Open Forum: November 2, 2019

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4,182 Responses to Open Forum: November 2, 2019

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  1. notafan

    And you’re right

    No seniors card here.

    Must be jealousy 🙂

  2. Win

    Westpac gave us a business loan at 21% and we were still paying it long after Howard and Costello’s economy dropped interest rates to 8%.

  3. notafan

    Only possums living in my garage.

  4. calli

    Possibly for some, egg_. What I see is frustration.

    We have wall to wall governments who are not acting in our best interests. And yes, they have fat mouthed enablers who vote for them. It has reached the stage of vote spoiling being the only alternative.

  5. Gab

    USA exits the Paris Agreement.

    Trump is awesome!

  6. Win

    If every one hates Baby Boomers so much and want to do what we did stop buying anything made in China , bring manufacturing back and start working.

  7. Top Ender:

    No Winston, you don’t want to come – trust me.
    The violence, drinking, abuse, drinking, threats, and drinking were shocking last time.
    Was while entree was on.

    So what were the bad points?
    And who was the entree on?
    Did Lizzie do the leap out of the cake trick again?

  8. notafan

    We paid 18%

    On a loan of $30,000 it wasn’t that difficult.

    Even on low incomes.

    And it wasn’t for very long.

  9. calli

    Oh noes! If the US won’t play ball then Australia really will fall apart.

    Ross Garnault told me so.

  10. RobK

    Yikes! Now Australia is going to fall apart!
    Ross has a new book out. https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/nov/06/ross-garnaut-three-policies-will-set-australia-on-a-path-to-100-renewable-energy
    Much publicity on abc and guardian.
    The book is called Superpower.

  11. notafan

    Young people are working.

    Hard, doing manual labour.

    Doing long commutes in heavy traffic or on crowded trains.

    Not everyone can be an influence.

  12. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    The scientists make specific calls for policymakers to quickly implement systemic change to energy, food, and economic policies. But they go one step further, into the politically fraught territory of population control. It “must be stabilized—and, ideally, gradually reduced—within a framework that ensures social integrity,” they write.

    And that folks is what it is really all about. Has always been what it was always really all about – population reduction and control. This current push at it – just the latest of many – was started based on the work of Paul Ehrlich in the early Sixties. But even that, in turn, followed in the footsteps of Armand Hammer.

    Ehrlich’s work laid the foundation for Maurice Strong in the Seventies, which laid the foundations for the IPCC, which was neatly wrapped up in the cloak of “science” provided by Maggie Thatcher and her claims of “Catastrophic Anthropogenic Global Warming, using global temperature data lovingly doctored by Phil Jones in his capacity as head of the Hadley Climate Research Unit, set up and funded specifically for that purpose by Maggie.

    Now, as global temps start to cool the catch phrase has become “climate change”, which is exactly what is going to happen, with major crop failures in the NH.

    In short, the weather is about to do what the elitists have previously failed to do, through wars, pestilence, and man-made ailments.

  13. John Constantine

    https://www.afr.com/politics/how-11m-vanished-in-huang-xiangmo-property-deal-20191105-p537h0

    Huang Xiangmo, the Chinese billionaire at the centre of a NSW corruption inquiry and tax office investigation, used a Sydney property deal to funnel $11 million to a notorious political fixer.

    Documents obtained by The Australian Financial Review reveal the July 2017 payment was made to Sevag Chalabian, a former lawyer who previously hi

  14. egg_

    Young people are working.

    Hard, doing manual labour.

    Doing long commutes in heavy traffic or on crowded trains.

    I hear the opposite from hiring managers – snowflakes don’t want to do Trades, let alone labouring.

  15. notafan

    Now let’s talk about China increasing it’s use of coal till at least 2030

    More on the US exit from Paris

  16. egg_

    The scientists make specific calls for policymakers to quickly implement systemic change to energy, food, and economic policies. But they go one step further, into the politically fraught territory of population control. It “must be stabilized—and, ideally, gradually reduced—within a framework that ensures social integrity,” they write.

    The whole screed that JC pasted was boilerplate Totalistrism.

  17. notafan

    Egg

    Most of the boys that my youngest son to school with/played sport with are tradies, just finishing apprenticeships

    Could be something to do with what’s on offer at the universities

  18. Des Deskperson

    ‘Anyone know the size of the federal government public service departments?

    TE, I can get you the figures for the main departments @ 30 June 2019, after breakfast.

    Totalling up the other agencies that come under the portfolios may take a bit more time

  19. RobK

    From the above link:

    Writing in his new book, Superpower, which builds on his advice to Labor governments in 2008 and 2011 to set out a vision for a low-carbon future, Garnaut says introducing three policies that align with the government’s commitments could “increase the chances of a strong outcome”.
    He says embracing low-carbon opportunities could lead to a clean electricity system more than three times the existing capacity that powers a transformed economy, including electric transport and new and expanded industries in minerals smelting.

    There are a lot of weasel words there. Utopia.
    Tell him he’s dreaming.

  20. notafan

    The good thing about the US withdrawal is that the EU are giving China lots more money.

    Millions.

    That means the chicoms will have even more money to buy houses in Australia and vineyards in Bordeaux!

  21. John Constantine

    Big Australia is an unswerving committment to mass importation of millions of the worlds poorest people to form vast debt herds that consume the dogbox apartment developments of the donor landsharks class.

    What can possibly go wrong with an economic Ponxi monoculture?.

    Why is it assumed the billionaire donor landsharks are untouchable?. Are they really australia’s epsteins?.

    https://www.vox.com/2019/11/5/20949839/jeffrey-epstein-abc-news-leaked-tape-project-veritas

    Their american abc killed their story on epstein years ago, because it was truthful, not helpful.

    Their australian media must know about the Ponxi corruption of australia, but only dribbles come out.

    Comrade Maaaaaates.

  22. egg_

    within a framework that ensures social integrity

    KRuddish?

  23. egg_

    boilerplate Totalitarianism

  24. Bruce of Newcastle

    He says embracing low-carbon opportunities could lead to a clean electricity system more than three times the existing capacity that powers a transformed economy, including electric transport and new and expanded industries in minerals smelting.

    Wow, Garnaut is now living in cloud cuckoo land with fluffy unicorns prancing in every direction.
    None of that rubbish is realistic at all, which is trivially easy to prove with real world data.

  25. egg_

    Now, as global temps start to cool the catch phrase has become “climate change”, which is exactly what is going to happen,

    A 60-year cycle of cooling following a 60-year cycle of warming?
    Da Milankovitch?

  26. Bruce of Newcastle

    Their american abc killed their story on epstein years ago, because it was truthful, not helpful.

    Might’ve also been a bit of fear of suddenly getting uncontrollable urges to suicide in interesting ways.

    Project Veritas Exposes ABC News: Network Allegedly Killed Epstein Story Implicating Bill Clinton, British Family, and More

    The name that must never be mentioned!

  27. egg_

    Writing in his new book, Superpower, which builds on his advice to Labor governments in 2008 and 2011 to set out a vision for a low-carbon future, Garnaut says introducing three policies that align with the government’s commitments could “increase the chances of a strong outcome”.
    He says embracing low-carbon opportunities could lead to a clean electricity system more than three times the existing capacity that powers a transformed economy, including electric transport and new and expanded industries in minerals smelting.

    Sounds more like Superwang.

  28. John Constantine

    The Weekly Times
    @theweeklytimes
    #BREAKING #EXCLUSIVE

    Farmers face more red tape in plan to widen property ID code beyond livestock.

    Property Identification Code regulations to extend from livestock, where godless communist saint jaaala bought it in posing as disease control, to all production.

    Repeated indoctrination courses posing as education and regular onfarm inspections to force compliance with the progressive agenda.

    If you aren’t a big super fund with a compliance department, the State just stole another week a year off you for paperwork.

    If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear when the enraged wymynsys vegynsys progressive commo inspector drives her landcruiser onto your property.

    Comrades.

  29. twostix
    #3202649, posted on November 5, 2019 at 10:19 pm

    Yep, the reason that first homebuyers can’t get a 4 bedroom, 3 bathroom property inner city Melbourne or Sydney for an ‘affordable’ price is beacuse of greedy Boomers.

    You keep trying this stupid shit on…

    You’ve just got to time the hell out of things. A young (!) bloke I know who just passed away (aggressive cancer) low balled some older boomers during the GFC who were looking to retire early. I think he waited and with the low balling he snapped up their beach front property for half of the asking.

    I saw a farm I had an eye on go for less than half of the asking price, and the retiring boomer farmer literally said in his ad for the property that he wasn’t willing to negotiate on price and only wanted “serious buyers”. I valued the farm for about 55% of his asking price and it sold for even less than that.

    The boomers here have to realise they’re typically atypical. Their generation voted in Gough and still are the biggest voting bloc. Their generation kept on voting in Hawke and Keating for years during 450% interest rates…yes it is an exaggeration because in REAL, not NOMINAL terms, mortgages were more expensive under GILLARD than Fraser/Howard or Hawke/Keating and Keating/whatever second fiddle deputy leader the ALP dredged up in the early 1990s. Nothing stopped boomers from renting, like how most people choose to rent now because mortgages now are insane and make no economic sense.

    Until the late 1990s renting was quite cheap. There are definitely vested interests in each generation. The boomers have more power through their numbers and accumulated wealth.

    Younger people are angry because the boomers did walk into unregulated markets and SOME of them did start to outlaw the competition, whilst MOST, NOT ALL of them kept on lapping this up as mug punters/the electorate.

    What is happening now is simply a confluence of factors. There is a considerable portion of boomers who are making off like banditos. There are some of them who will defend this shit to their graves. I don’t buy this “stupid millenials” crap, because I grew up reading whiners like Lette and Liability Boob. The stupidity will (usually) pass. The usual response is “you gotta start off small”, 650k for a dog box near Penrith is the cheapest new home you can get in Sydney that is freestanding. That’s not small at all. You need to be on an executive level salary or be a two household income to afford that. Let’s be honest. It will take a very long time to save up for a deposit on that joint. This is time people could be paying off a smaller mortgage or having more children, if they weren’t enriching a few benefiting from the laws we have, as well as insatiable State and Federal Treasuries. If only they could get entry level jobs where land is highly affordable…

    (This sort of thing is also why I am so keen on industry growing in regional areas – get people to move out of Shittony. Why we constantly attack our own farmers, foresters, fishers and miners is truly mind boggling and sad.)

    Clearly the taxation and regulation imposed to prop up some property “investors” is literally attacking the ability of their children’s generation to actually raise their grandchildren. Two income families are not ideal for raising children. I’m not even talking about how most women really would prefer to stay at home IF THE COUPLE COULD AFFORD IT. Two working people see each other less than some fuck buddies do in university or at TAFE!

    If the Mum & Dad grow apart because of their wage cuckery, what chance do they have of having more than 1 kid on average, (*replacement is 2.1 to 2.3 kids usually*), let alone be a good role model for the kid?
    . High taxes are literally stealing part of that kid’s childhood. HOW DARE YOU (Fried Chicken Burger)!?

    ALWAYS REMEMBER

    ALWAYS REMEMBER

    AFTER YOU HAVE PAID INCOME TAX (probably at least 25%) AND YOUR EMPLOYER HAS PAID PAYROLL TAX (around 5%).

    EACH AND EVERY NEW HOME BUILT IN AUSTRALIA HAS 45% OF THE PURCHASE PRICE

    BAKED IN AS DIRECT TAXATION

    GOVERNMENT GREED IS WHY HOUSING IS EXPENSIVE IN OUR AFFLUENT FIRST WORLD COUNTRY

  30. min

    My late husband was on a board with the fellow you say is now living in cloud cuckooland Bruce of N.
    Hubby used to say similar things about him moore han 20 years ago .

  31. RobK

    Sounds more like Superwang.
    With just the odd vested interests.

  32. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Wow, Garnaut is now living in cloud cuckoo land with fluffy unicorns prancing in every direction. None of that rubbish is realistic at all, which is trivially easy to prove with real world data.

    Which is absolutely true, BoN, and absolutely irrelevant.
    Your demonstrable truth will languish here on an obscure blog, while Garnaut’s ridiculous BS spends the day being disseminated afar and wide as gospel truth by the Propaganda Dept, aka the MSM.

  33. Knuckle Dragger

    I’ve never really looked up the ‘born between’ dates that make you a Boomer, but I suspect my olds fit squarely into it, both being born in 1942. If true, that makes me a Son of Boomers (SOB).

    I find it very difficult to believe that alllllll these people born between these arbitrary dates got together as one and colluded to keep the best bits for themselves and give subsequent generations – ie, their children* – a giant fuck you.

    When I’m occupied frothing up greenies on social media I am invariably called a boomer by the pasty man-bun commos (to my delight). It’s become a catch all for the world’s ills. Every single person born between dates X and Y is a Boomer and therefore responsible for ruining everything for everyone else ever in the whole world.

    Clowns.

    *I am the first born, and as such have long advocated for the olds to support the concept of prima genesis, which is I get the lot when they go. Even if they did, I wouldn’t get much. Hard workers throughout, they were. Scrooge McDuck Richie Riches, they ain’t.

  34. Entropy

    Writing in his new book, Superpower, which builds on his advice to Labor governments in 2008 and 2011 to set out a vision for a low-carbon future, Garnaut says introducing three policies that align with the government’s commitments could “increase the chances of a strong outcome”.

    Those Garnault papers we just sad. He buffers up the wool industry with his academic structural arrangement in the early nineties, and his model in these papers was strange,y similar. As for his proposals, the agriculture section was unbelievably stupid. Convert the entire livestock industry to kangaroo production so we can all eat skippy. The work was actually a cut and paste of a simple dse conversion on a spreadsheet done by some Canberra based activist. Beyond embarrassing.

  35. STEM or the trades.

    White men will be outlawed from any white collar job that doesn’t have any blue collar aspect or isn’t highly mathematical.

    I’m not kidding. Have a look at most solicitors filing into court now, or most white collar professionals now in a small office.

    Maybe a male boss and six female employees.

    It has to be this way. We are seeing the beginning of gender quotas and women get soft degrees.

    Men have to go this way. I know a bloke that made school principal not long ago, but his female rival was gunning for him to be fired and they were both going for the role (it totally backfired). 9/10 times, it goes the other way. See how many male principals there are under 50.

    STEM or the trades boyos.

  36. Entropy

    Sometimes need an edit function:
    He stuffs up the wool industry with his academic structural arrangement in the early nineties, and his model in these papers was strangely similar.

  37. struth

    Melbourne is adding close to 200,000 people per annum.

    Insane.
    It is an in your face attack, an invasion, orchestrated by traitors in our political class who are anti western, anti white, racists.
    They are desperate to wipe what they see as the embarrassing stain of white colonialism from the country.
    That’s why Moooosie Paki’s good….western whites or Christians, (remember the outcry over bringing in just one S African farmer).
    And seeing that generations of white Australians have been told by Marxist revolutionaries in schools, they are foul sub humans, they aren’t even putting up a fight.

    Sco Mo in power is a disaster for this nation.
    A snake oil salesman calming the herd for slaughter, by, straight out, in your face lying.
    He laughs……………Whatcha gunna do about it, ya piss weak white fucks?

  38. Bruce of Newcastle

    Dot – Your love of renting is charming.

    Anyone who rents these days gets a six monthly anal probe by a black dressed nazi who often turns up only on working days thereby necessitating a day off from work. Which is a problem for many.

    The rise of the house inspection SS is probably closely correlated with the rise in house prices as people flee this horror.

  39. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    I’ve never really looked up the ‘born between’ dates that make you a Boomer, but I suspect my olds fit squarely into it, both being born in 1942. If true, that makes me a Son of Boomers (SOB).

    No, Knuckles, by definition, baby boomers are those born in the post-war years 1946 to 1964. Numerically, over two thirds of baby boomers were born between 1950 and 1956.

  40. Knuckle Dragger

    STEM or the trades, indeed.

    If I’d kicked off an apprenticeship as a sparky at 16, right now I’d be on a yacht somewhere with tuxedo-clad butlers bringing me breakfast muffins and replacement durries from the mainland on jetskis, and being nuzzled by a dozen lingerie models being paid on performance-based contracts.

    Oh well.

    In any event, I learned more about life in my first four weeks in the Army than I would have in four years in any tertiary institution in the country.

  41. struth

    I don’t want to ever live in a city, but I wouldn’t be able to afford it now, anyway .

    I’m in sunny regional QLD, with a bloody mansion of an old Qlder that I admit needs constant up keep, with lovely gardens, outdoor areas and under the house is the Garage and second home for the visitors.
    Probably worth 300k at the moment as prices have fallen.
    Paid off except for not wanting to close the withdraw facility on it, and I won’t be going anywhere.
    Even if I’d like to.
    I’m just not willing to invest anything else on Australian soil, be it domestic, property, or business.
    Minimising expense is the way to go in a country that punishes wealth creation.

    Couldn’t sell it and buy a toilet in Sydney with the money.

  42. Some History

    Greta™ tweeted about this article

    Climate crisis: 11,000 scientists warn of ‘untold suffering’

    The world’s people face “untold suffering due to the climate crisis” unless there are major transformations to global society, according to a stark warning from more than 11,000 scientists.
    “We declare clearly and unequivocally that planet Earth is facing a climate emergency,” it states. “To secure a sustainable future, we must change how we live. [This] entails major transformations in the ways our global society functions and interacts with natural ecosystems.”
    There is no time to lose, the scientists say: “The climate crisis has arrived and is accelerating faster than most scientists expected. It is more severe than anticipated, threatening natural ecosystems and the fate of humanity.”
    The statement is published in the journal BioScience on the 40th anniversary of the first world climate conference, which was held in Geneva in 1979. The statement was a collaboration of dozens of scientists and endorsed by further 11,000 from 153 nations. The scientists say the urgent changes needed include ending population growth, leaving fossil fuels in the ground, halting forest destruction and slashing meat eating.
    Prof William Ripple, of Oregon State University and the lead author of the statement, said he was driven to initiate it by the increase in extreme weather he was seeing. A key aim of the warning is to set out a full range of “vital sign” indicators of the causes and effects of climate breakdown, rather than only carbon emissions and surface temperature rise.

    RTWT

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/nov/05/climate-crisis-11000-scientists-warn-of-untold-suffering

  43. Knuckle Dragger

    A 55 year old can be a boomer?

    Wow.

  44. Old School Conservative

    I’ve never really looked up the ‘born between’ dates that make you a Boomer, but I suspect my olds fit squarely into it, both being born in 1942. If true, that makes me a Son of Boomers (SOB).

    The key definition of Boomers is that they were born during the population explosion post WWII.
    So KD you may be a SOB to some, but not a Son of Boomers.

  45. Some History

    The article in BioScience

    World Scientists’ Warning of a Climate Emergency
    William J Ripple, Christopher Wolf, Thomas M Newsome, Phoebe Barnard, William R Moomaw
    BioScience, biz088, https://doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz088
    Published:

    05 November 2019

    https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/advance-article/doi/10.1093/biosci/biz088/5610806

    The Worthy Garden Club furnished partial funding for this project.

  46. Shy Ted

    National Press Club today. Guess who – one of the Q&A panel. The one on the left, American, steel girder implants in her face. Gonna tell us how to look after the old folks. If she gets past the metal detector.
    On a not unrelated note, got spaminated yesterday for trying to link to an article/clickbait about calls for Frank Elly to be sacked. Can’t find it today. Funny that.

  47. Farmer Gez

    It’s hard to draw the conclusion that we’re in a climate crisis when all the indicators have rising but unspectacular increases. The only dramatic graph was Mann’s fudgorama, which is dust binned.

    The eleven thousand scientists (fields unknown) who signed the Das Kapital can only be working on projection and not measured data. Sea rise as measured by long term tidal gauges looks boringly regular and even the much fiddled terrestrial temps are only able to peak above 1930’s highs.

    Seems to me that the crisis is that they can’t show a crisis.

  48. Knuckle Dragger

    Learnin’ all the time in here.

    Appreciated, Peter and OSC.

  49. egg_

    STEM or the trades.

    White men will be outlawed from any white collar job that doesn’t have any blue collar aspect or isn’t highly mathematical.

    I’m not kidding. Have a look at most solicitors filing into court now, or most white collar professionals now in a small office.

    Maybe a male boss and six female employees.

    Indians and Filipinos in Sydney’s West – they don’t like Chinks (and openly say it), for some reason.
    The Chinks work too hard and show them up?

  50. Shy Ted

    Oh, and what’s everybody using for sore knees? Promising start with Krill Oil 1g daily but doesn’t seem to have maintained the early relief. Xrays confirm I’ve got “bad knees”. Everything seems to work a bit, just wondered if there’s a miracle cure.

  51. Knuckle Dragger

    Ted,

    Knee pads.

  52. Mother Lode

    Ross Garnaut?

    The adulation of specialists really gives me the irrits.

    Gullible people seem to think that skill is a trait separate to the area of expertise such that a person skilled in one area is just as authoritative on any other area save the one the gull is specialised in. Most people are not economists or ‘climate scientists’ (a ridiculous modern invention) so when Garnaut the economist reports on climate they believe him. If he spoke structural engineering it would be reported with a fervour that would make j’ismists heads swim as the blood drained from their brains and flooded their loins. It would be the structural engineers who could zoom right in on his error.

    The vast gravitational distortion known as Gor Al (from the planet Klepton) is a former VP who weighed (tee hee) in on AGW. He was wheeled around and jimmied through door frames greased with butter and feted as a climate guru regardless of the fact that he had absolutely no competence or experience.

    We have a palaeo-mammalogist who spent years scratching through dry river beds look for bones (like a chicken does worms) but who now puts on his scientificalisticismal persona to sound in grim and sombre tones a terrible warning – and if we keep giving us warning he will regularly warn us again no matter what happens. Like a cuckoo clock. An accountant would have a more experience of statistics than a palaeo-mammalogist.

    But there then are others who are not so easily seduced by titles and post nominals and look at people in the eye, rather than averting our gaze out of deference to our betters. And we can see the spivs and charlatans that they are – the very thing they are trying to hide with their histrionics of erudition.

    They are a great hessian sack filled with bottom-burps.

    And strangely the supply is renewable, as long as you throw money at it.

  53. egg_

    The Chinks work too hard and show them up?

    A bit like Wogs out of Work where the Greek cleaning lady didn’t like the Vietnamese because they worked too hard.
    Established Californian Mexicans don’t like new Mexican immigrants taking their jerbs.

  54. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    A 55 year old can be a boomer?

    Yup.
    Currently the bulk of boomers are 62 to 68 years old. Which means, apart from public servants and the like, the bulk of them are still working. Which makes all the claims about filthy rich, self-funded retired baby boomers who all own twenty houses so laughable.

    Sick, but laughable.

  55. egg_

    The Chinks work too hard and show them up?

    A bit like Wo gs out of Work where the Greek cleaning lady didn’t like the Vietnamese because they worked too hard.
    Established Californian Mexicans don’t like new Mexican immigrants taking their jerbs.

  56. Percy Popinjay

    Krudelkers – if you find this even remotely funny there is something seriously wrong with you.

  57. 1735099

    In any event, I learned more about life in my first four weeks in the Army than I would have in four years in any tertiary institution in the country.

    You must have led a very sheltered existence.
    I learned only three things in the army – one was not to volunteer for anything; another was that those who wore pips on their shoulders were to be avoided and ignored where possible.
    The third was that the most dangerous individuals were Duntroon graduates with a map and compass.

  58. A 55 year old can be a boomer?

    Back in 2008/09, Knuckles.

  59. dover_beach

    MV’s right, the vast majority of boomers are 65-75 years old.

    Re millenials, depends where you live. On the coast, you tend to find a lot of them still move out earlier and have a trade. That was also true re Gen X too.

  60. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Everything seems to work a bit, just wondered if there’s a miracle cure.

    The only reason I can walk at all is the monthly cortisone shots in each thigh.
    They have been a “miracle cure” for me.

  61. If I’d kicked off an apprenticeship as a sparky at 16, right now I’d be on a yacht somewhere with tuxedo-clad butlers bringing me breakfast muffins and replacement durries from the mainland on jetskis, and being nuzzled by a dozen lingerie models being paid on performance-based contracts.

    Sir I salute you.

    You may have unlocked the route around the effective “banning” of pre nuptial agreements (“BFAs”) per Thorne v Kennedy.

  62. Knuckle Dragger

    Ah geez.

    And we were all having such a lovely time.

    To state the freakin’ obvious, Liability Bob – you didn’t learn anything because you spent your entire time in it bitching, unloading your ‘mates’ at every opportunity and trying to get out of it.

    Inherent cowardice will do that to people.

  63. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Scientists have now produced a co-regulation map of the human proteome
    , which was able to capture relationships between proteins that do not physically interact or co-localize. This will enable the prediction and assignment of functions to uncharacterised human proteins. The co-regulation map can be explored at http://www.proteomeHD.net.

  64. Percy Popinjay

    Anyone know the size of the federal government public service departments?

    TE – you might be able to find what you’re after if you want to wade through this mountain of shit.

    Of course the 2018-19 version hasn’t been released yet.

  65. 1735099

    To state the freakin’ obvious, Liability Bob – you didn’t learn anything because you spent your entire time in it bitching, unloading your ‘mates’ at every opportunity and trying to get out of it.

    Funny that.
    I don’t recall serving with you. Visited a few mates down south last weekend.
    Your name didn’t come up.
    You would have absolutely no idea – you’re a fantasist of the first order.

  66. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘those who wore pips on their shoulders were to be avoided and ignored where possible’

    Except when they remove you from that nasty scrub with biteys, right Old Yeller?

    Woof.

  67. Percy Popinjay

    A 55 year old can be a boomer?

    Anyone who thinks a person of that age is a boomer is an appallingly ignorant innumerate imbecile.

    “Generations”, as absurd as the concept is, are nowhere near two decades long.

  68. Bruce of Newcastle

    Very practical learnings there Numbers.
    The next step is to imagine a Labor or Greens pollie with a map and a compass and your enlightenment will be complete.

  69. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Seems to me that the crisis is that they can’t show a crisis.

    Oh there’s a climate crisis developing, Farmer Gez. Just not the one everybody’s expecting – or doesn’t believe in, as the case may be.

  70. calli

    No, Knuckles, by definition, baby boomers are those born in the post-war years 1946 to 1964. Numerically, over two thirds of baby boomers were born between 1950 and 1956.

    That’s what I don’t get.

    The end date has been pushed along to include a generation who are definitely not “Boomers”. My little sister was born in ‘64. Her generation is completely different to tail-enders like myself and my brother (‘52). You see it in a thousand ways.

    The Boomers were the result of the post war baby boom. Trying to push it out to eighteen years (a generation, in fact) to ‘64 is just nonsense.

    Somewhere along the way, someone arbitrarily decided to set up these dates regardless of fact or even common sense.

    Dot is right. Boomers here are most likely atypical, for all sorts of reasons.

  71. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Your name didn’t come up.’

    Thank Christ for that.

    We know all this, by the way, because you keep telling us. Mr ‘I’m an open book’.

    Sigh. Looks like it’s time to lock and load again.

  72. Eyrie

    That Ross Garnaut on The Conversation really is a fantasist isn’t he? Pity we don’t still have loony bins.

  73. calli

    Ha! I see Percy got there first.

  74. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Oh, and what’s everybody using for sore knees? Promising start with Krill Oil 1g daily but doesn’t seem to have maintained the early relief. Xrays confirm I’ve got “bad knees”. Everything seems to work a bit, just wondered if there’s a miracle cure.

    stem cells?

  75. Tintarella di Luna

    I’m just so tired of the broad brush hatred. Demonising people has a corrosive effect – it justifies evil treatment. The linking to cruelty to the elderly has been noted.

    Yep thanks to the ABC and allied leftist media, the enablers of Greta Thunberg, that fat-faced old Communist Guterres, tanned-rake and Fraudster Christine LeGarde and the rest of the UN ignobles. Now Paul Ehrlich lovers will have a field day — you first I say.

  76. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘You may have unlocked the route around the effective “banning” of pre nuptial agreements (“BFAs”) per Thorne v Kennedy.’

    I don’t know what that is, but I will by lunchtime.

    This is my quest.

  77. calli

    Oh, and what’s everybody using for sore knees?

    Simples.

    New knees.

  78. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    stem cells?

    I had my knees done with stem cells five years ago – they were “bone on bone”, but stemcells worked. May not be covered by private health though.

  79. Percy Popinjay

    so when Garnaut the economist reports on climate they believe him

    As an “economist”* garnaut makes an exemplary “climate scientist”. Bullshit piled on wrongology piled on even more bullshit.

    * Never forget, there are two very distinct types of economists – those that are wrong about everything 93.1% of the time and those that are wrong about everything, all the time.

  80. calli

    On erosion of wealth. High divorce rates will do that too.

  81. egg_

    A 55 year old can be a boomer?

    They are legally for Superannuation and retirement taxation purposes.

  82. Knuckle Dragger

    Miranda Devine on Sky, having just emerged from ICU.

    By the look of her, anyway.

  83. Farmer Gez

    Neil Mitchell 3aw is interviewing an author of the climate crisis document.
    Sydney Uni ecologist Dr Thomas Newsome.
    Much projection and extrapolation on supposed disaster.
    Wants to curb population growth in third world countries by education and Australia taking in more people.
    Riddle me that.
    The ecologist reckons the science of climate is clear and simple to understand?!?
    Finishing flourish with a call to save his kids and vote for parties that support action.

  84. Tintarella di Luna

    Those laydee-luvvies who virtue signal so elegantly should think of the planet — their bits of headwear fluff called fascinators (that’s because it’s fascinating as to how they stay on the bonce) should be made of straw and as a gesture to Gaia be fed to the retiring racehorses as a signal to planet-loving virtue

  85. calli

    Oh. Just noticed the Garnaut piece is from The Monologue.

    No opposing points of view there. He can be as batsh*t crazy as he wants without fear of challenge.

    All on our dime.

  86. Tintarella di Luna

    On erosion of wealth. High divorce rates will do that too.

    Indeed and the stats attest to that indubitably

  87. egg_

    Those laydee-luvvies who virtue signal so elegantly should think of the planet

    Probably drive [email protected] SUVs.

  88. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Anyone who thinks a person of that age is a boomer is an appallingly ignorant innumerate imbecile.

    I didn’t make the definitions, merely reported it, Percy.
    The “official” definition of a bay boomer us someone born between 1946 and 1964.
    I think the dates were arbitrarily selected to encompass the period between the end of WWII and the beginning of the impact of the introduction of the pill.

    I don’t think actual “generations” had anything to do with it.

  89. calli

    Newsome must truly hate Australia. He wants to “save” other ecologies by ruining his own.

    I hope Mitchell served him his derriere on a plate.

  90. calli
    #3202862, posted on November 6, 2019 at 8:54 am

    On erosion of wealth. High divorce rates will do that too.

    The taxation of and limiting competition through regulation of housing supply, is an indirect but strong influence on this.

    I assert that the prevalence of the *necessity* of two income households causes more relationship breakdowns. The government is taxing married couples apart, as they have to work so much to afford a family home. Both husband and wife doing overtime? That’s not living. That’s entering into a (near) sexless marriage at 25 or 30. When they may also be trying to have one child – or be disincentivised into having no more.

    Traditionalists may be disgusted at the more attractive option (“rootless” degeneracy) but the cause is more important than the symptom.

    Your boss pays 5% of payroll as tax.

    You pay at least 25% income tax if you can afford a mortgage.

    New housing supply is taxed at 45%.

    I don’t blame slaves for being slaves. I blame the house servant cracking the whip, as well as the delusional grub barking the orders.

  91. struth

    Eleven thousand parasites who are paid to make comment by socialist governments and the global bureaucratic unelected filth of their socialist bosses in the UN, declare unscientifically to declare not their scientific findings, but how we should live.
    Due to the fear of their funding drying up, thanks to the withdrawal of the USA from this global fraud, they have gone into a meltdown of even more exaggeration and lies, and forgotten that actual scientists only report findings but don’t advocate politics.
    Especially embarrassing for them is that they scream emergency while giving non western countries a “green” light to send their emissions through the roof, due to it being “their turn.”
    Some emergency.
    There are many more than 11 ooo people benefitting from this scheme, this fraud, more correctly called an attack on western civilisation, by not having a teary fit, are they starting to realise it might be time to keep their heads down?

  92. Percy Popinjay

    My little sister was born in ‘64. Her generation is completely different to tail-enders like myself and my brother (‘52). You see it in a thousand ways.

    No, MV, I’m not having it. I have a brother and two sisters who are all boomers. My younger sister is eight years older than me. To lump me into their generation is wrongologist idiocy of gold class standard.

  93. The ecologist reckons the science of climate is clear and simple to understand?!?

    It sure is. I will summarise for you all:

    The effect of CO2 on climate is short lived, warmer temperatures make it more wet, we should allow nuclear power and anyone saying otherwise or shilling for global communism, falling living standards or massive subsidies to laughable companies like Solyndra, Acciona or BNB is not to be trusted.

  94. Dr Faustus

    Professor Guano’s vision of an Australian Superpower is based on a key Unicorn Assumption:

    “I have no doubt that intermittent renewables could meet 100% of Australia’s electricity requirements by the 2030s, with high degrees of security and reliability, and at wholesale prices much lower than experienced in Australia over the past half dozen years,” Garnaut writes.

    He has no doubt, but his big problem is that “prices much lower than experienced in Australia over the past half dozen years” does not equal ‘cheap’, or ‘competitive’. Certainly not by the standards of those countries with which AussieSuperpower will be competing to produce tradable goods.

    Over the past half dozen years, the Australian wholesale electricity price has dodged around at $60 to $90/MWh – compared to $20 to $40/MWh in the halcyon days before that. And the wholesale cost of power in China, Brazil, South Africa, and India is still at, or lower than Australian halcyon pricing.

    So, Uncle Ross is actually predicting an amazing renewable technology revolution that delivers electricity prices at a half, or a third of the current mess. And, perhaps more importantly, that this same miracle technology will only work in Australia – and not at all in competing economies.

    Presumably because sunshine.
    Or stupid little brown men.

    You can see why everyone sits up straight and listens to him…

  95. calli

    I think the dates were arbitrarily selected to encompass the period between the end of WWII and the beginning of the impact of the introduction of the pill.

    If that is so, then those who are arguing on the basis of particular “characteristics” and “mindsets” are talking rubbish. There own arbitrary groupings are just as “bad” or just as “good” depending upon the barrow to be pushed.

    It isn’t about experience at all. Just a useful caning tool.

  96. calli

    Yikes!

    Their

    Teacher would have given me the ruler for that back in the day.

  97. Entropy

    Garnault’s main utility is providing a veneer of credibility to whatever action an ALP government, current or planned, already wants to do (see Kerin , John and Crean, Simon-wool and dairy); Rudd, Kevin-Klimate Kapers). He is also guaranteed an easy run in the media. If for no other reason than Gough Whitlam liked him.
    If you want to see how following a Garnault solution to an economic issue fails, see Wool International.
    Playing around with GCMs does not mean you have a clue with what to do about it in the real world, or worse, should be involved in establishing institutional frameworks.

  98. lotocoti

    Two weeks shy of 2 years ago, I got out of Brisneyland.
    Six hours after phoning a real estate agent, there was a buyer, on price, offering a 14 day settlement.
    Today, where there was once a two bedroom, post war austerity cottage on 405m²,
    there’s a 5 bed, 3 bath zero boundary ultimate family entertainer with pool.
    It’s been on the market for more than two months.

  99. Old School Conservative

    Farmer Gez
    #3202827, posted on November 6, 2019 at 8:28 am
    The eleven thousand scientists (fields unknown) who signed the Das Kapital

    From The Australian, evidence this is yet another appeal to improper authority:
    Dr Ashcroft said the list of signatories to the paper included at least 350 Australian scientists, with more ecologists and medical researchers than ­climate researchers.

  100. Entropy

    I would fit that calendar definition of a boomer, but I see my cohort as quite different. Many of us were entering the workforce during the recession we had to have, at a time of ludicrously high interest rates. This was more the gen X experience than the boomers.

  101. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    No, MV, I’m not having it.

    I repeat, Percy, I didn’t set the dates, the grubbymint did.
    I totally agree with you that, as a demographic, it is worse than useless.
    But a great tool for those who would divide and conquer.
    Which has always been the weapon of choice of those who aspire to rule us.

    .
    Speaking of cortisone shots, I have an appointment with the quack in an hour.
    Play safe children, and try not to fight too much.

  102. bespoke

    Frank Walker from National Tiles
    #3202802, posted on November 6, 2019 at 7:59 am

    Top rant but needs more exclamation marks.

  103. Old School Conservative

    Speaking of cortisone shots

    With a beer chaser?
    Hope all goes well with the quack Peter.

  104. Entropy

    I have no doubt that intermittent renewables could meet 100% of Australia’s electricity requirements by the 2030s, with high degrees of security and reliability, and at wholesale prices much lower than experienced in Australia over the past half dozen years,” Garnaut writes.

    I seriously doubt Garnault actually writes more than the forward of any of his political tracts, to be honest. He will have been given a small army of earnest young things do the slog for him.I actually think he is too smart to write crap like that, for instance.

    The Real Question is, who funded it?
    .

  105. Mother Lode

    I cannot grant Garnaut any credibility for his AGW prognostications due to the fact that he, along with the current clutch of economists (with a few defiant exceptions – Hi Doomlord!), has such an appalling record at economics.

    Even if he were right about AGW (which I cannot credit) his Keynesian remedies would not work.

  106. Tintarella di Luna

    Probably drive [email protected] SUVs..

    and some are built with similar characteristics to their [email protected] SUVs. Zali Stegall come on down.

  107. Farmer Gez

    Neil Mitchell now discussing if interest in the Cup is waning with Minister Martin Pakula.
    Sydney races, animal welfare, whips and the cost all discussed.
    Too many overseas horses and trainers is the real problem but the hierarchy of racing is mesmerised by the glamour of sheiks and multi billionaires.
    The industry may be international but the ordinary punters hate giving away cash to foreigners. A foreign wealthy winner could cure the image by signing a cheque over the the Royal Children’s Hospital.

  108. Top Ender

    Jeez, Percy, I got as far as the end of the Contents section.

  109. bespoke

    If that is so, then those who are arguing on the basis of particular “characteristics” and “mindsets” are talking rubbish. There own arbitrary groupings are just as “bad” or just as “good” depending upon the barrow to be pushed.

    It’s an expedient generalisation just like Left/right. Plus it’s fun!.

  110. Des Deskperson

    ‘Anyone know the size of the federal government public service departments?’

    TE, these are the figures for all employees – ongoing and non-ongoing – in the key Commonwealth portfolio Departments at 30 June 2019. They cover all those employed under the Public Service Act 1999 but do not include contractors or consultants employed under commercial contract.

    Agriculture: 5003
    Attorney-Generals: 1444
    Communication and the Arts: 561
    Defence: 16879
    Education:1902
    Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business: 2120
    Environment and Energy: 2717
    Finance: 1579
    Foreign Affairs and Trade; 3781
    Health: 4285
    Home Affairs: 14070
    Industry, innovation and Science: 4355
    Infrastructure, transport, Cities and Regional Development: 990
    PM&C: 2156
    Service Australia: 30572
    Social Services; 2545
    Treasury: 1287
    Veterans Affairs: 1674

    This doesn’t include the hundreds of separate organisations that come under the umbrellas of the portfolio Departments but are agencies under their own right. They range from ATO – 18,900 employees – to Screen Australia – 7 employees.

    Apart from ATO, larger ones include:

    Bureau of Meteorology: 1607
    Australian Electoral Commission: 2558
    Australian Bureau of Statistics: 2739
    ACCC: 1180
    ASIC: 1981
    Federal Court Agency: 1202

    Iv’e copied out these figures since I thought they might be of interest to all cats, but you can find the data tables in excel format here:

    https://www.apsc.gov.au/aps-employment-data-30-june-2019-release

    if you click on the link at the bottom of the left of the page.

    Total APS staff at 30 June 2019 was 147237, down 2.1% from last year.

  111. Tintarella di Luna

    Was it Top Ender who asked about numbers of public servants — jefferson at the Oz on Janet Albrechtsen’s article says this:

    Jefferson
    3 HOURS AGO
    (Edited)
    Janet, thank you for this piece. Some brief observations:
    1,987,000 Public servants nationally; about 1,200,000 too many.
    Too many politicians love legislating but without due diligence – I legislate, therefore, I am.
    Your example of people who allow their emotional view to cloud their reason in your second-last paragraph is really, really scary, because I know people like this and they are generally those who we would call ‘well educated’!
    I shudder at the thought that FITS and similar laws are in place when Labor gains power.

  112. Tintarella di Luna

    Thank you Des Deskperson very handy figures

  113. bespoke

    I’ve done it my self by telling my kids to go into mining. Big mistake. So it’s not just boomers but they did start it. Plus the credentialism and snobbery for blue collar work.

  114. Old School Conservative

    It’s an expedient generalisation

    I thought that marketing types followed the Boomers with products for the larger numbers in the post WWII birth rates.
    Baby products in the 1950’s.
    Education in the 1960’s.
    Housing products (whitegoods etc) in the 1970s.
    Affluenza goods in the 1980s (posh homes, BMWs, international travel)
    Stuff for the boomer’s kids in the 1990s (private school education, sporting equipment)
    Lifestyle products in the 2000s (Rolex watches!)
    Retirement products in the 2010s – villages, cruising, smaller homes, home care, funeral industry.

    As that great contemporary philosopher Elton John (/s) said, it’s the Circle of Life (dominated by those born in the several years after WWII)

  115. Helen

    Cassie and any one else who is Jooish, I likely have a couple coming to work who are also and I am wondering how to handle Sabbath (we normally have Sunday off ) and also diet?

    Any tips greatly appreciated.

    🙂

  116. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Medivac laws: Asylum-seeker refusal of care shows system ‘being gamed’

    exclusive
    Joe Kelly
    Canberra Bureau Chief
    @joekellyoz
    10:00PM November 5, 2019
    66 Comments

    Five people who refused to accept medical treatment after being transferred to Australia under contentious refugee medivac laws were diagnosed via teleconference with conditions including dermatitis, abdominal pain and dental pain.

    In two cases, specialist care was recommended for men who claimed dental problems with one saying he had been prevented from eating solid foods although both individuals did not seek further assistance after their transfer.

    While five transferees have refused any treatment, about 40 have turned down relevant pathology tests and X-rays, triggering new warnings from government MPs on Tuesday that the legislation was being “gamed”.

    The number of asylum-­seekers and refugees seeking transfers under the medivac legislation has steadily increased and spiked in October, with 120 ­submitting applications that month. Two weeks ago, 562 ­remained in Papua New Guinea and Nauru.

    Scott Morrison needs the support of Senate crossbencher Jacqui Lambie to repeal the medivac laws, which were passed prior to the May 18 election by Labor and independent MPs in defiance of his then minority government.

    Since the legislation came into force in March, 136 people have been brought from PNG and Nauru to Australia to receive medical assistance.

    Of these, about 45 have ­partially or completely refused to accept the medical treatment on offer.

    The five individuals who have refused all treatment are men aged from 29-37 and were initially assessed by teleconference or video.

    They included a man suffering from stomach inflammation and abdominal pain; another experiencing bowel inflammation and dermatitis as well as the man who claimed an ongoing dental con­dition had prevented him from ­eating.

    The other two cases involved a man suffering from a urological condition who refused medical and diagnostic scans while the fifth man also claimed he had gum and dental infections that had negatively affected his appearance.

    Former immigration minister Kevin Andrews told The Australian: “The level of rejection and partial rejection of treatments clearly indicates that the scheme is being gamed.”

    The government needs four crossbench votes to pass its planned medivac repeal, but will not win over the Centre Alliance, which holds two upper house seats.

    From the Oz.

  117. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Des,
    Sorry but your figures are shyte.

    For instance, where is Human Services which officially numbered 36,400 BEFORE they incorporated Medicare or started gearing up for NDIS?

    And that’s full time APS, NOT contractors and consultants.

    Federal Department of Education? Health? Defence?

  118. Dr Faustus

    Des Deskperson: Serious question.

    WTF is Service Australia?
    It appears to have a workforce the same size as The Australian Army, but no publicly discussed function other than to lifting and improving service delivery for all Australians “.

    It’s almost as if, in 2019, the Commonwealth Public Service became self aware.

  119. lotocoti

    1,987,000 Public servants nationally; about 1,200,000 too many.

    1.2 million is still a long way from perfect.

  120. C.L.

    Melbourne Cup pics …
    A man finds true love.
    ——-
    Full round-up.

  121. 1735099

    So much recent winning when it comes to income for women in sport.

  122. 1735099

    Medivac laws: Asylum-seeker refusal of care shows system ‘being gamed’

    Simple solution – fly them all to Christmas Island.
    At least we’d be getting better value for taxpayers dollar per asylum seeker that way.
    At the moment, the billion dollar facility supports just four people.

  123. Des Deskperson

    ‘Des,
    Sorry but your figures are shyte.’

    They are not ‘my’ figures, Peter. the are the Australian Public Service Commissioner’s numbers, taken from the APS Employment Data Base. The data base is not perfect and if you cross checked with agency annual reports you might find some small variations, but I have no reason to doubt their general accuracy as an indication of size.

    Medicare was part of Human Services from day 1.

    ‘WTF is Service Australia?’

    The old ‘Human Services’ department, incorporating Centrelink, Medicare and the Child Support Agency

  124. Eyrie

    C.L. a lot of those fillies are carrying extra weight.

  125. “Helen
    #3202903, posted on November 6, 2019 at 9:41 am
    Cassie and any one else who is Jooish, I likely have a couple coming to work who are also and I am wondering how to handle Sabbath (we normally have Sunday off ) and also diet?

    Any tips greatly appreciated.

    🙂”

    Helen….do you know how observant they are? In terms of diet….no pig, no shellfish and no mixing of meat and dairy….so sprinkling cheese on spag bol is a no no. Do they only eat Kosher meat? As for Shabbat….well it is from sunset on Friday night to sunset on Saturday night….and religious/observant Jooos will not turn lights on or off or drive a car and so on…any kind of activity that denotes work. The Shabbat and dietary laws are many and varied and complicated. Most religious Joooos leave work early on Friday afternoon to prepare for Shabbat….not so bad in summer with daylight saving at Shabbat will start late.

    Does that help?

  126. bespoke

    Life time leach complaining about tax, LOL!

  127. Bruce of Newcastle

    So much recent winning when it comes to income for women in sport.

    More incentive for second rank males to suddenly have a tranny epiphany.

    Male Athlete Wins ‘Woman Cricketer of the Year’ Award (4 Nov)

  128. Tel

    World Scientists’ Warning of a Climate Emergency
    William J Ripple, Christopher Wolf, Thomas M Newsome, Phoebe Barnard, William R Moomaw

    Scroll down a bit and read the fine print, “Forest gain is not involved in the calculation of tree cover loss.”

    Hmmm, so they make it look like lots of trees are being removed while ignoring the fact that trees grow back. Suppose the same methodology was used on wheat crops, imagine the vast amount of wheat cover “loss” we could calculate, by simply ignoring the replanting of the same crop every year.

    This is from people who claim to have a moral obligation to clearly warn humanity of any catastrophic threat and to “tell it like it is.”

    Except they don’t tell it like it is … they give some misleading graphs and then hope no one is going to call them on it. Nobel Prize to any mainstream journalist who bothers to critically check any part of this unscientific research.

  129. Top Ender

    Very many thanks Des.

    Sort of depressing, especially given Janet A’s figure which must have included all of the State/territory public “servants”.

    On a brighter note, a friend says she when she worked for the federal Dep of Education around a decade or more ago, there were just over 4000 staff in it.

    Not one taught a class anywhere.

  130. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Medicare was part of Human Services from day 1.

    Medicare as a separate department predates Human Services as a department by a couple of decades.

  131. “So much recent winning when it comes to income for women in sport.”

    Oh yes with the way its going and the ruination of women’s sport……there will be a lot of winning when it comes to income for men identifying as women in sport. Hooray!

    The Jooo hating turd is back.

  132. Roger

    11000 Scientists Declare Cimate Emergency! says the ABC.

    Delve deeper and discover that they’ve simply attached their namkes to a non-peer reviewed article written by 4 or 5 ecologists, including one Australian, who all seem to have links to the University of Oregon and who promote XR.

    Their six point manifesto….sorry, remedy, would require the imposition of a world-wide draconian regime presumably directed by the UN and would plunge us back to pre-industrial times. Except for the scientists, I suppose, who’d still get to fly around the planet “taking its pulse” and enjoying the odd skiing holiday.

    All for our good, of course.

  133. Des Deskperson

    Oh, and NDIS is a separate agency within the Social Services portfolio with I have overlooked – my bad.

    It employs 3491 staff

  134. Mark A

    Helen
    #3202903, posted on November 6, 2019 at 9:41 am

    Cassie and any one else who is Jooish, I likely have a couple coming to work who are also and I am wondering how to handle Sabbath (we normally have Sunday off ) and also diet?

    Having Sat off for them is an advantage for you, they can take over Sunday duties.

    Cooking is no problem unless ultra orthodox, but then they wouldn’t be there anyway, If there is any doubt ask before they come, easy and avoids disappointment.

    My wife is j. ish, fairly strict on some things but we don’t go overboard.
    She was even known to have an occasional hamburger with the lot.

  135. Geriatric Mayfly

    contentious refugee medivac laws were diagnosed via teleconference with conditions including dermatitis, abdominal pain and dental pain.

    In each case the ‘two doctors’ should be named and shamed. They are conspirators propping up a leftist agenda.

  136. Des Deskperson

    ‘Medicare as a separate department predates Human Services as a department by a couple of decades.’

    As was Centrelink, which predates Human Services by at least a decade.

    Both were incorporated into Human Services.

  137. “Cooking is no problem unless ultra orthodox, but then they wouldn’t be there anyway”

    That’s right Mark….I’m sure that they will be flexible.

  138. Old School Conservative

    Imagine if a politician decided to wind back the Federal Public Service.
    The process could be run by a “Razor gang”.
    Now there’s an original thought.

  139. Old School Conservative

    Blair nails it again.
    Posts a photo of two frightbats from the recent Q&A.
    Caption: Wouldn’t want to meet them in a brightly lit alley.

  140. notafan

    another forgotten score on the board for Tony Abbott, he privatised Medibank in 2014

    Medicare history

  141. Snoopy

    The statement was a collaboration of dozens of scientists and endorsed by further 11,000 from 153 nations.

    When did commies become so considerate? Does it have something to do with their increasingly arrogant self-confidence?

    Maintaining ‘The List’ is a doddle these days.

  142. notafan

    And it’s now
    ‘Services Australia’

    Can’t be speciesist in this day and age

    (Furries)

  143. Mother Lode

    In any event, I learned more about life in my first four weeks in the Army than I would have in four years in any tertiary institution in the country.

    I dunno.

    I doubt the army taught critical analysis of weapons as symbol and sign of phallocentric patriarchal society.

    Or the political contradiction where individuals of equal agency consent to the inequality hierarchies.

    You probably think beer is just a drink.

  144. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Roger, what sort of ‘scientists’ do these signers claim to be?

    Not that it really matters. Plenty of PhD’s want the funding gravy train to continue and are working in areas where scientific methods are not rigorously applied. This sort put politics first, science a poor second.

  145. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    As was Centrelink, which predates Human Services by at least a decade.
    Both were incorporated into Human Services.

    Which is the exact opposite of your original claim that “Medicare was part of Human Services from day 1”. Medicare existed as a standalone department when I worked for the Department of Social Security (DSS) in the early Eighties, which also was a standalone department and remained as such until the 2,000’s when John Howard disbanded the Commonwealth Employment Service (CES), and incorporated some of its functions into the DSS and renamed the combo “Centrelink”.

    And even then Human Services was still over a decade away.

    As I said, shyte.

  146. notafan

    I see the Melbourne cup photographer’s remit is now the same as for race day photographers in the UK

    Focus on any bad behaviour.

    In a crowd on 80,000 not so difficult.

  147. Knuckle Dragger

    The roundup of tomfoolery in C.L.’s link’s a bit understated.

    Love the ‘fight’ vision.

    Fat unco betas vs scrawny unco betas. Look at the killer haymakers. No wonder no-one else was interested.

    Poofs.

  148. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    The process could be run by a “Razor gang”.

    Is that a distant echo I hear?
    From times long past?

  149. notafan

    Des are you saying that Centrelink and Medicare were both incorporated into human services from day one of that super department’s creation?

    That would be my understanding.

  150. John Constantine

    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/property/ghosts-of-hih-collapse-amid-construction-insurance-crisis/news-story/286cbc02f29ad03537b46632c08df4e3

    Fire safety inspectors, engineers, architects and designers are being swept up in a professional indemnity insurance crisis that is causing a shake out in the construction sector that industry figures say they have not seen since insurer HIH collapsed in 2001.

    Consult Australia, which represents an industry comprising 48,000 firms, warned on Tuesday many contractors had been affected by professional indemnity hikes and exclusions, with some seeing excess fees jump four-fold.

    The insurance crisis was triggered by the London Grenfell Tower fire in June 2017 in which 72 people died, and a 2014 fire at the Lacrosse apartment building at Melbourne’s Docklands

    Construction defects that led to the evacuation of three Sydney apartment blocks also put pressure on the industry.

    The Australian revealed last Thursday that projects worth billions of dollars were at risk of grinding to a halt as one of Queensland’s biggest certifiers, GMA Certification Group, declared it was “dead in the water” after being unable to renew its ­insurance.

    Trillion dollars of unfunded liabilities for the big australia population Ponxi dogbox apartment scheme.

    The billionaire developer class fly out of the airports with the billions, the australian chicom kowtowing political class unwaveringly commit the australian proles to bailout the Ponxi for trillions.

    One belt, One road, One trillion in unfunded liabilities.

  151. notafan

    On the radio this morning headline news was there was a fight outside the Uber marquee at the Cup
    .
    With swearing.

    Even my son was disgusted at the overblown stupid.

    Shut the Melbourne Cup down

    Immediately.

    People did swearing!

  152. Steve trickler

    Check out the ‘bloke’ in the white glasses.

    And Vicpol have competition for being useless.



  153. feelthebern

    In a uber this morning & the driver had one of the ABC channels on.
    The story of the Utah family being killed in Mexico came on.
    The ABC called the Utah family part of a fringe Mormon group.
    They said the circumstances of their deaths were still to be determined.
    They referred to the Mexican president as President Lopez (his name is President Lopez Obrador, he has a double barrelled surname).
    They referred to the American president as Mr Trump.

    Goebbels would have been proud of it.

  154. 8th Dan

    The Boomers were the result of the post war baby boom. Trying to push it out to eighteen years (a generation, in fact) to ‘64 is just nonsense.

    Nope, not nonsense. The annual number of births increased significantly in 1946 and did not start to decline again until the end of 1964. Hence, that is the period of the post war baby boom.

  155. Roger

    Roger, what sort of ‘scientists’ do these signers claim to be?

    The fact that they’d attach their names to a non-peer reviewed paper on climate change by other scientists who appear not to be specialists in that field suggests they are scientists who put ideology above evidence, Lizzie.

    I was just now thinking of my niece, a lovely, bright girl who knows a lot about microbiology but little about anything else, inlcuding the philosophy of science. She’d probably sign in an instant if asked. Sigh….I’m working on her, little by little.

  156. Dr Faustus

    The old ‘Human Services’ department, incorporating Centrelink, Medicare and the Child Support Agency

    Ta.

  157. Bruce of Newcastle

    So if horseracing is now a crime against progressive wokedom does that mean Michelle Payne is now a heroine or pariah? It’s so hard to keep up with who is in and who is out these days.

    Meghan Murphy saga shows how extreme political correctness has become (2 Nov, via BCF)

    I’m guessing that on about 99% of issues, radical feminist Meghan Murphy and I would disagree. Subjects such as the free market, affirmative action, limited government, foreign affairs, income distribution and so on.

    On the other hand, the 500 or so protesters who gathered outside Murphy’s speech this week at a branch of the Toronto Public Library likely agree with her 99 times out of a hundred. It’s likely their only point of disagreement is transgender rights.

    But in a crystal-clear example of how extreme political correctness has become, people who agree more with me than with Murphy have become her staunchest defenders.

    In the bizzaro world of identity politics, a 99% friend is now seen as the enemy for not blindly agreeing 100% of the time.

    Trannies currently trump radical feminists in the virtuology ranking. And if you aren’t on top you ain’t anywhere.

  158. Helen

    Thanks Mark and Cassie, appreciated. I have asked their dietary requirements and if they take Saturday off, I will see what they come back with. We are pretty flexible but I like my MY space on Sunday. That is just me and Captain, not worrying about feeding or finding work for others , lols.

    It will be fun learning someting new.

  159. feelthebern

    Good point Bruce.

    Michelle Payne is right about horse racing.
    Isl*m is right about women.

    Heads explode.

  160. notafan

    Lover your comments on the boomer issue dot.

    The math is there.

  161. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    3491 staff, many with ‘expertise’ and thus overpaid. This, plus the leaching-on approved ‘service providers’ all charging double market rates, often to service people who are not particularly disabled, while the genuine needs of the very disabled are determined by a bureaucratic maze of confusion and lost paperwork. An unwieldy boondoggle from start to .. nope .. sadly with no finish point in sight. A huge and growing behemoth.

    How much better to have recognised the need lay greatest with the totally and permanently physically and/or brain damaged disabled and just to have channelled extra funds to these via Centrelink, to be spent as desired by recipients once they had taken some recognised form of precautionary advice against fraudulent pressures, with all guardianship orders properly in place. The private market would then have risen to meet real and desired needs for service.

  162. “Meghan Murphy saga shows how extreme political correctness has become (2 Nov, via BCF)”

    BoN…I have been following the Meghan Murphy saga for months now. Brendan O’Neill did a very good podcast with her which you can listen to the Spiked website. Everything Murphy says about trans ideology is 100% true.

  163. stackja

    Regarding public servants, Google – Barton Ministry.

  164. Mother Lode

    Male Athlete Wins ‘Woman Cricketer of the Year’ Award

    Thing is most men would consider this farcical too.

    The people behind this are male and female – opposite gender but common agenda.

    It is not a men issue or a women issue – it is purely political.

  165. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Male Athlete Wins “Woman Cricketer of the Year” Award’

    Hannah Mouncey must be frothing at the testicles reading this.

  166. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    1,987,000 Public servants nationally;

    out of a total workforce of 8.9m. absurd

  167. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Hannah Mouncey must be frothing at the testicles reading this.

    “She” needs to learn to flounce.
    Calli could make a fortune teaching “Advanced Flouncing”.
    Given the target audience, she could probably get government funding.

  168. Mother Lode

    Scroll down a bit and read the fine print, “Forest gain is not involved in the calculation of tree cover loss.”

    This methodology could really un-pucker the sphincters of those Malthusian scientists who think Climate Warming Change demands we reduce the population of the planet.

    Count the deaths, don’t count the births.

    Within a century the population will be zero – which might not make as much of an impact as you would expect upon the eight or nine billion people living.

  169. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Calli could make a fortune teaching “Advanced Flouncing”.

    Calli and Lizzie B teaching “advanced flouncing.”

  170. Helen

    They are not orthodox and do not take Saturday off, so that makes it a bit easier. 🙂 I’ll wait and see if they decide to take the job or not.

  171. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Calli and Lizzie B teaching “advanced flouncing.”

    Calli definitely, but I wouldn’t know about Lizzie, Zulu.
    A couple of weeks ago she requested I add her to my “ignore” list.
    Being a gentleman I have complied.

  172. stackja

    Michael Smith News
    @mpsmithnews
    Leaked video – US news anchor caught on hot mike exposing Jeffrey Epstein cover-up

  173. bespoke

    Roger
    #3202958, posted on November 6, 2019 at 10:46 am
    The end of Chimerica and the need for a Pivot to Asia v.2.

    At least it’s plan.

  174. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    see if they decide to take the job or not.

    If they do, you need to watch the movie “The Holiday” before their arrival, for a light-hearted portrayal of Jooo-gen tile interaction, Helen.

  175. Bruce of Newcastle

    Flouncing Mouncey?

  176. Dr Faustus

    US news anchor caught on hot mike exposing Jeffrey Epstein cover-up

    US news anchor found suicided in a zipped up gym bag, half-dissolved in battery acid.

  177. John Constantine

    Two million direct State employees, plus two million employed to do compliance with State regulations, plus two million employed in the dogbox apartment Landsharks deathtraps Ponxi scheme only because of government policy to use debt to multiply their debtherds.

    What could possibly go wrong when the Tyrant squeezes his grip?.

  178. thefrollickingmole

    John Constantine
    A quick scan of the second reading of the Vic governments ‘Levy which will never go away on people not involved in the napalm dog box construction” gives this.

    The Bill provides for a targeted increase to the rate of building permit levy to provide $300 million in funding for the cladding rectification program. Additional amounts of building permit levy are to be payable: • for a building that is a Class 2 (apartments), Class 3 (hotels), Class 4 (dwellings attached to commercial buildings), Class 5 (offices), Class 6 (shops), Class 7 (car parks and warehouses) and Class 8 (laboratories and factories), within the meaning of the Building Code of Australia; and • where the building work is not located in ‘regional Victoria’ (as defined in section 18(8) of the First Home Owner Grant Act 2000). In these circumstances, the following additional rates of building permit levy will be payable: • for building work where a building permit is required and the cost of the building work is equal to or greater than $800,000 and less than $1 million, an additional rate of 0.128 cents per dollar; • for building work where a building permit is required and the cost of the building work is equal to or greater than $1 million and less than $1.5 million, an additional rate of 0.256 cents per dollar; and • for building work where a building permit is required and the cost of the building work is equal to or greater than $1.5 million, an additional rate of 0.82 cents per dollar.

    So prior profits are baked in while new constructions fund the maaaates removing and reinstalling the fire foam cladding.

    Payment of surplus funds back into the Consolidated Fund At the conclusion of the cladding rectification program, there may be surplus funds in the Cladding Safety Victoria account from the collection of the building permit levy increase. The Bill provides that the Treasurer, after consultation with the Minister for Planning and the Authority, may direct the Authority to pay any surplus amounts in excess of what is expected to be needed to the Consolidated Fund.

    ..

  179. Bruce of Newcastle

    US news anchor found suicided in a zipped up gym bag, half-dissolved in battery acid.

    Nein news just now blamed the suppression of the story on the royal family.
    I thought it cute that they didn’t mention which royal family.

  180. johanna

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3202811, posted on November 6, 2019 at 8:09 am

    Dot – Your love of renting is charming.

    Anyone who rents these days gets a six monthly anal probe by a black dressed nazi who often turns up only on working days thereby necessitating a day off from work. Which is a problem for many.

    The rise of the house inspection SS is probably closely correlated with the rise in house prices as people flee this horror.

    Hear, hear.

    So called libertarian ‘economists’ have been pushing this line for decades. It is BS Grade 1.

    I rented for half of my adult life, and quickly learned to seek out private landlords (no agents) who just wanted the rent paid on time and a quiet life. They got what they wanted, and so did I. They might pop in once a year or so to make sure the joint was still standing, but that was it. Lease was renewed every year with no dramas, maybe a CPI rent increase.

    But, they are few and far between. Most renters get some agent trying to make a name for themselves by being hyper vigilant, and expecting a person’s home to look like a display house. If you had a roast last night, and there is grease in the oven, black mark. If you are a clean person with untidy habits, black mark. And so on.

    Then, since investment properties typically only have six month leases, there is the real chance that you will be rendered homeless in 5,4,3,2,1 months. This probably doesn’t bother rich people, but for families with children at school, or those just scraping by financially, it is very stressful.

    Poll renters and ask them if they would prefer to own their home, and the response is a no-brainer, even if you put in a caveat that they would not gain financially in terms of owning capital.

    I am not opposing renting, it fills a need for a lot of renters and owners. But, Dot and his ilk can take a running jump with their arguments that it is superior to owning one’s (however modest) own shack.

  181. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    What could possibly go wrong when the Tyrant squeezes his grip?

    John,
    I’ve said it before but I’ll repeat it.
    Stop worrying about the Chinese.

    We have State and Federal governments passing unbelievably totalitarian laws and regulations almost daily without anybody even noticing. We have sections of our State and Federal police being equipped with stun grenades, bullet-proof vests and full auto firearms. What do you think these people are being geared up for – traffic control?

    Right now the Chinese are the least of our problems.

  182. old bloke

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3202951, posted on November 6, 2019 at 10:39 am

    Trannies currently trump radical feminists in the virtuology ranking. And if you aren’t on top you ain’t anywhere.

    Right, so Elizabeth Warren should step aside to let Michael LaVaughn Robinson run as the Democrat POTUS candidate.

  183. Old School Conservative

    The un-reported words from Amy Robach are
    “And Alan Dershowitz was also implicated because of the planes….
    Um, it was unbelievable what we had, Clinton, we had everything……”

  184. Des Deskperson

    ‘Des are you saying that Centrelink and Medicare were both incorporated into human services from day one of that super department’s creation?

    That would be my understanding.’

    Yes, the super department was established under the Human Services Act 2011. Medibank and Centrelink – formerly separate agencies – were incorporated on day one of its – the Human Services Department’s – operation – 1 July 2011.

    There was an earlier and much smaller department of Human Services set up c. 2004 that managed the Child Support Agency and the Commonwealth rehabilitation service. It was subsumed into the new department.

  185. notafan

    Though I don’t own a residential rental property I know a couple of people that do.
    Minimum tenancy is always a year.
    Paying agent fees to get new tenants is pretty expensive.

    I also know a tight arse who wouldn’t pay an agent. Listed on Gumtree and always got rubbish tenants.

    Logical outcome.

    Victorian renters average 4.5 years

  186. Some History

    Arneta: It was FENTESTIC…

    It was fantastic to see my friend and one of my heroes @GretaThunberg last week and go on a bike* ride around Santa Monica together and I was so pumped to introduce her to my daughter Christina. Keep inspiring, Greta!

    https://twitter.com/Schwarzenegger/status/1191493616213975040?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet

    * Arnie is riding his “Mauler”, fat-tyre pushbike (he removed the flamethrower for the leisurely ride with Greta).

    “I was so pumped…” Is that PC?
    Maybe it should read, “I was so tyre-pumped…”

  187. Some History

    The Three and a half Four Bike Riders of the Aplopalypse:

    https://imgur.com/TH5z3t4

  188. Bruce of Newcastle

    Right, so Elizabeth Warren should step aside to let Michael LaVaughn Robinson run as the Democrat POTUS candidate.

    Robinson isn’t in the anointed group.
    But there is much butt-hurt right now that nice Mr Buttigeig isn’t getting support from black guys.

    James Clyburn: ‘No Question’ Buttigieg’s Gayness Is ‘An Issue’ For Older Black Voters (4 Nov)

    House Majority Whip James Clyburn said there is “no question” that South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s sexual orientation is “an issue” for older black voters in South Carolina.

    During a Sunday morning appearance on CNN’s “State of the Union,” the South Carolina Democratic congressman was asked by guest host Dana Bash about whether Buttigieg’s failure to gain traction in the state, despite polling well in other places, has anything to do with the fact that he is gay.

    Mr Clyburn happens to be a dusky gentleman and also Dem House whip. Thus the Dems are in a funk, split between the qwerty and African-America wings. Maybe if Mr Butti’s hubby was a big black guy, like Milo’s man, there wouldn’t be an issue.

    And if Mr Butti can’t win as a qwerty economic centrist then there is always another.

    Fox News Poll shows Hillary Clinton beating Donald Trump in 2020—and she’s not even running

  189. johanna

    Shy Ted
    #3202830, posted on November 6, 2019 at 8:33 am

    Oh, and what’s everybody using for sore knees? Promising start with Krill Oil 1g daily but doesn’t seem to have maintained the early relief. Xrays confirm I’ve got “bad knees”. Everything seems to work a bit, just wondered if there’s a miracle cure.

    Heavy duty painkillers, Ted. Don’t feel guilty about it. Bone grating on bone is excruciatingly painful. Believe me, I know of what I speak.

    Hot baths and massage can ameliorate the symptoms, but short of surgery, there are no cures. And, a lot of the time, there are no surgical fixes either.

    Now, all you have to do is convince your GP that you are not a drug dealer, or an addict seeking a fix. Best of luck!

  190. Some History

    Greta should be grateful. This is how Arnie usually looks after playing with the “Mauler” and flamethrower on rides around Santa Monica:

    https://imgur.com/0W8ZX9c

  191. johanna

    Notafan uses a ‘survey’ by a website that sells rentals to claim that renters on average stay in the same property for about five years?

    Given that lots of renters move in less than that, it seems that the rental market is chockers with people who have lived in the same property for seven, or even ten, years.

    Honestly, some people will believe anything.

  192. egg_

    ‘Let’s burn stuff’: Q&A panellists debate violence and shattering the status quo

    So, rather than smash the “glass ceiling” Mo na wants to burn down the house?
    Just an anarchist/terrorist wrecker?

  193. Some History

    So, rather than smash the “glass ceiling” Mo na wants to burn down the house?

    I think her name is spelled “Moaner”.

  194. Cassie and any one else who is Jooish, I likely have a couple coming to work who are also and I am wondering how to handle Sabbath (we normally have Sunday off ) and also diet?

    Any tips greatly appreciated.

    Are they 462 visa holders from the …er… land of …er… y’know, that country with no oil wells but lots of olive groves ‘n’ stuff like that? & has a really good army that all their neighbors are scared of?

  195. Some History

    Pro-Greta™, anti-Trump

    PATTI SMITH PRAISES GRETA THUNBERG AND SLAMS ‘NARCISSISTIC AND DISHONOURABLE’ TRUMP

    https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/patti-smith-greta-thunberg-climate-change-donald-trump-interview-a9185316.html

  196. Bruce of Newcastle

    This is how Arnie usually looks after playing with the “Mauler” and flamethrower on rides around Santa Monica.

    That can’t be right SH.
    He has terrible wind-catching facefuzz.
    Serious Lycrans shave off all their fur.

  197. John Constantine

    https://www.stockjournal.com.au/story/6477236/one-law-does-not-fit-all-says-vff-after-farm-death-figure-shock/?src=rss

    But digging down into the stats further, it shows that farming deaths are twice as likely than in any other industry.

    Statistics per 100,000 workers shows farms come in a 11.2 deaths, compared to the next highest transport workers at 5.9 deaths per 100,000 workers.

    State Parliament is currently debating new industrial manslaughter laws which will see employers found guilty of negligence resulting the death of an employee fined up to $16.5 million and potentially jailed for up to 20 years.

    Safe rewilding and clearances.

    Once the crushing commissars of the State can unwarranted and unannounced, enter a farm and shut it down if they find ‘unsafe’, the clearances of owner occupiers producing real food will make way for the frankenfood factories of the Golden Ton.

  198. areff

    This business about PNG coppers beating the suitcase out of unidentified men, there seems to be an element to the story that is a no-go zone: the victims appear to be white (look at the pic). Were the situation reversed, that would be the first and only element of this story we’d be hearing about.

    Why, I wonder, is it not being mentioned?.

    Doesn’t fit the narrative, I guess.

  199. egg_

    Proud tail end Boomer here – what’s the angst about FFS?

  200. egg_

    Some tail end Boomers don’t have enough fibre in their diet?
    /Prunes are your fiend

  201. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Proud tail end Boomer here – what’s the angst about FFS?

    Those who come after, demanding as their STARTING point, what it took the boomers their lives to achieve.

  202. Mark from Melbourne

    Shy Ted
    #3202830, posted on November 6, 2019 at 8:33 am

    Oh, and what’s everybody using for sore knees? Promising start with Krill Oil 1g daily but doesn’t seem to have maintained the early relief. Xrays confirm I’ve got “bad knees”. Everything seems to work a bit, just wondered if there’s a miracle cure.

    My Mum has had intermittent success with Synvisc injections.

    Not cheap.

    https://www.synviscone.com/what-is-synvisc-one/

  203. egg_

    Due to the fear of their funding drying up, thanks to the withdrawal of the USA from this global fraud, they have gone into a meltdown of even more exaggeration and lies,

    It’s like Trump laid a ‘roach bomb and they’re clambering out of the woodwork.
    Delicious.

  204. vr

    Interesting paper on the aftermath of Fukushima.

    This paper provides a large scale, empirical evaluation of unintended effects from invoking the precautionary principle after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. After the accident, all nuclear power stations ceased operation and nuclear power was replaced by fossil fuels, causing an exogenous increase in electricity prices. This increase led to a reduction in energy consumption, which caused an increase in mortality during very cold temperatures. We estimate that the increase in mortality from higher electricity prices outnumbers the mortality from the accident itself, suggesting the decision to cease nuclear production has contributed to more deaths than the accident itself.

  205. egg_

    Can Musk send 11k wankers to Mars on the B-Ark?
    The outer ones can shield the inner from the Van Allen Belts.

  206. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The schools edition of Professor Marcia Langton’s Welcome To Country is now available!

    Covering topics as broad as prehistory, post-colonial history, language, kinship, knowledge, art, performance, storytelling, native title, and the Stolen Generations, this book is the perfect resource for the younger generations of our country who are looking to learn about the world’s oldest continuing civilisation.

    More brainwashing.

  207. Caveman

    Funny how welcome to country and space travel wasn’t on there. Must be on a later edition.

  208. thefrollickingmole

    Heres one of those ‘wicked problems” in law.

    Does this bloke deserve a payout for wrongful imprisonment or is he to blame for his own situation?

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/nov/06/vinzent-tarantino-found-not-guilty-of-murdering-schoolgirl-quanne-diec-despite-confession

    In 2016, Tarantino walked into a Sydney police station and confessed to abducting and killing Quanne before leading officers into bushland in an attempt to find her body.

    The defence contended that he made false admissions because he had received what he considered repeated threats from bikies, and feared for his life and the lives of his loved ones.

    Tarantino was working at Sydney’s Blackmarket Cafe in late 1997 and saw the aftermath of the fatal shootings of three senior Bandidos bikies in the basement.

    Tarantino became convinced bikies were coming after him and spent years moving across the country, changing his name and implementing “anti-surveillance” measures, the court was told.

    He told the jury he regretted confessing to Quanne’s murder in November 2016 as “it affected so many people’s lives”.

    Awful smearing of a dead bloke as standard in this sort of case…
    Rigg said there was “a reasonable possibility” that a Vietnam veteran who had been working at a nearby mail centre was involved in Quanne’s disappearance.

    The now dead man had expressed hatred towards Asians, told people he had a sexual interest in young girls and went on leave just after Quanne disappeared.

    But that was the “extent of anything implicating him in any way” in Quanne’s disappearance, according to the Crown.

  209. Caveman

    Sorry my mistake Welcome to country is there. Kumbaya

  210. egg_

    Their six point manifesto….sorry, remedy, would require the imposition of a world-wide draconian regime presumably directed by the UN and would plunge us back to pre-industrial times.

    But, but… Ross Guano says we’ll be a Global Superpower with smelters a plenty!

  211. egg_

    Except they don’t tell it like it is … they give some misleading graphs and then hope no one is going to call them on it.

    Flannercasting?

  212. Top Ender

    WHITE RIBBON TIED IN KNOTS
    PAUL GARVEY

    When Tracy McLeod Howe, White Ribbon’s short-lived chief executive, sat down with her highlighter to rake through the charity’s expenses during her brief tenure last year, one particular item on the spreadsheet caught her eye.

    It was a charge for “plant hire”. The phrase is typically used to describe mobile equipment such as generators and light towers. What sort of equipment, she asked, had White Ribbon been hiring? The answer stunned her.

    “Plant hire” was exactly that — the cost of renting the ferns and pot plants that dotted White Ribbon’s spacious, and expensive, offices in North Sydney.

    The hired plants were swiftly removed, but so, too, was McLeod Howe. She lasted only 11 weeks in the job before she was tipped out by the charity’s board.

    White Ribbon’s collapse last month has highlighted how excessive the group’s spending became as it evolved into one of the nation’s highest profile charity organisations.

    As the public focus on the scourge of domestic violence intensified, White Ribbon experienced extraordinary growth in income. Between 2014 and last year it brought in more than $20m in revenue, including a record high $6.07m last year.

    But a growth in spending that matched and ultimately exceeded its growth in income, coupled with a split within the anti-violence movement and some bad press eventually overwhelmed the group.

    The charity’s demise has startled outsiders who saw the group as one of the country’s most prominent charities, but, as one former employee who did not want to be named said, the reality of White Ribbon was more like the Wizard of Oz — a visage of glamour and strength from the outside but a different reality behind the curtain.

    Passionately embraced by the Australian community, White Ribbon was championed by all sectors of our society.

    Grassroots organisations held picnics and barbecues. There was a convoy of emergency services vehicles sporting oversized white ribbons that drove through the streets of NSW to raise awareness of the cause.

    In November last year, women wearing headscarfs in the western Sydney Muslim heartland of Lakemba participated in the biggest march against violence towards women for White Ribbon Day. School assembly halls plastered their walls in pledges from children against violence.

    A Queensland primary school tied white ribbons to its fence. Indigenous communities marched alongside soldiers and multi-faith groups.

    Just weeks before the charity announced its collapse, Hobart held its Walk a Mile in Their Shoes White Ribbon Day fundraiser.

    In accordance with the fashion, the charity’s ubiquitous symbol adorned the lapels of our most senior politicians, sports stars and celebrities. Scott Morrison and his predecessor as prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, sported the white ribbon. Television personalities Andrew O’Keefe, David Koch and Wil Anderson were among the high-profile supporters. White Ribbon provided accreditation services to some of the nation’s biggest companies, including Telstra, Rio Tinto and Wesfarmers, which held morning teas and breakfasts.

    The next White Ribbon Day is just weeks away. White Ribbon’s own website continues to list dozens of events involving schools, workplaces and communities, scheduled across the nation in the next few weeks. Workers on the Wheatstone gas platform in the Indian Ocean are planning a morning tea; one man has promised to run 40 marathons in a single year while raising $40,000 for the charity; the RAAF is proposing a fundraiser where teams will compete to pull a Hercules aircraft. The organisation has urged people to push on with their plans.

    In the meantime, White Ribbon’s liquidators will work away in the background to see what they can salvage out of the one-time philanthropic juggernaut.

    Documents from liquidators Worrells Solvency and Forensic Accountants detail the inventory of items up for sale. Among them are 157,759 bags of white ribbons, 54,260 bags of wristbands, 20,045 balloons and four oversized foam hands.

    But the most valuable items are likely to be White Ribbon’s intellectual property and trademarks. Numerous groups have lodged offers with Worrells, and the group is on the brink of a deal that would resurrect White Ribbon under new ownership.

    There is a widespread belief that, under the right operating model, the White Ribbon message can thrive once again.

    But that future success relies on a clear-eyed understanding of the complex reasons for the charity’s collapse.

    Libby Lloyd was a central figure in White Ribbon’s early years, working alongside O’Keefe and spending a decade on the group’s board before stepping down in 2013. She says she has been grieving for the group in the weeks since its collapse.

    “We are our own worst enemies if we dance on the grave of those who fail. If a refuge crashed because funding ceased, we should weep. And I weep for this moment in our White Ribbon movement,” she said.

    “There’s a million steps in this space that we need to make it work. We need an organisation like this. Yes it wasn’t perfect, but we were learning.”

    Buying redemption

    Accused of a shallow approach to preventing the crime of domestic violence, White Ribbon became a high-profile target. The charity was portrayed as a fig leaf for those looking to move on quickly from a controversy — a way for men and organisations to feel good about themselves. When media personality Eddie McGuire made an onair “joke” about drowning Caroline Wilson, for example, his broadcaster Triple M responded to the fallout by signing up for White Ribbon’s training program.

    Nina Funnell, a journalist and sexual assault survivor advocate, says the group all too often slipped into the “redemption-buying industry”. “I saw it as a fairly facile, tokenistic organisation ripe for exploitation by those who needed a quick-fix solution to redeem their own brand as an individual or an organisation,” she says.

    Funnell also echoes a common criticism of White Ribbon — that its focus on brand recognition meant it grew at the expense of charities that funded shelters and those working at the frontline of the domestic violence crisis. “Those groups are far too busy to be working out their next hashtag campaign,” she says.

    However, former chairman Nicholas Cowdery QC says many of those “sinking the boot in” to White Ribbon in the wake of its collapse are doing so on the basis of “ignorance and misinformation”. “One piece of spectacular and stubborn ignorance is the complaint that White Ribbon didn’t do anything to help victims of domestic violence,” he says.

    “That has never been part of its mandate, as a cursory glance at the website would disclose.”

    October last year was a horror month for the organisation, arguably marking rock bottom for its reputation.

    Cowdery stood down over comments he made on an ABC documentary referring to convicted baby killer Keli Lane’s sex life. Also that month, the charity drew fire as it wavered in its support for women’s reproductive rights. Women’s Safety NSW chief executive Hayley Foster says the abortion position — that it was “agnostic” over the decriminalisation of abortion — did lasting damage. “Those on the frontline really had to question our support for what the organisation was doing,” Foster says.

    However, University of NSW associate professor of criminology Michael Salter, an adviser to the White Ribbon board during the past year, says few who attended community events were aware of the conceptual criticisms of the group. “Last year we saw massive community interest in White Ribbon Day. Nobody … on the ground had any idea of the elite media criticism of White Ribbon but they were really passionate about the issue,” he says.

    Outdated model

    More telling, says Salter, is that the group was stuck under an outdated not-for-profit model, burdened with excessive staff and office expenses.

    “These days not-for-profits tend to be more nimble, flexible and adaptable with a smaller burden of permanent staff and more engagement in a collaborative way that might involve pulling people in on contract,” he says.

    “When White Ribbon was set up, it was very much under the older model where you’ve got quite a high salary burden, you’ve got a lot of people on staff, and you need to bring in money to keep people employed.”

    Among its biggest financial missteps was the decision in May 2017 to break its office lease early and move 230m up Walker Street, North Sydney.

    It more than tripled its annual lease obligations in the process, from less than $100,000 a year at its old headquarters to about $350,000 a year at the time of its collapse.

    “They were signed up to a very expensive lease in North Sydney with a massive floor plate. That’s a huge set of overhead costs they just didn’t need,” Salter says. “They were decisions inherited by the last couple of chief executive officers and unfortunately there was very little they could do.”

    As White Ribbon’s income grew, employee expenses ballooned. They reached almost $4m last year, up from less than $1.6m in 2014. The growing overheads left White Ribbon in a precarious position when it started to run into headwinds.

    It recorded an $840,826 deficit last year, wiping out much of the accumulated surplus it had built up in previous years, and was on track to record another big loss this year before its directors made the decision to pull the pin.

    According to former insiders, the rapid growth in spending was not accompanied by any sufficiently rigorous business plan or analysis.

    The workplace accreditation program, according to one former insider, saw some of the biggest and richest companies in the country charged only $15,000 to $20,000 for a service that took about 18 months and multiple workers to deliver.

    Major corporations keen to demonstrate their social credentials flocked to the service, but the amount charged in some instances barely covered travel costs, let alone the wages of the staff and contractors involved.

    Merchandising slump

    White Ribbon was also hit by a sharp slump in merchandise sales last year.

    The revenue generated by all those white ribbons, wristbands and other paraphernalia tanked by almost 40 per cent that year, putting a strain on the group’s finances that ultimately would prove fatal.

    Some say the drop reflected a turn in public support away from the charity, but others closer to the organisation say the merchandise had grown stale and unappealing.

    They point to the record $1.15m in income generated by White Ribbon’s community events last year as proof that grassroots support remained strong for the organisation even as criticism grew louder.

    The liquidators at Worrells have been studying the charity’s groups during the past month.

    They say they have found no evidence of a single key cause for White Ribbon’s demise.

    “At the start of this process we said that third-party commentary seeking to lay blame was likely speculative, but can now confirm that such opinions are misinformed or biased. There is no ‘smoking gun’ when it comes to White Ribbon,” Worrells partner Aaron Lucan says.

    “Like most charities, White Ribbon was reliant on the sustainability of disparate, discretionary sources of revenue, yet was bound by hard commercial realities like long-term leases and fixed staffing costs.”

    White Ribbon found it hard to adapt to such quick growth in its revenue, while the high turnover at its upper levels also hurt its ability to make the right strategic decisions, he adds.

    “With three CEOs and four chairs over approximately 12 months, there was little continuity of management and leadership during the most critical times,” Lucan says.

    McLeod Howe, meanwhile, says she doesn’t feel any vindication over the events since her sudden departure last year.

    Instead, she says the whole situation makes her feel ill.

    “I’m incredibly sad to see people who I respect out of work just before Christmas,” she says.

    She hopes White Ribbon returns in some form.

    “In future, anyone who is going to be a backbone organiser should consider themselves a custodian, not a brand owner, and think about ways to give back to communities,” she says.

    “It’s not just about creating more staff for more staff’s sake, there needs to be something much more grassroots, community-led.”

    ‘I saw it as a fairly facile, tokenistic organisation ripe for exploitation by those who needed a quick-fix solution to redeem their own brand’

    Oz complete article from the print edition

  213. Top Ender

    WHITE RIBBON TIED IN KNOTS
    PAUL GARVEY

    When Tracy McLeod Howe, White Ribbon’s short-lived chief executive, sat down with her highlighter to rake through the charity’s expenses during her brief tenure last year, one particular item on the spreadsheet caught her eye.

    It was a charge for “plant hire”. The phrase is typically used to describe mobile equipment such as generators and light towers. What sort of equipment, she asked, had White Ribbon been hiring? The answer stunned her.

    “Plant hire” was exactly that — the cost of renting the ferns and pot plants that dotted White Ribbon’s spacious, and expensive, offices in North Sydney.

    The hired plants were swiftly removed, but so, too, was McLeod Howe. She lasted only 11 weeks in the job before she was tipped out by the charity’s board.

    White Ribbon’s collapse last month has highlighted how excessive the group’s spending became as it evolved into one of the nation’s highest profile charity organisations.

    As the public focus on the scourge of domestic violence intensified, White Ribbon experienced extraordinary growth in income. Between 2014 and last year it brought in more than $20m in revenue, including a record high $6.07m last year.

    But a growth in spending that matched and ultimately exceeded its growth in income, coupled with a split within the anti-violence movement and some bad press eventually overwhelmed the group.

    The charity’s demise has startled outsiders who saw the group as one of the country’s most prominent charities, but, as one former employee who did not want to be named said, the reality of White Ribbon was more like the Wizard of Oz — a visage of glamour and strength from the outside but a different reality behind the curtain.

    Passionately embraced by the Australian community, White Ribbon was championed by all sectors of our society.

    Grassroots organisations held picnics and barbecues. There was a convoy of emergency services vehicles sporting oversized white ribbons that drove through the streets of NSW to raise awareness of the cause.

    In November last year, women wearing headscarfs in the western Sydney M uslim heartland of Lakemba participated in the biggest march against violence towards women for White Ribbon Day. School assembly halls plastered their walls in pledges from children against violence.

    A Queensland primary school tied white ribbons to its fence. Indigenous communities marched alongside soldiers and multi-faith groups.

    Just weeks before the charity announced its collapse, Hobart held its Walk a Mile in Their Shoes White Ribbon Day fundraiser.

    In accordance with the fashion, the charity’s ubiquitous symbol adorned the lapels of our most senior politicians, sports stars and celebrities. Scott Morrison and his predecessor as prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, sported the white ribbon. Television personalities Andrew O’Keefe, David Koch and Wil Anderson were among the high-profile supporters. White Ribbon provided accreditation services to some of the nation’s biggest companies, including Telstra, Rio Tinto and Wesfarmers, which held morning teas and breakfasts.

    The next White Ribbon Day is just weeks away. White Ribbon’s own website continues to list dozens of events involving schools, workplaces and communities, scheduled across the nation in the next few weeks. Workers on the Wheatstone gas platform in the Indian Ocean are planning a morning tea; one man has promised to run 40 marathons in a single year while raising $40,000 for the charity; the RAAF is proposing a fundraiser where teams will compete to pull a Hercules aircraft. The organisation has urged people to push on with their plans.

    In the meantime, White Ribbon’s liquidators will work away in the background to see what they can salvage out of the one-time philanthropic juggernaut.

    Documents from liquidators Worrells Solvency and Forensic Accountants detail the inventory of items up for sale. Among them are 157,759 bags of white ribbons, 54,260 bags of wristbands, 20,045 balloons and four oversized foam hands.

    But the most valuable items are likely to be White Ribbon’s intellectual property and trademarks. Numerous groups have lodged offers with Worrells, and the group is on the brink of a deal that would resurrect White Ribbon under new ownership.

    There is a widespread belief that, under the right operating model, the White Ribbon message can thrive once again.

    But that future success relies on a clear-eyed understanding of the complex reasons for the charity’s collapse.

    Libby Lloyd was a central figure in White Ribbon’s early years, working alongside O’Keefe and spending a decade on the group’s board before stepping down in 2013. She says she has been grieving for the group in the weeks since its collapse.

    “We are our own worst enemies if we dance on the grave of those who fail. If a refuge crashed because funding ceased, we should weep. And I weep for this moment in our White Ribbon movement,” she said.

    “There’s a million steps in this space that we need to make it work. We need an organisation like this. Yes it wasn’t perfect, but we were learning.”

    Buying redemption

    Accused of a shallow approach to preventing the crime of domestic violence, White Ribbon became a high-profile target. The charity was portrayed as a fig leaf for those looking to move on quickly from a controversy — a way for men and organisations to feel good about themselves. When media personality Eddie McGuire made an onair “joke” about drowning Caroline Wilson, for example, his broadcaster Triple M responded to the fallout by signing up for White Ribbon’s training program.

    Nina Funnell, a journalist and sexual assault survivor advocate, says the group all too often slipped into the “redemption-buying industry”. “I saw it as a fairly facile, tokenistic organisation ripe for exploitation by those who needed a quick-fix solution to redeem their own brand as an individual or an organisation,” she says.

    Funnell also echoes a common criticism of White Ribbon — that its focus on brand recognition meant it grew at the expense of charities that funded shelters and those working at the frontline of the domestic violence crisis. “Those groups are far too busy to be working out their next hashtag campaign,” she says.

    However, former chairman Nicholas Cowdery QC says many of those “sinking the boot in” to White Ribbon in the wake of its collapse are doing so on the basis of “ignorance and misinformation”. “One piece of spectacular and stubborn ignorance is the complaint that White Ribbon didn’t do anything to help victims of domestic violence,” he says.

    “That has never been part of its mandate, as a cursory glance at the website would disclose.”

    October last year was a horror month for the organisation, arguably marking rock bottom for its reputation.

    Cowdery stood down over comments he made on an ABC documentary referring to convicted baby killer Keli Lane’s sex life. Also that month, the charity drew fire as it wavered in its support for women’s reproductive rights. Women’s Safety NSW chief executive Hayley Foster says the abortion position — that it was “agnostic” over the decriminalisation of abortion — did lasting damage. “Those on the frontline really had to question our support for what the organisation was doing,” Foster says.

    However, University of NSW associate professor of criminology Michael Salter, an adviser to the White Ribbon board during the past year, says few who attended community events were aware of the conceptual criticisms of the group. “Last year we saw massive community interest in White Ribbon Day. Nobody … on the ground had any idea of the elite media criticism of White Ribbon but they were really passionate about the issue,” he says.

    Outdated model

    More telling, says Salter, is that the group was stuck under an outdated not-for-profit model, burdened with excessive staff and office expenses.

    “These days not-for-profits tend to be more nimble, flexible and adaptable with a smaller burden of permanent staff and more engagement in a collaborative way that might involve pulling people in on contract,” he says.

    “When White Ribbon was set up, it was very much under the older model where you’ve got quite a high salary burden, you’ve got a lot of people on staff, and you need to bring in money to keep people employed.”

    Among its biggest financial missteps was the decision in May 2017 to break its office lease early and move 230m up Walker Street, North Sydney.

    It more than tripled its annual lease obligations in the process, from less than $100,000 a year at its old headquarters to about $350,000 a year at the time of its collapse.

    “They were signed up to a very expensive lease in North Sydney with a massive floor plate. That’s a huge set of overhead costs they just didn’t need,” Salter says. “They were decisions inherited by the last couple of chief executive officers and unfortunately there was very little they could do.”

    As White Ribbon’s income grew, employee expenses ballooned. They reached almost $4m last year, up from less than $1.6m in 2014. The growing overheads left White Ribbon in a precarious position when it started to run into headwinds.

    It recorded an $840,826 deficit last year, wiping out much of the accumulated surplus it had built up in previous years, and was on track to record another big loss this year before its directors made the decision to pull the pin.

    According to former insiders, the rapid growth in spending was not accompanied by any sufficiently rigorous business plan or analysis.

    The workplace accreditation program, according to one former insider, saw some of the biggest and richest companies in the country charged only $15,000 to $20,000 for a service that took about 18 months and multiple workers to deliver.

    Major corporations keen to demonstrate their social credentials flocked to the service, but the amount charged in some instances barely covered travel costs, let alone the wages of the staff and contractors involved.

    Merchandising slump

    White Ribbon was also hit by a sharp slump in merchandise sales last year.

    The revenue generated by all those white ribbons, wristbands and other paraphernalia tanked by almost 40 per cent that year, putting a strain on the group’s finances that ultimately would prove fatal.

    Some say the drop reflected a turn in public support away from the charity, but others closer to the organisation say the merchandise had grown stale and unappealing.

    They point to the record $1.15m in income generated by White Ribbon’s community events last year as proof that grassroots support remained strong for the organisation even as criticism grew louder.

    The liquidators at Worrells have been studying the charity’s groups during the past month.

    They say they have found no evidence of a single key cause for White Ribbon’s demise.

    “At the start of this process we said that third-party commentary seeking to lay blame was likely speculative, but can now confirm that such opinions are misinformed or biased. There is no ‘smoking gun’ when it comes to White Ribbon,” Worrells partner Aaron Lucan says.

    “Like most charities, White Ribbon was reliant on the sustainability of disparate, discretionary sources of revenue, yet was bound by hard commercial realities like long-term leases and fixed staffing costs.”

    White Ribbon found it hard to adapt to such quick growth in its revenue, while the high turnover at its upper levels also hurt its ability to make the right strategic decisions, he adds.

    “With three CEOs and four chairs over approximately 12 months, there was little continuity of management and leadership during the most critical times,” Lucan says.

    McLeod Howe, meanwhile, says she doesn’t feel any vindication over the events since her sudden departure last year.

    Instead, she says the whole situation makes her feel ill.

    “I’m incredibly sad to see people who I respect out of work just before Christmas,” she says.

    She hopes White Ribbon returns in some form.

    “In future, anyone who is going to be a backbone organiser should consider themselves a custodian, not a brand owner, and think about ways to give back to communities,” she says.

    “It’s not just about creating more staff for more staff’s sake, there needs to be something much more grassroots, community-led.”

    ‘I saw it as a fairly facile, tokenistic organisation ripe for exploitation by those who needed a quick-fix solution to redeem their own brand’

    Oz complete article from the print edition

  214. Steve trickler

    Bald, heading to Chechnya.



  215. Leigh Lowe

    Rigg said there was “a reasonable possibility” that a Vietnam veteran who had been working at a nearby mail centre was involved in Quanne’s disappearance.

    The now dead man had expressed hatred towards Asians

    It’s not uncommon that Viet Vets express hatred towards Asians.
    We’ve seen a little of it here.

  216. johanna

    Interesting article about movement of a shipwreck just above Niagara Falls, here.

    But, in case anyone thought that we have reached Peak Stupid, check this out:

    The ship, known as the Iron Scow, is a famous feature of Niagara Falls, which straddle the US-Canadian border.

    The ship broke loose from a tug on August 6, 1918, leaving two men stranded on board, according to Niagara Parks.

    In one of the most dramatic rescue efforts in the history of Niagara Falls, the two crewmen, Gustav Lofberg, 51, and James Harris, 53 were rescued the following day.

    Since then the ship had been stuck in the rocks about 600 metres from the edge of Horseshoe Falls.

    Niagara Parks Chief Executive Officer David Adames told The New York Times he had “thought it would be there for all time“.

    Words fail.

    This is the CEO, mind you, whom one would expect to have an IQ higher than that of a whelk.

  217. feelthebern

    We’ve seen a little of it here.

    A little?

  218. notafan

    Hmm

    Expensive lease in North Sydney and all the trimmings.

    Over 4 million in wages.

    What did they do for ‘women’ exactly?

    Raise ‘awareness’?

    Like a lot of these charities it’s not about the cause it’s about the cushy jobs for the few.

  219. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Andrew O’Keeffe, David Koch and Wil Anderson were among the high-profile supporters. White Ribbon provided accreditation services’

    Yes. I clearly recall those laugh-a-minute funsters from The Chaser wearing white ribbons all the time, while decrying the practice of covering up for blokes who think it appropriate to give ‘er indoors the rounds of the kitchen.

    Hang on. No, I don’t.

  220. Percy Popinjay

    Speaking of muppets, the ALPBC covers the fiftieth anniversary of a certain televisual feast in the former’s staggeringly boring cliched and utterly un-newsworthy style:

    There have been a few bumps in the road however, like Roosevelt, an early puppet whose stereotypical African American dialect offended many.

    Singer Katy Perry showed a little too much for some parents in 2010, and Cookie Monster, in the face of an obesity epidemic, had to moderate his adoration of cookies to “a sometimes food.”

    Brought to you by the letters “A”, “L”, “P”, “B” and “C” and the number eleventy gazillion.

    P.S. I believe Pol Dot may be able to assist those seeking to research the Katy Perry video.

  221. ZK2A:

    I had my knees done with stem cells five years ago – they were “bone on bone”, but stemcells worked. May not be covered by private health though.

    It would be an interesting experiment, though.
    Grab a few stem cells from a person, grow them to two kilos worth and re infuse them back into the person.
    Or has that been done?

  222. notafan

    Notafan used publically available statistics about renter behaviour rather than make stuff up.

    There are incentives for both tenants and landlords to take longer leases than six months.

    Agents fees is one, risk of no rent at all during relisting is another.

    Moving is also very expensive.

    I believe 12 months is usually the minimum offered.

    Tell us why landlords prefer six month leases please.

    Two of my children have rental properties so I might know.

    Oh and yes they are useless millennials.

    I also love people who one day boast of coming from money the next day pretending that everything they have is from the sweat of their own brow.

  223. Old School Conservative

    What did they do for ‘women’ exactly?

    Well former chairman Nicholas Cowdery QC partially answers your question:

    “One piece of spectacular and stubborn ignorance is the complaint that White Ribbon didn’t do anything to help victims of domestic violence,” he says.

    That has never been part of its mandate, as a cursory glance at the website would disclose.”

  224. notafan

    I thought as much osc

    Yet the article talks about refuges potentially having to close.

    No wonder the public had lost interest.

  225. Percy Popinjay

    Grassroots organisations held picnics and barbecues. There was a convoy of emergency services vehicles sporting oversized white ribbons that drove through the streets of NSW to raise awareness of the cause.

    Police harrassed muddle aged white males attempting to conduct their sacred Saturday ritual of visiting Bunnings …

  226. Cactus

    I care about practical matters and outcomes, not feels.

    I could never understand what white ribbon actually did. There is another mob promoting men painting a fingernail pink as well for DV which again I never understood. A bunch of elites proclaiming they are pious because they are wearing a white ribbon does nothing for DV. Reminds me of that Seinfeld episode when Kramer refused to wear the ribbon.

  227. Top Ender

    A look at Pocahontas and her policies, over at Quadrant:

    Global warming has also given a platform to extremists and eccentrics. In normal times people like Tim Flannery, Roger Hallam, Al Gore, the aging David Attenborough and the callow Greta Thunberg would be given the same regard as ranters at Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park. But these are not normal times. Superstition has gripped large sections of the population who have put aside their common sense in order to accept scientistic codswallop. We have twelve years to save the planet? Really, and Elizabeth Warren is a Cherokee Indian because her papa had high cheek bones.

    Something is going on that stretches beyond the global warming hoax. We are living in dangerous times. The aforementioned Pocahontas is the favourite among bookies to be the Democratic candidate for president. Here are just some (just some) of her mad policies. And this is not a spoof.

    Link

  228. Mother Lode

    What did they do for ‘women’ exactly?

    Raise ‘awareness’?

    They were not to keen on raising awareness of the way they spent money.

    I don’t know how effective they were in disseminating information regarding domestic violence – although my suspicion is that they were dedicated to pushing a barrow that it is straight white men who are the source of domestic violence. Lots of images of surly white men and grey crumpled, neurasthenic women to convey the message that works for them rather than reflects the truth.

    And like the purveyors of halal certification they make money from selling accreditation. And if they are quick enough to leap on any instance of offence they could put themselves forward as offering redemption so long advance the brand.

    It is hard not to be cynical when they were happy to turn a blind eye to the wider picture including violence by women, violence by gays, and violence by other cultures, as well as within the picture they had to see how violence among white men might break down – financial stability, long term vs revolving door relationships, religious attitudes, edumacation etc.

  229. johanna

    White Ribbon was a feelgood opportunity for politicians and ‘celebrities’ to network and be photographed together. It was also a nice little sinecure for its SJW employees, whose numbers grew and grew.

    As they themselves admit, not a single dollar ever went to help the victims of domestic violence. I wonder how many of the community groups who supported them knew that?

  230. Knuckle Dragger

    Just had a squiz at the WR website.

    Their donation portal is still up, as is their Careers section.

    You can be an intern there starting three weeks ago, apparently, as long as you fulfil the selection criteria. Of which one happens to be:

    ‘Have a passion for gender equality and ending violence against women’

    As the mechanic said, there’s yer problem. Mission creep and becoming a giant cash-eating amorphous SJW fatberg.

  231. calli

    Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault
    #3202969, posted on November 6, 2019 at 11:14 am
    Calli and Lizzie B teaching “advanced flouncing.”

    Calli definitely, but I wouldn’t know about Lizzie, Zulu.
    A couple of weeks ago she requested I add her to my “ignore” list.
    Being a gentleman I have complied.

    I have absolutely no idea what you are talking about.

  232. Percy Popinjay

    Forensic Accountants detail the inventory of items up for sale. Among them are 157,759 bags of white ribbons, 54,260 bags of wristbands, 20,045 balloons and four oversized foam hands

    What, no oversized foam rolling pins?

    Would you not feel like a total chump if you’d ever offered any support to that erstwhile pack of utterly incompetent narcissistic self aggrandizing flogs. What a joke.

  233. johanna

    I will ignore notafan’s addle-brained coments about renting, but what about this:

    I also love people who one day boast of coming from money the next day pretending that everything they have is from the sweat of their own brow.

    WTF? Is The Banned One drafting her comments?

  234. calli

    I’m learning to tango in BA next week.

    If flouncing is one of the moves, I’ll work extra hard at it. No good being accused of something you can’t do.

  235. Mark A

    I am not opposing renting, it fills a need for a lot of renters and owners. But, Dot and his ilk can take a running jump with their arguments that it is superior to owning one’s (however modest) own shack.

    I’m surprised this is even argued.

    If for no other reason, you can drill as many holes in your wall as you like and paint the flaming thing any colour you like. (Subject to some stupid council rules and taste)

    It take very astute financial acumen in investment to accumulate the same capital gain.
    Hardly any ordinary people can do that.

    It’s like giving up smokes, you’d think that after 10 years you would have a fortune in savings, show me one person who did that.

  236. Mother Lode

    54,260 bags of wristbands

    I hope it is just one or two wristband per bag – not something like 10. That would be half a million wristbands. And how many people would want to wear one as, not being easily recognisable, they would be useless for signalling virtue?

  237. Percy Popinjay

    There is another mob promoting men painting a fingernail pink as well for DV which again I never understood

    Seaman Steynes of the RAN is on board.

  238. The Barking Toad

    Seaman Steynes of the RAN is on board.

    Shouldn’t that be Seaperson Steynes?

  239. Roger

    A look at Pocahontas and her policies, over at Quadrant

    Old school Dems are getting so nervous they’re trying to conjure a Hillary candidacy out of a book tour.

  240. EvilElvis

    I care about practical matters and outcomes, not feels.

    I could never understand what white ribbon actually did.

    What do realistically ninety five percent of charities do apart from blow more than 75c in the dollar putting on virtue signalling do’s and harping incessantly about how shit society is but they need to do more.

    There’s far to much funding of useless charitable ‘jobs’ and fundraisers that has even permeated into grassroots, community based, grants driven funding of boomers hobbies.

  241. Knuckle Dragger

    Percy’s link:

    Whatever that beardy (and probably ranga) with the pink fingernail is, it’s an officer of some type.

    Let me know when you’re allowed to walk in the dark*, Captain Haddock, and then you can tell me about trannies in the rigging.

    *Anzac Day this year.

  242. DrBeauGan

    The Barking Toad
    #3203086, posted on November 6, 2019 at 2:08 pm
    Seaman Steynes of the RAN is on board.

    Shouldn’t that be Seaperson Steynes?

    Only if you want to ruin the joke.

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