Open Forum: November 23, 2019

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3,854 Responses to Open Forum: November 23, 2019

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  1. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    C’mon, syphilis, you sanctimonious, tiresome ol’ narcissistic onanist – let’s have a response to this:

    Quite possibly the most obnoxious, monstrously ooglee venereal disease laden cumbucket slag to have existed in human history.

  2. DrBeauGan

    Quite possibly the most obnoxious, monstrously ooglee venereal disease laden cumbucket slag to have existed in human history.

    I do think that’s a slight exaggeration, Spurgeon.

  3. thefrollickingmole

    Steady on Monkey 3, she has some stiff homegrown competition.

    Clementine Ford 🧟‍♀️
    @clementine_ford
    Follow Follow @clementine_ford
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    Replying to @raddledoldtart @cint_g43 and 4 others
    Abortion saves lives. It is healthcare.

    1:01 AM – 5 Aug 2019

    And the last part of your description matches some others as well.

    Benjamin Law 羅旭能
    @mrbenjaminlaw
    Follow Follow @mrbenjaminlaw
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    If Andrew Bolt’s publicly shitting himself over it, you know it’s good.

    Semi-regular reminder: Dark Emu will recalibrate everything you about about Aboriginal architecture, engineering and agriculture on this continent.

    Give it to your non-Indigenous relatives this Christmas.

    And on the topic of dork emu its depressing just how deliberately stupid some people can be.

    Steve Wilson
    @Steve_Lockstep
    Nov 17
    More
    Replying to @mrbenjaminlaw
    Yes Dark Emu is just extraordinary. It could actually be a chance to build the national pride that Australian Aboriginals deserve. They had cities, roads, agriculture and abundance 10,000 years ahead of the other civilizations in the textbooks. ^Aussies^ could celebrate that.

  4. Juan

    From China tried to plant its candidate in Federal parliament, authorities believe:

    For a businessman with interests in Melbourne, Mr [Brian] Chen leads a complicated life. He has been photographed wearing a Chinese military uniform and has also posed as a journalist with global media while attending international political summits, including the G20 and APEC. Mr Chen said in an interview he had been pictured in a Chinese military uniform because “some friends joined the army so I borrowed their uniforms to take some photos to show off. There’s no other meaning”.

    Totes legit.

  5. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    They had cities, roads, agriculture and abundance 10,000 years ahead of the other civilizations in the textbooks.

    And this malarkey is going to be taught in schools, and broadcast on “your” A.B.C?

  6. Bruce of Newcastle

    They had cities, roads, agriculture and abundance 10,000 years ahead of the other civilizations in the textbooks.

    And when Neil Armstrong landed he was presented with a native title claim by an aboriginal guy in a possum-skin spacesuit.

  7. Mak Siccar

    Brett
    #3243867, posted on November 24, 2019 at 4:52 pm
    Hoping Constable Rolfe has got a good QC…….

    Is there a GoFund Me page because I will happily contribute?

  8. thefrollickingmole

    Looking at fords twitter i was struck how incestuous most of the ABC/Arts mob are. All seem to be patron of some little ABC promoted festival ofr another and busily invite each other to various talkfests.

    I dont think its possible to overstate just how much damage and cost their ABC inflicts on this country.

  9. Rockdoctor

    Countess. I recently was talking to some young people on China and what possibly drives their attitudes. I brought up the last Emperor of the Qing Dynasty, Opium Wars, Boxer Rebellion, rise of Sun Yat Sen and later Chaing Kai Shek who escaped to Taiwan after Mao’s army was victorious. Also went into the multiple different kingdoms that they sometimes revert to in times of division. I learned this at High School around year 10. Most of these kids didn’t know any of it. How are we supposed to engage with one of our biggest trading partners prudently if we don’t know why they are the way they are? Our education system is failing our children big time…

  10. Caveman

    ABC, now spruking marine heat waves under the sea getting more intense by 2040 -2050.
    How kool catch fish already cooked.

  11. A Lurker

    Yes Dark Emu is just extraordinary. It could actually be a chance to build the national pride that Australian Aboriginals deserve. They had cities, roads, agriculture and abundance 10,000 years ahead of the other civilizations in the textbooks. ^Aussies^ could celebrate that.

    Yes, quite extraordinary. Now show me the archaeological proof of all these cities, roads etc.
    Oh, you don’t have any archaeological proof? Just feels?
    Right then.
    Off you go now and find me an Aboriginal city. I’m sure they are just littering the landscape…

  12. DrBeauGan

    Replying to @mrbenjaminlaw
    Yes Dark Emu is just extraordinary. It could actually be a chance to build the national pride that Australian Aboriginals deserve. They had cities, roads, agriculture and abundance 10,000 years ahead of the other civilizations in the textbooks. ^Aussies^ could celebrate that.

    Racist crap. He thinks aborigines are so hopeless that telling lies about their history will make them feel good about themselves. And the rest of us are as gormless as he is.

  13. mh

    Juan
    #3243921, posted on November 24, 2019 at 6:52 pm
    It doesn’t miss the point when you are punting.

    But it might effect how much your winnings are worth in January 2121. 😜

    In any case, your point is well taken.

    Last Saturday I pointed out Tories were $1.55 to win majority government, but no one had any advice on whether it was value. Now the price has shortened to $1.40.

    No matter, most likely too volatile to be betting on UK politics.

    btw, BetEasy have Trump at $2.20 and Ladbrokes have the price $2.38.
    Raise your game, BetEasy.

  14. Nick

    Was about to say the same thing Beaugy

  15. Juan

    From Church of England says Christians must repent for past antisemitism:

    The document acknowledged that two C of E cathedrals, Norwich and Lincoln, were associated with the spread of the “blood libel” in the late Middle Ages. J–ish communities were falsely accused of abducting and killing Christian children to use their blood in the making of Passover matzos (unleavened bread).

    “This allegation, originating in England, became the catalyst for the murder of many J–s in this country and across Europe, especially in pogroms at Eastertide.”

    Both cathedrals now have signs referencing their role in the blood libel. In Lincoln Cathedral, a plaque says: “This libel against the J–s is a shameful example of religious and racial hatred which, continuing down the ages, violently divides many people in the present day.”

  16. Old Lefty

    Ironic, isn’t it, that Robb has now emerged as one be of the leading advocates of the ‘lower lower lower’ school of policy towards imperial Peking. Amply rewarded through his directorships, no doubt.

  17. Bruce of Newcastle

    And all the anthropology and archaeology academics will have to profess belief in this stuff or they’ll lose their jobs. So like the Soviets.

  18. Old Lefty

    You can’t appeal to archaeological evidence, Lurker, unless it’s in a tendentious ideological attempt to discredit the J00deo-Christian scriptures. Go wash your keyboard out!

  19. Knuckle Dragger

    Mak Siccar, 7.26;

    Apparently there’s no need. The Police Associations of every jurisdiction in the country are tipping in. The budget is unlimited, as (allegedly) the rank and file wallopers across the country have voted to get their personal wallets out in the highly unlikely event they need more.

    One of the best criminal barristers in the country has volunteered, and is doing his part pro bono.

    This is also said to cover the malicious prosecution and punitive civil remedies, after the criminal proceedings have finished.

  20. Knuckle Dragger

    BoN,

    Little known fact: Tennant Creek is in fact the very tip of the indigenous Atlantis.

  21. DrBeauGan

    And all the anthropology and archaeology academics will have to profess belief in this stuff or they’ll lose their jobs. So like the Soviets.

    They’ll just have to acknowledge a higher truth, BoN.

    And the scum who wallow in this foulness believe they are morally superior.

  22. min

    Drones were flown over Scotland and discovered the remainder of old villages ,farm lands so now they know what was there preRoman times . Maybe drones can be flown over the region Bruce Pascoe reckons there were large stone villages of more than a thousand people . Amazing what the drones can detect from overhead that cannot be seen at ground level .

  23. Roger

    Say, if journalism is such a public service to our democratic commonwealth that its exponents deserve special protections from laws other Australians must submit to, why is most of it sequestered behind a paywall?

  24. Geriatric Mayfly

    So that’s what the Hindmarsh Island fiasco was all about. The Abos were building the bridge and the island’s NIMBY’s went into meltdown. It will be all in those envelopes marked ‘Secret Wimmin’s Business.’

  25. mh

    SBS have a season of Michael Moore documentaries starting soon.

    FMD

  26. Bruce of Newcastle

    Say, if journalism is such a public service to our democratic commonwealth that its exponents deserve special protections from laws other Australians must submit to, why is most of it sequestered behind a paywall?

    To show how important it is, of course.
    The ABC must therefore also have a paywall.
    With subscription price the average of the Fairfax and Murdoch subs.
    It will show for all the world how important the ABC is for the country!

  27. Roger

    This is also said to cover the malicious prosecution and punitive civil remedies, after the criminal proceedings have finished.

    Meanwhile, how are NT police recruitment numbers shaping up?

  28. jupes

    Driving past RAC Arena this arvo saw that people were streaming in taking their tots to see the Wiggles. Also counted 14 security guards and four policemen. Seriously. A Wiggles concert.

    Oh the joys of multiculturalism. Thank you M*sl*ms. Thank you politicians. Can we have some more please?

  29. Roger

    It will show for all the world how important the ABC is for the country!

    What we need is a contemporary, voluntary version of the old TV license that used to fund the ABC but which Gough axed c. 1973.

    The ABC is constantly telling us how much it is loved by Australians, so there would surely be no problem in take up. And it would relieve the national budget and the long suffering tax payer of a $1 bn a year burden.

    Win – win!

    Salaries might have to be adjusted meantime, but the cause is worth it, is it not, comrades?

  30. Top Ender

    If I remember rightly the Hindmarsh Island “Secret Women’s Business” included that parts of the area looked like the ovaries of a woman – but only when seen from the air.

    Flight obviously invented several thousands of years ago, along with the bulldozers to push the earth into the right shape. Then the technology was disposed of because not necessary when living in Utopia.

    (Not to be confused with the real Utopia, a dump of a place in the NT.)

  31. Juan

    No matter, most likely too volatile to be betting on UK politics.

    Wise choice! At this point in the 2017 election, Theresa May held a commanding lead in the polls and almost everyone expected her to win a large majority; which isn’t to say history will be repeated — BoJo isn’t Maybot Mk 2 — but it does underscore the unpredictability of UK elections.

  32. Roger

    ABC TV news tonight: Oceanic heat waves will destroy the GBR by mid-century!

    Bookmark and revisit in 2050, Catallaxy young’uns.

  33. Geriatric Mayfly

    This Dark Emu chap must be given credit for his perfect timing. We are now confronted daily with the notion of: That Which Is, Is Not. Men being women and menstruating, gestated babies not humans, innocence does not belong to children, language twisted beyond being meaningful etc. etc.

  34. mh

    Do Mus lims hate the wiggles?

  35. Snoopy

    Roger
    #3243964, posted on November 24, 2019 at 8:30 pm
    ABC TV news tonight: Oceanic heat waves will destroy the GBR by mid-century!

    Good. Cease funding the GBR research parasites and use the savings to reduce fuel excise.

  36. jupes

    To paraphrase the great man:

    Never in the field of human existence has so much idiocy been believed by so many to the benefit of so few.

  37. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    China tried to plant its candidate in Federal Parliament, authorities believe
    Sources with knowledge of the alleged plot believe the suspected Chinese intelligence group offered a million dollars to pay for the political campaign of Liberal Party member and Melbourne luxury car dealer Bo “Nick” Zhao, 32, to run for an eastern suburbs seat.

    In March this year, Mr Zhao was found dead in a Melbourne motel room. Local police who have prepared a brief for the coroner have been unable to conclude how he died.

  38. Muddy

    Long, looong rant. Feel free to scroll past.

    It could actually be a chance to build the national pride that Australian Aboriginals deserve.

    History tells us that when cultures meet, the dominant culture (economically, militarily, technologically, population-wise, etc.) often absorbs elements of the non-dominant culture. Vice versa, the non-dominant culture will absorb – forcefully or voluntarily – elements of the dominant culture. Of course, this takes place over a long period. My point is that cultures evolve, due to both external and internal (natural disasters for example) influences. While some of these evolutions may be traumatic or deleterious, other influences may in the long term be seen as beneficial. It is impossible for a culture not to evolve, as it had to develop somehow in the first place.

    Let me skip a few paragraphs and get to my point.

    The black armband view of Australian history posits indigenous culture as an old-style museum exhibit: an untouchable, non-interactive display behind glass, where replica Aboriginals are posed in various scenarios that never change. The poses never change, I mean. The models may be dusted now and then, but otherwise, the display is not to be altered in any way, shape, or means. The fear is that if the display changes, the paying visitors, the arts funding for travelling exhibitions, and the employment opportunities that go with a museum, will dry up. The message is that what you see behind the glass, was unique. It cannot be replicated, and therefore requires preservation.

    I’m digressing again – back to it.

    Numerous towns in the region in which I live, are named using indigenous words. For whatever reason, the early settlers chose to take elements of the local indigenous culture – the names of animals, plants, indigenous characters from myth – and absorb it into their own. I’m rusty on the dates, but some of the oldest names have endured for roughly 140+ years. This cannot be interpreted as anything other than complimentary.

    While the above example may seem trivial, it demonstrates that the dominant culture (technologically speaking) on first contact, chose to acknowledge the non-dominant culture.

    Modern indigenous culture encompasses numerous elements and ‘traditions’ which must have been reconstructed. Indigenous culture then, can evolve, and has evolved.

    There is absolutely no reason why indigenous culture (not that it’s homogenous, but that’s another debate), must be a (selectively) separatist one; no reason why there cannot be pride felt in an evolved culture that takes the ‘best from both worlds.’

    Indigenous ‘culture’ is used as a tool to mummify a percentage of our population. The Priests and Soothsayers wish to bandage indigenous Australians so tightly, that they cannot move; cannot breathe, cannot talk, cannot experience anything other than the pose selected for them, without their input.

    The Priests, Soothsayers, and Curators begin with a museum, but they really desire to create whole suburbs, whole ‘nations’ of mummified humans. Unlike the living dead we see in films, these mummies are not a threat to anyone’s safety. They are, however, a shameful indictment on many of those who self-identify as ‘leaders.’

  39. DrBeauGan

    This Dark Emu chap must be given credit for his perfect timing. We are now confronted daily with the notion of: That Which Is, Is Not. Men being women and menstruating, gestated babies not humans, innocence does not belong to children, language twisted beyond being meaningful etc. etc.

    There have always been plenty of human beings who prefer insane dogma to truth. It’s the new religion. The sleep of reason and the end of Christianity coming together. Not a pretty picture.

  40. jupes

    Do Mus lims hate the wiggles?

    Who knows? But I don’t think the security was there to guard against “right wing extremists”.

  41. Muddy

    jupes
    #3243976, posted on November 24, 2019 at 8:46 pm

    Do Mus lims hate the wiggles?

    Who knows? But I don’t think the security was there to guard against “right wing extremists”.

    I’m not so sure about that. The Wiggles are People of Colour after all.

  42. DrBeauGan

    It is impossible for a culture not to evolve, as it had to develop somehow in the first place.

    The museum curators assume that a culture can be preserved. This is like keeping a rosebush in a fridge to keep it fresh. It shows a complete failure to understand living things.

  43. Snoopy

    cohenite
    #3243979, posted on November 24, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Global warming strikes again:

    UK snow forecast: Coldest winter in 100 YEARS as 3-month sub-zero freeze hits Britain

    Like all forecasts, I’ll believe it when I see it.

  44. jupes

    … no reason why there cannot be pride felt in an evolved culture that takes the ‘best from both worlds.’

    Excellent post Muddy.

    I think the best hope for Aborigines is pride in the evolved culture. While pride in pure Aboriginal culture has been pushed hard for the last few decades, I don’t think anyone believes it, least of all Aborigines. Hence their despair and dysfunction.

  45. jupes

    Like all forecasts, I’ll believe it when I see it.

    Exactly. Let’s not descend into lefty idiocy.

  46. Snoopy

    It is impossible for a culture not to evolve, as it had to develop somehow in the first place.

    Only if ‘evolve’ encompasses the possibility of devolution.

  47. Helen

    Now show me the archaeological proof of all these cities,

    Why the stone eating termites – a special kind of termite only known in Pasco County in Australia in the world – ate them.

    Now also extinct, the termites were eaters of stone, meaning the indigenous people had to rebuild their cities annually.

    Just like paperbark.

  48. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Medivac edges closer to chopping block
    One Nation Senator Pauline Hanson, who controls two upper house seats, withheld her support on Sunday for the union-­restricting legislation. Picture: AAP

    Geoff Chambers
    Federal Political Correspondent
    @Chambersgc
    Joe Kelly
    Canberra Bureau Chief
    @joekellyoz
    5 minutes ago November 24, 2019
    No Comments

    Pauline Hanson and Jacqui Lambie are holding the government’s legislative agenda to ransom in the Senate, as Scott Morrison tries to win their support for key election pledges headlined by union-busting laws and repealing the medivac bill.

    Ahead of the final parliamentary sitting fortnight of the year, the Morrison government was inching closer on Sunday to ­securing the crucial vote of Senator Lambie to repeal the medivac laws.

    As MPs return to Canberra, the government will attempt to win passage through the parliament this week for its Ensuring Integrity Bill, “big stick” energy legislation creating new powers to divest the assets of energy companies and the medivac repeal. It will table its final religious discrimination bill next week.

    Senator Hanson, who controls two upper house seats, withheld her support on Sunday for the union-­restricting legislation, declaring she would hold more talks with unions before making a final decision.

    “I have meetings organised with unions. I think it was not very good of the government to actually release the amendments late Friday afternoon,” the One Nation leader said.

    Centre Alliance has committed its two upper house votes to support the bill, which means the government will need the support of One Nation or Senator Lambie to secure its passage.

    Opposition industrial relations spokesman Tony Burke used the 23 million breaches of anti-money laundering and terrorism rules by Westpac to discredit the government’s bill, arguing that a union could be shut down for “three breaches of paper work”.

    “Under this bill, after the amendments, if a union puts its paper work in late or fails to put its paper work in three times the ­entire organisation can be deregistered. Now, if that’s meant to be corporate equivalence I’m not sure how 23 million equals three,” Mr Burke said.

    On Sunday, another of the government’s election promises to repeal the medivac laws, which passed in the dying days of the 45th parliament with Labor, Greens and crossbench support, looked closer to being resolved.

    Senator Lambie flagged changes to the repeal bill, confirming her office had been locked in negotiations with the government and suggested “we’re not far off it”, with a potential resolution within a few days.

    The Tasmanian senator, whose vote would secure the numbers for the government, said there would be more face-to-face meetings to finalise her position on the medivac repeal.

    “I think what you’ll find with the medivac, it may not look like it does today,” Senator Lambie said.

    Breaking, from the Oz.

  49. min

    NASA has predicted cold weather due to lack of sun spots , the lowest since the Maunder Minimum. Canada and USA experiencing record snowfalls.Soya bean crop has lost 40% in Canada. Oz has lost a lot of soya bean crop here because of drought . Greens and Climate alarmists may not be able to get their soy lattes.

  50. jupes

    NASA has predicted cold weather due to lack of sun spots , the lowest since the Maunder Minimum.

    Have they sacked that evil prick Hansen?

  51. DrBeauGan

    NASA has predicted cold weather due to lack of sun spots , the lowest since the Maunder Minimum. Canada and USA experiencing record snowfalls.Soya bean crop has lost 40% in Canada. Oz has lost a lot of soya bean crop here because of drought . Greens and Climate alarmists may not be able to get their soy lattes.

    In a sane world this would kill.the climate catastrophists stone dead. In our world, who knows?

  52. Tel

    NASA has predicted cold weather due to lack of sun spots , the lowest since the Maunder Minimum.

    The Russians have been predicting that for more than ten years, but strange that NASA would suddenly start thinking the Sun has an effect on climate. Gosh … maybe it was the Sun all along, and not CO2?

  53. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Extinction Rebellion threat to block MPs

    Joe Kelly
    Canberra Bureau Chief
    @joekellyoz
    6:18PM November 24, 2019
    106 Comments

    Climate activist group Extinction Rebellion has threatened to blockade the Canberra airport when parliament rises unless MPs meet its demand and begin to “shut down the fossil fuel industry” in the next two weeks.

    An ACT division of the group has written a letter to all federal MPs demanding that the parliament also “legislate towards meeting net zero emissions” by 2025.

    “If you fail to do this by the last sitting day of parliament we will give you a taste of the kind of disruption that you are inflicting on ordinary people across the world by failing to take action on climate change,” the letter said.

    “We plan to blockade your route to the airport on the 5th of December. You don’t deserve a smooth trip home from work if your work is ensuring the continued destruction of the planet.”

    Resources Minister Matt Canavan told The Australian the tactic was “straight of the Green activist playbook.”

    “They always resort to threats and blackmail when reason and debate fails,” he said.

    Labor’s resource spokesman Joel Fitzgibbon — who holds the NSW electorate of Hunter where coal mining is a key industry — was also unimpressed. He warned that the demand for net zero emissions by 2025 would “destroy our economy.”

    “Their idealism is to be commended but a dose of realism would be a good thing too. We all want more meaningful action on climate change but net zero emissions by 2025 would destroy our economy and leave us literally in the dark.

    “We will not make progress on this issue until people stop promoting extreme solutions which achieve little except further divide our communities.”

    Extinction Rebellion linked its push to the bushfires which have claimed four lives and slammed the development of further coal mines and gas projects.

    “As we write this there are 195 active bushfires burning across Australia, people’s homes and communities have been destroyed, some have even lost their lives,” the letter said.

    “Since 2005, ordinary people in Australia have lived through eight of the ten hottest years in recorded history. This is the result of climate change.

    “And what has your response been? Continuing to subsidise the fossil fuel industry by 12 billion dollars each year, continuing to build new coal mines and gas projects and to crack down on activists who are fighting action on this crisis.

    “We are Extinction Rebellion Youth and Students and we are now giving you an ultimatum.”

    From the Oz… Bring it on, Gen Snowflake, bring it on….

  54. They had cities, roads, agriculture and abundance 10,000 years ahead of the other civilizations in the textbooks.

    So what happened to them?

    There were some settlements and aquaculture.

    Not much more.

  55. Tintarella di Luna

    Muddy
    #3243974, posted on November 24, 2019 at 8:45 pm

    Thanks for your thoughtful and thought-provoking comment.

  56. min

    I read it on NASA website re cold weather. There is a Russian woman scientist has done a lot of research on sunspots.

  57. Shy Ted

    After much experimentation I’ve discovered the perfect oil to inject into the old todger. Whale oil. Shopping for larger undies tomorrow.

  58. Chilling stars is now mainstream science

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chilling_Stars (poorly presented there for obvious reasons).

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-02082-2

    Increased ionization supports growth of aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei

    H. Svensmark, M. B. Enghoff, N. J. Shaviv & J. Svensmark

    Nature Communications volume 8, Article number: 2199 (2017)

  59. Snoopy

    There were some settlements and aquaculture.

    A regularly used campsite and a fish trap are not settlements and aquaculture.

  60. Geriatric Mayfly

    Shopping for larger bloomers tomorrow.

  61. I’m being generous. The start of something.

    I’m talking about Lake Condah not Brewarrina.

    I don’t know if it’s worth saving. A couple of diversionary channels.

    World heritage…?

  62. Geriatric Mayfly

    Wonder if they are still there as testimony to my architectural brilliance AND as a budding gastronome. As akids we used to build castles on the sandbanks of the then pristine Upper Yarra. A moat was absolutely essential. And around the fortification would swim elvers elevating the excitement to a fever. A fish trap, and we never knew.

  63. Muddy

    Jupes and Tinta: Thank you for your compliments.

    min
    #3243954, posted on November 24, 2019 at 8:07 pm

    Drones were flown over Scotland and discovered the remainder of old villages ,farm lands so now they know what was there preRoman times . Maybe drones can be flown over the region Bruce Pascoe reckons there were large stone villages of more than a thousand people . Amazing what the drones can detect from overhead that cannot be seen at ground level .

    You raise a solid point there, min. Settled humans often changed the landscape to suit their needs, and indeed, this is one of the prime attributes that differentiates us as a species. Traces of these natural adaptations can sometimes still be observed or inferred by methods you identify.

    Aside from the foundations of domestic abodes which conceivably may have eroded or been covered by centuries of soil etc, one would expect an agricultural settlement of population 1,000+ to also have a means of identifying which pastures belonged to which family (stone hedges, earth berms etc.), of delivering and storing water from a reliable source (culverts, ditches), and even defensive works (mounds, earth ramparts; it is inconceivable that a large, successful settlement would not have been a target for disaffected neighbouring settlements, or wandering ne’er do wells).

  64. Read for the comments.

    https://theconversation.com/the-detective-work-behind-the-budj-bim-eel-traps-world-heritage-bid-71800

    You can claim indigenous Australians did a lot with virtually no evidence.

    I’m angry too that we were never taught about the wonderful richness and wisdom of Indigenous culture and the insights provided by both your article and the book, Dark Emu.

    …..

    These large-scale fishing facilities and associated aquaculture ponds rupture traditional representations of Aboriginal people as simply hunter gatherers.

    Do they though? This seems to invite us to understand indigenous people as a monolithic entity when in fact there was great diversity in culture and technology across the continent.

    I have trouble with some of the dates being put forward, frankly. A group with knowledge of this technology surely would have thrived and become dominant, spreading it over a vast area and fuelling trade. Where is the evidence for this?

    ——-

    I see the eel farming as simply pointing to appropriate use of a particular niche, using hard work and brainpower, and accumulated knowledge and understanding gleaned over many generations.

    Other niches used other techniques to cultivate, contain, trap or harvest foods.

    A great place to start digging deeper is, as mentioned, Bruce Pascoe’s Dark Emu, and also Bill Gammage’s The Greatest Estate on Earth. They indicate that, as you suggest, there was great diversity of culture and tech across the continent.

    For me, it was a head spinner to realise that Indigenous Aussies were active land managers, using local resources and deep knowledge of ecosystems and cycles, in ways that were, to the first Europeans and to us now, recognisably farming.

    *********

  65. Muddy

    Additionally, if indigenous Australians were as technologically advanced as is claimed by Pascoe, you would expect that settled life might have, over time, resulted in the development of classes within the population.

  66. Snoopy

    The fish traps at Lake Condah are an important part of Pascoe’s argument. … The area had a permanent supply of freshwater and abundant eels, fish and water plants. The Gunditjmara people used ingenious methods of channelling water flows …

    They dug diversionary channels with sharp sticks?

  67. Settled humans often changed the landscape to suit their needs, and indeed, this is one of the prime attributes that differentiates us as a species.

    Some indigenous Australians were indeed active land managers.

    …who in turn wiped out a lot of the rainforest and non-sclerophyll forests in Australia.

  68. jo

    Went to the Sagrada Familia last year. There must have been at least 1000 people inside all talking, yet it wasn’t loud, fantastic acoustics and at 12 midday Ave Maria was played. Very nice. I loved the place.

  69. DrBeauGan

    It’s certainly conceivable that aborigines had agriculture and towns twenty thousand years ago. And that the culture that did that degenerated to what captain Cook found. But it’s unlikely and there’s no evidence. The Black Emu stuff is mythology being constructed for the poor aborigines on the patronising assumption that they are too dumb to invent their own.

  70. Let’s get the Bradshaw Paintings radioisotopically dated.

  71. Muddy

    DrBeauGan
    #3244022, posted on November 24, 2019 at 9:52 pm

    It’s certainly conceivable that aborigines had agriculture and towns twenty thousand years ago. And that the culture that did that degenerated

    How long until we get an Australian version of the Easter Island story, thus explaining the decline?

  72. Snoopy

    Frank Walker from National Tiles
    #3244019, posted on November 24, 2019 at 9:50 pm
    Settled humans often changed the landscape to suit their needs, and indeed, this is one of the prime attributes that differentiates us as a species.

    Some indigenous Australians were indeed active land managers.

    …who in turn wiped out a lot of the rainforest and non-sclerophyll forests in Australia.

    Imagine if the knowledge of how to protect human settlements from bushfires hadn’t been destroyed by white colonialists?

  73. Top Ender

    A South Australian federal crossbench senator has raised fears a Chinese naval base will be built close to Darwin on East Timor’s southeast coast.

    Centre Alliance senator Rex Patrick wants Australia to cut out Chinese investment in East Timor by helping Darwin’s closest international country with its development of the multimillion-dollar Greater Sunrise oil and gas project.

    Mr Patrick says failure to do so will open the door for Chinese investment.

    Senator Patrick wants federal parliament to have an inquiry to come up with ways to help the East Timorese government with its plan for a southeast coast Greater Sunrise processing plant 600km from Darwin.

    Mr Patrick pointed to the funds China has already contributed to port facilities on the southeast coast and said East Timor will accept assistance from who ever offers to provide it.

    “China already has a presence on the south coast and they will build it up over the decade, and I wouldn’t be surprised over time if there is a Chinese naval base on the southeast coast of Timor,” he said.

    NT News

  74. New South Holland

    I just remember them throwing rocks at me trying to ride my bike to school circa 1956.
    One hit me on the funny bone that’s near your ankle. I didn’t laugh much.

  75. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘we are now giving you an ultimatum.’

    Gotcha. The first Extinction Rebellion muppet who can change a tyre – on the flat, no camber, no rain and with a complete kit – inside five hours I will listen to.

    Also, junior glue freaks – according to you, no Federal MP ever has hung around Canberra for a day or two finalising their own shit, having end of sitting year dinners or generally faffing about before heading back to their electorates.

    That’s if they don’t go on holidays.

    Backbone of the nation stuff.

  76. egg_

    it was a head spinner to realise that Indigenous Aussies were active land managers, using local resources and deep knowledge of ecosystems and cycles, in ways that were, to the first Europeans and to us now, recognisably farming.

    The Negritos, or the next wave who wiped them out?

  77. Muddy

    The Excrement Retention ultimatum was designed to gain media attention – the plan worked.

  78. Tintarella di Luna

    It’s certainly conceivable that aborigines had agriculture and towns twenty thousand years ago. And that the culture that did that degenerated to what captain Cook found.

    I suggest Tiddalick is responsible – greedy little bastard is that frog

  79. Tintarella di Luna

    For me, it was a head spinner to realise that Indigenous Aussies were active land managers, using local resources and deep knowledge of ecosystems and cycles, in ways that were, to the first Europeans and to us now, recognisably farming

    So Cook just made the Terra Nullius stuff up and wrote it down too — the cad!

  80. DrBeauGan

    it was a head spinner to realise that Indigenous Aussies were active land managers, using local resources and deep knowledge of ecosystems and cycles, in ways that were, to the first Europeans and to us now, recognisably farming.

    These people are children. They can’t distinguish between reality and their fatuous fantasies.

  81. Steve trickler

    Those bloody Russians and their climate models. ( :

    How ironic.



  82. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    So Cook just made the Terra Nullius stuff up and wrote it down too — the cad!

    “Terra Nuiluis” didn’t appear on the scene for over another hundred years or so.

  83. Snoopy

    Centre Alliance senator Rex Patrick wants Australia to cut out Chinese investment in East Timor by helping Darwin’s closest international country with its development of the multimillion-dollar Greater Sunrise oil and gas project.

    East Timor’s onshore facilities are going to be a money pit. Routing a subsea oil pipeline over the Timor trench coupled with East Timor’s mestizo kleptocrats? FMD let the Ching Chongs have it.

    Another Turnbull achievement.

  84. Muddy

    What’s more, despite organised settlements of 1,000+ and agricultural practices, there developed no system of recording other than spitting mud over one’s hand on a cave wall? In theory, such settlements elsewhere in the world lead to specialisation in terms of the role an individual played in their community beyond their immediate family. Specialisation lead to commerce, and commerce eventually required a system of record keeping. As I noted upthread, social classes also eventually developed, and the more privileged of these classes would have required – surprise, surprise – some form of record keeping (what they owned – including slaves/serfs – for taxation purposes, for example).

    Perhaps this is examining the issue in too much detail, but given the period of time we are apparently talking about – what’s it up to now? – for such structure to be present (the grouping of a population in allegedly solid housing, the formalised agricultural practices etc.), yet never developed further into the elements I have noted above (role specialisation and commerce, a system of record keeping, physical adaptation of the natural environment), is plainly – excuse the jargon – whackadoodle.

  85. 8th Dan

    One of the best criminal barristers in the country has volunteered, and is doing his part pro bono.

    Chortle.

  86. min

    Reckon they would have had clothing before record keeping . Perhaps it was all done on message stucks but then they do not have numbers. either

  87. Muddy

    I need to get to bed, but I’m on a roll here…

    Settlements of 1,000+ of our ancient indigenous brethren: Imagine the logistics of feeding that sized population. Let’s assume that this settlement is in a coastal location, so has access has to marine as well as terrestrial food sources. That’s a lot of hunting for animals, a good swathe of land required for grain (with presumably access to a water source), and a potential for overfishing in the nearest waters. Even in a best-case scenario where nutrients are prolifically available, for there to have been no obvious development on a social and cultural level (see my posts above) as a result of those logistical tasks, is incredible.

  88. Steve trickler

    Avi, in Hong Kong.



  89. Geriatric Mayfly

    Agriculture in abundance

    30 50 60 thousand years and spinifex seeds show little sign of husbandry, nor do those of nardoo. There may be other crops which had evolved better nutritional outcomes under human management, but sadly they perished in 1788.

  90. Knuckle Dragger

    Excellent last point, Muddy.

    How did they get hold of the tens of thousands of roos and goannas and skinks and possums to feed 1000 punters three times a day?

    Truck? Jetpack?

  91. Knuckle Dragger

    And assuming they did, how did the bringers of many roos exchange goods and services?

    Barter? Bitcoin?

    As mentioned upthread, how was it all recorded? Where’s the evidence for any of it?

  92. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    As mentioned upthread, how was it all recorded? Where’s the evidence for any of it?

    Where’s the archeological evidence? The ruined huts, the middens, the fireplaces, the piles of bones?

  93. Muddy

    Last thought for the night.

    I may embarrass myself with this one, but I’m sure the hunters among you will let me know: How many people will an average sized ‘roo or wobbly (depends on the type of roo, I know, and wobblies are generally smaller) provide meat for? Ten? So 100 kangas for our population of 1,000-odd?

    Let’s say that this settlement of 1,000+ only ate meat twice a week. On my uneducated reckoning, that makes a requirement of 200 bipedal marsupials per week. How intelligent are these creatures? Will they scram permanently – assuming our settlement is surrounded by abundant grassland – after the first slaughter of their bros?

    That number of required kills also must demand some type of organisation, and not just an individual hunting for their own family.

    Lot’s of other questions, but beauty sleep and all that …

    Dark Emu my rubber ducky.

  94. Muddy

    An apostrophe snuck in there somehow. Bastard.

  95. Muddy

    Oh, and if that number of killings was possible, and continued for at least a brief period until the local population was decimated, surely that would result in an abundance of roo skins, which could then be traded with neighbouring settlements. Voila! Commerce. What’s a roo skin worth, though? Who decides? Does the value of a roo skin change when fewer skins are available?

  96. Geriatric Mayfly

    Somewhere out in that wilderness in the Simpson Desert, my mate Kev knew where the Aboriginal miller’s
    complex was located. He had been there before. A number of sticks bent over in a semi circle may have served as some sort of roof, with no space to stand up. In front, a number of flat rocks which Kev said were used for grinding seed. Despite my reservations, it did look a site of some distant human activity. Have photos of this secondary industry establishment, but cannot upload.

  97. Top Ender

    You’d be surprised how much meat a large animal will provide.

    I did some research a while back on how much it took to supply medieval armies. One para from that:

    One study argues that one cow can feed 4,500 men with one small “hamburger” each ¬– an impressive total. But that is only one meal. If you fed your army of 10,000 three such repasts a day that would mean around 15 cattle a week would need to be processed. And of course man cannot live on meat alone: bread was a necessity and some measure of vegetables and/or fruit would be necessary.

    Mercola. “How Many Burgers Can You Make from One Cow?”. https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/11/14/cafo-beef-hamburger.aspx 14 November, 2015. Accessed June 2017. The study argues for the very small hamburger McDonalds sell, not the “Quarter-pounder” – if that was preferred the cow could only supply 1,000 such hamburgers.

  98. Muddy

    Definitely my last though on this (maybe):

    Sticking with the 1,000+ population, one would imagine that if authority in this settlement still rested with a select few ‘elders,’ why would the youngsters, once they gained the numbers, not organise amongst themselves and overthrow the wrinklies? Then they’d have access to the young girls.

    My point here is that I cannot imagine how the leadership structure we are told existed amongst our indigenous brothers and sisters, would remain effective within a large, settled, population. (Not that they’d be settled for long; as noted above, they’d outstrip the local food supply in no time).

  99. Muddy

    thought

    Sigh.

    Mayfly and Top Ender: I read your posts – both interesting. Thanks.
    Goodnight all.

  100. min

    George Cox ,surveyor was sent out after Blaxland and co to confirm their findings . He went with 5 others,I think, and crossed grassy lands and travelled far. to rivers Cannot remember the names. In his diaries he wrote that he only saw small family groups until he got to where the river met the sea where there were about 70 having some sort of corroboree. He tried using language of those around Sydney area but they could not understand him . There are diaries of early explorers in Library in Sydney no one writes about seeing large groups and settlements . Conspiracy do you think to cover up .

  101. min

    Apologies Evans was sent, Cox was the one to build the road across the Blue Mountains..

  102. Knuckle Dragger

    Bloody hell.

    If a handful of non-paeleontologists (as far as I know) on a blog can deconstruct the entire Dark Emu premise in an hour and a half, wait ’till the real experts start on this crock of shit.

  103. Mark A

    Muddy
    #3244072, posted on November 24, 2019 at 11:43 pm

    Definitely my last though on this (maybe):

    Sticking with the 1,000+ population, one would imagine that if authority in this settlement still rested with a select few ‘elders,’ why would the youngsters, once they gained the numbers, not organise amongst themselves and overthrow the wrinklies? Then they’d have access to the young girls.

    I think you are wrong on this one Muddy.
    The ratio of old v young is the same in a small tribe or large village. They didn’t and don’t rebel in tribes and wouldn’t in a village of a 1000.

    I don’t know squat about tribal society but the elders must have some sort of a power over the others that is quite compelling, absolute and intimidating.

    What it may be?
    No idea.

  104. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    If a handful of non-paeleontologists (as far as I know) on a blog can deconstruct the entire Dark Emu premise in an hour and a half, wait ’till the real experts start on this crock of shit.

    My grandfather was one of the pioneers into the Eastern Wheatbelt, in the early 1920’s. He wrote in his diary
    “Nothing. No campsites, no fireplaces, no middens, no bones, no cave paintings, nothing. No sign that mine weren’t the first footprints ever on this part of Earth.”

    He was furious when the local school started acknowledging the “traditional owners” of the land.

  105. Knuckle Dragger

    Mark A;

    It’s sorcery. The Spirit Man rules the tribal groups with the Big Man/Men as figureheads.

    They’re terrified of it to this day.

  106. Hazmatic

    Friday 31st March 1944 in Ambon. RAAF Flight Sergeants McDonald and Stewart are led to a pit and executed with a pistol shot to the head. The murder of captured allied aircrew by Japanese was an occurrence so commonplace that no investigation of this war crime was ever made. The only noteworthy aspect of their death even today is that a PhD student is in denial of them. You see McDonald and Stewart were both crew of separate Vultee Vengeance’s.

    McDonald was shot down in airframe A27-276 and Stewart from A27-82.

    The PhD student in question has a very curious attitude towards these sort of war crimes. A prominent denialist of every outrage and massacre conducted by Australia’s wartime enemies but a fan boy of those authors who peddle false accusations of Australian War Crimes. Very curious indeed. 31st March 1944 was just another Friday.

    Casual murder of the RAAF type was unremarkable on Ambon a place characterised by the sort of efficient mass murder of captured Australian Infantrymen that made the early German effort against their ‘State enemies’ look amateurish.

    The unfortunate 2/21st Battalion of the ill-fated Australian 8th Division took on a Brigade sized Japanese Invasion force at Ambon in 1942 and inevitably lost. A lot has been written about the suffering of the 8th Div POW’s from 42 to 45. The Burma Railway is well known and the subject of film and books. The Sandakan Death March deserves more attention. Paul Ham’s ‘Sandakan’ has been the best piece of Australian WW2 writing of the past decade. The horrendous fate of the 2/21st has been unfortunately ignored. Significantly the death toll of this one Infantry battalion exceeded the casualties incurred by all three Australian services in the entire Vietnam War. The Australian participation in the Vietnam War a “debacle second only to Gallipoli”? Please…

    The abject tragedy of the 8th Division in 1942 focused the Australian military mind like nothing else during and immediately after the war. The fate of the defenders of the Malay peninsula and the Indonesian archipelago was sealed with the sinking of the Prince of Wales and Repulse. 840 British sailors died in an afternoon from land-based bombers flying from Vietnamese airfields.

    They were land based aircraft because the Japanese Carriers were all busy further East giving Hawaii a flogging. The troops that General Yamashita used to invade Thailand and Malaya set sail from Hainan and picked up a second convoy sailing from Saigon. For Australian Military planners the domino theory had not yet been invented but was precisely what they witnessed. Japanese from China gained access to French Indochina from which they launched an amphibious op on the Thai/Malay border that ultimately saw the fall of Singapore. The Philippines and Dutch East Indies folded quickly, and war was on Australia’s doorstep with Darwin bombed by February 42 and the Japanese thrust not blunted until September 1942 at Milne Bay.

    Most of the men of the 2/21st Battalion never got to hear about the great Australian Victory at Milne Bay. About 300 of them had been murdered by the Japanese in mass executions conducted seven months earlier. The suffering of the 2/21st Battalion exceeded that of every other formed unit of any Australian Service. Assumed Australian national traits such as egalitarianism, resourcefulness and initiative will catastrophically break down given enough stress. No one likes to talk much about the breakdown of the 2/21. They were broken. They had put up a valiant fight against an overwhelmingly superior enemy and in the weeks after their preordained defeat approximately a third of those that survived were dragged off to a pit and then shot, bashed and stabbed to death by the Japanese killing platoon volunteers, while the next batch looked on… They broke. For three years they knew no pity.

    Speaking years after the war, some survivors admitted to acts of extreme selfishness. An Australian adept at climbing coconut trees would note those trees with ripe fruit during the day but would only climb at night so that unseen he did not have to share the bounty. No mention was made about qualifications to operate a Bell and Howell projector…

    There were a lot of distractions from 1946-54 including a savage war in Korea. Australian military planners still had not lost the domino plot of 1942. When SEATO was formed in 1954 in a reaction to the partition of Vietnam Australia was an enthusiastic supporter. It was the airfields and ports of South Vietnam that had done for Malaya and 8th Div only 12 years earlier in 1942. Australia was an enthusiastic and ardent contributor to SEATO in the same sense that Pakistan and France were not. For those Australian Generals familiar with the butt puckering reality of 1942 SEATO had some real promise in terms of forward defence.
    Nobody wants to talk about the trials of the 2/21 in the same way that nobody wants to look at SEATO Plan 7. They embarrass people. SEATO Plan 7 was 6 years in the making and was finally baked and taken out of the oven in 1960. It was a cracking plan.

    In the event of overt North Vietnamese intervention in South Vietnam or should the PAVN take their marching orders south from the Chicoms SEATO had Plan 7. Plan 7 called for a Commonwealth Brigade (Based in Malaya – 1 Battalion per Poms, Kiwis, OZ, Poms doing all the heavy lifting) to lodge themselves at Danang secure it and allow ARVN Divisions to head west to cut off a conventional invasion…
    Which is precisely what the US Marines did in 1965 when they waltzed ashore at Danang in 1965. That was SEATO Plan 7. Unilaterally exercised by the US.

    When Australia – who you recall had a strong interest in forward defence and long-term interest in South Vietnam invited itself to defend South Vietnam in 1966 it adopted SEATO Plan7 for the Southern most port Vung Tau and implemented what it could. In the prosecution of this conflict, that was in Australia’s own national self-interest, Australian troops performed creditably, courageously and compassionately. I’m reluctant to fault Pollard. He had everything. Academic quals with real life experience. Modern universities would be queuing up to make him their poster child.

    The PhD Student has recently cited Stuart Rintoul’s 1987 work ‘Ashes of Vietnam’

    The PhD Student has been given a ‘don’t go there’ hint that he has chosen to ignore.

    Rintoul’s 1987 work consists largely of short extracts from interviews with anonymous veterans. According to Rintoul “Australians in Vietnam were guilty of acts of barbarity. There were Australians whose morality was so eroded that they murdered villagers, raped women, tortured and killed wounded enemy soldiers and mutilated corpses” (Rintoul 1987: xiv).

    Challenge offered. Challenge met. Let’s go there.

    “Australians in Vietnam were guilty of acts of barbarity. There were Australians whose morality was so eroded that they murdered villagers, raped women, tortured and killed wounded enemy soldiers and mutilated corpses.”

    Let’s have that debate…

  107. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    It’s sorcery. The Spirit Man rules the tribal groups with the Big Man/Men as figureheads.

    They’re terrified of it to this day.

    Sorcery, and the power to inflict savage and brutal tribal punishments for the most minor of transgressions.

  108. Mark A

    It’s sorcery. The Spirit Man rules the tribal groups with the Big Man/Men as figureheads.

    It was my guess too.
    Powerful stuff, specially if reinforced by some example from time to time, need only be once in a generation.

  109. Knuckle Dragger

    I’m going to have a bit of a stab here, knowing what we know (or what’s reported) on the one and two year old who died in a hot car in Logan.

    The mother was ‘known to police’, and apparently very well known to the child services people.

    With the dubious benefit of cynicism, I will speculate that the mother was yet another drug fucked piece of shit who came home with her kids from somewhere, and was that desperate to a) get on the pipe, b) stick some shit in her arm, c) piss off to the pokies, d) fuck her latest equally scrotey boyfriend or any combination of the above that she left the kids in the car.

    Hours and hours later, they were found and put in the bath to try and deal with obvious heatstroke, but to no effect. Hence the murder charges.

    I hope I’m wrong, I really do. But I don’t think I am.

  110. classical_hero

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2019/11/22/former-aag-matthew-whitaker-discusses-upcoming-ig-report-on-fisa-abuse-and-trump-campaign-surveillance/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

    The FBI requested a type of surveillance generally reserved for tracking suspected terrorists.

    This line is extremely scary based on political lies. Wow.

  111. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Car-death toddlers ‘had been left before’

    Charlie Peel
    Journalist
    @charliepeeled ‏
    10 minutes ago November 25, 2019

    Friends and neighbours of the mother charged with murdering her two baby daughters say they had previously seen the girls sitting alone in the car where their bodies were found on Saturday.

    Single mother Kerri-Ann Conley, 27, was charged with the murder of Darcey-Helen, 2, and Chloe-Ann, 1, after they were found unresponsive in the black car where they had allegedly been left for several hours in sweltering 31C heat.

    Paramedics tried to revive them but they were pronounced dead at the scene about 2pm, on a quiet suburban street in Waterford West, a suburb of southeast Queensland city Logan.

    Within hours, police confirmed they had charged a woman with murder.

    The Australian understands police are investigating whether drugs had played a role in the tragedy. Nine News reported it was “believed (Conley) had fallen asleep inside the home” while the children were in the car.

    Ms Conley spent Saturday and Sunday nights in the Brisbane watch-house and will front Brisbane Magistrates Court on Monday.

    Gina McKenzie, who regularly babysat the girls, told The Australian there had been previous complaints to authorities about the children being left in the car. “It had happened before as welfare had been contacted a number of times by people complaining,” Ms McKenzie said.

    “I am not shocked at the charges, I am disgusted they were left in that car.”

    Breaking.

  112. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Lizzie: They had a rich mythology and have left an artistic presence that complements that of other stone age cultures elsewhere.

    Top Ender: Dunno about that. Dot painting only seems to have dated from the 1970s.

    TE, modern ‘dot’ painting is certainly something that was introduced in recent times, circa 1970’s if I recall correctly. It drew upon dot marks used in the sand to depict various song lines and mythological travels as well as food producing areas with sacred associations, as most of them had.

    What I had in mind though was the very ancient rock art of aboriginal dwellers, found right across the continent. Rock carvings on special rocks were part of that. Jessie has mentioned the cup and ring type rock carvings which is also found elsewhere in Europe and Eurasia and these are very ancient, and not frequent in Australia. The spray on hand prints are common to the Upper Paleolithic hunting and gathering cultures and are very widespread forms of the artistic expression of early Homo Sapiens.

    As you likely know, in Kakadu there are some very special examples of this earlier type of rock art, in huge rock overhangs, and plenty in the Kimberley as well as some in Weipa area in the north cape. The associated mythology smacks of more recent times though. X-ray paintings of animals, stick figures of hunters, and women with pendulous breasts often feature, depending too on where you are. This is the genuine value of aboriginal heritage and culture, what it tells us of early human history and of the utilization of kinship relationships to form a complicated system of social categories to inform re suitable marital categories – all a means of extending relationships of a classificatory sort whilst still keeping all within the clan or tribal system. Left isolated and alone, and with no technological development, the development was all in human categorization – and associated gerontocratic power relationships reinforced by the stasis of the ‘eternal dreamtime’ in the religious system. The lived reality was often squashed into this category system of ‘skin’ kinship in some peculiar ways.

    The art expressed some of the culture, and along with the cave art of Europe (and also some interesting stuff now emerging in the depths of South America, extending the time depth there a lot), all allows us to glimpse human history in its earlier forms. Glamorising this with fake ‘civilization’ and ‘technology’ (the real technology in some craft work and weaponry achieves great heights in and for itself) is sheer bowdlerization of anything that is worthwhile in aboriginal culture.

  113. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Paramedics tried to revive them but they were pronounced dead at the scene about 2pm, on a quiet suburban street in Waterford West, a suburb of southeast Queensland city Logan.

    Heartbreaking.

    A sad note to go to sleep on, but sleep I must.
    Busy week coming up. Another one.
    *sigh*

  114. Cold-Hands

    Have they sacked that evil prick Hansen?

    Hansen left NASA’s Goddard Institute in 2013, handing the directorship to his protege, Gavin Schmidt (@ClimateofGavin). More lucrative pastures as an activist & expert adviser beckoned, and he also has a position at Columbia University.

  115. classical_hero

    Star Wars Rated R

    These guys are sick and twisted.

  116. Bruce in WA

    Not a fecking chance … but the responses are so unbelievably stupid I think my brain is bleeding!

    Hand guns should be legalised and licensed, Nigel Farage has said
    The Ukip leader says the ban on the guns, which were made illegal in the wake of the Dunblane shooting, was a “kneejerk” reaction and should be lifted
    Mr Farage said the current ban on the guns, which were made illegal following the school shooting at Dunblaine in 1996, was “ludicrous.
    The Ukip leader has said it is party policy for hand guns to be legalised and licensed in the UK despite being banned in the UK for the last 18 years.
    Speaking on LBC Radio Mr Farage said that it was Ukip policy to create a “proper licensing policy” and that people who kept hand guns responsibility locked up and had were willing to get an official licence should “absolutely” be allowed them.
    Experts have said his comments were “stupid” and encourage an American-style idea that you and your home are only safe if you are armed.
    Peter Squires, professor of criminology at Brighton University and a member of Association of Police Officer’s advisory group on the criminal use of fire arms said that Mr Farage’s comments were “irresponsible”.
    He said: “If public safety is a consideration then it’s a particularly stupid thing to say. It opens up the problem that we have almost dealt with successfully.
    “It will generate a demand, it will generate illegal traffic around that demand – the problem with hand guns is that they are small and concealable and they are already the weapon of choice of gangs members and criminals.”
    Hand guns were banned in Britain after public outcry in the wake of the Dunblane shooting.
    Following the shooting of 16 children and their teacher at a primary school in The Cullen Inquiry into the massacre recommended that the government introduce tighter controls on handgun ownership and tens of thousands of the guns were handed into the Government when the law was changed in 1998.
    Penalties for anyone found in possession of illegal firearms range from heavy fines to prison terms of up to 10 years.
    Mr Farage said: “I would not like us to go to the American System which strikes me as being absolutely crazy that you can go and buy automatic repeating rifles down at a local gun shop that looks more like a supermarket.
    He added: “Proper gun licensing is something we have done in this country responsibly and well and I think the knee jerk legislation that Blair brought in that meant that the British Olympic pistol team have to go to France to practice was jut cracker – if you criminalise handguns then only the criminals carry the guns.
    Asked what Ukip’s official policy was on gun control he said: “We need a proper gun licensing system to which we already have, and I think the ban on handguns is ludicrous.”
    Keith Vaz, the chair of the home affairs committe, said Britain has the toughest gun laws in the world and strong action had been needed following the “horrific tragedy” at Dunblaine.
    He added: “The logical consequence of relaxing gun laws, as suggested by Mr Farage, is an increase in gun use which should be discouraged rather than encouraged. Any change could possibly act as a green light for an increase in criminality.
    “Our legislation makes Britain a beacon of safety and it would be completely irresponsible to change the law governing hand guns.”

    (Site blocked)

  117. Bruce in WA

    Quote fail … dunno why it came out as a single block!

  118. Bruce in WA

    Hours and hours later, they were found and put in the bath to try and deal with obvious heatstroke, but to no effect. Hence the murder charges.

    I hope I’m wrong, I really do. But I don’t think I am.

    My wife and I were having dinner when this came on the news. Suddenly, I started to cry and just couldn’t stop. My wife put her hand on my arm and asked me “Why?”

    I said, “I could just imagine those little kids crying for Mummy to help them — the one person they thought they could trust in the world — and she was the one who had betrayed them”.

    Ah, fuck, I’m tearing up even now just typing this; I must be getting old! Better call it a night.

  119. Bruce in WA

    Those poor, poor coppers who found them and tried to revive them in a bath … 🙁

  120. JC

    Bloomberg officially enters the presidential race.
    I never thought he’d do it.

  121. Mark A

    Bruce in WA
    #3244098, posted on November 25, 2019 at 1:43 am

    Hours and hours later, they were found and put in the bath to try and deal with obvious heatstroke, but to no effect. Hence the murder charges.

    I hope I’m wrong, I really do. But I don’t think I am.

    My wife and I were having dinner when this came on the news. Suddenly, I started to cry and just couldn’t stop. My wife put her hand on my arm and asked me “Why?”

    I said, “I could just imagine those little kids crying for Mummy to help them — the one person they thought they could trust in the world — and she was the one who had betrayed them”.

    Ah, fuck, I’m tearing up even now just typing this; I must be getting old! Better call it a night.

    Nothing wrong with you Bruce.

    I can be softy at times myself although I’m called a hard basterd by others

    When reading about this I don’t tear up but get vengeful feelings.
    It wasn’t even the first time for them, for God’s sake what are the social workers for if not to deal with cases like this?
    Bring back the death penalty.

  122. johanna

    I don’t know how this great little piece about roosters passed the Thought Control censors at TheirABC:

    No, they’re not all charmers. Their instinct to protect can translate into aggression, although theoretically they shouldn’t view the bringer of food as a threat.

    My grandparents had chooks, and we had to carry an extra pail at feeding time because Peter, the rooster, was an arsehole. If you didn’t put the bucket on his head as soon as you opened the door, he’d lacerate your legs.

    Peter went for Dad once too often, and turned up roasted one Sunday dinner. He had a diminished fan base at this point, and from memory the most concerned comment was “pass the potatoes”.

    The vegans and animal activists and their sympathisers will be gunning for Fiona Scott-Norman, who despite her unfortunate name, clearly has a sense of humour and also writes a lot better than most of them.

  123. johanna

    Still scrolling through what we are all paying for, and found this gem in an article about why there should be more female auctioneers:

    However, success selling requires sacrifices, like avoiding coffee on sale day, because experts say it affects the voice.

    “I do love coffee, so if you get me on a day when I haven’t had coffee, good luck to you,” Ms Hanns said.

    Some people will believe anything.

    But, does our taxpayer funded media behemoth make even the most elementary inquiries? What experts? Do successful auctioneers refrain from imbibing coffee on sale days?

    Nup, they just repeat it as if it is true. This is cutting edge journalism today.

  124. bespoke

    If you struggle like me to put down you thoughts it’s well worth scrolling up starting with Geriatric Mayfly at 8:34 pm then Muddy’s attempt to unpack what’s happening. A heart felt cheers to them and many others.

    Life is good.

  125. bespoke

    write down your thoughts

  126. Rockdoctor

    K.D. agree and FYI whilst not trying to be a pendant, I do believe the profession you were looking for is an archeologist not a paleontologist. The latter is an earth studies field branch of my profession mainly covering fossils and excludes modern humans but does cover the history of the earth till the Holocene about 12K y.o.

  127. Mark A

    Not may know this about the origins of the word jaywalking.

    In the early part of the 20th century, there was still a significant divide between the lifestyles of people living in U.S. cities and rural towns. Many regions of the country still didn’t have electricity, indoor plumbing, or widespread use of automobiles. In the Midwestern and Eastern United States, city-dwellers took to using the pejorative term “jay” to refer to country-folk that were unacquainted with life in the big city and often made mistakes or looked foolish as a result.

    Although the use of “jay” to mean a silly or stupid person has vanished from common use in English, it has lived on in one particular way: jaywalking. Those country-folk, upon visiting the city, would rarely pay attention to fast-moving automotive traffic as there wasn’t any in their towns of origin. As a result, they’d often cross streets away from intersections and “jaywalk” their way into accidents.

  128. Rockdoctor

    East Timor’s onshore facilities are going to be a money pit. Routing a subsea oil pipeline over the Timor trench coupled with East Timor’s mestizo kleptocrats? FMD let the Ching Chongs have it.

    Snoopy, agree 100%. They don’t know what a money pit & cesspool of corruption that place is. They will even give the Chinese a run for their money with changing goal posts to suit their own needs…

  129. johanna

    Knuckle Dragger
    #3244086, posted on November 25, 2019 at 12:18 am

    I’m going to have a bit of a stab here, knowing what we know (or what’s reported) on the one and two year old who died in a hot car in Logan.

    The mother was ‘known to police’, and apparently very well known to the child services people.

    With the dubious benefit of cynicism, I will speculate that the mother was yet another drug fucked piece of shit who came home with her kids from somewhere, and was that desperate to a) get on the pipe, b) stick some shit in her arm, c) piss off to the pokies, d) fuck her latest equally scrotey boyfriend or any combination of the above that she left the kids in the car.

    Hours and hours later, they were found and put in the bath to try and deal with obvious heatstroke, but to no effect. Hence the murder charges.

    I hope I’m wrong, I really do. But I don’t think I am

    I’ve seen a picture of her. She’s an Instagram bimbo. Quite pretty, with no moral compass whatsoever. I doubt that she intended to kill her kids, but her priorities were more important.

  130. Mark A

    KD

    “mother was yet another drug fucked piece of shit who came home with her kids from somewhere”

    For 27, just look at her. You don’t get wrinkles around the eyes from too much sleep and healthy living.

  131. Mother Lode

    I read it on NASA website re cold weather. There is a Russian woman scientist has done a lot of research on sunspots.

    She has laid the foundation on sunspots?

    Sounds like something only a wean would have the instincts for, n’est ce pas?

    And a guy wearing fishnets, inexpertly daubed lipstick and comically long eyelash extensions who insists he needs a tampon vending machine in the toilets, wouldn’t.

  132. johanna

    Not linking, but TheirABC has two contradictory stories about migrants.

    One is allegedly groundbreaking research which shows that migrants prefer big cities. Taxpayers have funded this insight.

    Another is a story about Burundians working in the fields outside Mildura, complete with happy, smiling workers. How many of them will be there in five or ten years’ time?

    On a hazy (local bushfires) morning here in Queanbeyan, a bit of wake up benzos with:

  133. Mother Lode

    For me, it was a head spinner to realise that Indigenous Aussies were active land managers, using local resources and deep knowledge of ecosystems and cycles, in ways that were, to the first Europeans and to us now, recognisably farming.

    His head’s spin was imparted by the extreme amount of spin in the stupid book.

    The attempted (and ubsupported) re-writing of Aboriginal culture will eventually become an embarrassing fad of the time. Like astrology which seemed an esoteric knowledge anyone could play. Or the upsurge in spiritualism after WW1. (Although in the latter case it served a human rather than a political need.)

    First they started divvying up ‘traditional country’ to tribes even though the impermanence and paucity of artefacts, and lack of records means they could only allocate land as distributed in 1788. We have no way of reconstructing 1768.

    Then the started grouping them into ‘nations’, like the Native Americans.

    Now there was a single Atlantean civilisation of astounding technology and social achievement.

    The obvious next step is to connect Europeans (the pantomime villains in every lefty narrative) with the annihilation of the dark skinned Utopia.

    Problem is that they need to bring Aborigines and Europeans into contact, but can’t do this by crediting Europeans (Boo! Hiss!) with means to travel so far and bring something so effective. Yet at the same time have taken Aboriginal technology as a seed of European (Boo! Boo!) technology they pretended was theirs.

    And modern Europeans (Boo! Hiss! Boo!) are not likely to join in a myth where Aborigines travelled to their lands since they have their own mythologies to license their own ideological excesses to manufacture.

  134. johanna

    Wake up, sleepyheads.

    In this age of techo ‘music’ let us recall the age of the three piece band. Ladies and Gentlemen – The Cure:

  135. Mark A

    Mother Lode
    #3244134, posted on November 25, 2019 at 6:43 am

    Now there was a single Atlantean civilisation of astounding technology and social achievement.

    I don’t believe so but willing to go along with some fancy ideas that they somehow “lost/ forgot” the advances they made.

    But one thing human beings never can forget once learned, that is practicing agriculture.
    Climate changes, they move on but the skills remain because they are so useful that it cannot be forgotten or discarded.

    This is what happened with ancient civilizations.

  136. 1735099

    “Australians in Vietnam were guilty of acts of barbarity. There were Australians whose morality was so eroded that they murdered villagers, raped women, tortured and killed wounded enemy soldiers and mutilated corpses.”

    Let’s have that debate…

    No debate to have.
    With minor exceptions, Australians acted honorably in Vietnam, unlike our erstwhile allies.
    The AN-D blathers on about confected history, and then attempts to set up a spurious strawman so he can demonstrate his omnipotence.

    The PhD student in question has a very curious attitude towards these sort of war crimes. A prominent denialist of every outrage and massacre conducted by Australia’s wartime enemies but a fan boy of those authors who peddle false accusations of Australian War Crimes.

    Now that’s a big call.
    Show me one post where I’ve denied any massacre committed by the Japanese or the Germans in WW2. Given my father served in New Guinea in the RAAF in that conflict, that would be passing strange.
    Take your time…..

  137. areff

    Good morning, Vietnam!

    Again.

    What a surprise.

  138. Nob

    What Rock Doctor and snoopy said about East Timor.

    They are already getting way more out of “Timor gap” gas resources than what the original agreement with Indonesia was.

    For no good reason since it’s all on the Australian continental shelf

  139. Johno

    A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.

    Give it a rest Sniffy. Just for one day, you lunatic.

  140. areff

    Good beat and you can dance to it. Pity about the lyrics, unless you’re Bruce Pascoe.

  141. johanna

    Get out of your suburban world with Santana at Woodstock, especially Jose Chepito Areas, the drummer, who was 17. Steve Winwood’s version of I’m a Man was killer when he was 17.

    The homogenised view of what and who kids should be is stupid and wrong.

  142. Entropy

    Rockdoctor
    #3244128, posted on November 25, 2019 at 5:50 am
    East Timor’s onshore facilities are going to be a money pit. Routing a subsea oil pipeline over the Timor trench coupled with East Timor’s mestizo kleptocrats? FMD let the Ching Chongs have it.

    Snoopy, agree 100%. They don’t know what a money pit & cesspool of corruption that place is. They will even give the Chinese a run for their money with changing goal posts to suit their own needs

    I doubt the Chinese are doing it for the money, and it is a strategic location. And yes, as Snoopy said, another Potentially Great Mick Trumble achievement.

  143. Entropy

    Please don’t respond to one of the reasons for Queensland’s ranking in educational performance.

  144. Bruce of Newcastle

    Since we have a seagull, here is a story about chips.

    BBC staff in ‘uproar’ over new canteen rule ‘limiting them to six chips each’ (22 Nov, via BCF)

    BBC staff are said to be in “uproar” after the corporation’s canteen instigated a “six chip” rule for cooked meals.

    Servers in the kitchens at Broadcasting House caused widespread bafflement after they were seen individually counting out chips as part of a new quota for employees.

    Rebellion quickly started brewing among the BBC’s staff over the policy, some of whom took to social media to express their dismay.

    Sharing a picture of his pitiful serving on Twitter, Arif Ansari, head of news at the BBC Asian Network, wrote: “New rules in the BBC canteen limit the number of chips to six.

    “The staff seemed shocked that I didn’t go with the unlimited couscous instead.”

    Dom Stirling, a freelance producer for BBC radio, disclosed details of the new regime to dispel any misconception that the “BBC was a glamorous place to work”.

    He wrote: “There is currently uproar in the canteen as the ‘6 chip rule’ is introduced.

    “In which servers are instructed to individually count out 6 chips per person.”

    The BBC scrambled to deny the existence of a six chip rule when approached by The Daily Telegraph.

    Despite being presented with accounts from several members of staff, a spokeswoman insisted: “It’s not true. As far as I’m concerned, it is not the rule.”

    Maybe they brought in Michelle Obama as a culinary consultant.

  145. Entropy

    Carbs are bad, Bruce.

    And what about the Irish?

  146. 1735099

    Fatty 5D’s* friends are turning on him –

    Kilmeade in particular seemed uncomfortable with the situation, frequently asking the President: “Who is your source, sir?”

    This from The Telegraph –

    His claim that Ukraine was behind the 2016 election interference has been discredited by intelligence agencies and his own advisers.

    CrowdStrike, an internet security firm based in California, investigated the DNC hack in June 2016 and traced it to two groups of hackers connected to a Russian intelligence service – not Ukraine.

    One version of the debunked theory holds that CrowdStrike is owned by a wealthy Ukrainian. In fact, company co-founder Dmitri Alperovitch is a Russian-born US citizen who immigrated as a child and graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

    But hey, Trump doesn’t believe this stuff either.
    He makes it up as he goes along – more popcorn please….
    *Trump’s 5 deferrals allowed him to avoid military service (which killed 57000 Americans in Vietnam and has a weight problem.

  147. Mark A

    Entropy
    #3244150, posted on November 25, 2019 at 7:25 am

    Carbs are bad, Bruce.

    And what about the Irish?

    There was a link here or elsewhere I forgot about this guy living on spuds for a year and losing weight with no ill effects.

  148. Zatara

    One study argues that one cow can feed 4,500 men with one small “hamburger” each ¬– an impressive total. But that is only one meal. If you fed your army of 10,000 three such repasts a day that would mean around 15 cattle a week would need to be processed. And of course man cannot live on meat alone: bread was a necessity and some measure of vegetables and/or fruit would be necessary.

    Another fact that makes that problematic is that a small hamburger patty contains only 190 calories. That amount would allow an average sized soldier of the day to walk approximately 2 miles OR is about 1/10th of what he would need to maintain a sedentary lifestyle. He couldn’t do both.

    Even at 3 meals or 450 calories per day you would have a very slim populace very quickly.

  149. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘I couldn’t care less about what happens in the land of the shooting spree.’

    Take a letter, Stenographer Bob.

  150. Knuckle Dragger

    Rockdoctor, 5.45;

    Y’see, this is merely one of the reasons I enjoy this forum. Larnin’ stuff.

    Paelontologists, archaeologists.

    Potato, spinach.

  151. Top Ender


    Racism rears its confused political head – Andrew Bolt

    OUR sick new cancel culture works only because victims lack the guts to call it out – particularly those of the Left, now being eaten by their own revolution.

    Take Jonathan Biggins and Drew Forsythe, who each year perform a review for the Sydney Theatre Company ridiculing conservatives like me.

    Last year they wanted to mock US President Donald Trump, showing him taking tips from the dictators of North Korea and China.

    Oops! As they told The Australian last week, they and their two white co-stars were banned from playing the Asian characters themselves for fear of causing racial offence.

    So they replaced the Asian dictators with Syria’s Bashar al-Assad, which makes no sense. Why is it racist for a white actor to play an Asian but not an Arab?

    This year they again surrendered to the STC’s crazed race rules, hiring Asian-Australian actor Lena Cruz to play North Korea’s Kim Jong-un.

    But Cruz is from the Philippines. Do all Asians look alike to the STC, or does it think only whites can be racist when pretending to be of another ethnicity?

    I wondered why Biggins and Scott put up with this hypocrisy, irrationality and censorship. But here’s a telling admission to The Australian: “When indigenous activists shut down Jonathan Biggins’ play Australia Day merely because they didn’t like its title, he was reluctant to push back hard …

    “He had no desire to engage in a dispute that provided fodder for Right-wing politicians and commentators.”

    Wouldn’t make a stand because it might prove “Right-wing” commentators right? Talk about defending a side and not a principle.

    Comedian Wil Anderson seems to me another man of the Left who caved to what he should resist, after he told a joke on the ABC’s Gruen about an Instagram influencer posing as a robot.

    Anderson said this “robot” was actually a computer-generated avatar, and joked: “But she identifies as a robot so I will use the term that she prefers.”

    Instant triggering of the wilfully sensitive. Two people tweeted complaints – “sad to hear vulnerable trans people’s identity being mocked”, “a sadly common way of mocking trans individuals” – but two was all it took for Anderson to apologise and cut the joke from the show on iview.

    He wouldn’t talk to The Australian about it, either. Too scared to prove conservatives right?

    NT News print edition

  152. Top Ender

    That amount would allow an average sized soldier of the day to walk approximately 2 miles OR is about 1/10th of what he would need to maintain a sedentary lifestyle.

    Indeed. Imagine asking the medieval soldier to exist on one very small Maccas a day. Better make that four. With buns ‘n’ stuff.

    And beer.

  153. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘I’ve seen a picture of her. She’s an Instagram bimbo. Quite pretty, with no moral compass whatsoever. I doubt that she intended to kill her kids, but her priorities were more important.’

    Sadly, I was right.

    Left her kids – AGAIN, as it turns out – alone in the car on a warm day. Cooked.

    Generally, if you do something that could – by a reasonable person – be foreseen to cause serious or injury or death, and that occurs you get the big one. Murder. Times 2.

    Aaaaaaand once again we’ll have the standard rations served up in court. Fell in with wrong crowd. Bravely struggled with addiction. Lost a favourite sock once. Ice cream not at the right temperature.

    And the big one, the trump card that belittles people that actually battle through this on a daily basis – mental health.

  154. Bruce of Newcastle

    The ICIJ goes great work.

    Another leftist astroturf site.
    This type of checking takes me about a minute.

  155. Bruce of Newcastle

    And this:

    The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists receives general support funding from the Open Society Foundations.

    Golly, I wonder who the Open Society Foundations are? /sarc

  156. Shy Ted

    *Trump’s 5 deferrals allowed him to avoid military service (which killed 57000 Americans in Vietnam and has a weight problem.
    Failed English grammar at the specials needs school, Nambers? You must always close a bracket – ).
    There should be a statue (law) against bad grammar.

  157. Cassie of Sydney

    “He makes it up as he goes along”

    You gotta laugh…..no self awareness from the ultimate liar….who defecates here every day.

  158. Knuckle Dragger

    Taking one for the team, BoN. Marvellous.

    It’s no wonder Steno Bob the Cut ‘n’ Paste King linked to this shit. Journalistic brilliance follows:

    ‘This week revealed a remarkable example of one such effort. About 100 media outlets around the world—including Suddeütsche Zeitung, the Guardian, BBC, Le Monde, German broadcasters NDR and WDR, the Miami Herald, Univision, and many others—began publishing reports exposing a sprawling worldwide system of offshore companies that enable financial secrecy.’

    ‘About 100’ media outlets. Globally. At the same time. About offshore companies being used to evade taxes and whatnot, because this state of affairs was hitherto unknown. Okay.

    ‘Collectively known as the Panama Papers, the reports were based on a leak of over 11.5 million records—perhaps the largest data leak in history. Spanning 40 years, from 1977 through 2015, the leak provides an unprecedented window’

    The world’s top investigative journalists have just uncovered this, apparently.

  159. DrBeauGan

    Entropy
    #3244150, posted on November 25, 2019 at 7:25 am
    Carbs are bad, Bruce.

    And what about the Irish?

    They’re bad too

  160. 1735099

    Another leftist astroturf site.
    This type of checking takes me about a minute.

    Now hang about.
    They’re exposing Chinese (Communists).
    If you read this blog you’ll understand that they are the devil incarnate – the root of all evil and likely to end civilisation as we know it.
    Obviously a false flag operation😡

  161. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Failed English grammar’

    It’s indicative of a slipshod approach, Ted, doncha know.

    Kinda surprising. He is, after all, a squalor.

  162. John Constantine

    https://www.fastcompany.com/90279079/turns-out-that-morning-people-really-are-more-productive-than-night-owls?partner=rss&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=rss+fastcompany&utm_content=rss

    The age old proverb, “Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise” may just be true, according to an upcoming book The Morning Mind. In the book, author Robert Carter, PhD, says there’s a biological reason the early bird gets the worm.

    Our brains are actually physically bigger when we first wake up, according to Carter.

  163. Shy Ted

    there should be more female auctioneers. Yeah, you can be in the front row nearest to the lady with the hammer.

  164. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘exposing Chinese (Communists)’

    On the form they’re displaying at your own link, Liability Bob, the ICIJ would indeed be just realising that the Chinese are communists.

  165. Geriatric Mayfly

    Ah! Hah! Super novae, of which my nana told me, about to enter mainstream astronomy. I wonder if they were bright enough to give a glimpse of Dark Emu.

    Dr Hurley-Walker says younger supernova remnants are easier to spot than the older ones seen in the image and 295 are already known. She said one of the newly-discovered supernova remnants lies in an empty region of space, far out of the plane of our galaxy. It’s the remains of a star that died less than 9,000 years ago, meaning the explosion could have been visible to Indigenous people across Australia at that time.’ Anthropologists from Australia hope to be able to examine the traditional records of the aboriginal people to see if there is any cultural memory of these events. Some Aboriginal traditions do describe bright new stars appearing in the sky, but we don’t know of any definitive traditions that describe this particular event’, said Duane Hamacher from the University of Melbourne, an expert in cultural astronomy. ‘Now that we know when and where this supernova appeared in the sky, we can collaborate with Indigenous elders to see if any of their traditions describe this cosmic event. If any exist, it would be extremely exciting,’ he said. ( lucianne .com)

  166. Knuckle Dragger

    How does one exactly become an expert in the caffeine/vocal cord matrix?

  167. 1735099

    Interesting infographic.
    We’re up there with the the “Land of the Free”.

  168. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Duane Hamacher from the University of Melbourne, an expert in cultural astronomy.’

    There’s yer early morning giggle right there.

    Duane. Expert.
    Cultural astronomy.

  169. DrBeauGan

    Anthropologists from Australia hope to be able to examine the traditional records of the aboriginal people to see if there is any cultural memory of these events

    Oh wow! Just think of it, those dark skinned blokes with the funny eyebrows could look up into the night sky and see stars a whole 9,000 years ago! They’re almost human.

  170. Bruce of Newcastle

    They’re exposing Chinese (Communists).

    Good. Also note that they are exposing Chinese Communist persecution of Uighur Mu slims.

    And if you check the search engines you won’t find any references to the ICIJ reporting on the persecution of Christians, by China or anyone else. At least I couldn’t find any on Goolag and DDG just now.

    Which neatly proves my point.

  171. Snoopy

    Something fundamental is inexplicably absent from this #climatefright piece from TheirABC.

    I wonder why?

  172. 1735099

    the ICIJ would indeed be just realising that the Chinese are communists.

    Tell me, old mate – how many communes would you see if you visited China these days?
    China has come a long way from its revolutionary past since Deng Xiaoping’s free-market reforms. Today, only ignorant bogans stuck in the twentieth century, call an economy, the world’s second-largest, “socialist” or “communist”, when 70 per cent of it is privately owned, when it hosts the world’s largest army of billionaires, or when it grapples with issues such as a debt crisis, stock market woes and a real estate bubble.
    China is a tightly controlled totalitarian plutocracy.
    It is neither socialist or communist.

  173. Knuckle Dragger

    Naturally, Duane is from the Yarrograd brainy uni people:

    ‘Duane is Secretary of the International Society for Archaeoastronomy and Astronomy in Culture, Chairs the IAU C1-C4 Working Group on Intangible Heritage, serves as an Associate Editor of the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, and is a collaborator on the ATLANTYS program at the University of Nantes in France’

    Chairs the Intangible Heritage (Imagined Heritage) Working Group. Probably not a massive government-funded junket that doesn’t require any meaningful results.

    Rockdoctor – archaeoastronomy?

  174. Eyrie

    Not long after the East Timor intervention in 1999 I figured the bunch we installed to run the place were crooks and we should have shot them, handed the place back to the Indos along with an apology and half a billion dollars.

    The Indon takeover in 1975 forestalled an independent “People’s Republic of East Timor” complete with Soviet naval and air base in a very strategic location during the Cold War.

  175. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘China is a tightly controlled totalitarian plutocracy.
    It is neither socialist or communist.’

    Don’t yap at me, Old Yeller.

    Take it up with the chinks. The ones who have the temerity to call themselves the Chinese Communist Party, and have done since before 1949.

  176. Bruce of Newcastle

    China is a tightly controlled totalitarian plutocracy.
    It is neither socialist or communist.

    Quite true. They’re fascists.

    It is important to understand that China is a fascist dictatorship. The term “fascist” is now thrown around with such carelessness that it has lost most of its meaning outside the offices of a few historians or political science professors. But fascism, in its original early twentieth century incarnation, meant a political system defined by three attributes—authoritarianism, ethnonationalism, and an economic model in which capitalism co-existed with large state-directed industries and partnerships between the government and corporations.

    China ticks all three boxes: authoritarian, Han nationalism, partnership between the Party and corporations.

  177. MatrixTransform

    How does one exactly become an expert in the caffeine/vocal cord matrix?

    I don’t understand the question … ask Numpty

  178. Leigh Lowe

    Our brains are actually physically bigger when we first wake up, according to Carter.

    Depends which part of the dick the brain is in.

  179. Bruce of Newcastle

    Any wonder the progressive socialist ICIJ are teeing off on national socialist China?
    International socialists have been at war with national socialists since the early 20thC split.

  180. Knuckle Dragger

    Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls;

    I present to you what I assert at this early stage of the day to be the most unassailable piece of non-self-awareness that we will see until at least 5.30 a.m. tomorrow. Of course, the author of this masterpiece is Four Leaf Tayback:

    ‘Today, only ignorant bogans stuck in the twentieth century’

    Bahahahaaaaaa.

  181. Top Ender

    Just sent the Hobart Mercury my response to the University of Tasmania sending me last week the new about its forthcoming “apology to Aboriginals.”

    What divisive tokenistic rubbish the University of Tasmania is proposing with its “apology” to Aboriginals.

    Martin Luther King is perhaps one of the most famous campaigners on race. On 28 August, 1963, Dr. King delivered his most powerful words, known as the “I Have a Dream” speech, from the steps of the the USA’s Abraham Lincoln Memorial. It included: “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

    Why does the University seek now to divide us by race?

    Instead of dwelling on what happened to others many years ago why not seek to unite us for the future?

    Why not treat ALL people who have needs according to how we can help them – rather than help people by what race they might be?

    Top Ender
    (Graduate of the University)
    Resident in Darwin, Northern Territory

    Be interesting to see if they publish it. The “apology” is on 4 December.

  182. DrBeauGan

    China is a tightly controlled totalitarian plutocracy.
    It is neither socialist or communist.’

    The Soviet Union was a tightly controlled totalitarian bureacracy.
    It was neither socialist nor communist.

    Venezuela is a tightly controlled totalitarian kleptocracy.
    It is neither socialist nor communist.

    Amazing how these places that advertised themselves as the socialist workers paradise all turned to shit, innit?

  183. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Amazing how these places that advertised themselves as the socialist workers paradise all turned to shit, innit?

    by definition all socialist economies are utopian, any non-utopian socialist societies are therefore not real socialism. insert prefered strawman as causal actor.

  184. mh

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    ·
    21s
    The Impeachment Scam is driving Republican Poll Numbers UP, UP, UP! Thank you Shifty.

  185. Bruce of Newcastle

    One for Johanna.

    Just had a channel-bill cuckoo land in the camellia near my front door, about 2 m from me. She looked at me and I looked at her.

    She lobbed in the camellia because she saw some friendly currawongs were in it collecting breakfast.

    Which brings me to your question yesterday. I think what you have in that tree is a currawong nest with a channel bill chick in it. Channel bill chicks are one of the most annoying critters in the universe. They are very loud and they squawk for food incessantly. I get one or two of them arrive most seasons with unfortunate currawong parents who come to me for food then relay it back to the enormous flying gullet waiting and squawking in a nearby tree. A couple years ago one of them memorably ate about half a pound of mince in about 10 minutes before it finally shut up.

    So I think your unwelcome guest is a channel-billed cuckoo kiddie.

  186. mh

    NFL teams haven’t reached out to Colin Kaepernick after recent workout, report says

    https://www.foxnews.com/sports/no-calls-colin-kaepernick-workout-report

  187. cohenite

    China is a tightly controlled totalitarian plutocracy.
    It is neither socialist or communist.

    What a fucking idiot you are.

  188. Zatara

    These people are doing the Lord’s work.
    They have today succeeded in forcing the Trump administration to release hundreds of documents they had withheld from Congress.

    Yeah, they sure are: State Department Releases Detailed Accounts Of Biden-Ukraine Corruption

    A liberal watchdog group’s attempt to nail Rudy Giuliani has backfired in spectacular fashion after their FOIA request resulted in the US State Department releasing detailed accusations of corruption against the Bidens – based on interviews with former Ukrainian officials who were in charge of the investigations.

    Never ask a question you don’t know the answer to and never demand a document dump unless you know what’s in it.

  189. Leigh Lowe

    Anthropologists from Australia hope to be able to examine the traditional records of the aboriginal people to see if there is any cultural memory of these events. Some Aboriginal traditions do describe bright new stars appearing in the sky

    Anthropologists from Australia hope to be able to interview Aboriginal women to ascertain the cause of the commonly reported Centrelink Supernova effect. That is, seeing extra stars on pension day.

  190. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Media freedom views obscured by political leaningsChris Mitchell

    12:00AM November 25, 2019

    Some journalists seem to have discovered a passion for media freedom since the election of Scott Morrison’s Coalition in May and raids on the ABC’s Sydney headquarters and the home of News Corp journalist Annika Smethurst in June. Yet some of the same ­people once supported the Gillard government’s attempt to muzzle the press. Now revelations about the authenticity of a West Australian Corporate Affairs document in the AWU slush fund affair may again test views on free inquiry.

    Chris Kenny, on Sky News on October 28, said former Ten Network political editor Paul Bongi­orno had not always supported media freedom. Writing for The New Daily in mid-October, Bongiorno warned that Australia was on a slippery slope to tyranny. Yet in March 2013, Bongiorno supported an attempt by the Gillard government, in the face an investigation by Hedley Thomas of the slush fund affair, to introduce a news media council to regulate the press. He tweeted: “There is no censorship. Just laws to uphold the newspaper-owned Press Council’s own stated aims.”

    Many at the ABC and Fairfax backed Julia Gillard’s attempt to nobble the media via the Finkelstein inquiry set up by her former communications minister, now Sky News commentator, Stephen Conroy.

    Gillard, a solicitor in the early 1990s with Slater and Gordon in Melbourne, incorporated for her then boyfriend Bruce Wilson the Australian Workplace Reform Association in Perth. Wilson, at the time WA secretary of the Australian Workers Union, used money from the association to help buy a house in Melbourne’s Fitzroy in the name of union official Ralph Blewett.

    I first learned of the affair in the mid-1990s when Queensland former state secretary of the AWU Bill Ludwig urged The Courier-Mail to look at the disappearance of money he considered his union’s. Years later, Ludwig’s faction in federal parliament, led by then treasurer and now national ALP president Wayne Swan, remained loyal to Gillard.

    Former AWU national secretary Paul Howes in 2012 ­famously told Gillard at his union’s conference on the Gold Coast: “We’ve got ya back.”

    Those wanting to replace her with Kevin Rudd, deposed by Gillard in June 2010, drove the slush fund issue to destabilise her. Former ALP attorney-general Robert McClelland was just one of several factional heavyweights pushing the story.

    Gillard was rolled by Rudd in mid-2013 and the press regulator idea was dropped. Later, the incoming Abbott government set up the $45.9m trade union royal commission (TURC) led by former High Court judge Dyson Heydon to look at trade union corruption.

    The royal commission found witnesses interviewed by Hedley in 2012 about the use of slush fund money to renovate Gillard’s house in Abbotsford in inner northern Melbourne were truthful.

    He had spoken to an AWU organiser, Wayne Hem, and Victoria Police fraud squad detectives and builder Athol James about work on the house. The TURC recommended no action against Gillard as she had been duped by Wilson but criticised her legal work for him and commented adversely about her testimony on James, saying “Athol James’s testimony is to be accepted over hers”.

    In August 2012, Hedley tracked down former Slater and Gordon equity partner Nick ­Styant-Browne in the US, who revealed the firm had wanted Gillard out in 1995 over her role in setting up the association for Wilson.

    Hedley, when interviewed for a piece on his induction into the Media Hall of Fame last November, said his slush-fund coverage was his proudest achievement, no small thing for a journalist with two Gold Walkleys and five other Walkleys.

    Gillard’s political handling of the issue was masterful. She tried to intimidate two of this company’s former Australian chief executives and their Fairfax counter­parts into a series of backdowns.

    She pulled on surprise press conferences at short notice in Canberra with political journalists who were not across the story — yet she refused to be interviewed by Hedley. She tried to shut down mainstream media interest but could not stop her own internal critics or the blogosphere.

    Some of those bloggers have kept looking. Chief among them is former Sydney 2UE radio host Michael Smith, who lost his job in 2011 after a dispute with Fairfax management over his pursuit of the story. He now runs his Michael Smith News site from a small Thai island in the Andaman Sea. He and retired former Perth detective Dave McAlpine, who investigated the matter for the WA police in the 1990s, have kept probing the slush fund. McAlpine lives on a farm in northern Thailand.

    Late last year, Smith emailed me to say he had located retired former WA Corporate Affairs chief R.P. Neal. Gillard had adopted a document allegedly from Neal in her evidence at the TURC.

    Dated May 15, 1992, it purports to be Neal’s conditional approval of the Workplace Reform Association. The TURC relied on this document in its chapter on the association’s incorporation. It is signed and the words “Ray Neal assistant director” appear beneath the signature.

    Neal’s name is Ramon not Raymond. For that reason, he always used the initials R.P. rather than “Ray” beneath his signature.

    Smith has obtained from Neal a sworn affidavit that he did not sign this document. Speaking from Perth 10 days ago, Neal said he was not alleging the document was a forgery and mentioned a stamped signature that was sometimes used when he was away. On his blog, Smith has reproduced the stamp and signature from the alleged Neal document and they appear different. Smith also recorded a powerful phone interview with Neal, published on Smith’s blog in October 2016.

    Both Neal and his former boss, Ralph Mineif, have said the association would never have been incorporated under terms set out in the letter: the association will be incorporated “subject to receiving a written undertaking that the ­association will amend its rules to include new rule 3A within 30 days of being notified of the incorporation.” Mineif says of the Neal letter: “In my opinion this is not a valid document.”

    I advised Smith last year to send the Neal affidavit to Justice Heydon, whose office responded by notifying him the matter would be forwarded to federal ­Attorney-General Christian Porter’s office.

    Speaking in Sydney last month, Smith and McAlpine said they thought the matter needed to be pursued. McAlpine does not understand how $400,000 can have been embezzled yet no one held legally accountable. Smith is trying to launch a private prosecution through the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions.

    Gillard did not respond to texts for this column but her office emailed saying she was overseas and would not be commenting. Having spoken to her several times about the slush fund when she was PM, I believe she would suggest the paper speak to Wilson and Blewett about the Neal letter.

    Doubtless Smith is right about likely media reaction. Journalists last month demanding federal Minister for Energy Angus Taylor fall on his sword over a forged set of travel expenses involving Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore are likely to ignore the latest twist in the slush fund story.

    Wrote Smith on October 31: “The issue of … (deceiving) a royal commission is a serious matter. I’d rate it much more highly than bagging Clover Moore over her travel expenses.” Indeed.

    From the Oz. Cue the outraged wails of “But oi have done nuffink wrong.”

  191. Top Ender

    It’s the remains of a star that died less than 9,000 years ago, meaning the explosion could have been visible to Indigenous people across Australia at that time.

    Trouble is, did our old mates way back when have any concept of 9,000?

    One presumes they used the decimal system, as we happen to have a set of symbols for it at the end of our arms.

    Did they?

  192. Entropy

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3244205, posted on November 25, 2019 at 8:41 am
    China is a tightly controlled totalitarian plutocracy.
    It is neither socialist or communist.

    Quite true. They’re fascists.

    It is important to understand that China is a fascist dictatorship. The term “fascist” is now thrown around with such carelessness that it has lost most of its meaning outside the offices of a few historians or political science professors. But fascism, in its original early twentieth century incarnation, meant a political system defined by three attributes—authoritarianism, ethnonationalism, and an economic model in which capitalism co-existed with large state-directed industries and partnerships between the government and corporations.

    China ticks all three boxes: authoritarian, Han nationalism, partnership between the Party and corporations.

    I find it amazing that a political ideology that has the state controlling, if not directly owning, the means of production is called right wing. The only practical differences between fascism and communism are that it is possible to make a fortune following the dictates of their political masters; and they are better at making the trains run on time than the old Italian rail service. Fascism, just like nazis and communists, are just variations on left wing collectivist ideologies that have the state playing the central and deciding role in people’s lives and actively persecute the individualists.

  193. Zatara

    One presumes they used the decimal system, as we happen to have a set of symbols for it at the end of our arms.

    Wouldn’t that be a digital system?

  194. Snoopy

    Snoopy
    #3243835, posted on November 24, 2019 at 4:02 pm
    You can download the documents here.

    I’m lazy, Bob. Hit me with the half dozen that best demonstrate Trump’s high crimes.

    How did that work out for ya, Bobby?

  195. Boambee John

    Hazmatic at 1201

    The horrendous fate of the 2/21st has been unfortunately ignored.

    Not entirely. The made for TV film Blood Oath covered the Laha and other murders and the post-war trials and execution of various Japanese. IIRC, one was executed for killing captured aircrew.

  196. Leigh Lowe

    I’ve seen a picture of her. She’s an Instagram bimbo. Quite pretty, with no moral compass whatsoever. I doubt that she intended to kill her kids, but her priorities were more important

    Saw the ABC report last night.
    Very vanilla flavoured.
    “X happened a X time. Ambos called. Nothing could be done. Charges laid. Next item please.
    Had it been a bloke we would have had three separate femista activists interviewed about “all men”.

  197. Black Ball

    Good Lord Knuckle Dragger. So many titles for Duane. Bit over this Dark Emu shite. As someone upthread mentioned, why not use drones to ascertain what has been claimed in the book?
    And Muddy, your posts last night were a must read. Well done.

  198. Des Deskperson

    What you have all been waiting for, the State/territory nominees for AOYT 2020:

    https://www.australianoftheyear.org.au

    To summarise:

    NSW: Professor Munjed Al Muderis. Orthopaedic surgeon and human-rights advocate

    Vic: Archie Roach AM. Musical storyteller

    Qld: Rachel Downie. Educator and social entrepreneur

    WA: Annie Fogarty AM. Education social venturer[?]

    SA: Dr James Muecke AM. Eye surgeon and blindness prevention pioneer

    Tas: Dr Jess Melbourne-Thomas. Marine, Antarctic and climate scientist

    ACT: Katrina Fanning. Women’s rugby league pioneer

    NT: Dr Geoffrey Thompson. Sports physician and ex-RAAF flying doctor

    All seems pretty orthodox and safe; two Indigenous, one Middle Eastern and a 50/50 gender split. The wokest candidates appear be:

    Al Muderis. ‘A compassionate ambassador for multiple organisations, including the Red Cross, Munjed is a powerful advocate for humanitarian work supporting people seeking asylum and refugees. ‘

    and:

    Melbourne-Thomas: ‘With a background in mathematical modelling and Antarctic climate change science, Jess is now a Knowledge Broker for CSIRO, helping to bridge the gap between complex scientific research and decision-making for sustainability. A passionate advocate for diversity and gender equality in science..”

    Hard to pick. My money is on Roach.

  199. Bruce of Newcastle

    Entropy – Yes. Numbers was referring to progressive socialism and communism. National socialism is neither. National socialists are a variety of socialists, but they are in violent competition with international socialists, who they traditionally regarded as a threat.

  200. max

    Hazmatic
    #3244083, posted on November 25, 2019 at 12:01 am

    Not sure if you’re around, Hazmatic, but your post on Ambon struck a chord.

    Do you know about the group of WWII veterans and family members who journeyed back to Ambon annually and worked on various projects on the island ? It’s a moving story.

  201. P

    One for Johanna.
    Just had a channel-bill cuckoo land in the camellia near my front door, about 2 m from me. She looked at me and I looked at her.
    She lobbed in the camellia because she saw some friendly currawongs were in it collecting breakfast.

    For BoN and Johanna:
    Big Baby Birds – An Amazing Aussie Bird Tale

  202. Mother Lode

    Trump’s 5 deferrals allowed him to avoid military service (which killed 57000 Americans in Vietnam and has a weight problem.

    I will wager Trump is healthier that Viet Man by a long shot. Not only due to life-long abstemiousness, but the fact he does not possess a hypertrophied gland that secretes a steady stream of poison that he then ingests, and has done for 50 years.

    Unlike the Numberwang cur.

  203. Geriatric Mayfly

    Looks like Wiki is due for an update. Duane will present the relevant citations and no doubt mention, in passing, more recent Aboriginal observations as seen through their telescopes.

    The Crab Nebula is a pulsar wind nebula associated with the 1054 supernova.[Recorded by the Chinese] The known history of supernova observation goes back to 185 AD, when supernova SN 185 appeared, the oldest appearance of a supernova recorded by humankind. Several additional supernovae within the Milky Way galaxy have been recorded since that time, with SN 1604 being the most recent supernova to be observed in this galaxy.[1]
    Since the development of the telescope, the field of supernova discovery has expanded to other galaxies.

  204. DrBeauGan

    Communism and socialism are all about being nice and kind to everyone but particularly poor people, just like Christianity. It’s all about fairness and not letting mean and greedy bastards steal all the money. So it’s morally admirable and we should all embrace it. This is why we should admire and respect numbers, as he will assure us.

    The unfortunate fact that everywhere it’s been tried it collapses into a totalitarian shithole is something we should all ignore. Numbers does, why can’t you?

  205. Mater

    Fascism, just like nazis and communists, are just variations on left wing collectivist ideologies that have the state playing the central and deciding role in people’s lives and actively persecute the individualists.

    “By the end of the century, many notable intellectuals called attention to substantial affinities between Marxist-Leninist systems and fascism. Paul Johnson, Richard Pipes and Reno’s De Felice all identified fascism as a “Marxist heresy.”

    A Place In The Sun: Marxism and Fascism In China’s Long Revolution – Anthony James Gregor

    ”Anthony James Gregor (April 2, 1929 – August 30, 2019) was a Professor of Political Science Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley, well known for his research on fascism, Marxism, and national security.”

  206. Boambee John

    *Trump’s 5 deferrals allowed him to avoid military service (which killed 57000 Americans in Vietnam and has a weight problem.

    Envy is one of the Seven Deadly Sins.

  207. lotocoti

    If you’re looking for chuckles aplenty, you can’t go past the dystopian drama progressive nightmare Years and Years on SBS.
    Only the hardest hearted won’t find themselves stifling a snigger when woke mum and woke dad lose their shit when they discover daughter No.1’s transition plan isn’t about swapping an innie for an outie.
    Or council housing officer brother (who leaves his husband for a refugee) struggling to cope with the refugee load, voting Tory.
    Or the violent overthrow of refugee friendly Socialist Spain by the refugee unfriendly ultra left wing People’s Party.
    Naturally, the fall is all down to Orange Man Bad going full HAM on China, four days from the end of His second term.
    And OMB puppet #46 Pence.

  208. Des Deskperson

    ‘I find it amazing that a political ideology that has the state controlling, if not directly owning, the means of production is called right wing.’

    In Italy, at least, Fascism’s core origins were ‘right wing’, bourgeoise – or lumpen bourgeoise and nationalist. Its foot soldiers were the ‘Squadrisi’, gangs led by disgruntled ex army officers employed by landlords and businesses to beat up – and murder – mutinous workers and peasants.

    Under former socialist Mussolini, Fascism as a form of government developed into a sort of corporatist nationalism that was in many ways indistinguishable for Marxist-Leninism but it is also arguable that it retained elements – rampant nationalism and the accord with the Church – that reflected its right wing, bourgeoise origins.

    So there is in my view an historical basis for referring to Fascism as ‘right wing’. Whether this is still now relevant or helpful is another issue.

  209. Tailgunner

    Hand guns were banned in Britain after public outcry in the wake of the Dunblane shooting.

    One of the most successful MKUltra operations so far.
    A template for ours& the Kiwis.
    Hamilton,Bryant,Tarrant.

  210. stackja

    2GB USA reporter said RBG wanted to see out DT. Can RBG last till January 2025?

  211. BrettW

    The Chris Mitchell column, copied above, egarding AWU / Gillard and the Michael Smith inquiries is interesting. It involves a forged document.

    Looked at Michael Smitb News today and clearly he is expecting a big week over this.

    I admire Smith for his tenacity and the detailed investigation. However the problem is the matters involved are about 25 years ago. I recall seeing on his site a letter from a WA Assistant Commissioner indicating they would not be pursuing the matter any further.

    Apparently there is some sort of private prosecution planned.

    Hope something comes of it.

  212. Roger

    I note Ponce Andrew has experienced the ultimate humiliation:

    Mummy has cancelled his 60th birthday bash.

  213. Old School Conservative

    China is a tightly controlled totalitarian plutocracy.
    It is neither socialist or communist.

    Wiki begs to differ.
    1. Governed by the Communist Party of China,
    2. China is a unitary one-party socialist republic and is one of the few remaining Communist states.
    3. Since 2018, the main body of the Chinese constitution declares that “the defining feature of socialism with Chinese characteristics is the leadership of the Communist Party of China

  214. 1735099

    Not sure if you’re around, Hazmatic, but your post on Ambon struck a chord.

    Apart from a low energy swipe at me yesterday, he’s gone to ground since I asked him to justify two assertions he made a short time ago.
    He claims –
    1. Doug Gibbons, my platoon commander when I was a member of 5 Platoon, 7 RAR, was a Nasho.
    2. Frank Topp, whom I went to school with at Downlands, joined D Coy 6 RAR a couple of weeks before the battle of Long Tan.
    He lacks the courage to admit to posting lies, and dishonors the memory of these men with his cavalier attitude to historical accuracy, something he has abused me for since he began posting here.
    He is quite to happy to disrespectfully drop names hell west and crooked, but less comfortable to deal with fact when it comes to individuals.

  215. stackja

    BW – Juliar has been protected by the usual suspects. WA Inc comes to mind. And Carmen never faced real scrutiny.

  216. Old School Conservative

    Today, only ignorant bogans stuck in the twentieth century, call an economy, the world’s second-largest, “socialist” or “communist”, when 70 per cent of it is privately owned, when it hosts the world’s largest army of billionaires, or when it grapples with issues such as a debt crisis, stock market woes and a real estate bubble.
    8 commas in one sentence.
    Has anyone seen numbers and Pirate Pete on the same blog at the same time?

  217. from the prc thread:

    Six steamed Dim Sams and one Lizard of Oz in Black Bean sauce please.

  218. 1735099

    So there is in my view an historical basis for referring to Fascism as ‘right wing’. Whether this is still now relevant or helpful is another issue.

    It’s about as relevant as using “Communist” or “Socialist” as a form of abuse, something that is a hallmark of the ignorant conformity that characteristics this site.

  219. Boambee John

    On the subject of the bogan from Logan and her unfortunate children, perhaps if “Chain of Responsibility” legislation applied to government employees, such as social workers, there would be fewer of these tragedies?

  220. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    And Carmen never faced real scrutiny.

    Seem to remember a Royal Commission that found that she’d lied to Parliament.

  221. Eyrie

    Sorry, that should be contrived horseshit.

  222. Johno

    Nah Sniffy you went to ground after Hazmatic released the list of Nashos who said they had volunteered to go to SVN. The same mob who said they were offered the choice. The same mob who you said were forced to go.

    You disappeared for about three days and then came back offering the wisdom of Gorgeous George.

    Lunatic, one trick Boor.

  223. Eyrie

    Government wants to make the rules we must obey but doesn’t want to take any responsibility for their failures.

  224. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘my platoon commander when I was (briefly, and unhelpfully) a member of 5 Platoon’

    FIFY.

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