I had a look at CX-8. Nice motor, no good for large families. Third row is too tight, second row too narrow for three teenagers. cox-9 better except for fuel consumption.
    Santa Fe highlander with tow pack upgrade fits all the bells and whistles.

  167. pete m

    Mother lode 7.55am

    Don’t you hate when the title spoils the ending though?

    And no music.

    Had to forward it to end to see drips dry shape, awesome work that man

    Pisspoor painter though.

  168. Leigh Lowe

    areff

    #3142402, posted on August 28, 2019 at 1:07 am

    When Sylvia Plath gassed herself …

    Sylvia Plath is dead?
    Way to break the news, dude.

  169. Entropy

    Sorrento needs to be updated to be equivalent to newer Santa Fe. For some reason it is the older platform.

  170. pete m

    Entropy, wifey wanted a nice brand car to drive, something about seeing all those bmws, Mercs and Audi’s in the school car park driving her nuts.

  171. min

    Re Paul Kelly’s article it seems to me that Cultural Marxism has taken over . Elitist in schools, universities and bureaucracies are winning . When are we going to fight back ?

  172. Leigh Lowe

    calli

    #3142475, posted on August 28, 2019 at 8:00 am

    My dad used to get an IOU for a pencil stub.

    Paper to write on? Looxury!

    Ah, no.
    The IOUs were never collected on.
    The parents were canny.
    They’d hand over the IOU before the single meal of gruel on Christmas Day knowing the 14 hungry urchins would eat the paper.

  173. Mater

    Dave,
    Also, KIA offer an insurance package with their new cars which lasts 10 years (IIRC). It will pay you the difference between between your purchase price and the write off value your insurance company gives you…plus seven grand extra for on road costs, etc.
    I think it was an extra $1000, but a good investment over 10 years, given the rapid depreciation of cars at that price point.
    In short, if you write it off, you’ll get your purchase price back + $7k.

  174. Leigh Lowe

    Will no-one here stand up for the MX-5?

  175. Mother Lode

    Johnson and Johnson only have themselves to blame.

    The supplied a product to people who want to pay the barest minimum (or less) and they supplied a product that had not been tested across millennia and species of creature of every possible permutation of physiological and psychological conditions and the full range of IQ’s.

    It is like those reckless profiteering companies that sell dangerous products like lawn mowers, forks, and nail guns to people who might also be looking for a home haircut, check to see if the power outlet is working, or ways to hold up their pants if they can’t find a belt.

  176. Leigh Lowe

    In short, if you write it off, you’ll get your purchase price back + $7k.

    This will be the towel-heads car of choice then.

  177. Dave in Marybrook

    Looked at a top-option Kia Sorento- had leather, but far too many bells and whistles for dusty Marybrook.
    Drove an entry-level diesel- a bit stiff on the ride, but handled like a much smaller car. Great visibility. From a Korean family- a bit weird with red lights throughout and a subliminal chrysanthemum behind the tacho.
    Then drove 2.2L diesel Santa Fe- mpressive. Claustrophobic up the back corners, but air vents all the way- magnificent on the road.
    Now, for a bit of Inception style clues planted for the lovely vet, so she thinks it’s her idea. And I’ll send her up their with a friend if possible. My Perth anti-perthy set in as I read the West in a customer lounge, with McGowan lecturing at Polly Farmer’s funeral how theGeelong captain was not counted in the human population.

  178. mh

    Facebook Blacklists Ads from the Epoch Times

    Facebook has blacklisted ads from the Epoch Times, a global multi-language newspaper known for its critical coverage of the communist regime in China…

    https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2019/08/26/facebook-blacklists-ads-from-the-epoch-times/

  179. feelthebern

    Reject anything Kraut.

    Shush your mouth.
    Get an Audi.

  180. notafan

    I’m not sure what you mean bespoke.

    What laws will protect Christianity from criticism?

    And what kind of criticism?

    Theological?

    The problem being aired is that Christians merely quoting the Bible are running afoul of ‘hate speech’ laws.

    That beliefs like marriage can only be between men and women are being denounced, because ssmarriage is legal as though man made law must trump God’s law.

    That people cannot pray for the victims of abortion outside abortion clinics because hurty feelings , which is quite puzzling if you are it’s not a baby til I say so proponent.

    Tell us exactly how some laws to guarantee religious freedom will be playing into Christian hands.

    .

  181. Mater

    Will no-one here stand up for the MX-5?

    Nah. Like the AK-47, the MX-5 was designed to be used by communist conscripts.

  182. struth

    Good Moaning.

    Iran says Australia’s standing in the Middle East has been damaged by the decision to join the United States in patrolling the Strait of Hormuz.

    Oh No’s…………………
    How will we live with ourselves?

    Another day of socialist insanity growing in Australia.
    An Australia under a traitorous LINO government.

  183. bespoke

    Leigh Lowe
    #3142491, posted on August 28, 2019 at 8:13 am
    Will no-one here stand up for the MX-5?

    You had a 180B with sheep skin seat covers. So best to stay out of it.

  184. Dave in Marybrook

    Thanks, mater- second hand market for us.
    Funnily enough, there’s many two or three year old Sorentos with 30k, $30k and the balance of the new car warranty, from dealerships. Made me wonder why ppl seem to be moving on from Kias soon after the honeymoon.

  185. feelthebern

    How long before numbers funeral review drops?
    Maybe it calls for a game of bingo.
    “We all agreed it was a life destroyed by the Libs”
    “We all had a laugh at that”
    “We don’t think this mob is much better”
    “We all worry about Trump”.

  186. Perfidious Albino

    We had a real good look at the Kia Sorrento recently, looking for 7 seats. Current model is based on the Carnival people mover wheelbase, so plenty of space. That and the styling pushed it ahead of its Santa Fe cousin for us, but a new model Santa Fe might correct that. Anyway, both represent great value for the money, all the bells and whistles, long warranty etc.

    In the end we opted for a second hand Land Rover Discovery 4 (last of the boxy ones). Step up in price level, but very nice.

  187. feelthebern

    Iran says Australia’s standing in the Middle East has been damaged by the decision to join the United States in patrolling the Strait of Hormuz.

    Regardless of what Iran says, it is a stupid policy decision.

  188. Leigh Lowe

    You had a 180B with sheep skin seat covers. So best to stay out of it.

    No sheep was harmed in the making of those seat covers.

  189. calli

    Ahhh. I get it.

    You’re looking for a car for a woman that a guy would like.

  190. Diogenes

    In case anyone has the time.

    Motherlode,
    this isn’t the same one as I am know the history of

    The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) has determined that Charlie Lyne’s 10-hour Paint Drying contains “no material likely to offend or harm”, and has accordingly awarded it a “suitable for all” U certificate.
    Nicely described by the BBFC as “a film showing paint drying on a wall”, Paint Drying is the result of a Kickstarter campaign aimed at highlighting the “prohibitively expensive” cost of presenting cinematic works for classification.
    The BBFC charges a £101.50 submission fee and £7.09 per minute of film. However, it is obliged to sit through every single frame of material, so Lyne decided he’d make the censors work for their money.
    He originally planned to raise £109 for a symbolic one-minute submission of paint drying, but ultimately attracted pledges of £5,936, financing an extended 607-minute submission to the BBFC.

    Given the penchant for sequels readers of the Register came up with this https://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/01/29/paint_drying_sequel/

  191. John Constantine

    Australia will survive sending a patrol to watch over oil logistics supply lines.

    Allowing Iran’s proxies hezbollah to establish themselves in australias cities and enrich themselves from the drug trade and car rebirthing and insurance fraud and welfare fraud while training their diaspora using the security industry as an excuse, this is not so easy to shrug off.

  192. Dave in Marybrook

    Ooooh yeah- drove my brother’s Disco 4 up the Trossachs. Great car.
    But no Calli, I don’t need to like the family car- just respect and trust it, and know enough to head off excessive towing mistakes or rear-endings from trees.

  193. struth

    You guys make me laugh.
    Get an old six cylinder ford Falcon like an FG for a coupla thou, tell your comprehensive insurer to take a hike and get a z9 filter to change your own oil every now and then.
    Save yourself thousands.
    Take a holiday to the states with the money you saved in not trying to keep up with the Jones’s and stop being ripped off thousands for services that involve checking your windscreen wipers and not much else.
    They still have A/C, cruise control, power windows and more power than you think.
    You can buy a shit load of fuel with the money you save on initial purchase and insurances and running costs like servicing and niggly bullshit with new cars and their electrical bullshit, if that’s what you’re concerned about.

  194. Leigh Lowe

    Nah. Like the AK-47, the MX-5 was designed to be used by communist conscripts.

    Where is rocked and roaded?
    My scrolling finger is getting flabby.

  195. Leigh Lowe

    Ooooh yeah- drove my brother’s Disco 4 up the Trossachs.

    You can drive a Discovery anywhere.
    Driving it back is where the problems start.

  196. struth

    Regardless of what Iran says, it is a stupid policy decision.

    When we couldn’t defend 5 k’s of coastline with all our combined forces, I’d suggest we give the token hand to the States, as that is all it is.

  197. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    My Perth anti-perthy set in as I read the West in a customer lounge, with McGowan lecturing at Polly Farmer’s funeral how theGeelong captain was not counted in the human population.

    Hi ho, Mark MacGowan fell for that old myth…

  198. Bruce of Newcastle

    Will no-one here stand up for the MX-5?

    I saw a car with a number plate REDMX5 last week.
    The number plate was red.
    So was the MX-5.
    The guy didn’t look like Numbers though.
    Too young.

  199. bespoke

    Nota, I’m not going to have another pedantic argument with you I am not the enemy and it was just a concern not a statement.

  200. Chris

    Made me wonder why ppl seem to be moving on from Kias soon after the honeymoon.

    Just looking on the street, I suggest that Kia are reaching new-car market penetration numbers that used to be Toyota’s! So the reason for near-new ones being sold secondhand is probably just the law of averages – a small proportion people bought Kia and then found they needed the MX5 or the Prius.

  201. Leigh Lowe

    The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) has determined that Charlie Lyne’s 10-hour Paint Drying contains “no material likely to offend or harm”

    Clearly the BBFC have never drunk a pint of semi-gloss.

  202. Chris

    Will no-one here stand up for the MX-5?

    A perfect car for the newly-divorced 37.5 year old public servant.

  203. lotocoti

    “If it bleeds, it leads.” has always been Rule One in news broadcasting.
    It’s also been a bit of a legal minefield.
    You could identify people and show an act right up until the moment someone was charged (which is not the same as arrested). Once the wallopers dropped the C word, criminal acts became alleged, naming names and showing faces became verboten, lest identity entered the realms of defence argument.
    Vision of the now alleged crime became evidence, and could only be broadcast after it had been brought before a trial jury.
    The average punter has probably never considered such matters, so when someone posts vision of aspiring DJs/future doctors/talented footballers bringing cultural enrichment to the streets, they get a little cranky when Plod gets all shouty without properly explaining why.

  204. mh

    Uh-oh: Silicon Valley is building a Chinese-style social credit system

    In China, scoring citizens’ behavior is official government policy. U.S. companies are increasingly doing something similar, outside the law.

    https://www.fastcompany.com/90394048/uh-oh-silicon-valley-is-building-a-chinese-style-social-credit-system

  205. jupes

    When we couldn’t defend 5 k’s of coastline with all our combined forces, I’d suggest we give the token hand to the States, as that is all it is.

    Well the RAN better take it seriously because Iran could quite possibly try it on. Drones, speedboats, semi-submersible speed boats, who knows, maybe even suicide boats.

    They will need some pretty robust rules of engagement too.

  206. Percy Popinjay

    julian lesser is an utterly useless gliberal twat and none of the “issues” raised in Paul “is wrong, again” Kelly’s latest puff piece will be addressed in any satisfactory or even semi-honest manner by our beloved politicians or braindead lamestream meeja.

    Who or what for example, could be behind the extraordinary escalation in the number of attacks on Joos? If you’re a braindead collectivist cockhead, the subject will remain one of those “grate mysteries” incapable of being answered.

  207. JC:
    Marcie Bianco.
    Scroll down and check out the tats.
    If one was to wake up next to that, one would chew off not only ones own arm, but hers as well. Just for the bragging rights.

  208. areff:

    What I hate most about myself is that still want to believe — believe there’s something greater than the sum of human imperfections shaping the future and hobbling potential.
    There isn’t, of course. Decency, rationality, logic, sincerity — so low-valued theyre not even worth offerring before the altars of vanity.
    The motto for today: friends are those who haven’t yet betrayed you.

    You read my mind.

  209. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    High pressure water sprays are racist.

    Some of the comments are pure gold..

  210. Mater

    Get an old six cylinder ford Falcon like an FG for a coupla thou, tell your comprehensive insurer to take a hike and get a z9 filter to change your own oil every now and then.

    Tried that, Struth.
    Worked for a year or two until major components (ABS pump, Transmission, etc) and suspension bits started to fail.
    Cost me thousands upon thousands upon thousands. Every time I turned around, something else broke.
    Cars have limits, and the law of diminishing return was well in play.
    A seven year warranty, and fixed price servicing, on a cheap(ish) KIA has saved me more money, and promises to continue to do so.

  211. Some History

    Uh-oh: Silicon Valley is building a Chinese-style social credit system

    In China, scoring citizens’ behavior is official government policy. U.S. companies are increasingly doing something similar, outside the law.

    https://www.fastcompany.com/90394048/uh-oh-silicon-valley-is-building-a-chinese-style-social-credit-system

  212. struth

    Well the RAN better take it seriously because Iran could quite possibly try it on. Drones, speedboats, semi-submersible speed boats, who knows, maybe even suicide boats.

    Maybe you’re right.
    They should stay at home and deal with more important matters like sex change surgery for their trannies.

  213. Diogenes

    his isn’t the same one as I am know the history of

    I was watching a debug run of some code at the same time as typing …
    Should read , this isn’t the same one that I know the history to

  214. Geriatric Mayfly

    For those of us suffering sleepless nights, the agony is nearly over. Our little tar(t) is bob, bob, bobbing ever closer to the the US media.

    Greta Thunberg

    @GretaThunberg
    Day 13. Rough seas south of Nova Scotia. But conditions closer to New York will be slower than predicted and weather update suggests Wednesday arrival – an updated ETA will come as we near the coast.

  215. struth

    Bit rough on the gear, Mater.

    Cars have limits,

    So do drivers.

    I have an old Ford Ute I do all the jobs like dump runs and gear for the truck, it’s worked hard, I used to put people in it, including a few times Ms Struth to pilot me with wide loads so it’s been all over Australia, been on the dirt, in heat and even snow.
    I never done anything to it except basic servicing and thee is not a thing wong with it to this day.
    Not worth selling as a second car, I’d only get a few grand for it, and it’s as handy as hell.
    It’s done 500, ooo ks, uses no oil or water and purrs like a kitten.
    It’s in great nick as I am fastidious with my gear.

    We had one old Ford Panelvan set up as a pilot car when I had a couple of trucks and it got to 750,000 ks
    Not a problem with it but in those days we swapped more for image than practicality.

    What are you doing to you vehicles Mater?

  216. Top Ender

    Bought a Kia Cerato, and a Mazda CX3 18 months ago.

    Both good to drive; reliable; comfortable.

    Cerato much more zippy than the Cx3.

    Should have gone with the reversing camera on the CX3 but it was a rip-off – $2K extra from memory.

  217. Leigh Lowe

    A seven year warranty, and fixed price servicing, on a cheap(ish) KIA has saved me more money, and promises to continue to do so.

    Cheaper than “high quality” European cars which strangely lose faith in their “high quality” when it comes to warranties.

  218. stackja

    Who created the concept of rules of engagement and when?
    What were the rules of engagement for Kokoda?

  219. Dr BeauGan:

    I don’t understand the Cuban concept of time. I don’t think she’s messing me around as policy, I think it’s more that clock time doesn’t rate very highly compared to the internal sense of urgency. I think she does nothing much until the urge to move comes upon her.

    She’s playing dominance games with you, you bloody stupid twat.
    FFS – get out of there.

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