Open Forum: December 14, 2019

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5,297 Responses to Open Forum: December 14, 2019

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  1. I have $1 that says the following response will be given:

    “I find it difficult to remember when I haven’t eaten for so long*”

    * 15 minutes

  2. mh

    Please amend that to Deputy Prime Minister.

    So while he was Deputy PM and National member.

    Nothing to do with the LNP then.

    We got there eventually.

  3. Juan

    Airbus assures everyone this has nothing to do with the MAX problem

    That’s because it has nothing to do with the MAX problem.

    Only their burgeoning order book the the A320neo family has anything to with the MAX!

  4. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    A scratch behind the ears for Boofhead when he wakes.

    He gets that every time I go past him sprawled on the rocker-recliner – which he commandeered 30 seconds after #1 Son and mate put it down in the lounge area. I have to give him a scratch to reassure myself he’s just dreaming about food, and not dead.

    What does he look like?

    Big. Very, very big. Bigger than any cat I’ve ever seen, including ferals on the farm. Long hair, 70% white, with big splotches of lion coloured tabby.

  5. Juan

    Nothing to do with the LNP then.

    … except the 21 LNP MPs without which Barnaby Joyce wouldn’t have been Deputy Prime Minister.

    The LNP produced Barnaby; they owned him as Deputy PM; but other than that, there’s no LNP connection whatsoever!

    We got there eventually.

    Yes, we did.

  6. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    Some news just rocks you back on your heels – Sir Ron Brierley has this morning been detained in Sydney – media reports say:

    ” NZ investor been arrested and charged with alleged possession of child pornography by Sydney police, Australian media are reporting.

    The reports say an international alert was placed on his name by detectives and he was detained while trying to leave Australia.”

    Brierley was a well known and successful player in the corporate world during the ’70s and ’80s, continually in the news for clever corporate takeovers and impressive entrepreneurial corporate moves, mainly locally and sometimes in Europe. His would be a familiar name to older contributors here – and I imagine they would be similarly shocked.

    He is 82 and he just this year stepped down from an active business life.

  7. areff

    Notice how Big Kev rated actual policing, of which she had next to no personal experience (paraphrased): “the changes were intended to address organisational restructure, human resources [pause, then as an afterthought] … crime”

    So drawing up biz-school flow charts and favouring the promotion of women and gays were opf greater importance than protecting the citizenry’s lives and property.

  8. Tom

    Full text of the Paywallian “exclusive” on the latest climate zombie propaganda campaign:

    Climate activist Tim Flannery is the force behind a band of former state fire and emergency chiefs accusing Scott Morrison of abandoning­ bushfires across the nation and demanding an immediat­e end to the burning of fossil fuels.

    The Australian has confirmed Emergency Leaders for Clima­te Action — 29 ex-fire chiefs led by former NSW Fire and Rescue commissioner Greg Mullins — is funded by Professor Flannery’s crowd-funded Climate Council as an official “project”.

    Mr Mullins was joined by five other former state and territory fire chiefs on Tuesday in pledging to convene a national summit of industry experts early next year to find a long-term solution to bushfires savaging Australia’s east and west coasts.

    A source close to the Climate Council claimed it was “largely a vehicle for Tim Flannery”. He added, however, that the decision of fire chiefs to accept support as a Climate Council “project” was significant and could not be underestimated because­ of their authority in the community as experienced firefighters who had witnessed worsening weather conditions.

    “These fire chiefs are not muppets, they are hardly activists,” he said. “They’ve made a deliberat­e decision to take a stand because they see conditions are getting serious.”

    Mr Mullins said the former fire chiefs were prepared to “go it alone” with a national bushfire summit, claiming the Prime Minister had offered “no moral leadership” on climate change.

    The former NSW fire chief, who is also a councillor with Professo­r Flannery’s group, said he hoped Mr Morrison and state leaders would attend the summit.

    Climate writer and scientist Professor Flannery, Australian of the Year in 2007, has sparked past criticism that he is an alarmist for urging that coal-fired power stations­ be shut down and for suggesting Perth could become the nation’s “first ghost town” based on its scarce water supply.

    The chief executive of his Climate Council is Amanda McKenzie, a board member of Labor’s Whitlam Institute and founder of the Australian Youth Climate Coalitio­n, the activist group that has sponsored climate change protests by schoolchildren in Canberra and other capital cities.

    Mr Mullins blasted Canberra for a “leadership vacuum” on bushfires raging across the nation that he said were linked to climate change. He said the Morrison government had offered “no moral leadership” by opposing tougher carbon emissions standards at the Madrid climate conference.

    “The facts are that Australia is burning while we turn a blind eye to the driving force, which is climate­ change and a warming planet,” Mr Mullins said at a news conference called to confirm that a national summit would be convened after the current bushfire season ended in March or April.

    Emergency Leaders was formed in April with Climate Council support, after the Prime Minister rebuffed Mr Mullins­’s request for a meeting on fighting bushfires that would also consider the impact of climate change. Mr Morrison instead referre­d Mr Mullins to Water Resources­ Minister David Littleproud.

    The Climate Council was formed in 2013 by Professor Flannery as a crowd-funded climate change communications body after the Abbott government abolished Labor’s taxpayer-funded Climate Commission that he had headed since its creation in 2008.

    The Climate Council seeks tax-deductible donations to help the group’s “author­it­ative, expert advice­ to the public on climate change, energy solutions and international action, based on the most up-to-date ­science”.

    Mr Mullins said on Tuesday it was “no good saying we’re only a small emitter” of carbon dioxide pollutio­n and it was “simply not true” when Australia ranked 17th in the world, and was the world’s No 5 emitter when coal exports were taken into account.

    West Australian Naomi Brown, former chief of the Australasian Fire and Emergency Services Authority, said Emergency Leaders for Climate, which had grown this year from 23 to 29 ex-fire chiefs, wanted to “draw attention to an appalling problem”.

    She said Australia would have worse scorching summers and uncontrollable fires unless action was taken now to tackle climate change. “This is climate change, we are seeing it,” Ms Brown said.

    Urging the Morrison government to set the example for others worldwide, she said: “We can’t keep digging up fossil fuels and shipping it out.”

    Major General Peter Dunn, retired­ commissioner of the ACT Emergency Services Authority, said: “We have to stop burning fossil­ fuels. This is what is inducing climate change. This is not specul­ation. This is science. Just read what the CSIRO is saying.”

    Queensland former fire and emergency services chief Lee Johnson said firefighters were seeing the effects of climate change “firsthand” as they battled blazes.

    Professor Flannery said he had no comment about his council’s link to Emergency Leaders.

  9. C.L.

    We need to have a good hard look at who’s starting these fires!

    Most of these fires are started by people incited by the media’s “dangerous conditions + klimate change” reportage. And we know that warmists love the fires. Jokes aside, then, an overlap between arsonism and warmism would exist.

  10. Tom

    Full text of the Paywallian “exclusive” on the latest climate zombie propaganda campaign:

    Climate activist Tim Flannery is the force behind a band of former state fire and emergency chiefs accusing Scott Morrison of abandoning­ bushfires across the nation and demanding an immediat­e end to the burning of fossil fuels.

    The Australian has confirmed Emergency Leaders for Clima­te Action — 29 ex-fire chiefs led by former NSW Fire and Rescue commissioner Greg Mullins — is funded by Professor Flannery’s crowd-funded Climate Council as an official “project”.

    Mr Mullins was joined by five other former state and territory fire chiefs on Tuesday in pledging to convene a national summit of industry experts early next year to find a long-term solution to bushfires savaging Australia’s east and west coasts.

    A source close to the Climate Council claimed it was “largely a vehicle for Tim Flannery”. He added, however, that the decision of fire chiefs to accept support as a Climate Council “project” was significant and could not be underestimated because­ of their authority in the community as experienced firefighters who had witnessed worsening weather conditions.

    “These fire chiefs are not muppets, they are hardly activists,” he said. “They’ve made a deliberat­e decision to take a stand because they see conditions are getting serious.”

    Mr Mullins said the former fire chiefs were prepared to “go it alone” with a national bushfire summit, claiming the Prime Minister had offered “no moral leadership” on climate change.

    The former NSW fire chief, who is also a councillor with Professo­r Flannery’s group, said he hoped Mr Morrison and state leaders would attend the summit.

    Climate writer and scientist Professor Flannery, Australian of the Year in 2007, has sparked past criticism that he is an alarmist for urging that coal-fired power stations­ be shut down and for suggesting Perth could become the nation’s “first ghost town” based on its scarce water supply.

    The chief executive of his Climate Council is Amanda McKenzie, a board member of Labor’s Whitlam Institute and founder of the Australian Youth Climate Coalitio­n, the activist group that has sponsored climate change protests by schoolchildren in Canberra and other capital cities.

    MTC…

  11. Juan

    Boeing has more problems than the 737 MAX; and even the delays to its 777X program.

    The latest issue to arise has to do with 787s delivered since February this year, which are missing some lightening protection measures built into earlier iterations of the same aircraft.

    Crucially, at least two such planes are flying with ‘VH’ registrations, with a third about to be delivered.

  12. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    missing some lightening protection

    The paint fades?

  13. Geriatric Mayfly

    No Dear Diary from Kev. Surprise.

  14. stackja

    C.L.
    #3265290, posted on December 18, 2019 at 10:24 am

    Pyromania, another ‘successive’ example of NSW Richmond Report?

  15. 8th Dan

    lightning … with no “e” in the middle.

  16. Tom

    The spaminator won’t let me post the text of the Paywallian story about Tim Flannery’s latest climate zombie propaganda campaign — even if I break it up into pieces. Dumbass piece of shit.

  17. 8th Dan

    Nixon’s speech is affected by her dentures.

  18. Geriatric Mayfly

    Nixon’s speech is affected by her dentures.

    Doesn’t affect her chirpiness on matters close to her heart.

  19. Infidel Tiger

    Nixon’s speech is affected by her dentures

    Same as alcoholic Nancy Pelosi.

  20. stackja

    Climate activist Tim Flannery is the force behind a band of former state fire and emergency chiefs accusing Scott Morrison of abandoning­ bushfires across the nation and demanding an immediat­e end to the burning of fossil fuels.

    The Australian has confirmed Emergency Leaders for Clima­te Action — 29 ex-fire chiefs led by former NSW Fire and Rescue commissioner Greg Mullins — is funded by Professor Flannery’s crowd-funded Climate Council as an official “project”.

    Mr Mullins was joined by five other former state and territory fire chiefs on Tuesday in pledging to convene a national summit of industry experts early next year to find a long-term solution to bushfires savaging Australia’s east and west coasts.

  21. struth

    And while post-2013 he switched his membership to the LNP affiliate south of the border, he was Deputy Prime Minister in a government with a one seat majority by grace of the support of the 21 LNP MPs.

    Yes we did get there, didn’t we.
    He was a National MP when he started “banging” his assistant, who’s father posts here.
    So he had no reason to follow Liberal Party doctrine, LNP doctrine, that didn’t exist anyway, as you have admitted.

    He is still with that woman and they’ve had a child, and maybe as you watch your disrespectful wife with your cock in your hand, you should go easy on judging others.

  22. stackja

    Climate activist Tim Flannery is the force behind a band of former state fire and emergency chiefs accusing Scott Morrison of abandoning­ bushfires across the nation and demanding an immediat­e end to the burning of fossil fuels.

  23. stackja

    The Australian has confirmed Emergency Leaders for Clima­te Action — 29 ex-fire chiefs led by former NSW Fire and Rescue commissioner Greg Mullins — is funded by Professor Flannery’s crowd-funded Climate Council as an official “project”.

  24. stackja

    The Australian has confirmed Emergency Leaders for Clima­te Action — 29 ex-fire chiefs led by former NSW Fire and Rescue commissioner Greg Mullins — is funded by Professor Flannery’s crowd-funded Climate Council as an official “project”.

  25. Mick Gold Coast QLD
    #3265286, posted on December 18, 2019 at 10:20 am
    Some news just rocks you back on your heels

    Yep. My first thought was – Sir Ron Brierley has been railroaded.

  26. stackja

    The Australian has confirmed Emergency Leaders for Clima­te Action

  27. Juan

    you should go easy on judging others.

    Not all others, only the holier-than-thou public moralisers … or are you of the opinion hypocrisy is a virtue in public life?

  28. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald respond to Ben Roberts-Smith
    Michael Bachelard
    By Michael Bachelard
    December 18, 2019 — 10.30am

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    Former special forces soldier and Victoria Cross recipient Ben Roberts-Smith put out a statement on Monday critical of reporting by The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald which he said contained “a number of demonstrably false claims”.

    Mr Roberts-Smith was responding to a story that revealed a second Australian Federal Police investigation into allegations that he had committed war crimes in Afghanistan.

    The story quoted the president of the journalists’ union suggesting that elements of Mr Roberts-Smith’s defamation action against the Herald and The Age could damage press freedom. It also said Mr Roberts-Smith had been critical of a separate inquiry by the Inspector-General of the Australian Defence Force and the leaders of the Australian Defence Force.

    The Age and Herald believe the multiple investigations into alleged war crimes by Australian soilders in Afghanistan is a matter of significant public interest. We take any criticism of our reporting seriously and have responded to Mr Roberts-Smith’s claims below.

    Roberts-Smith: “I have made no criticisms of the Inspector-General [of the Australian Defence Force], and I unequivocally support the IGADF in its investigation”.

    Response: In August 2017, the Inspector-General asked for serving and ex-soldiers to come forward with information or rumours about misconduct by special forces soilders. Roberts-Smith responded: “I don’t think these soldiers should be suffering through this ridiculous notion of being investigated for a rumour. When have you heard of a judicial process initiated off the back of rumours? It’s just a joke. We should be looking after our soldiers not persecuting them.” (source The West Australian, October 26, 2017).

    Roberts-Smith’s lawyer, Mark O’Brien, has accused a lawyer working for the Inspector-General of leaking against Roberts-Smith with comments that were “defamatory, embarrassing, demonstrates bias and … raises a serious concern about the integrity of the Inquiry”.

    Mr O’Brien’s allegations were found, after investigation, to be false and backed by “no evidence whatsoever”. None of the witnesses backed up the claim and the lawyer that Mr O’Brien believed was the leaker did not actually exist. (Source: The Age, February 12, 2019)

    Roberts-Smith: The Age and Herald journalists “asserted that I have criticised the Chief of the Defence Force and other top Australian Defence Force commanders. Again, this is not the case.”

    Response: In an interview on Sky News last month, Mr Roberts Smith:

    questioned whether young people should join the defence forces any more because they would “not be supported”, and the problems were “all about the leadership”;
    said it was “shameful” how returning soldiers were treated, and again blamed the leadership;
    was asked if there needed to be new leadership at the very top of the Defence Force, and responded, “Absolutely”;
    said “we’re actually being let down by our own military”;
    accused defence senior leadership of “reactive self-protection” and of becoming bureaucrats;
    said defence leaders were “about protecting their patch”, which, “to me is unacceptable. (Source, The Daily Telegraph, November 15, 2019)

    Roberts-Smith: The Age and Herald journalists Chris Masters and Nick McKenzie have “falsely asserted that this is a test of press freedom … We are not asking them to betray their confidential sources.”

    Response: In his defamation case against the former Fairfax newspapers and two journalists, Roberts-Smith has brought an application in the Federal Court which would in effect cause the journalists to reveal their sources by compelling them produce notes and documents including the names and details of sources that they relied upon in preparing their reports. The case was pursued at a hearing last week. If this motion was successful, there is no doubt it would expose confidential sources.

    Roberts-Smith: The journalists have “already served outlines of evidence from named individuals … so the identities of those individuals are already known … what we are seeking is any documents pertaining to those known named individuals which is perfectly normal practice in any legal matter”.

    Response: The outlines of evidence produced by The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald outline the witness testimony that the journalists believe they can bring to a legal process to prove the allegations about Roberts-Smith to be true.

    These witnesses may be voluntary or may attend court in response to a subpoena issued by one of the parties. This is entirely different from revealing confidential sources and the information they provided. During last week’s court hearing, Sandy Dawson SC, the senior barrister for The Age and Herald said that Roberts-Smith’s argument “conflates the identity of a witness with the identity of the informant”. The journalists are using journalist’s privilege and shield laws to protect the identity of their sources and have indicated that they would challenge any order requiring them to do reveal them.

    Sydney Morning Herald.

  29. Some History

    Jane Carosene from Frightbat Central has a few questions

    Dear climate change deniers, when is it ok to panic? If it’s not when we can’t breathe. If it’s not when the firies say they are dealing with unprecedented bushfires. If it’s not when the fire season started in August. If it’s not when temperature records are tumbling? Then when?

    https://twitter.com/JaneCaro/status/1206504798838616064?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet

  30. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    and demanding an immediat­e end to the burning of fossil fuels.

    That’s good news!
    No more bushfires. We’re gunna ban them.

  31. Liberty Quote

    The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.
    — Edmund Burke

    And evil plans for this system feature.

  32. struth

    While it seems that some people get their testosterone levels up by play-fighting with trolls – it’s very tedious for the adults.

    If you don’t like the show, change channels, or just scroll, but I’m heartily sick of those who know only too well the silence of the right is what got us into this mess……..by “being above it all”
    Thank God Trump doesn’t listen to the advice of women and political cucks.
    Take the aguments here out in to the eal wold and have some fun.
    If you talk to MV about his fucking cat on this political blog, do an of us give a shit?
    No……………………go for it.
    Please give us the same courtesy.

  33. Shy Ted

    My go to weather site has an interesting get out clause. Yesterday 38.7 but “feels like” 34.1. Hazy without a breath of wind, it was 34.1 on the upstairs verandah, cooler on the downstairs one. Luckily this episode of AGW only lasting 3 1/2 days before dropping 20degC.

  34. struth

    Not all others, only the holier-than-thou public moralisers … or are you of the opinion hypocrisy is a virtue in public life?

    Hypocrisy is not a virtue in any life.
    So stop it.

  35. mh

    Juan, your selective quoting is disingenuous. It was

    He is still with that woman and they’ve had a child, and maybe as you watch your disrespectful wife with your cock in your hand, you should go easy on judging others.

  36. stackja

    West Australian Naomi Brown, former chief of the Australasian Fire and Emergency Services Authority, said Emergency Leaders for Climate, which had grown this year from 23 to 29 ex-fire chiefs, wanted to “draw attention to an appalling problem”.

    She said Australia would have worse scorching summers and uncontrollable fires unless action was taken now to tackle climate change. “This is climate change, we are seeing it,” Ms Brown said.

    Urging the Morrison government to set the example for others worldwide, she said: “We can’t keep digging up fossil fuels and shipping it out.”

    Major General Peter Dunn, retired­ commissioner of the ACT Emergency Services Authority, said: “We have to stop burning fossil­ fuels. This is what is inducing climate change. This is not specul­ation. This is science. Just read what the CSIRO is saying.”

    Queensland former fire and emergency services chief Lee Johnson said firefighters were seeing the effects of climate change “firsthand” as they battled blazes.

  37. JMH

    Someone noted yesterday that Overland had two options; one showing him as a competent CC and the second – an incompetent numpty. He chose the second option and further, Nixon would not choose option 2, thus setting the stage to hurl Overland under the bus. It looks as though the poster was on the money.

  38. cohenite

    feelthebern
    #3265201, posted on December 18, 2019 at 8:58 am
    Worth the 42 mins.
    Jimmy Dore breaks down the Jim Comey interview on Fox.

    That is excellent. If after the Durham report comey isn’t wearing an orange suit we might as well move to Mars. If even Trump can’t nail these scum, that’s it. Speaking of which the great Bogino notes there were likely other FISAs against Trump people:

    https://videos.whatfinger.com/2019/12/17/who-else-were-they-spying-on-the-clues-are-everywhere/

  39. cohenite

    If you don’t like the show, change channels, or just scroll, but I’m heartily sick of those who know only too well the silence of the right is what got us into this mess……..by “being above it all”
    Thank God Trump doesn’t listen to the advice of women and political cucks.
    Take the aguments here out in to the eal wold and have some fun.
    If you talk to MV about his fucking cat on this political blog, do an of us give a shit?
    No……………………go for it.
    Please give us the same courtesy.

    Correct. Taking the high moral ground and being aloft allows the left to actually implement their high moral ground.

  40. struth

    Dear climate change deniers, when is it ok to panic? If it’s not when we can’t breathe. If it’s not when the firies say they are dealing with unprecedented bushfires. If it’s not when the fire season started in August. If it’s not when temperature records are tumbling? Then when?

    I’d almost join twitter to answer that

  41. Juan

    Juan, your selective quoting is disingenuous.

    There are some who like let their fantasies run wild. I prefer to ignore that and keep going, kind of like how you would deal with a toy-sized dog intent on humping your leg! 🤣

  42. Juan

    I’d almost join twitter to answer that

    Unfortunately struth is taken: https://twitter.com/struth

  43. cohenite

    toy-sized dog intent on humping your leg

    Great, as well as having a bisexual girlfriend you’re also into beastiality.

  44. duncanm

    Chris Uhlmann channels Brendan O’Neill in fine fashion today. British labour hate the working class

    Whenever working-class outsiders complain about how an immigration or economic policy blights their lives the response of the enlightened insiders is to brand them either “racist” or “stupid”.

    This is the judgment of those who make or champion enlightened policies but don’t live in the frontline suburbs where they land. It is not their jobs, wages or communities that are asked to endure wrenching change.

  45. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Taking the high moral ground and being aloft

    Gee, Cohenite. Please make up your mind.
    Just the other day I was a low life for pointing out a few home truths about Maggie Thatcher and the global warming scam. Now I’m taking the “high ground”.

    What is this? A roller coaster ride?

  46. mh

    Juan, you know what is being referred to

    He is still with that woman and they’ve had a child, and maybe as you watch your disrespectful wife with your cock in your hand, you should go easy on judging others.

  47. struth

    There are some who like let their fantasies run wild. I prefer to ignore that and keep going, kind of like how you would deal with a toy-sized dog intent on humping your leg!

    We can only go on what you tell us and therefore, we come to the conclusion your wife and you have no respect for each other and neither is enough for each other if you were truly in love.
    You have sex and don’t make love.
    Big difference.
    You tell us all about it, which shows your lack of respect, and then fantasise that we are getting off on it when very few of us are perverts…………………….You mustn’t be too old, you haven’t thought through the results of your actions here, and as I said earlier, later in life you will most likely pay a heavy price.

    However, after all that , you come on here and publically berate the sexual exploits of a politician……….who at least was trying to keep it quiet, and nobody’s business.
    If only you had thought they maybe we didn’t need to hear the grotty details of you sex life either.

  48. Bruce of Newcastle

    Jane Carosene from Frightbat Central has a few questions

    Maybe she should flee Australia then.
    I suggest to Somalia, since they don’t seem to have many bushfires there.

  49. Roger

    It appears the budget surplus is derived primarily from bracket creep.

    Nice work Josh, Matthias, Scott.

  50. struth

    I’m orrf to me favourite shop.
    The music shop.
    I need a blues Harp in C that just blew out but I know I’ll come out with strings, picks, leads, maybe another effect pedal …. god knows.

    Is this what I am supposed to be talking about?

  51. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    I suggest to Somalia, since they don’t seem to have many bushfires there.

    Given their performance here, that’s probably because the locals stole all the bush.

    Good morning Bruce.
    A very Merry Christmas to you and yours.

  52. hzhousewife

    How exactly does one “panic” ? Am I supposed to stamp the ground and hold my breath? Am I supposed to get creative and make a banner with foul words in it and stand outside the local member’s office? For how long? Can I have Xmas Day off? Must I sit at my computer all day, join twitter and send rude messages to people. How will any of the above make any difference?

    Curious people want to know.

  53. stackja

    Sometimes Peter now John.
    Who next?

  54. Bruce of Newcastle

    Likewise Peter!
    A neighbour has a cat coloured like Boofhead, he’s short haired though.
    He and I have an arrangement whereby he stays on his side of the fence and I don’t hose him. 😀
    I like cats but not stalking Cafe Bruce clientelle.

  55. Roger

    I need a blues Harp in C that just blew out but I know I’ll come out with strings, picks, leads, maybe another effect pedal …. god knows.

    Effects pedals just clutter up the floor.

    Good tone is in the fingers; although a good amp helps 😉

  56. Shy Ted

    Morning quiz – where was I last week? Clues –
    Town A, a once thriving town built on primary production brought to it’ knees by Green policies with amiable citizens doing their best to eke out a living producing arts and crafts or offering scenic tours which might be pleasant enough on a nice day but it wasn’t a nice day. Yoof well on their way to morbid obesity wandering aimlessly around town . Op shops in every street.
    City B. Again a cold, wet day. Local market on, handcrafted this and organic that and a careless propensity to accidentally leave the Made in China label on clothing. 40ish chunky wives with lessbian haircuts, ABC glasses and no makeup. Pasty beta male husbands carrying babies, organic snacks and health drinks, dutifully following mum but looking like they might collapse from exhaustion any moment. Tour hosts wrapped up for Winter, trying to smile while offering scenic excursions but rain and poor visibility mean there are no takers. All shop assistants and supermarket workers seem to be Indian. A pigeon flew into a window, broke it’ neck and died very slowly, flapping on the ground, ignored by most but one lady suggested it should be taken to a vet. I trod on it’s head and popped it in a bin to suffer no more. Looks of horror. Most cruisers, as I did, returned to the ship early rather than die of boredom on land. Nothing for me or anyone I spoke to that persuaded us to part with our hard earned $$.
    Coolest Summer week ever.
    As always, big money prizes for 2 correct answers.

  57. cohenite

    Gee, Cohenite. Please make up your mind.
    Just the other day I was a low life for pointing out a few home truths about Maggie Thatcher and the global warming scam. Now I’m taking the “high ground”.

    Eh?

  58. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Curious people want to know.

    All of the above m’lady. And more.
    These days you have to be versatile.

    Regardless, have a very Merry Christmas, and a Happy New Year.

  59. Roger

    a band of former state fire and emergency chiefs [is] accusing Scott Morrison of abandoning­ bushfires across the nation and demanding an immediat­e end to the burning of fossil fuels.

    It’s a worry that useful idiots like this could rise to be in charge of emergency services…and presumably still do.

  60. Juan

    We can only go on what you tell us

    Quite evidently you don’t.

    It’s been asked and answered.

    Having established that, if you wish to believe I’d actually said something other than what I said, well, it’s a free country and you’re entitled to do that, and I’m entitled to ignore you when you do.

    And, gents, re-paste whichever comment I’ve ignored as many times as you want. It just makes you look slightly obsessed. Well, maybe ‘slightly’ is being a tad generous.

  61. Juan

    It appears the budget surplus is derived primarily from bracket creep.

    Nice work Josh, Matthias, Scott.

    And then they expect our thanks when they give back bracket creep in the form of tax cuts. (This applies to all governments.)

    They could index tax brackets, but then how could they pretend to give us our money back?

  62. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    I like cats but not stalking Cafe Bruce clientelle.

    Then you need a cat like Boofhead, Bruce.
    He’s terrified of anything bigger than a spider.
    Including spiders.

  63. Roger

    Morning quiz – where was I last week?

    NZ north island?

  64. Megan

    Dear climate change deniers, when is it ok to panic?

    How about never, you useless waste of space. My Dad, survivor of the 2/24th – Tobruk, El Alamein, Finschaven, Port Moresby, Lae etc – dealt with our childhood tendencies to freak out under pressure with the advice that if you are in a life threatening situation then panic will guarantee your demise. Panic is contagious and you are doing your best to infect everyone. I’m not interested in your hysteria…there’s an old fashioned cure for that.

  65. Anthony

    WTF has Donald Trump done to deserve this madness?

  66. Roger

    Panic is contagious and you are doing your best to infect everyone.

    That is the method in their madness.

  67. Black Ball

    Terry McCrann in fine form in today’s Hun. Apparently the election of Boris Johnson has boosted the British stock markets, to the puzzlement of political junkies. The wrongology on display by our elites is a joy to see.

  68. Eyrie:

    How does buying what are standard US Navy P-8 maritime patrol/antisub aircraft come in over budget?
    The transport helos are another Howard screwup as are the ARH Tigers.

    There needs to be a Royal Commission run through the Department of Defence and whole equipment procurement game.
    Obviously something is really rotten in there.

  69. hzhousewife

    To my mind, these fire chiefs are out and out proudly telling us all that their fire management strategies of the last 20 years were useless, because look at us now. Nothing to do with the weather, everything to do with their rules and regulations.

  70. Mother Lode

    Zycon, if the USN is going to name a ship after Harvey Milk, appropriate that it is an oiler. Better than a submarine anyway. No doubt the poms will soon have the HMS Julian Clary.

    I heard the US had plans for the USS Barack Obama.

    It would have its engines at the front and oriented the opposite direction to usual so that it could face its enemies as it retreated at flank speed, the paint was going to be rainbow stripes, and all the flags were going to be white.

  71. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    How about never, you useless waste of space.

    Okay Megan, I get the message – panic is out.
    But there is a lot more going on than just the global warming scam.
    So is it alright to at least freak out? Just a little bit?
    I promise I’ll do it quietly.

    Meantime, a very Merry Christmas to you and yours.

  72. Bruce of Newcastle

    WTF has Donald Trump done to deserve this madness?

    Oppose the climate scam.
    The green-progressives are in control of the Democrat Party and the MSM, they all believe in thermageddon. They think Trump literally is the end of the world.

  73. duncanm

    a band of former state fire and emergency chiefs [is] accusing Scott Morrison of abandoning­ bushfires across the nation and demanding an immediat­e end to the burning of fossil fuels

    no worries – let’s turn off those diesel and petrol water pumps then, eh?

  74. Oppose the climate scam

    As did Tony Abbott (yes Peter, not wholeheartedly) but the green progressives were more successful in removing him from office.

  75. Bruce O’Newk:

    The plane is fine.
    It’s the software which is rooted.
    Software is the graveyard of so many projects.

    Perhaps one could be a little more focussed by saying the method of software repair is to blame.
    The entire software platform needs to be scrapped rather than the – it seems – process of adding a few more lines of code to fix the problem, which then causes further problems down the circuit board.

  76. Mother Lode

    Comey is still drifting down that river in Egypt

    Hahahahaa!

  77. Overburdened

    Tooling back from the sewer that is the goldy.

    The drive up was a shocker. The drive back is shaping up to be the same.

    It will be hell for the holiday makers and a boon for state revenue in qld n nsw.

  78. 8th Dan

    He is still with that woman and they’ve had a child

    Two childs now, isn’t it? Both boys.

  79. Bruce of Newcastle

    As did Tony Abbott

    ScoMo is making some quiet moves in the right direction. The solar panels rebate expires in January, and the installers are frantically advertising. Whilst on treadly this morning I passed a house getting a few dozen panels put on it. In a month’s time that would cost the owner approaching double what it has done this month. That feeds directly into the payback calc – suddenly what was economic for the homeowner no longer is.

    I hope he’ll next remove the REC subsidies per kWh, using the argument that solar energy is “mature now” and “can stand on its own two feet” or some such.

  80. vr

    I got a call, allegedly from Telstra telling me that my internet was hacked and if I didn’t do anything about it my internet would be shut down. Got a name (“Alex Wilson”), but the accent didn’t match the name. Claimed to be in a call center in 242 Exhibition St. So, I asked for an id which he gave. It sounded like a scam. Has anyone had a similar experience?

  81. Some History

    … a band of former state fire and emergency chiefs

    The Fright Stuff

    https://imgur.com/MMriIJu

  82. Top Ender

    The complete Flannery – print edition of the Oz.

    Climate activist Tim Flannery is the force behind a band of former state fire and emergency chiefs accusing Scott Morrison of abandoning bushfires across the nation and demanding an immediate end to the burning of fossil fuels.

    The Australian has confirmed Emergency Leaders for Climate Action — 29 ex-fire chiefs led by former NSW Fire and Rescue commissioner Greg Mullins — is funded by Professor Flannery’s crowd-funded Climate Council as an official “project”.

    Mr Mullins was joined by five other former state and territory fire chiefs on Tuesday in pledging to convene a national summit of industry experts early next year to find a long-term solution to bushfires savaging Australia’s east and west coasts.

    A source close to the Climate Council claimed the group was “largely a vehicle for Tim Flannery”. He added, however, that the decision of fire chiefs to accept support as a Climate Council “project” was significant and could not be underestimated because of their authority in the community as experienced firefighters who had witnessed worsening weather conditions.

    “These fire chiefs are not muppets, they are hardly activists,” he said. “They’ve made a deliberate decision to take a stand because they see conditions are getting serious.”

    Mr Mullins said the former fire chiefs were prepared to “go it alone” with a national bushfire summit, claiming the Prime Minister had offered “no moral leadership” on climate change.

    The former NSW fire chief, who is also a councillor with Professor Flannery’s group, said he hoped Mr Morrison and state leaders would attend the summit.

    Climate writer and scientist Professor Flannery, Australian of the Year in 2007, has sparked past criticism that he is an alarmist for urging that coal-fired power stations be shut down and for suggesting Perth could become the nation’s “first ghost town” based on its scarce water supply.

    The chief executive of his Climate Council is Amanda McKenzie, a board member of Labor’s Whitlam Institute and founder of the Australian Youth Climate Coalition, the activist group that has sponsored climate change protests by schoolchildren in Canberra and other capital cities.

    Mr Mullins blasted Canberra for a “leadership vacuum” on bushfires raging across the nation that he said were linked to climate change. He said the Morrison government had offered “no moral leadership” by opposing tougher carbon emissions standards at the Madrid climate conference.

    “The facts are that Australia is burning while we turn a blind eye to the driving force, which is climate change and a warming planet,” Mr Mullins said at a news conference called to confirm that a national summit would be convened after the current bushfire season ended in March or April.

    Emergency Leaders was formed in April with Climate Council support, after the Prime Minister rebuffed Mr Mullins’s request for a meeting on fighting bushfires that would also consider the impact of climate change. Mr Morrison instead referred Mr Mullins to Water Resources Minister David Littleproud.

    The Climate Council was formed in 2013 by Professor Flannery as a crowd-funded climate change communications body after the Abbott government abolished Labor’s taxpayer-funded Climate Commission that he had headed since its creation in 2008.

    The Climate Council seeks tax-deductible donations to help the group’s “authoritative, expert advice to the public on climate change, energy solutions and international action, based on the most up-to-date science”.

    Mr Mullins said on Tuesday it was “no good saying we’re only a small emitter” of carbon dioxide pollution and it was “simply not true” when Australia ranked 17th in the world, and was the world’s No 5 emitter when coal exports were taken into account.

    West Australian Naomi Brown, former chief of the Australasian Fire and Emergency Services Authority, said Emergency Leaders for Climate, which had grown this year from 23 to 29 exfire chiefs, wanted to “draw attention to an appalling problem”.

    She said Australia would have worse scorching summers and uncontrollable fires unless action was taken now to tackle climate change. “This is climate change, we are seeing it,” Ms Brown said.

    Urging the Morrison government to set the example for others worldwide, she said: “We can’t keep digging up fossil fuels and shipping it out.”

    Major General Peter Dunn, retired commissioner of the ACT Emergency Services Authority, said: “We have to stop burning fossil fuels. This is what is inducing climate change. This is not speculation. This is science. Just read what the CSIRO is saying.”

    Queensland former fire and emergency services chief Lee Johnson said firefighters were seeing the effects of climate change “firsthand” as they battled blazes.

    Professor Flannery said he had no comment about his council’s link to Emergency Leaders.

  83. Top Ender

    WHAT IS IT WITH THIS SOFTWARE PROBLEM THAT DUMPS SOME COMMENTS COMPLETELY?

    CENSORSHIP, OBVIOUSLY!

  84. Top Ender

    Refused to post the Flannery article.

  85. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    As did Tony Abbott

    Yes, I remember him.
    His very first act as PM was to renege on his commitment to repeal 18C, and his very last act was to sign into being the regulation that effectively introduced an emissions trading scheme which is why we now have record electricity prices. And for good measure, along the way he gave us a “fairness tax”, amongst other things.

    A sterling fellow, and a practicing Christian as well, apparently. He will be sorely missed.

    Regardless, a very Merry Christmas to you and yours, OSC.

  86. mh

    Two childs now, isn’t it? Both boys.

    Congrats to the Beetrooter and Mrs Beetrooter.

  87. Bruce of Newcastle

    the USN is going to name a ship after Harvey Milk

    Could be a great strategy.
    Transfer all the gay and lesbian sailors to USS Harvey Milk.
    They can have a whale of a time together and not affect the efficiency of the rest of the Navy.
    The sailors could hardly object to being sent to the most qwerty ship on the seven seas.
    And the vessel could have the Village People single for its ship’s anthem.

  88. Juan

    I hope he’ll next remove the REC subsidies per kWh, using the argument that solar energy is “mature now” and “can stand on its own two feet” or some such.

    Considering they were created by statute, wouldn’t that necessitate a bill to repealed or amended it?

    Looking at the current Senate, that might be a tall order; particularly getting the Independent Senator for Hydro Tasmania, sorry, the State of Tasmania, on board.

  89. old bloke

    the USN is going to name a ship after Harvey Milk

    The Western Australian version, the HMAS Harvey Milk.

  90. Bruce of Newcastle

    VR – It’s a scam. Last one I had from “Telstra Technical Services Deptartment” happened to coincide with the 1st Aus-Paki cricket test, so I started talking about how good the Paki bowlers were. Especially young Naseem.

    The guy took offense at this. Called me rude words, hung up, then rang me twice more to call me more rude words. It was rather funny.

  91. areff

    Splat!

    Big Kev just pushed Commissioner Cueball under that bus.

  92. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    They can have a whale of a time

    Frigging in the rigging..

  93. VR – It’s a scam.

    As is “Nicole from NBN”

  94. Big Kev just pushed Commissioner Cueball under that bus.

    Phew! If it was the other way around, it would have been a disaster.
    Think of the bus passengers!

  95. Juan

    the USN is going to name a ship after Harvey Milk

    The Western Australian version, the HMAS Harvey Milk.

    Naval ships should go back to names such as HMS Dreadnought:

    Several ships and one submarine of the Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Dreadnought in the expectation that they would “dread nought”, i.e. “fear nothing”.

  96. Mother Lode

    Christine “Don’t Go Easy on the Gravy” Nixon confronts the RC at around 9-ish.

    Ridiculous!

    That would be right in the middle of breakfast.

    As would be 8:00 and 10:00.

  97. Peter, you’ve got to admit that the great Tony Abbott did “axe the tax”! Some kudos surely.

    Thanks for the Christmas greetings, and right back at you with best wishes for Christmas and the New Year. I know it will be tough for you but my thoughts are with you today.

  98. Help!
    The name “Big Kev”: who, why, what etc.
    The rationale escapes me.

  99. Bruce of Newcastle

    Naval ships should go back to names such as HMS Dreadnought

    I can’t wait for the new supercarrier USS Donald Trump.
    The wailing will be awesome.

  100. vr

    Bruce — Very funny. The guy was Indian and I asked him if he was calling from India. He took offence and said that he was calling from 242 Exhibition St. Told him I would call technical support and hung up.

  101. mh

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3265382, posted on December 18, 2019 at 11:56 am
    WTF has Donald Trump done to deserve this madness?

    Oppose the climate scam.
    The green-progressives are in control of the Democrat Party and the MSM, they all believe in thermageddon. They think Trump literally is the end of the world
    .

    Donald Trump has interrupted the transfer of power from sovereign nations to a global elite. ‘Climate change’ is only one weapon in the globalist arsenal. You would have to go very low in the chain of command to get to the idiots that believe the end is nigh.

    Populist movements have sprung up around the world rebelling against global government. Working class Englishmen are the latest to have climbed aboard. Eventually the nexus of global government and the climate change hoax will be realised by all of these populist movements.

  102. scam callers: “Hi this Mr. Obvious Scam from …”
    me: “Hi, you have reached the Internet Fraud Division, how can I help you?”

  103. JMH

    Oops! “This part of the hearing has been redacted” Sad.

  104. Boambee John

    Old School Conservative
    #3265423, posted on December 18, 2019 at 12:34 pm
    Help!
    The name “Big Kev”: who, why, what etc.
    The rationale escapes me.

    I think it is former Chiel Commissioner of VicPol, Christine Nixon.

    Based essentially on size, and possibly a resemblance to a bloke who appeared in TV ads a while back?

  105. jo

    Val Majkus
    #3265223, posted on December 18, 2019 at 9:17 am

    Facebook strikes again for no apparent reason

    Greenies trying to shut down farming

  106. mh

    Democrat support for impeachment is falling.

    CNN in denial

    ALX 🇺🇸
    @alx
    CNN is trying to comprehend polls showing support for impeachment dropping.

    “I get it, but, I mean, you know, life mean — life has shown us that polls are sometimes wrong. And, David, that poll is wrong. Just because I said so, OK?”

    https://twitter.com/alx/status/1207026592591036416?s=20

  107. old bloke

    Peter MV, harking back to your comments regarding Lord Monckton yesterday, it reminded me of something which happened a few years ago which left me somewhat puzzled.

    I attended a lecture given by Monckton on the UWA campus, and a group of individuals turned up with their CEC – LaRouche newspapers and started questioning Monckton about the Royal family. Monckton politely told them to bugger off, he was there to discuss the non-existent CAGW nonsense and he wasn’t interested in their conspiracy theories.

    Why are your mates in the CEC targetting Monckton?

  108. Arky

    Sorry. Sorry. Sorry.
    someone repost the royal commishion into fat idiots link again please.
    I will bookmark this time.
    Otherwise have four socket sets to arrange and WILL make and post video of said socket sets unless I have a Royal Commission to watch.

  109. Bubbles

    Ancent Cats of military background might remember (“we must stop burning fossil fuels”) MAJGEN Peter Dunn’s attempt to destroy Army capability through the farcical ‘Army 2000’ project.
    I didn’t realise that he had moved on to screwing the whole country via the climate scam, but it is predictable. Being a mindlessly hip attention whore was always his career strategy.

  110. Arky

    Thank you JMH.
    You are excused from watching the socket sets being cleaned and arranged.
    Hey! Fatso Nixon is on. cool.

  111. Narwhal Tusk

    On the subject of panic, where’s Jones from the Home Guard?

  112. Arky

    Fat must be a wonderful preservative.
    The bird looks no different than she did during her landmark, historic “I had to eat speech”.

  113. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Peter, you’ve got to admit that the great Tony Abbott did “axe the tax”!

    Sorry OSC. You’ve lost me. Which tax did Abbott actually “axe”?
    (Please don’t say the Carbon Tax. That was one of the dirtiest, most underhand episodes in Australia’s dirty political history).

  114. Top Ender

    the USN is going to name a ship after Harvey Milk

    Quiz question: what Australian Navy ship was named after a gunfighter of the American West?

  115. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Why are your mates in the CEC targetting Monckton?

    I have no idea why they would be targeting him, Old Bloke. First I’ve of heard of it.
    And when did they become “mates” of mine?

    You have a very Merry Christmas.

  116. Arky

    Gawd lawyering must be the dullest profession on Earth.
    “Nooooowwwww, can you see on document 225F-003, page seven, section five, subclause b (iii) on the left hand side… Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

  117. HMAS Capt. Wilton Parmenter
    HMAS Wild Eagle
    HMAS Crazy Cat

  118. Arky

    We need more people with ADD in charge of the world.
    “Fuck this shit.
    You there! Against the wall”.

  119. old bloke

    I have no idea why they would be targeting him, Old Bloke. First I’ve of heard of it.
    And when did they become “mates” of mine?

    You have a very Merry Christmas.

    Sorry Peter, I thought that you were involved at one time with the CEC.

    I hope that you and Boofhead also have a very Merry Christmas.

  120. Arky

    You think someone with ADD would have the patience to write millions of lines of code that causes an aircraft to fall out of the sky?
    Hell no. Just bolt on four engines instead of the two wrong ‘uns.

  121. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    I thought that you were involved at one time with the CEC.

    I did more than that Old Bloke. I created it. From nothing.
    But that was long before the likes of Etteridge and some other bloke came along and subverted it.
    And that, in turn, was before it got commandeered by the LaRouche crowd.
    Somewhere in all that was when Pauline Hanson got involved with them.
    Ancient history now.

  122. Megan

    When trying to track down details on HMS Skirmisher to which my grandad was assigned in WWI, I discovered the Flower (or Gladiolus) class corvettes. I had a good giggle thinking about burly, bearded, tattooed, British sailors stomping into the pub with HMS Bluebell or Buttercup on their wee hats. Whatever happened to Invincible?

  123. Carbon Emitter

    HMAS “Wheretheheckarewe”

  124. stackja

    Former top cop Christine Nixon gives evidence at the Lawyer X Royal Commission

    Ex-top cop Christine Nixon has blamed her then-deputy Simon Overland for not telling her about barrister Nicola Gobbo’s role as a secret police informer, saying she only learned of Lawyer X’s identity through the media.
    Genevieve Alison, Herald Sun
    Subscriber only

    December 18, 2019 1:20pm

    She laid this responsibility at the feet of her then-deputy, Mr Overland, who had oversight of the crime department, including the gang-busting Purana taskforce.

    “I assume people like Simon Overland would have been one (person responsible),
    “He’s the person who has continuity through this process, perhaps there were others,” Ms Nixon said.

    But Ms Nixon said she was never told by anyone that police were using the gangland barrister as a supergrass.

    “I don’t have a recollection, and you’re right, there is no – I don’t have any documentation,” Ms Nixon said.
    Ms Nixon also joined the growing list of high-ranking officers who admitted they stopped keeping diaries during the height of Gobbo’s informing.

    She has also become the third Chief Commissioner to reveal she did not keep official records.

    The former top cop told the commission into the Lawyer X saga she had a “tradition” of not keeping a diary, but said she understood keeping records would have made things “easier” for the Commission.

    “It wasn’t any intention to cause problems for anybody down the track,”

    “I suppose I never quite imagined, you know, we would be here today,” she said.

    “Certainly someone else will have taken some sort of a record or a note of it, but I didn’t,” Ms Nixon said.
    The commission has heard current Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton, Assistant Commissioner Luke Cornelius and former police chief Simon Overland did not keep diaries at some point.

    All men were involved in gangland murders investigations which received information from Gobbo.

  125. Cardimona

    Areff

    I’ve heard from Sinc and have sent you some stuff via email.
    (Just in case it goes to spam…)

  126. stackja

    incoherent rambler
    #3265467, posted on December 18, 2019 at 1:36 pm
    Worth a look:

    Smelters off the grid?

  127. All men were involved in gangland murders investigations which received information from Gobbo.

    You are tasked with adding a comma to that sentence.
    1st prize is a dinner* with Christine Nix.

    * you may be the main course

  128. Infidel Tiger

    Police will allege the 82-year-old businessman, one of the most high-profile in the country, was in possession of 207,000 images of child abuse and more than 500 videos at the time of the search. A law enforcement official with knowledge of the arrest described the material as “very sexualised, not violent” and involving “young children”.

    Upon his arrest, Mr Brierley allegedly told officers he found the material “interesting”. He declined to provide a formal statement upon being taken back to Mascot Police Station, where he met with a legal representative.

    Prison will be interesting too, you degenerate perv.

  129. Mater

    She has also become the third Chief Commissioner to reveal she did not keep official records.

    Do you think they might consider putting this in as a key competency, within the Job Description, when they go to market looking for the next one?

    Perhaps included it as a KPI?

    Cops used to note and/or log everything. By the time they get to that level, it should be ingrained in their DNA. It just doesn’t add up.

  130. stackja

    Infidel Tiger
    #3265476, posted on December 18, 2019 at 1:49 pm

    Mental health issues will probably be raised?

  131. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    This unprecedented heatwave is crippling.
    The temperature here in sub-tropical SE QLD has now soared to 28 degrees.

  132. She has also become the third Chief Commissioner to reveal she did not keep official records.

    I would not be the one to suggest that there might be some collusion between the commissioners, but couldn’t one of them have lost a diary (or two)?

  133. Delta A

    The temperature here in sub-tropical SE QLD has now soared to 28 degrees.

    43c where I am.

    Getting a tad warm now.

  134. stackja

    incoherent rambler
    #3265484, posted on December 18, 2019 at 1:58 pm

    ‘To lose one may be regarded as a misfortune, to lose two looks like carelessness.’

    Three? Well seems very unusual.

  135. dover_beach

    I’m slowly making my way through IT’s link on the problem with porn:

    As of this writing, at least ten studies published since 2010 report a tremendous rise in ED. Rates of ED among men under 40 ranged from 14 percent to 37 percent, and rates of low libido from 16 percent to 37 percent. No variable related to youthful ED has meaningfully changed since then, except for one: the advent of on-demand video porn in 2006. It’s worth repeating: we went from less than 1 percent of erectile dysfunction in young men to 14 to 37 percent, an increase of several orders of magnitude.

    If this is more or less true, no prudent society can continue to ignore it.

  136. Mother Lode

    Correct. Taking the high moral ground and being aloft allows the left to actually implement their high moral ground.

    You don’t have to go back and rebut his same idiotic points with your same insights whenever he wants.

    I don’t think I have ever considered the winner of a debate to be the last person who spoke, but the person who answered with the unanswerable. All the best points stand on their own merit.

    When Numbers or OmPoida do that thing just link to when you explained it previously and say “As we have been through before…”

    Now, if you get your jollies out of sparring with tards then go to it. My point would be that if you think you will get them to concede you are right then you are on a hiding to nothing.

    Yesterday a great column of CL’s was ruined by OmPoida squatting over the blog and disgorging a huge noisome brain-turd. From there he led people who engaged with him off on tangent after tangent and then, as usual, he went back to his first putrescence and started again. The discussion on CL’s post was lost in all the noise.

    As I say, if you enjoy slapping the silly little buggers then fine. Go to it. But don’t do it because you think you are going to win. They are not here to be right. They are here to waste your time and smother discussions.

    Even when you have utterly demolished their points with a meticulous display of clear thinking, they have won.

    Just sayin’.

  137. The dog ate my diary.

    Telco call records and associated meta data must be kept by telcos for a long time. I recall that this was legislated by the Trumble government. Correct me if I am wrong.

    Has the RC requested the call records of our commissioners and Ms Gobbo? If not, why not?
    And how about we get their phone location history from Apple/Google ?

  138. Infidel Tiger

    If this is more or less true, no prudent society can continue to ignore it.

    No, Dover. “The neutral public square”.

    We must never trample on the rights of pornographers, ever! Besides, the free market invented a filter.

  139. Infidel Tiger

    Mental health issues will probably be raised?

    More than likely.

  140. C.L.

    Mental health issues will probably be raised?

    Inevitable.

  141. stackja

    dover_beach
    #3265492, posted on December 18, 2019 at 2:05 pm

    As I remember Don Chipp said it was harmless.

  142. Mother Lode

    Dear climate change deniers, when is it ok to panic?

    When your predictions begin to approximate real events and real temperatures then it might be worth a look.

    But, of course, it is simpler to just look at real temperatures and events.

    But then there is nothing to panic about.

    Poor buggers so desperately want to save us from ourselves, but they can’t find anything we need that they can deliver.

  143. Infidel Tiger

    Andy Ngo

    Verified account

    @MrAndyNgo

    The Seattle homeless agency director who oversaw the conference that featured a topless transsexual stripper giving lap dances has resigned. Kira Zylstra made $123,000 a year in the position with @allhomekc.

    Peak 2019.

  144. Dear climate change deniers, when is it ok to panic?

    When someone takes Timmy seriously.

  145. Tailgunner

    Upon his arrest, Mr Brierley allegedly told officers he found the material “interesting”

    Yeah, but did he mention pizza or handkerchief’s?
    The world actually controlled by pedo satanist cabal?
    Yeh,nah,nah,nah…couldn’t be,m8.

  146. Infidel Tiger

    As I remember Don Chipp said it was harmless.

    Liberalism kills people in private, socialism kills them in public.

    Both are abhorrent ideologies.

  147. stackja

    Mother Lode
    #3265493, posted on December 18, 2019 at 2:05 pm

    With the usual suspects. Scrolling, scrolling… Rawhide!

  148. Top Ender

    Quiz question: what Australian Navy ship was named after a gunfighter of the American West?

    Answer: HMAS Wyatt Earp

  149. Tailgunner

    The porn industry is run by….errrr…
    And didn’t a certain ethno-state recently ban it within their borders?
    🤔

  150. Black Ball

    I recall a poster on Piers Akerman’s articles many who went by the handle ‘Death To The Left’. Does that person post here?

  151. Top Ender

    Warship naming

    By Top Ender

    Why are warships named as they are? The Royal Australian Navy has inherited a tradition handed down from the Royal Navy, but in recent years has moved to adopt its own ideas on how to decide these significant titles.

    A lot of significance can be attached to a name, and for a long time ships have been regarded by mankind almost as living things. They can also be seen as symbols of a country or ruler’s authority. In 1418, Britain’s King Henry V paid the Bishop of Bangor five pounds for christening the largest warship of the time, the Henri Graze A Dieu, which translated as Henry By Grace Of God. This certainly reminded the general public that he was appointed by divine right.

    A look through the history of the RAN’s many hundreds of ships shows that while themes have often been followed in ship-naming, this is not always the case. The ship list of 2001 was relatively disciplined, with FFGs following city names; the patrol boats carrying the names of towns – and therefore following in the footsteps of the WWII corvettes; Collins-class submarines carrying famous RAN members’ surnames, and so on. However, a look through Joe Straczek’s The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments, shows a bewildering variety in the past: from Acheron and Aeolus to Yippee to Zetta.

    To name a warship after a country or sovereign is particularly significant. Consider what happens to the nation’s morale if that warship is heavily damaged or sunk. Perhaps for that reason, the British liner Queen Elizabeth II was kept well out of harm’s way in the Falklands War, rather than being utilised as a troopship or general transport, as some had suggested.

    The RAN has had two Australia’s. The first was scuttled outside Sydney in 1924 as a result of the naval limitations brought about as a result of the Washington Treaty, and the second saw much action in WWII, including being hit five times by kamikaze aircraft. Since then the name has lain dormant. Historian Joe Straczek, when working for the Naval History Directorate, advised that the name is reserved for “a large vessel, which due to its role would have a high national and regional profile.”

    Some ship names might be considered ill-fated. Two Voyagers have been lost by the RAN, the first off Timor in WWII, where she went aground and was partially destroyed by her own ship’s company to prevent her falling into the hands of the enemy. The second Voyager was sunk off Jervis Bay in February 1964 by a collision with the aircraft carrier Melbourne. Will the Navy ever have another ship of this name?

    Sometimes the names themselves of ships can provoke argument. Some years ago the Anzac-class frigate Arunta’s naming was in some confusion over claims that the spelling should have been Arrente or another variation, which would reflect better the pronunciation of the Arrente Aboriginal tribe after which the original WWII ship was named. After some argument and further research – including a visit to the tribe, who pointed out they didn’t have a written language – the original spelling was retained.

    Aboriginal names have featured further in the RAN – Otama for example, is an Aboriginal word meaning “dolphin”, which is particularly apt, as this vessel is a submarine. Our first submarines were named AE1 and AE2, with the “A” in their name standing for “Australian” added to the Royal Navy’s “E”-class letter and number.

    A tendency in the RAN to use abstract concepts or place names for ships was changed with the naming of the Collins-class submarines. These all were all given the names of heroic past members of the Service, with HMAS Sheean being distinguished by carrying the name of sailor Teddy Sheean, who died in heroic action on board HMAS Armidale in WWII.

    The Royal Australian Navy has also sometimes followed the RN with also using placenames, spiritual attributes or mythological titles for its ships. So the RN has had as examples of the first HMS Belfast; for the second HMS Victory and for the third HMS Jupiter.

    The Royal Navy has ship names which go back in time for hundreds of years, and like other navies, are called back into service as necessity dictates. Ark Royal; Royal Sovereign, Invincible, Revenge and so on are ship names that have been used many times. Over the past 400 years or so of the formal existence of the Royal Navy there have been some 24, 000 ships. RN vessel names extend across a wide spectrum from counties and towns, to bird species, to heroic individuals and places, and the mythical Gods. The naming conventions have evolved over the many years of the Navy and the origins are unclear.

    Some ship nicknames within the RN are quite clever:

    ‘Eggshells’, the nickname for Achilles (1905)
    ‘The Smoke’, London (1927)
    ‘Gin Palace’, Agincourt (1913)
    ‘Tea Boat’, Ceylon (1942)
    ‘Big Lizzie’, Queen Elizabeth (1914)
    ‘Despair Ship Remorse’, Resource (1928)
    ‘Tin Duck’, Iron Duke (1913)

    RAN nicknames are less widely distributed, but include:

    HMAS Queenborough – The Queen Bee
    HMAS Brisbane – The Steel Cat
    HMAS Cerberus at FND has been known as ‘Sarah-bare-arse’.

    The Royal Navy has also featured some unusual names. HMS Cockchafer, for example, was a Royal Navy Insect class gunboat. Launched on 17 December 1915, she was the fifth Royal Navy ship to carry this name. The Insect class spent most of their service on Chinese rivers.

    Starting at the beginning of the 20th Century, US Navy ships followed a system tailored to ship types. Names of states, for example, were borne by battleships. Cruisers were named for cities while destroyers came to be named for American naval leaders and heroes, as today’s destroyers are still named. Starting in 1931 submarines were named for “fish and denizens of the deep.” Mass-produced anti-submarine patrol and escort ships were named in honour of members of the naval service killed in action in World War II. Some were named for destroyers lost in the early stages of that war. Ships lost in wartime were normally honoured by having their names reassigned to new construction. During World War II the names of individuals were once again assigned to aircraft carriers.

    Until the 1970s, the United States followed a custom of not naming a ship for a person while the person was still alive. The first ship named for a then-living person was USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), named in 1975. Other examples of ships named for then-living people include: USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76); Arleigh Burke (DDG 51); Hyman G. Rickover (SSN 709); Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) and USNS Bob Hope (T-AKR 300). Another unusually-named US ship is the Fletcher-class destroyer USS The Sullivans, launched in 1943, and named for five brothers who lost their lives in the Battle of the Solomon Islands when their ship was sunk.

    Notably in USN history there has featured a USS Canberra, that name being given to a cruiser commissioned in 1943. This was in honour of the Australian cruiser Canberra, sunk while operating with American warships during the Battle of Savo Island in August 1942. The naming “…was seen to be an appropriate exception to the custom of naming cruisers for American cities”, according to one US source. Canberra’s loss can in part be related to the failure of the American radar ships in that battle to detect the oncoming Japanese force.

    This outcome affected the naming of one of the “Tribal” class destroyers built in Australia from 1940. At the meeting of the Naval Board in July the board decided to recommend to the Minister the names Arunta, Warramunga and Chingilli. Later, at their meeting on 29 March 1941 (item 48) they gave further consideration to the third ‘Tribal’ and recommended the name Kurnai be submitted. Subsequently, however, the name of this ship became Bataan, to reciprocate for the USN’s gesture. Bataan was later launched by Mrs Jean MacArthur, the famous US general’s wife.

    Some of the more unusual RAN ship names have arisen because ships were taken up from trade in time of conflict and retained their – rather “non-naval” – names in their service career. Some names which might be worth a second glance:

    Blowfly – a survey launch of 1944.
    Bluenose – a part-time Naval Auxiliary Patrol vessel.
    Bogan – a frigate ordered in WWII, but which never eventuated with the cancellation of the order.
    Cockroach – a motor launch of 1914.
    The “Snake” series of 66’ armed trawlers of WWII – so Coral Snake; Grass Snake and so on.
    Mate-O-Mine – a requisitioned cabin cruiser which served in WWII.
    Tasmania – a destroyer of the 1920s – there has not been another Tasmania but there have been two Tassie’s – both auxiliary patrol vessels of WWII.
    Vagrant – name given to two patrol vessels of WWII.
    Wyatt Earp – two Antarctic patrol vessels, the first entering service in 1947 and the second in 1993. As RT Sexton tells us in Ships That Passed, the unusual name of this (first) ship was because she was taken up from trade and that was her name at the time. She was originally the Fanefjord, built in Norway in 1919. A wooden ship, she was a single-deck motor vessel, 150 feet in length, of 402 tons, and made of Baltic pine. She had two masts and carried fore-and-aft auxiliary sails. Her superstructure, with one tall thin funnel, was placed well aft.

    After 10 years of herring fishing in the North Sea, she was purchased by a sealing firm which operated her in the Arctic seas around Greenland. Sexton relates:

    While engaged in this she was seen by the famous Australian explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins, who had been commissioned by the American Lincoln Ellsworth to purchase a suitable vessel for Antarctic exploration. He bought the Fanefjord and Ellsworth renamed her Wyatt Earp after a Wild West character – the fighting Sheriff of Tombstone, whose deeds have become part of American folklore.

    However, perhaps the most unusual names of RAN vessels were those of the “Chinese ships” of WWII. These were all ex-Chinese river steamers or ocean-going vessels on the Japan-China-Australia run. During WWII they were requisitioned and manned by RAN members, serving from December 1941 to 1946. They were HMA ships Ping Wo, Poyang, Whang Pu, Yunnan and VSIS (Victualling Supply Issue Ship) Changte and Taiping.

    -o-o-O-o-o-

    Sources:
    Evans, Peter. President of the RAN Fairmile Association. Naval Board meeting notes.

    Federation of American Scientists web site: http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/names.htm

    Royal Navy. “Covey Crump” website: http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/content/377.html

    Royal Navy. http://www.warships.net/royalnavy/

    Sexton, RT. Ships That Passed. Friends of the South Australian Maritime Museum. No other publishing information on site except ISBN 0 646 31467 X. Complete text given at: http://www.picknowl.com.au/homepages/malcolm/shippass.htm

    Straczek, Joe. “What’s in a Name – the naming of RAN Units”. Warship. Volume 12/2002. (16)

    Straczek, Josef. The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments. Sydney: Navy Public Affairs, 1996.

    Wildy, Merv. Chinese Ships’ Association. Descriptive article. In the possession of the author.

  152. Tailgunner

    38.1c currently in the Yarragrad Oblast.
    Too hot for schooners. Back to pots.
    Swellnet says waves are tiny down the coast,natch.
    Knuckles, get in here and tell us your movements. Come to TigerTown for a round! Matrix is in, we’ll round up some other stray Cats too!

  153. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    C.L.
    #3265500, posted on December 18, 2019 at 2:12 pm

    Sorry to bother you C.L., but I’m genuinely confused by a comment upthread.
    Did you recently author a post about something?
    As far as I remember, the only posts I’ve read in the past couple of weeks have been the Open ones, and the one yesterday by Elle. Your advice would be appreciated.

    Merry Christmas to you and yours.

  154. Top Ender

    Warship naming

    By Top Ender

    Why are warships named as they are? The Royal Australian Navy has inherited a tradition handed down from the Royal Navy, but in recent years has moved to adopt its own ideas on how to decide these significant titles.

    A lot of significance can be attached to a name, and for a long time ships have been regarded by mankind almost as living things. They can also be seen as symbols of a country or ruler’s authority. In 1418, Britain’s King Henry V paid the Bishop of Bangor five pounds for christening the largest warship of the time, the Henri Graze A Dieu, which translated as Henry By Grace Of God. This certainly reminded the general public that he was appointed by divine right.

    A look through the history of the RAN’s many hundreds of ships shows that while themes have often been followed in ship-naming, this is not always the case. The ship list of 2001 was relatively disciplined, with FFGs following city names; the patrol boats carrying the names of towns – and therefore following in the footsteps of the WWII corvettes; Collins-class submarines carrying famous RAN members’ surnames, and so on. However, a look through Joe Straczek’s The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments, shows a bewildering variety in the past: from Acheron and Aeolus to Yippee to Zetta.

    To name a warship after a country or sovereign is particularly significant. Consider what happens to the nation’s morale if that warship is heavily damaged or sunk. Perhaps for that reason, the British liner Queen Elizabeth II was kept well out of harm’s way in the Falklands War, rather than being utilised as a troopship or general transport, as some had suggested.

    The RAN has had two Australia’s. The first was scuttled outside Sydney in 1924 as a result of the naval limitations brought about as a result of the Washington Treaty, and the second saw much action in WWII, including being hit five times by kamikaze aircraft. Since then the name has lain dormant. Historian Joe Straczek, when working for the Naval History Directorate, advised that the name is reserved for “a large vessel, which due to its role would have a high national and regional profile.”

    Some ship names might be considered ill-fated. Two Voyagers have been lost by the RAN, the first off Timor in WWII, where she went aground and was partially destroyed by her own ship’s company to prevent her falling into the hands of the enemy. The second Voyager was sunk off Jervis Bay in February 1964 by a collision with the aircraft carrier Melbourne. Will the Navy ever have another ship of this name?

    Sometimes the names themselves of ships can provoke argument. Some years ago the Anzac-class frigate Arunta’s naming was in some confusion over claims that the spelling should have been Arrente or another variation, which would reflect better the pronunciation of the Arrente Aboriginal tribe after which the original WWII ship was named. After some argument and further research – including a visit to the tribe, who pointed out they didn’t have a written language – the original spelling was retained.

    Aboriginal names have featured further in the RAN – Otama for example, is an Aboriginal word meaning “dolphin”, which is particularly apt, as this vessel is a submarine. Our first submarines were named AE1 and AE2, with the “A” in their name standing for “Australian” added to the Royal Navy’s “E”-class letter and number.

    A tendency in the RAN to use abstract concepts or place names for ships was changed with the naming of the Collins-class submarines. These all were all given the names of heroic past members of the Service, with HMAS Sheean being distinguished by carrying the name of sailor Teddy Sheean, who died in heroic action on board HMAS Armidale in WWII.

    The Royal Australian Navy has also sometimes followed the RN with also using placenames, spiritual attributes or mythological titles for its ships. So the RN has had as examples of the first HMS Belfast; for the second HMS Victory and for the third HMS Jupiter.

    The Royal Navy has ship names which go back in time for hundreds of years, and like other navies, are called back into service as necessity dictates. Ark Royal; Royal Sovereign, Invincible, Revenge and so on are ship names that have been used many times. Over the past 400 years or so of the formal existence of the Royal Navy there have been some 24, 000 ships. RN vessel names extend across a wide spectrum from counties and towns, to bird species, to heroic individuals and places, and the mythical Gods. The naming conventions have evolved over the many years of the Navy and the origins are unclear.

    Some ship nicknames within the RN are quite clever:

    ‘Eggshells’, the nickname for Achilles (1905)
    ‘The Smoke’, London (1927)
    ‘Gin Palace’, Agincourt (1913)
    ‘Tea Boat’, Ceylon (1942)
    ‘Big Lizzie’, Queen Elizabeth (1914)
    ‘Despair Ship Remorse’, Resource (1928)
    ‘Tin Duck’, Iron Duke (1913)

    RAN nicknames are less widely distributed, but include:

    HMAS Queenborough – The Queen Bee
    HMAS Brisbane – The Steel Cat
    HMAS Cerberus at FND has been known as ‘Sarah-bare-a rse’.

    The Royal Navy has also featured some unusual names. HMS Cockchafer, for example, was a Royal Navy Insect class gunboat. Launched on 17 December 1915, she was the fifth Royal Navy ship to carry this name. The Insect class spent most of their service on Chinese rivers.

    Starting at the beginning of the 20th Century, US Navy ships followed a system tailored to ship types. Names of states, for example, were borne by battleships. Cruisers were named for cities while destroyers came to be named for American naval leaders and heroes, as today’s destroyers are still named. Starting in 1931 submarines were named for “fish and denizens of the deep.” Mass-produced anti-submarine patrol and escort ships were named in honour of members of the naval service killed in action in World War II. Some were named for destroyers lost in the early stages of that war. Ships lost in wartime were normally honoured by having their names reassigned to new construction. During World War II the names of individuals were once again assigned to aircraft carriers.

    Until the 1970s, the United States followed a custom of not naming a ship for a person while the person was still alive. The first ship named for a then-living person was USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), named in 1975. Other examples of ships named for then-living people include: USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76); Arleigh Burke (DDG 51); Hyman G. Rickover (SSN 709); Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) and USNS Bob Hope (T-AKR 300). Another unusually-named US ship is the Fletcher-class destroyer USS The Sullivans, launched in 1943, and named for five brothers who lost their lives in the Battle of the Solomon Islands when their ship was sunk.

    Notably in USN history there has featured a USS Canberra, that name being given to a cruiser commissioned in 1943. This was in honour of the Australian cruiser Canberra, sunk while operating with American warships during the Battle of Savo Island in August 1942. The naming “…was seen to be an appropriate exception to the custom of naming cruisers for American cities”, according to one US source. Canberra’s loss can in part be related to the failure of the American radar ships in that battle to detect the oncoming Japanese force.

    This outcome affected the naming of one of the “Tribal” class destroyers built in Australia from 1940. At the meeting of the Naval Board in July the board decided to recommend to the Minister the names Arunta, Warramunga and Chingilli. Later, at their meeting on 29 March 1941 (item 48) they gave further consideration to the third ‘Tribal’ and recommended the name Kurnai be submitted. Subsequently, however, the name of this ship became Bataan, to reciprocate for the USN’s gesture. Bataan was later launched by Mrs Jean MacArthur, the famous US general’s wife.

    Some of the more unusual RAN ship names have arisen because ships were taken up from trade in time of conflict and retained their – rather “non-naval” – names in their service career. Some names which might be worth a second glance:

    Blowfly – a survey launch of 1944.
    Bluenose – a part-time Naval Auxiliary Patrol vessel.
    Bogan – a frigate ordered in WWII, but which never eventuated with the cancellation of the order.
    Cockroach – a motor launch of 1914.
    The “Snake” series of 66’ armed trawlers of WWII – so Coral Snake; Grass Snake and so on.
    Mate-O-Mine – a requisitioned cabin cruiser which served in WWII.
    Tasmania – a destroyer of the 1920s – there has not been another Tasmania but there have been two Tassie’s – both auxiliary patrol vessels of WWII.
    Vagrant – name given to two patrol vessels of WWII.
    Wyatt Earp – two Antarctic patrol vessels, the first entering service in 1947 and the second in 1993. As RT Sexton tells us in Ships That Passed, the unusual name of this (first) ship was because she was taken up from trade and that was her name at the time. She was originally the Fanefjord, built in Norway in 1919. A wooden ship, she was a single-deck motor vessel, 150 feet in length, of 402 tons, and made of Baltic pine. She had two masts and carried fore-and-aft auxiliary sails. Her superstructure, with one tall thin funnel, was placed well aft.

    After 10 years of herring fishing in the North Sea, she was purchased by a sealing firm which operated her in the Arctic seas around Greenland. Sexton relates:

    While engaged in this she was seen by the famous Australian explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins, who had been commissioned by the American Lincoln Ellsworth to purchase a suitable vessel for Antarctic exploration. He bought the Fanefjord and Ellsworth renamed her Wyatt Earp after a Wild West character – the fighting Sheriff of Tombstone, whose deeds have become part of American folklore.

    However, perhaps the most unusual names of RAN vessels were those of the “Chinese ships” of WWII. These were all ex-Chinese river steamers or ocean-going vessels on the Japan-China-Australia run. During WWII they were requisitioned and manned by RAN members, serving from December 1941 to 1946. They were HMA ships Ping Wo, Poyang, Whang Pu, Yunnan and VSIS (Victualling Supply Issue Ship) Changte and Taiping.

    -o-o-O-o-o-

    Sources:
    Evans, Peter. President of the RAN Fairmile Association. Naval Board meeting notes.

    Federation of American Scientists web site: http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/names.htm

    Royal Navy. “Covey Crump” website: http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/content/377.html

    Royal Navy. http://www.warships.net/royalnavy/

    Sexton, RT. Ships That Passed. Friends of the South Australian Maritime Museum. No other publishing information on site except ISBN 0 646 31467 X. Complete text given at: http://www.picknowl.com.au/homepages/malcolm/shippass.htm

    Straczek, Joe. “What’s in a Name – the naming of RAN Units”. Warship. Volume 12/2002. (16)

    Straczek, Josef. The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments. Sydney: Navy Public Affairs, 1996.

    Wildy, Merv. Chinese Ships’ Association. Descriptive article. In the possession of the author.

  155. Top Ender

    Warship naming

    By Top Ender

    Why are warships named as they are? The Royal Australian Navy has inherited a tradition handed down from the Royal Navy, but in recent years has moved to adopt its own ideas on how to decide these significant titles.

    A lot of significance can be attached to a name, and for a long time ships have been regarded by mankind almost as living things. They can also be seen as symbols of a country or ruler’s authority. In 1418, Britain’s King Henry V paid the Bishop of Bangor five pounds for christening the largest warship of the time, the Henri Graze A Dieu, which translated as Henry By Grace Of God. This certainly reminded the general public that he was appointed by divine right.

    A look through the history of the RAN’s many hundreds of ships shows that while themes have often been followed in ship-naming, this is not always the case. The ship list of 2001 was relatively disciplined, with FFGs following city names; the patrol boats carrying the names of towns – and therefore following in the footsteps of the WWII corvettes; Collins-class submarines carrying famous RAN members’ surnames, and so on. However, a look through Joe Straczek’s The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments, shows a bewildering variety in the past: from Acheron and Aeolus to Yippee to Zetta.

    To name a warship after a country or sovereign is particularly significant. Consider what happens to the nation’s morale if that warship is heavily damaged or sunk. Perhaps for that reason, the British liner Queen Elizabeth II was kept well out of harm’s way in the Falklands War, rather than being utilised as a troopship or general transport, as some had suggested.

    The RAN has had two Australia’s. The first was scuttled outside Sydney in 1924 as a result of the naval limitations brought about as a result of the Washington Treaty, and the second saw much action in WWII, including being hit five times by kamikaze aircraft. Since then the name has lain dormant. Historian Joe Straczek, when working for the Naval History Directorate, advised that the name is reserved for “a large vessel, which due to its role would have a high national and regional profile.”

    Some ship names might be considered ill-fated. Two Voyagers have been lost by the RAN, the first off Timor in WWII, where she went aground and was partially destroyed by her own ship’s company to prevent her falling into the hands of the enemy. The second Voyager was sunk off Jervis Bay in February 1964 by a collision with the aircraft carrier Melbourne. Will the Navy ever have another ship of this name?

    Sometimes the names themselves of ships can provoke argument. Some years ago the Anzac-class frigate Arunta’s naming was in some confusion over claims that the spelling should have been Arrente or another variation, which would reflect better the pronunciation of the Arrente Aboriginal tribe after which the original WWII ship was named. After some argument and further research – including a visit to the tribe, who pointed out they didn’t have a written language – the original spelling was retained.

    Aboriginal names have featured further in the RAN – Otama for example, is an Aboriginal word meaning “dolphin”, which is particularly apt, as this vessel is a submarine. Our first submarines were named AE1 and AE2, with the “A” in their name standing for “Australian” added to the Royal Navy’s “E”-class letter and number.

    A tendency in the RAN to use abstract concepts or place names for ships was changed with the naming of the Collins-class submarines. These all were all given the names of heroic past members of the Service, with HMAS Sheean being distinguished by carrying the name of sailor Teddy Sheean, who died in heroic action on board HMAS Armidale in WWII.

    The Royal Australian Navy has also sometimes followed the RN with also using placenames, spiritual attributes or mythological titles for its ships. So the RN has had as examples of the first HMS Belfast; for the second HMS Victory and for the third HMS Jupiter.

    The Royal Navy has ship names which go back in time for hundreds of years, and like other navies, are called back into service as necessity dictates. Ark Royal; Royal Sovereign, Invincible, Revenge and so on are ship names that have been used many times. Over the past 400 years or so of the formal existence of the Royal Navy there have been some 24, 000 ships. RN vessel names extend across a wide spectrum from counties and towns, to bird species, to heroic individuals and places, and the mythical Gods. The naming conventions have evolved over the many years of the Navy and the origins are unclear.

    Some ship nicknames within the RN are quite clever:

    ‘Eggshells’, the nickname for Achilles (1905)
    ‘The Smoke’, London (1927)
    ‘Gin Palace’, Agincourt (1913)
    ‘Tea Boat’, Ceylon (1942)
    ‘Big Lizzie’, Queen Elizabeth (1914)
    ‘Despair Ship Remorse’, Resource (1928)
    ‘Tin Duck’, Iron Duke (1913)

    RAN nicknames are less widely distributed, but include:

    HMAS Queenborough – The Queen Bee
    HMAS Brisbane – The Steel Cat
    HMAS Cerberus at FND has been known as ‘Sarah-bare-arse’.

    The Royal Navy has also featured some unusual names. HMS C ockchafer, for example, was a Royal Navy Insect class gunboat. Launched on 17 December 1915, she was the fifth Royal Navy ship to carry this name. The Insect class spent most of their service on Chinese rivers.

    Starting at the beginning of the 20th Century, US Navy ships followed a system tailored to ship types. Names of states, for example, were borne by battleships. Cruisers were named for cities while destroyers came to be named for American naval leaders and heroes, as today’s destroyers are still named. Starting in 1931 submarines were named for “fish and denizens of the deep.” Mass-produced anti-submarine patrol and escort ships were named in honour of members of the naval service killed in action in World War II. Some were named for destroyers lost in the early stages of that war. Ships lost in wartime were normally honoured by having their names reassigned to new construction. During World War II the names of individuals were once again assigned to aircraft carriers.

    Until the 1970s, the United States followed a custom of not naming a ship for a person while the person was still alive. The first ship named for a then-living person was USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), named in 1975. Other examples of ships named for then-living people include: USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76); Arleigh Burke (DDG 51); Hyman G. Rickover (SSN 709); Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) and USNS Bob Hope (T-AKR 300). Another unusually-named US ship is the Fletcher-class destroyer USS The Sullivans, launched in 1943, and named for five brothers who lost their lives in the Battle of the Solomon Islands when their ship was sunk.

    Notably in USN history there has featured a USS Canberra, that name being given to a cruiser commissioned in 1943. This was in honour of the Australian cruiser Canberra, sunk while operating with American warships during the Battle of Savo Island in August 1942. The naming “…was seen to be an appropriate exception to the custom of naming cruisers for American cities”, according to one US source. Canberra’s loss can in part be related to the failure of the American radar ships in that battle to detect the oncoming Japanese force.

    This outcome affected the naming of one of the “Tribal” class destroyers built in Australia from 1940. At the meeting of the Naval Board in July the board decided to recommend to the Minister the names Arunta, Warramunga and Chingilli. Later, at their meeting on 29 March 1941 (item 48) they gave further consideration to the third ‘Tribal’ and recommended the name Kurnai be submitted. Subsequently, however, the name of this ship became Bataan, to reciprocate for the USN’s gesture. Bataan was later launched by Mrs Jean MacArthur, the famous US general’s wife.

    Some of the more unusual RAN ship names have arisen because ships were taken up from trade in time of conflict and retained their – rather “non-naval” – names in their service career. Some names which might be worth a second glance:

    Blowfly – a survey launch of 1944.
    Bluenose – a part-time Naval Auxiliary Patrol vessel.
    Bogan – a frigate ordered in WWII, but which never eventuated with the cancellation of the order.
    Cockroach – a motor launch of 1914.
    The “Snake” series of 66’ armed trawlers of WWII – so Coral Snake; Grass Snake and so on.
    Mate-O-Mine – a requisitioned cabin cruiser which served in WWII.
    Tasmania – a destroyer of the 1920s – there has not been another Tasmania but there have been two Tassie’s – both auxiliary patrol vessels of WWII.
    Vagrant – name given to two patrol vessels of WWII.
    Wyatt Earp – two Antarctic patrol vessels, the first entering service in 1947 and the second in 1993. As RT Sexton tells us in Ships That Passed, the unusual name of this (first) ship was because she was taken up from trade and that was her name at the time. She was originally the Fanefjord, built in Norway in 1919. A wooden ship, she was a single-deck motor vessel, 150 feet in length, of 402 tons, and made of Baltic pine. She had two masts and carried fore-and-aft auxiliary sails. Her superstructure, with one tall thin funnel, was placed well aft.

    After 10 years of herring fishing in the North Sea, she was purchased by a sealing firm which operated her in the Arctic seas around Greenland. Sexton relates:

    While engaged in this she was seen by the famous Australian explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins, who had been commissioned by the American Lincoln Ellsworth to purchase a suitable vessel for Antarctic exploration. He bought the Fanefjord and Ellsworth renamed her Wyatt Earp after a Wild West character – the fighting Sheriff of Tombstone, whose deeds have become part of American folklore.

    However, perhaps the most unusual names of RAN vessels were those of the “Chinese ships” of WWII. These were all ex-Chinese river steamers or ocean-going vessels on the Japan-China-Australia run. During WWII they were requisitioned and manned by RAN members, serving from December 1941 to 1946. They were HMA ships Ping Wo, Poyang, Whang Pu, Yunnan and VSIS (Victualling Supply Issue Ship) Changte and Taiping.

    -o-o-O-o-o-

    Sources:
    Evans, Peter. President of the RAN Fairmile Association. Naval Board meeting notes.

    Federation of American Scientists web site: http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/names.htm

    Royal Navy. “Covey Crump” website: http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/content/377.html

    Royal Navy. http://www.warships.net/royalnavy/

    Sexton, RT. Ships That Passed. Friends of the South Australian Maritime Museum. No other publishing information on site except ISBN 0 646 31467 X. Complete text given at: http://www.picknowl.com.au/homepages/malcolm/shippass.htm

    Straczek, Joe. “What’s in a Name – the naming of RAN Units”. Warship. Volume 12/2002. (16)

    Straczek, Josef. The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments. Sydney: Navy Public Affairs, 1996.

    Wildy, Merv. Chinese Ships’ Association. Descriptive article. In the possession of the author.

  156. Top Ender

    Is my list of banned words complete?

    Checked an article trying to post for all words and still going into moderation:

    Ba lls
    I slam
    M uslim
    N igger
    W og
    J ew
    C oon
    M ohammad in all variations
    P aedophile
    P edophile
    R ape
    R apist

  157. Val Majkus

    Val Majkus
    #3265223, posted on December 18, 2019 at 9:17 am

    Facebook strikes again for no apparent reason

    Greenies trying to shut down farming

    Facebook has apologised and that page has now been reinstated

    …. The group was suspended by Facebook yesterday after it breached a community standard in relation to selling livestock, a mistake Facebook has now acknowledged.
    “We appreciate the hard work that ‘One Day Closer To Rain’ is doing to support drought-stricken farmers and their families at this difficult time,” a Facebook company spokesperson said.
    “We’ve looked into yesterday’s removal, and upon further review, realised that we made an error and have since restored the Group and are reaching out to the admins of this Group to apologise for our mistake.”

  158. Twostix

    British labour hate the working class

    It’s not just British Labour it’s a new class war: technocratic bugmen and their retarded white collar professional lickspittles vs the everyman.

  159. dover_beach

    Dover, did you see these stories?

    I have to read it C.L. but their on-going ill-treatment of the canonization of Sheen is a stain on their souls that our Lord will not look lightly upon.

  160. Mother Lode

    Cute story. Some couples are attached at the hip.

    https://www.mlive.com/news/jackson/2019/12/after-70-years-of-marriage-couple-dies-minutes-and-inches-apart.html

    A lot of people would dream of a marriage that endured like that.

    No inkling that an integral part of it was the difficulties they dealt with together, or even that there may even have been moments when they doubted whether they wished to stay together, but accepted that it takes work sometimes, and thus they reap their reward.

  161. dover_beach

    BTW, nothing illustrates this pontificate better than that picture. An absolute malevolent clown show.

  162. Tailgunner

    labour hate the working class

    Drop a vowel and this is what I’ve been using in the site toilet stalls.
    Need to start making my own stickers….

  163. Tom

    Cops used to note and/or log everything. By the time they get to that level, it should be ingrained in their DNA. It just doesn’t add up.

    I’m guessing that Nixon, Overland and Ashton all kept detailed diaries of the period under review and that they are therefore lying to the Royal Commission. There should be serious consequences, including criminal charges, but there won’t be in Dickhead Dan’s lawless CFMEU caliphate of Victoriastan, where selected insiders are above the law.

    It looks to me like Simple Simon is going to be the fall guy.

  164. Mitch M.

    IT,

    That article strikes me as containing too much pop neuroscience. The same argument could be used to ban sugar because it also activates the same pathways.

    That’s right: porn addiction literally atrophies the most important part of our brain

    .

    That’s rubbish. Hypofrontality is not evidence of brain damage. It can indicative of a problem but not necessarily indicative of tissue loss.

    So neuroplasticity means that porn addiction, by strengthening certain neural pathways in the brain, weakens others, especially those related to executive function.

    An addict can have very poor self control in one domain and excellent self control in other. Smoking is an obvious example. We must ban smoking because it makes people lose control? While we’re at it ban video games, mobile phones, fast cars … .

    Might Porn Cause Societal Collapse?

    So many things have been claimed to be a threat to civilisation and we’re still here.

    The evidence is in: porn is as addictive as smoking, or more, except that what smoking does to your lungs, porn does to your brain.

    Why doesn’t he go all the way and assert porn causes glioblastomas?

    I’m not reading anymore, I’ve seen too many articles like this that claim to be based on neuroscience. There’s is much controversy in interpreting neuroimaging results and I’m certainly no expert on that but sufficient numbers of those claims have been debunked that I will not trust those results just because they are in peer reviewed journals.

    Porn is a problem. Some could argue titty bars are a problem. When will the banning stop?

  165. Top Ender

    Labor dilemma: Can Anthony Albanese avoid the Jeremy Corbyn wreck?

    JACK THE INSIDER

    After Labour’s abject humiliation last week, one thing we can be grateful for is the “Oh, Jeremy Corbyn” chant to the tune of the White Stripes’ Seven Nation Army will never be seen or heard of again.

    But the poison that has consumed the party will course through its veins for years. Like arterial blood spray on an otherwise pristine white shirt, the stain may never be removed.

    There are big, important lessons for Anthony Albanese and Labor in Australia to learn, too. The problem for Labour with a u is eerily similar to that of Labor without one.

    Corbyn, who babbled culpas various without managing to conjugate the first person singular, claimed his party had won the argument but lost the election. It was the greatest piece of self-delusion since Billy Snedden conceded in the 1974 Australian federal election, declaring that his party had neither lost nor won.

    I have spent many amusing hours since the news of Boris Johnson’s landslide triumph reading Corbynist columns that pollute the internet. Gary Younge, formally editor at large with The Guardian, is a particular favourite.

    In internet speak, the columns have not aged well. Even in the latter part of the campaign, where polling showed Corbyn was about as popular as something I just stepped in, Younge waxed philosophical that Corbyn had already won by sheer weight of his rancid 1970’s socialist platform. He’d been writing this empty triumphalist nonsense for four years.

    It must have come as a crippling disappointment to discover that renationalising the railways was not a vote winner in 2019.

    One delicious quote sent to me by a friend in the wake of Corbyn’s crushing defeat sums up Labour’s woes and highlights the dilemma faced by all progressive parties in western democracies.

    The provenance of the quote goes back some years to the Brexit referendum. It ran in Tim Shipman’s study of the politics of Brexit, “All Out War” and how leavers outplayed the hapless remain campaign so utterly, so comprehensively.

    But the comment could easily have been made this morning just before lunchtime.

    “There are always going to be 500,000 people in the country who are off-the-page nuts. The problem we’ve got is that they have all joined the Labour Party because of Jeremy Corbyn.”

    Problems won’t end with Corbyn’s exit

    The quote is a masterpiece of political analysis in two sentences. Sadly, it was uttered by an unnamed Labour MP in 2016. That Labour MP should have put his name to it and shouted it long and loud then. Corbyn should have it tattooed on his forehead now.

    The anonymous Labour MP went on.

    “It slowly dawned on us that the man’s insane and the people around him are too.”

    Labour’s problems won’t end when Corbyn finally departs. If he had a shred of decency, he would have hitched a ride on the collective caravan and departed on Thursday night. Not that this matters because what Corbyn will leave in his rancid path is a party whose soul has been sold to a platform that is electoral scorched earth.

    It is as if the recent history of politics in the UK was scribbled down on the back of a napkin and accidentally hurled into the bin with the table scraps.

    Twisted history

    For the record, since Margaret Thatcher became leader of the Conservatives, James Callaghan lost, Michael Foot lost, Neil Kinnock lost (twice), John Smith died in office, Tony Blair won (three times), Gordon Brown lost, Ed Miliband lost and now Corbyn has lost again.

    The twisted history of the Corbynites now portrays Blair as the failure among this group because he is perceived perhaps more now than ever as a ‘Red Tory’, a pejorative used on social media as a brutal rejoinder in the election campaign to attack Labor’s centrists who had the temerity to wonder out loud what the hell had happened to their party.

    The truth is Blair did more for the working class, more for the marginalised, more in health, more in education, and more in social justice in the space of a weekend than Corbyn has done in his entire rancid career.

    Corbyn’s toxic achievements are not only that he ideologically hijacked a party, but that he brought like-minded “off-the-page nuts” along with him in such significant number that cultist organisations like the Momentum group were formed who continue to hold a gun to the party’s head.

    Albanese’s balancing act

    We might think Labor in Australia holds its heroes higher. Albanese praises the Hawke-Keating reforms now but in his early days as a rising star in the NSW Left, he was less than effusive.

    In any event, he has to traverse the high wire act of driving policy that may run contrary to views held by large sections of the party’s rank and file. For example, many from the party’s Left want coal mining gone by last Thursday with coal miners, with shearers traditionally Labor’s most iconic group, roughly dispatched to socio-economic oblivion.

    A party leader respects the rank and file view but does not kowtow to it.

    Politics is not a sport. It’s not a game. It’s not an intellectual stroll in the park. It is not of itself as the romanticists describe it, a contest of ideas.

    Major political parties exist only to gain power and wield it. When they don’t for long periods of time they veer into irrelevance, internal animus, into a vortex of failure and finally to a point where they simply cease to exist.

    I’m sure Albanese has looked long and hard at the Corbyn misadventure. We don’t know just yet what he might have learned if anything.

    But if we start hearing devotional chants to Albo at music festivals, we’ll know Labor is in big trouble.

    Link

  166. Tailgunner

    Ooooo
    This guy.
    Respect
    Surfn Cats will love.

  167. BrettW

    Another reason for a VICPOL Chief not to record details in a diary would be to hide all the inappropriate discussions with their political masters.

    Luckily Ken Jones kept records but then again he was a real cop not a political one.

  168. I’m guessing that Nixon, Overland and Ashton all kept detailed diaries of the period under review and that they are therefore lying to the Royal Commission.

    If they haven’t, how could they possible write their sensational memoires in the future?

  169. stackja

    TE – Tom had a problem with Oz story this morning. I tried several times. I managed to post parts separately. Some successful and some not. No obvious reasons why. A mystery inside a puzzle inside an enigma.

  170. Mother Lode

    Mother Lode
    #3265493, posted on December 18, 2019 at 2:05 pm

    With the usual suspects. Scrolling, scrolling… Rawhide!

    The scrolling muscles on my mouse-hand have 6-packs.

  171. Tailgunner

    We must ban smoking because it makes people lose control? While we’re at it ban video games, mobile phones, fast cars …

    Hehe, Tiger, you’ve noticed this too,right?
    Lol

  172. Leigh Lowe

    8th Dan

    #3265302, posted on December 18, 2019 at 10:37 am

    Nixon’s speech is affected by her dentures.

    Or, more correctly, lying through her dentures.

  173. Leigh Lowe

    hzhousewife

    #3265542, posted on December 18, 2019 at 2:51 pm

    I’m guessing that Nixon, Overland and Ashton all kept detailed diaries of the period under review and that they are therefore lying to the Royal Commission.

    If they haven’t, how could they possible write their sensational memoires in the future?

    Spot on.
    They would have been assiduously recording every last detail.
    This was going straight to Hollywood.
    Of course, when they realised the route to Hollywood might be via HM Prison Barwon, there was a bonfire of the diaries.

  174. Armadillo

    Luckily Ken Jones kept records but then again he was a real cop not a political one.

    Yep. His statement to the RC is a great read if you want to understand what has actually gone on here.

    https://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2019/12/sir-ken-jones-reveals-the-pro-labor-corrupt-culture-in-victoria-police-1.html

  175. Infidel Tiger

    Porn is a problem. Some could argue titty bars are a problem. When will the banning stop?

    Porn and titty bars are actually quite different in my opinion. Very different interaction.

    Both are sinful, but at least one is getting you out of the house.

  176. Top Ender

    Warship naming

    By Top Ender

    Why are warships named as they are? The Royal Australian Navy has inherited a tradition handed down from the Royal Navy, but in recent years has moved to adopt its own ideas on how to decide these significant titles.

    A lot of significance can be attached to a name, and for a long time ships have been regarded by mankind almost as living things. They can also be seen as symbols of a country or ruler’s authority. In 1418, Britain’s King Henry V paid the Bishop of Bangor five pounds for christening the largest warship of the time, the Henri Graze A Dieu, which translated as Henry By Grace Of God. This certainly reminded the general public that he was appointed by divine right.

    A look through the history of the RAN’s many hundreds of ships shows that while themes have often been followed in ship-naming, this is not always the case. The ship list of 2001 was relatively disciplined, with FFGs following city names; the patrol boats carrying the names of towns – and therefore following in the footsteps of the WWII corvettes; Collins-class submarines carrying famous RAN members’ surnames, and so on. However, a look through Joe Straczek’s The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments, shows a bewildering variety in the past: from Acheron and Aeolus to Yippee to Zetta.

    To name a warship after a country or sovereign is particularly significant. Consider what happens to the nation’s morale if that warship is heavily damaged or sunk. Perhaps for that reason, the British liner Queen Elizabeth II was kept well out of harm’s way in the Falklands War, rather than being utilised as a troopship or general transport, as some had suggested.
    HMAS Australia (I) under
    inspection by Royalty in 1914

    The RAN has had two Australia’s. The first was scuttled outside Sydney in 1924 as a result of the naval limitations brought about as a result of the Washington Treaty, and the second saw much action in WWII, including being hit five times by kamikaze aircraft. Since then the name has lain dormant. Historian Joe Straczek, when working for the Naval History Directorate, advised that the name is reserved for “a large vessel, which due to its role would have a high national and regional profile.”

    Some ship names might be considered ill-fated. Two Voyagers have been lost by the RAN, the first off Timor in WWII, where she went aground and was partially destroyed by her own ship’s company to prevent her falling into the hands of the enemy. The second Voyager was sunk off Jervis Bay in February 1964 by a collision with the aircraft carrier Melbourne. Will the Navy ever have another ship of this name?

    Sometimes the names themselves of ships can provoke argument. Some years ago the Anzac-class frigate Arunta’s naming was in some confusion over claims that the spelling should have been Arrente or another variation, which would reflect better the pronunciation of the Arrente Aboriginal tribe after which the original WWII ship was named. After some argument and further research – including a visit to the tribe, who pointed out they didn’t have a written language – the original spelling was retained.

    Aboriginal names have featured further in the RAN – Otama for example, is an Aboriginal word meaning “dolphin”, which is particularly apt, as this vessel is a submarine. Our first submarines were named AE1 and AE2, with the “A” in their name standing for “Australian” added to the Royal Navy’s “E”-class letter and number.

    A tendency in the RAN to use abstract concepts or place names for ships was changed with the naming of the Collins-class submarines. These all were all given the names of heroic past members of the Service, with HMAS Sheean being distinguished by carrying the name of sailor Teddy Sheean, who died in heroic action on board HMAS Armidale in WWII.

    Teddy Sheean’s final moments as a Japanese aircraft attacks

    The Royal Australian Navy has also sometimes followed the RN with also using placenames, spiritual attributes or mythological titles for its ships. So the RN has had as examples of the first HMS Belfast; for the second HMS Victory and for the third HMS Jupiter.

    The Royal Navy has ship names which go back in time for hundreds of years, and like other navies, are called back into service as necessity dictates. Ark Royal; Royal Sovereign, Invincible, Revenge and so on are ship names that have been used many times. Over the past 400 years or so of the formal existence of the Royal Navy there have been some 24, 000 ships. RN vessel names extend across a wide spectrum from counties and towns, to bird species, to heroic individuals and places, and the mythical Gods. The naming conventions have evolved over the many years of the Navy and the origins are unclear.

    Some ship nicknames within the RN are quite clever:

    ‘Eggshells’, the nickname for Achilles (1905)
    ‘The Smoke’, London (1927)
    ‘Gin Palace’, Agincourt (1913)
    ‘Tea Boat’, Ceylon (1942)
    ‘Big Lizzie’, Queen Elizabeth (1914)
    ‘Despair Ship Remorse’, Resource (1928)
    ‘Tin Duck’, Iron Duke (1913)

    RAN nicknames are less widely distributed, but include:

    HMAS Queenborough – The Queen Bee
    HMAS Brisbane – The Steel Cat
    HMAS Cerberus at FND has been known as ‘Sarah-bare-arse’.

    The Royal Navy has also featured some unusual names. HMS Cockchafer, for example, was a Royal Navy Insect class gunboat. Launched on 17 December 1915, she was the fifth Royal Navy ship to carry this name. The Insect class spent most of their service on Chinese rivers.

    Starting at the beginning of the 20th Century, US Navy ships followed a system tailored to ship types. Names of states, for example, were borne by battleships. Cruisers were named for cities while destroyers came to be named for American naval leaders and heroes, as today’s destroyers are still named. Starting in 1931 submarines were named for “fish and denizens of the deep.” Mass-produced anti-submarine patrol and escort ships were named in honour of members of the naval service killed in action in World War II. Some were named for destroyers lost in the early stages of that war. Ships lost in wartime were normally honoured by having their names reassigned to new construction. During World War II the names of individuals were once again assigned to aircraft carriers.

    Until the 1970s, the United States followed a custom of not naming a ship for a person while the person was still alive. The first ship named for a then-living person was USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), named in 1975. Other examples of ships named for then-living people include: USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76); Arleigh Burke (DDG 51); Hyman G. Rickover (SSN 709); Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) and USNS Bob Hope (T-AKR 300). Another unusually-named US ship is the Fletcher-class destroyer USS The Sullivans, launched in 1943, and named for five brothers who lost their lives in the Battle of the Solomon Islands when their ship was sunk.

    Notably in USN history there has featured a USS Canberra, that name being given to a cruiser commissioned in 1943. This was in honour of the Australian cruiser Canberra, sunk while operating with American warships during the Battle of Savo Island in August 1942. The naming “…was seen to be an appropriate exception to the custom of naming cruisers for American cities”, according to one US source. Canberra’s loss can in part be related to the failure of the American radar ships in that battle to detect the oncoming Japanese force.

    This outcome affected the naming of one of the “Tribal” class destroyers built in Australia from 1940. At the meeting of the Naval Board in July the board decided to recommend to the Minister the names Arunta, Warramunga and Chingilli. Later, at their meeting on 29 March 1941 (item 48) they gave further consideration to the third ‘Tribal’ and recommended the name Kurnai be submitted. Subsequently, however, the name of this ship became Bataan, to reciprocate for the USN’s gesture. Bataan was later launched by Mrs Jean MacArthur, the famous US general’s wife.

    Some of the more unusual RAN ship names have arisen because ships were taken up from trade in time of conflict and retained their – rather “non-naval” – names in their service career. Some names which might be worth a second glance:

    Blowfly – a survey launch of 1944.
    Bluenose – a part-time Naval Auxiliary Patrol vessel.
    Bogan – a frigate ordered in WWII, but which never eventuated with the cancellation of the order.
    Cockroach – a motor launch of 1914.
    The “Snake” series of 66’ armed trawlers of WWII – so Coral Snake; Grass Snake and so on.
    Mate-O-Mine – a requisitioned cabin cruiser which served in WWII.
    Tasmania – a destroyer of the 1920s – there has not been another Tasmania but there have been two Tassie’s – both auxiliary patrol vessels of WWII.
    Vagrant – name given to two patrol vessels of WWII.
    Wyatt Earp – two Antarctic patrol vessels, the first entering service in 1947 and the second in 1993. As RT Sexton tells us in Ships That Passed, the unusual name of this (first) ship was because she was taken up from trade and that was her name at the time. She was originally the Fanefjord, built in Norway in 1919. A wooden ship, she was a single-deck motor vessel, 150 feet in length, of 402 tons, and made of Baltic pine. She had two masts and carried fore-and-aft auxiliary sails. Her superstructure, with one tall thin funnel, was placed well aft.

    After 10 years of herring fishing in the North Sea, she was purchased by a sealing firm which operated her in the Arctic seas around Greenland. Sexton relates:

    While engaged in this she was seen by the famous Australian explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins, who had been commissioned by the American Lincoln Ellsworth to purchase a suitable vessel for Antarctic exploration. He bought the Fanefjord and Ellsworth renamed her Wyatt Earp after a Wild West character – the fighting Sheriff of Tombstone, whose deeds have become part of American folklore.

    However, perhaps the most unusual names of RAN vessels were those of the “Chinese ships” of WWII. These were all ex-Chinese river steamers or ocean-going vessels on the Japan-China-Australia run. During WWII they were requisitioned and manned by RAN members, serving from December 1941 to 1946. They were HMA ships Ping Wo, Poyang, Whang Pu, Yunnan and VSIS (Victualling Supply Issue Ship) Changte and Taiping.

    -o-o-O-o-o-

    Sources:
    Evans, Peter. President of the RAN Fairmile Association. Naval Board meeting notes.

    Federation of American Scientists web site: http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/names.htm

    Royal Navy. “Covey Crump” website: http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/content/377.html

    Royal Navy. http://www.warships.net/royalnavy/

    Sexton, RT. Ships That Passed. Friends of the South Australian Maritime Museum. No other publishing information on site except ISBN 0 646 31467 X. Complete text given at: http://www.picknowl.com.au/homepages/malcolm/shippass.htm

    Straczek, Joe. “What’s in a Name – the naming of RAN Units”. Warship. Volume 12/2002. (16)

    Straczek, Josef. The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments. Sydney: Navy Public Affairs, 1996.

    Wildy, Merv. Chinese Ships’ Association. Descriptive article. In the possession of the author.

  177. Infidel Tiger

    We must ban smoking because it makes people lose control? While we’re at it ban video games, mobile phones, fast cars …

    Hehe, Tiger, you’ve noticed this too,right?
    Lol

    It’s the usual argument.

    “Well if we are going to ban meth, I guess we’ll have to ban green tea!”

  178. If Viktoristan was a local council it would be placed in administration.

  179. Top Ender

    Warship naming

    By Top Ender

    Why are warships named as they are? The Royal Australian Navy has inherited a tradition handed down from the Royal Navy, but in recent years has moved to adopt its own ideas on how to decide these significant titles.

    A lot of significance can be attached to a name, and for a long time ships have been regarded by mankind almost as living things. They can also be seen as symbols of a country or ruler’s authority. In 1418, Britain’s King Henry V paid the Bishop of Bangor five pounds for christening the largest warship of the time, the Henri Graze A Dieu, which translated as Henry By Grace Of God. This certainly reminded the general public that he was appointed by divine right.

    A look through the history of the RAN’s many hundreds of ships shows that while themes have often been followed in ship-naming, this is not always the case. The ship list of 2001 was relatively disciplined, with FFGs following city names; the patrol boats carrying the names of towns – and therefore following in the footsteps of the WWII corvettes; Collins-class submarines carrying famous RAN members’ surnames, and so on. However, a look through Joe Straczek’s The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments, shows a bewildering variety in the past: from Acheron and Aeolus to Yippee to Zetta.

    To name a warship after a country or sovereign is particularly significant. Consider what happens to the nation’s morale if that warship is heavily damaged or sunk. Perhaps for that reason, the British liner Queen Elizabeth II was kept well out of harm’s way in the Falklands War, rather than being utilised as a troopship or general transport, as some had suggested.

    The RAN has had two Australia’s. The first was scuttled outside Sydney in 1924 as a result of the naval limitations brought about as a result of the Washington Treaty, and the second saw much action in WWII, including being hit five times by kamikaze aircraft. Since then the name has lain dormant. Historian Joe Straczek, when working for the Naval History Directorate, advised that the name is reserved for “a large vessel, which due to its role would have a high national and regional profile.”

    Some ship names might be considered ill-fated. Two Voyagers have been lost by the RAN, the first off Timor in WWII, where she went aground and was partially destroyed by her own ship’s company to prevent her falling into the hands of the enemy. The second Voyager was sunk off Jervis Bay in February 1964 by a collision with the aircraft carrier Melbourne. Will the Navy ever have another ship of this name?

    Sometimes the names themselves of ships can provoke argument. Some years ago the Anzac-class frigate Arunta’s naming was in some confusion over claims that the spelling should have been Arrente or another variation, which would reflect better the pronunciation of the Arrente Aboriginal tribe after which the original WWII ship was named. After some argument and further research – including a visit to the tribe, who pointed out they didn’t have a written language – the original spelling was retained.

    Aboriginal names have featured further in the RAN – Otama for example, is an Aboriginal word meaning “dolphin”, which is particularly apt, as this vessel is a submarine. Our first submarines were named AE1 and AE2, with the “A” in their name standing for “Australian” added to the Royal Navy’s “E”-class letter and number.

    A tendency in the RAN to use abstract concepts or place names for ships was changed with the naming of the Collins-class submarines. These all were all given the names of heroic past members of the Service, with HMAS Sheean being distinguished by carrying the name of sailor Teddy Sheean, who died in heroic action on board HMAS Armidale in WWII.

    The Royal Australian Navy has also sometimes followed the RN with also using placenames, spiritual attributes or mythological titles for its ships. So the RN has had as examples of the first HMS Belfast; for the second HMS Victory and for the third HMS Jupiter.

    The Royal Navy has ship names which go back in time for hundreds of years, and like other navies, are called back into service as necessity dictates. Ark Royal; Royal Sovereign, Invincible, Revenge and so on are ship names that have been used many times. Over the past 400 years or so of the formal existence of the Royal Navy there have been some 24, 000 ships. RN vessel names extend across a wide spectrum from counties and towns, to bird species, to heroic individuals and places, and the mythical Gods. The naming conventions have evolved over the many years of the Navy and the origins are unclear.

    Some ship nicknames within the RN are quite clever:

    ‘Eggshells’, the nickname for Achilles (1905)
    ‘The Smoke’, London (1927)
    ‘Gin Palace’, Agincourt (1913)
    ‘Tea Boat’, Ceylon (1942)
    ‘Big Lizzie’, Queen Elizabeth (1914)
    ‘Despair Ship Remorse’, Resource (1928)
    ‘Tin Duck’, Iron Duke (1913)

    RAN nicknames are less widely distributed, but include:

    HMAS Queenborough – The Queen Bee
    HMAS Brisbane – The Steel Cat
    HMAS Cerberus at FND has been known as ‘Sarah-bare-arse’.

    The Royal Navy has also featured some unusual names. HMS Cockchafer, for example, was a Royal Navy Insect class gunboat. Launched on 17 December 1915, she was the fifth Royal Navy ship to carry this name. The Insect class spent most of their service on Chinese rivers.

    Starting at the beginning of the 20th Century, US Navy ships followed a system tailored to ship types. Names of states, for example, were borne by battleships. Cruisers were named for cities while destroyers came to be named for American naval leaders and heroes, as today’s destroyers are still named. Starting in 1931 submarines were named for “fish and denizens of the deep.” Mass-produced anti-submarine patrol and escort ships were named in honour of members of the naval service killed in action in World War II. Some were named for destroyers lost in the early stages of that war. Ships lost in wartime were normally honoured by having their names reassigned to new construction. During World War II the names of individuals were once again assigned to aircraft carriers.

    Until the 1970s, the United States followed a custom of not naming a ship for a person while the person was still alive. The first ship named for a then-living person was USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), named in 1975. Other examples of ships named for then-living people include: USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76); Arleigh Burke (DDG 51); Hyman G. Rickover (SSN 709); Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) and USNS Bob Hope (T-AKR 300). Another unusually-named US ship is the Fletcher-class destroyer USS The Sullivans, launched in 1943, and named for five brothers who lost their lives in the Battle of the Solomon Islands when their ship was sunk.

    Notably in USN history there has featured a USS Canberra, that name being given to a cruiser commissioned in 1943. This was in honour of the Australian cruiser Canberra, sunk while operating with American warships during the Battle of Savo Island in August 1942. The naming “…was seen to be an appropriate exception to the custom of naming cruisers for American cities”, according to one US source. Canberra’s loss can in part be related to the failure of the American radar ships in that battle to detect the oncoming Japanese force.

    This outcome affected the naming of one of the “Tribal” class destroyers built in Australia from 1940. At the meeting of the Naval Board in July the board decided to recommend to the Minister the names Arunta, Warramunga and Chingilli. Later, at their meeting on 29 March 1941 (item 48) they gave further consideration to the third ‘Tribal’ and recommended the name Kurnai be submitted. Subsequently, however, the name of this ship became Bataan, to reciprocate for the USN’s gesture. Bataan was later launched by Mrs Jean MacArthur, the famous US general’s wife.

    Some of the more unusual RAN ship names have arisen because ships were taken up from trade in time of conflict and retained their – rather “non-naval” – names in their service career. Some names which might be worth a second glance:

    Blowfly – a survey launch of 1944.
    Bluenose – a part-time Naval Auxiliary Patrol vessel.
    Bogan – a frigate ordered in WWII, but which never eventuated with the cancellation of the order.
    Cockroach – a motor launch of 1914.
    The “Snake” series of 66’ armed trawlers of WWII – so Coral Snake; Grass Snake and so on.
    Mate-O-Mine – a requisitioned cabin cruiser which served in WWII.
    Tasmania – a destroyer of the 1920s – there has not been another Tasmania but there have been two Tassie’s – both auxiliary patrol vessels of WWII.
    Vagrant – name given to two patrol vessels of WWII.
    Wyatt Earp – two Antarctic patrol vessels, the first entering service in 1947 and the second in 1993. As RT Sexton tells us in Ships That Passed, the unusual name of this (first) ship was because she was taken up from trade and that was her name at the time. She was originally the Fanefjord, built in Norway in 1919. A wooden ship, she was a single-deck motor vessel, 150 feet in length, of 402 tons, and made of Baltic pine. She had two masts and carried fore-and-aft auxiliary sails. Her superstructure, with one tall thin funnel, was placed well aft.

    After 10 years of herring fishing in the North Sea, she was purchased by a sealing firm which operated her in the Arctic seas around Greenland. Sexton relates:

    While engaged in this she was seen by the famous Australian explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins, who had been commissioned by the American Lincoln Ellsworth to purchase a suitable vessel for Antarctic exploration. He bought the Fanefjord and Ellsworth renamed her Wyatt Earp after a Wild West character – the fighting Sheriff of Tombstone, whose deeds have become part of American folklore.

    However, perhaps the most unusual names of RAN vessels were those of the “Chinese ships” of WWII. These were all ex-Chinese river steamers or ocean-going vessels on the Japan-China-Australia run. During WWII they were requisitioned and manned by RAN members, serving from December 1941 to 1946. They were HMA ships Ping Wo, Poyang, Whang Pu, Yunnan and VSIS (Victualling Supply Issue Ship) Changte and Taiping.

    Sources:
    Evans, Peter. President of the RAN Fairmile Association. Naval Board meeting notes.

    Federation of American Scientists web site: http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/names.htm

    Royal Navy. “Covey Crump” website: http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/content/377.html

    Royal Navy. http://www.warships.net/royalnavy/

    Sexton, RT. Ships That Passed. Friends of the South Australian Maritime Museum. No other publishing information on site except ISBN 0 646 31467 X. Complete text given at: http://www.picknowl.com.au/homepages/malcolm/shippass.htm

    Straczek, Joe. “What’s in a Name – the naming of RAN Units”. Warship. Volume 12/2002. (16)

    Straczek, Josef. The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments. Sydney: Navy Public Affairs, 1996.

    Wildy, Merv. Chinese Ships’ Association. Descriptive article. In the possession of the author.

  180. Juan

    Is my list of banned words complete?

    Checked an article trying to post for all words and still going into moderation:

    Is the inclusion of ‘w0g’ due to copyright considerations?

  181. Tailgunner

    It’s the usual argument.

    But I don’t recall you calling for a ban on anything?
    Link, please
    😃

  182. Leigh Lowe

    It looks to me like Simple Simon is going to be the fall guy.

    Always going to be.
    He’s damaged goods anyway.
    Nixon is sisterhood, so no problems for her.
    Ashton fixed the red-shirts so he is safe.
    Planet Cornelius is Ashton’s bestie from Plastic Fed days, so he’s OK.
    .
    Simon back in the box next.
    Does he take one for the team, or pull the string on the suicide vest?

  183. Top Ender

    Warship naming Pt 1

    By Top Ender

    Why are warships named as they are? The Royal Australian Navy has inherited a tradition handed down from the Royal Navy, but in recent years has moved to adopt its own ideas on how to decide these significant titles.

    A lot of significance can be attached to a name, and for a long time ships have been regarded by mankind almost as living things. They can also be seen as symbols of a country or ruler’s authority. In 1418, Britain’s King Henry V paid the Bishop of Bangor five pounds for christening the largest warship of the time, the Henri Graze A Dieu, which translated as Henry By Grace Of God. This certainly reminded the general public that he was appointed by divine right.

    A look through the history of the RAN’s many hundreds of ships shows that while themes have often been followed in ship-naming, this is not always the case. The ship list of 2001 was relatively disciplined, with FFGs following city names; the patrol boats carrying the names of towns – and therefore following in the footsteps of the WWII corvettes; Collins-class submarines carrying famous RAN members’ surnames, and so on. However, a look through Joe Straczek’s The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments, shows a bewildering variety in the past: from Acheron and Aeolus to Yippee to Zetta.

    To name a warship after a country or sovereign is particularly significant. Consider what happens to the nation’s morale if that warship is heavily damaged or sunk. Perhaps for that reason, the British liner Queen Elizabeth II was kept well out of harm’s way in the Falklands War, rather than being utilised as a troopship or general transport, as some had suggested.

    The RAN has had two Australia’s. The first was scuttled outside Sydney in 1924 as a result of the naval limitations brought about as a result of the Washington Treaty, and the second saw much action in WWII, including being hit five times by kamikaze aircraft. Since then the name has lain dormant. Historian Joe Straczek, when working for the Naval History Directorate, advised that the name is reserved for “a large vessel, which due to its role would have a high national and regional profile.”

    Some ship names might be considered ill-fated. Two Voyagers have been lost by the RAN, the first off Timor in WWII, where she went aground and was partially destroyed by her own ship’s company to prevent her falling into the hands of the enemy. The second Voyager was sunk off Jervis Bay in February 1964 by a collision with the aircraft carrier Melbourne. Will the Navy ever have another ship of this name?

    Sometimes the names themselves of ships can provoke argument. Some years ago the Anzac-class frigate Arunta’s naming was in some confusion over claims that the spelling should have been Arrente or another variation, which would reflect better the pronunciation of the Arrente Aboriginal tribe after which the original WWII ship was named. After some argument and further research – including a visit to the tribe, who pointed out they didn’t have a written language – the original spelling was retained.

    Aboriginal names have featured further in the RAN – Otama for example, is an Aboriginal word meaning “dolphin”, which is particularly apt, as this vessel is a submarine. Our first submarines were named AE1 and AE2, with the “A” in their name standing for “Australian” added to the Royal Navy’s “E”-class letter and number.

    A tendency in the RAN to use abstract concepts or place names for ships was changed with the naming of the Collins-class submarines. These all were all given the names of heroic past members of the Service, with HMAS Sheean being distinguished by carrying the name of sailor Teddy Sheean, who died in heroic action on board HMAS Armidale in WWII.

    The Royal Australian Navy has also sometimes followed the RN with also using placenames, spiritual attributes or mythological titles for its ships. So the RN has had as examples of the first HMS Belfast; for the second HMS Victory and for the third HMS Jupiter.

    The Royal Navy has ship names which go back in time for hundreds of years, and like other navies, are called back into service as necessity dictates. Ark Royal; Royal Sovereign, Invincible, Revenge and so on are ship names that have been used many times. Over the past 400 years or so of the formal existence of the Royal Navy there have been some 24, 000 ships. RN vessel names extend across a wide spectrum from counties and towns, to bird species, to heroic individuals and places, and the mythical Gods. The naming conventions have evolved over the many years of the Navy and the origins are unclear.

    Some ship nicknames within the RN are quite clever:

    ‘Eggshells’, the nickname for Achilles (1905)
    ‘The Smoke’, London (1927)
    ‘Gin Palace’, Agincourt (1913)
    ‘Tea Boat’, Ceylon (1942)
    ‘Big Lizzie’, Queen Elizabeth (1914)
    ‘Despair Ship Remorse’, Resource (1928)
    ‘Tin Duck’, Iron Duke (1913)

    RAN nicknames are less widely distributed, but include:

    HMAS Queenborough – The Queen Bee
    HMAS Brisbane – The Steel Cat
    HMAS Cerberus at FND has been known as ‘Sarah-bare-arse’.

  184. Top Ender

    Part 2

    The Royal Navy has also featured some unusual names. HMS Cockchafer, for example, was a Royal Navy Insect class gunboat. Launched on 17 December 1915, she was the fifth Royal Navy ship to carry this name. The Insect class spent most of their service on Chinese rivers.

    Starting at the beginning of the 20th Century, US Navy ships followed a system tailored to ship types. Names of states, for example, were borne by battleships. Cruisers were named for cities while destroyers came to be named for American naval leaders and heroes, as today’s destroyers are still named. Starting in 1931 submarines were named for “fish and denizens of the deep.” Mass-produced anti-submarine patrol and escort ships were named in honour of members of the naval service killed in action in World War II. Some were named for destroyers lost in the early stages of that war. Ships lost in wartime were normally honoured by having their names reassigned to new construction. During World War II the names of individuals were once again assigned to aircraft carriers.

    Until the 1970s, the United States followed a custom of not naming a ship for a person while the person was still alive. The first ship named for a then-living person was USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), named in 1975. Other examples of ships named for then-living people include: USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76); Arleigh Burke (DDG 51); Hyman G. Rickover (SSN 709); Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) and USNS Bob Hope (T-AKR 300). Another unusually-named US ship is the Fletcher-class destroyer USS The Sullivans, launched in 1943, and named for five brothers who lost their lives in the Battle of the Solomon Islands when their ship was sunk.

    Notably in USN history there has featured a USS Canberra, that name being given to a cruiser commissioned in 1943. This was in honour of the Australian cruiser Canberra, sunk while operating with American warships during the Battle of Savo Island in August 1942. The naming “…was seen to be an appropriate exception to the custom of naming cruisers for American cities”, according to one US source. Canberra’s loss can in part be related to the failure of the American radar ships in that battle to detect the oncoming Japanese force.

    This outcome affected the naming of one of the “Tribal” class destroyers built in Australia from 1940. At the meeting of the Naval Board in July the board decided to recommend to the Minister the names Arunta, Warramunga and Chingilli. Later, at their meeting on 29 March 1941 (item 48) they gave further consideration to the third ‘Tribal’ and recommended the name Kurnai be submitted. Subsequently, however, the name of this ship became Bataan, to reciprocate for the USN’s gesture. Bataan was later launched by Mrs Jean MacArthur, the famous US general’s wife.

    Some of the more unusual RAN ship names have arisen because ships were taken up from trade in time of conflict and retained their – rather “non-naval” – names in their service career. Some names which might be worth a second glance:

    Blowfly – a survey launch of 1944.
    Bluenose – a part-time Naval Auxiliary Patrol vessel.
    Bogan – a frigate ordered in WWII, but which never eventuated with the cancellation of the order.
    Cockroach – a motor launch of 1914.
    The “Snake” series of 66’ armed trawlers of WWII – so Coral Snake; Grass Snake and so on.
    Mate-O-Mine – a requisitioned cabin cruiser which served in WWII.
    Tasmania – a destroyer of the 1920s – there has not been another Tasmania but there have been two Tassie’s – both auxiliary patrol vessels of WWII.
    Vagrant – name given to two patrol vessels of WWII.
    Wyatt Earp – two Antarctic patrol vessels, the first entering service in 1947 and the second in 1993. As RT Sexton tells us in Ships That Passed, the unusual name of this (first) ship was because she was taken up from trade and that was her name at the time. She was originally the Fanefjord, built in Norway in 1919. A wooden ship, she was a single-deck motor vessel, 150 feet in length, of 402 tons, and made of Baltic pine. She had two masts and carried fore-and-aft auxiliary sails. Her superstructure, with one tall thin funnel, was placed well aft.

    After 10 years of herring fishing in the North Sea, she was purchased by a sealing firm which operated her in the Arctic seas around Greenland. Sexton relates:

    While engaged in this she was seen by the famous Australian explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins, who had been commissioned by the American Lincoln Ellsworth to purchase a suitable vessel for Antarctic exploration. He bought the Fanefjord and Ellsworth renamed her Wyatt Earp after a Wild West character – the fighting Sheriff of Tombstone, whose deeds have become part of American folklore.

    However, perhaps the most unusual names of RAN vessels were those of the “Chinese ships” of WWII. These were all ex-Chinese river steamers or ocean-going vessels on the Japan-China-Australia run. During WWII they were requisitioned and manned by RAN members, serving from December 1941 to 1946. They were HMA ships Ping Wo, Poyang, Whang Pu, Yunnan and VSIS (Victualling Supply Issue Ship) Changte and Taiping.

    Sources:
    Evans, Peter. President of the RAN Fairmile Association. Naval Board meeting notes.

    Federation of American Scientists web site: http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/names.htm

    Royal Navy. “Covey Crump” website: http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/content/377.html

    Royal Navy. http://www.warships.net/royalnavy/

    Sexton, RT. Ships That Passed. Friends of the South Australian Maritime Museum. No other publishing information on site except ISBN 0 646 31467 X. Complete text given at: http://www.picknowl.com.au/homepages/malcolm/shippass.htm

    Straczek, Joe. “What’s in a Name – the naming of RAN Units”. Warship. Volume 12/2002. (16)

    Straczek, Josef. The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments. Sydney: Navy Public Affairs, 1996.

    Wildy, Merv. Chinese Ships’ Association. Descriptive article. In the possession of the author.

  185. Tailgunner

    Can all Cats&Dol…Trolls at least, on this Christmas Week, present day, agree that dentures are death for public speakers?
    Ffs,xunts
    🦆🧐😅

  186. Bubbles

    Bloody ‘ell some maniac has lit a fire just down the road, and it has taken off.
    Four lit here yesterday apparently.
    It needs to be recognised as, and treated as what it is – terrorism.

  187. Top Ender

    Part 2

    The Royal Navy has also featured some unusual names. HMS Cockchafer, for example, was a Royal Navy Insect class gunboat. Launched on 17 December 1915, she was the fifth Royal Navy ship to carry this name. The Insect class spent most of their service on Chinese rivers.

    Starting at the beginning of the 20th Century, US Navy ships followed a system tailored to ship types. Names of states, for example, were borne by battleships. Cruisers were named for cities while destroyers came to be named for American naval leaders and heroes, as today’s destroyers are still named. Starting in 1931 submarines were named for “fish and denizens of the deep.” Mass-produced anti-submarine patrol and escort ships were named in honour of members of the naval service killed in action in World War II. Some were named for destroyers lost in the early stages of that war. Ships lost in wartime were normally honoured by having their names reassigned to new construction. During World War II the names of individuals were once again assigned to aircraft carriers.

    Until the 1970s, the United States followed a custom of not naming a ship for a person while the person was still alive. The first ship named for a then-living person was USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), named in 1975. Other examples of ships named for then-living people include: USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76); Arleigh Burke (DDG 51); Hyman G. Rickover (SSN 709); Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) and USNS Bob Hope (T-AKR 300). Another unusually-named US ship is the Fletcher-class destroyer USS The Sullivans, launched in 1943, and named for five brothers who lost their lives in the Battle of the Solomon Islands when their ship was sunk.

    Notably in USN history there has featured a USS Canberra, that name being given to a cruiser commissioned in 1943. This was in honour of the Australian cruiser Canberra, sunk while operating with American warships during the Battle of Savo Island in August 1942. The naming “…was seen to be an appropriate exception to the custom of naming cruisers for American cities”, according to one US source. Canberra’s loss can in part be related to the failure of the American radar ships in that battle to detect the oncoming Japanese force.

    This outcome affected the naming of one of the “Tribal” class destroyers built in Australia from 1940. At the meeting of the Naval Board in July the board decided to recommend to the Minister the names Arunta, Warramunga and Chingilli. Later, at their meeting on 29 March 1941 (item 48) they gave further consideration to the third ‘Tribal’ and recommended the name Kurnai be submitted. Subsequently, however, the name of this ship became Bataan, to reciprocate for the USN’s gesture. Bataan was later launched by Mrs Jean MacArthur, the famous US general’s wife.

    Some of the more unusual RAN ship names have arisen because ships were taken up from trade in time of conflict and retained their – rather “non-naval” – names in their service career. Some names which might be worth a second glance:

    Blowfly – a survey launch of 1944.
    Bluenose – a part-time Naval Auxiliary Patrol vessel.
    Bogan – a frigate ordered in WWII, but which never eventuated with the cancellation of the order.
    Cockroach – a motor launch of 1914.
    The “Snake” series of 66’ armed trawlers of WWII – so Coral Snake; Grass Snake and so on.
    Mate-O-Mine – a requisitioned cabin cruiser which served in WWII.
    Tasmania – a destroyer of the 1920s – there has not been another Tasmania but there have been two Tassie’s – both auxiliary patrol vessels of WWII.
    Vagrant – name given to two patrol vessels of WWII.
    Wyatt Earp – two Antarctic patrol vessels, the first entering service in 1947 and the second in 1993. As RT Sexton tells us in Ships That Passed, the unusual name of this (first) ship was because she was taken up from trade and that was her name at the time. She was originally the Fanefjord, built in Norway in 1919. A wooden ship, she was a single-deck motor vessel, 150 feet in length, of 402 tons, and made of Baltic pine. She had two masts and carried fore-and-aft auxiliary sails. Her superstructure, with one tall thin funnel, was placed well aft.

    After 10 years of herring fishing in the North Sea, she was purchased by a sealing firm which operated her in the Arctic seas around Greenland. Sexton relates:

    While engaged in this she was seen by the famous Australian explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins, who had been commissioned by the American Lincoln Ellsworth to purchase a suitable vessel for Antarctic exploration. He bought the Fanefjord and Ellsworth renamed her Wyatt Earp after a Wild West character – the fighting Sheriff of Tombstone, whose deeds have become part of American folklore.

    However, perhaps the most unusual names of RAN vessels were those of the “Chinese ships” of WWII. These were all ex-Chinese river steamers or ocean-going vessels on the Japan-China-Australia run. During WWII they were requisitioned and manned by RAN members, serving from December 1941 to 1946. They were HMA ships Ping Wo, Poyang, Whang Pu, Yunnan and VSIS (Victualling Supply Issue Ship) Changte and Taiping.

  188. Top Ender

    Sources:
    Evans, Peter. President of the RAN Fairmile Association. Naval Board meeting notes.

    Federation of American Scientists web site: http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/names.htm

    Royal Navy. “Covey Crump” website: http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/content/377.html

    Royal Navy. http://www.warships.net/royalnavy/

    Sexton, RT. Ships That Passed. Friends of the South Australian Maritime Museum. No other publishing information on site except ISBN 0 646 31467 X. Complete text given at: http://www.picknowl.com.au/homepages/malcolm/shippass.htm

    Straczek, Joe. “What’s in a Name – the naming of RAN Units”. Warship. Volume 12/2002. (16)

    Straczek, Josef. The Royal Australian Navy: Ships, Aircraft and Shore Establishments. Sydney: Navy Public Affairs, 1996.

    Wildy, Merv. Chinese Ships’ Association. Descriptive article. In the possession of the author.

  189. Top Ender

    For some reason the system balks at the sources list. Three HTML links, but nothing else unusual. Oh well.

  190. What is the verdict on whether or not Christine is going down?

  191. Arky

    It was an historic speech:

    I had to eat, that one day these souffles will rise up and get covered in double whipped cream and strawberry jam: “We hold these chicken wings to be self-saucing.” (Yeah, Uh-huh, Hear hear) [applause]

    I had to eat that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of cheese platters and chardonnay.

    I had to eat (Yes) [applause] that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of cooking (Yeah), sweltering with the heat of spicy treats (Mhm), will be transformed into an oasis of pizza slices, party pies and Cokes.

    I had to eat (Yeah) [applause] that my four little club sandwiches will one day sit on a platter where they will not be judged by the color of their bread, but by the content of their fillings. (My Lord) I had to eat today. [enthusiastic applause]

    I had to eat that one day down in Alabama, with its burgers (Yes, Yeah), with its governor having his lips dripping with meat juices and gravy(Yes), one day right there in Alabama little gingerbread men and teddy bear biscuits will be able to join hands before I gobble them all up [burp] I had to eat today. [applause] (God help him, Preach)

    I had to eat that one day every pig shall be bacon (Yes), every corn cob smothered in butter, the golden roughs will be made fresh (Yes), and the cookies made with chocolate chips (Yes), and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed [cheering], nom nom nom nom. (Yes Lord)

  192. Bruce of Newcastle

    TE – Those words get you moderated (also the c*** word and the tag of a Cat: r a b z).

    What you seem to be getting is WordPress spam filtering. There’s no clear criteria for that, although sometimes removing all links will work. Sometimes it doesn’t.

    I can only guess they have an machine learning algorithm trained on spam ‘comments’ and etc which gets triggered by certain phrases and styles.

  193. Top Ender

    What is the verdict on whether or not Christine is going down?

    You want to rephrase that IR?

    Some visions are hard to get out of your mind.

  194. Infidel Tiger

    But I don’t recall you calling for a ban on anything?
    Link, please
    😃

    I never did.

    You can’t ban porn. You can make it harder for kids to get, but they don’t want that to happen.

    It’s almost like they get off on it.

  195. Mitch M.

    It’s the usual argument.

    The point I was making is that the author doesn’t understand executive function because he thinks one addiction is indicative of a loss of self-control generally. That is obviously wrong. You should know that when someone asserts porn does to your brain what smoking does to your lungs is such absurd hyperbole that the author might want to consider he is already in the throes of vascular dementia(smoking is a major cause of vascular dementia).

  196. feelthebern

    I nominate IT as porn tzar of Australia.

  197. vr

    Hedge funds short companies they say ‘greenwash’

    LONDON (Reuters) – Tens of trillions of global investment dollars are pouring into companies touting robust environmental, social and governance credentials. Now short-sellers spy an opportunity.

    Such hedge funds, often cast as villains of the piece because they bet against share prices, scent a profit from company valuations they believe are unduly inflated by ESG promises or which they say ignore risks that threaten to undermine the company’s prospects.

    The fact short-sellers, who look to exploit information gaps, are targeting the ESG sphere underlines the complexities facing investors in accurately gauging companies’ sustainability credentials. Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg last week spoke of CEOs masking inaction with “creative PR”.

  198. Arky

    Let me help her out with some of her testimony:


  199. Infidel Tiger

    You should know that when someone asserts porn does to your brain what smoking does to your lungs is such absurd hyperbole that the author might want to consider he is already in the throes of vascular dementia(smoking is a major cause of vascular dementia).

    Was he not using a metaphor?

    Smoking is a net good. Porn has no redeeming worth.

  200. Arky

    “Pleece” is not a word.

  201. Tel

    You can’t ban porn. You can make it harder for kids to get, but they don’t want that to happen.

    It’s almost like they get off on it.

    “Thunbugging” — howling about a non-existent problem and demanding action because won’t somebody think of the children. When questioned, get all uppity and say, “How dare you?”

  202. Bruce of Newcastle

    It needs to be recognised as, and treated as what it is

    Bubbles – That’s so not going to happen. You will see why by reading this recent story.

  203. feelthebern

    Interesting point vr.
    Up until recently, one of the biggest ESG screening providers in Australia had two banks rated deep green.
    Westpac & Bendigo/Adelaide Bank.
    Macquarie was moved off their RED list to light green.

    PS their rating system is ranked deep green, light green, red light.

  204. Tel

    It’s the usual argument.

    “Well if we are going to ban meth, I guess we’ll have to ban green tea!”

    For every one thing you want to ban, you have to name two other things you want to unban.

    It worked for Trump with the US Federal Register … seems like a winning approach.

  205. Speedbox

    Narwhal Tusk
    #3264986, posted on December 17, 2019 at 11:14 pm

    I seem to recall that some time ago we were offered a battalion of Gurkas that were for some reason superfluous to the British army. The offer was rejected. Do you remember this or am I suffering from FITH syndrome?

    The issue arose around the time that Hong Kong was being handed over to the Chinese (1997).

    The local Gurkha headquarters in HK was relocated to Britain but, the Gurkhas were not granted permission to live permanently in the UK. (Gurkhas have always had the raw end of the stick serving in the British army).

    Anyway, there was a ‘call’ for Australia to take an infantry regiment (or something similar) but I don’t recall it being a formal offer from the British. Rather, it was a suggestion by well-meaning citizens to ‘help’ the Gurkhas whilst bolstering our own forces. (John Howard was our PM at the time so you would have to ask him whether the idea was given any Government consideration regardless of source).

    Footnote: It wasn’t until 2009 that the UK was forced to change their immigration rules about ex Gurkha soldiers and admit them to the UK with permanent residency.

  206. Infidel Tiger

    For every one thing you want to ban, you have to name two other things you want to unban.

    I don’t want to ban anything. It doesn’t work.

    I want a culture that embraces shame and responsibility. Far better tools than banning stuff.

  207. Tailgunner

    Simon back in the box next.
    Does he take one for the team, or pull the string on the suicide vest?

    Lol!
    Nothing happens to the protected crew.
    Falling up, generally?
    Accelerate things and things will turn out differently.
    #stockpilingAKs

  208. Barry

    I am hoping the RC follows the well worn path of letting Overland, Nixon et al. hang themselves by their testimony and bring out the documents later that expose their lies.

    I’d like to see Ken Lay on the stand. He mysteriously retired prematurely, and I’d like to imagine he did so because of the stench. He might have kept notes too…

  209. feelthebern

    I want a culture that embraces shame

    I believe shame was last seen in the 1990’s.

  210. Mother Lode

    When trying to track down details on HMS Skirmisher to which my grandad was assigned in WWI, I discovered the Flower (or Gladiolus) class corvettes. I had a good giggle thinking about burly, bearded, tattooed, British sailors stomping into the pub with HMS Bluebell or Buttercup on their wee hats. Whatever happened to Invincible?

    Au contraire. Imagine rough burly men bounding into the pub and not a single person dare even risk the slightest smile at the little flowers.

    I would direct you to the scene in Firefly when Jayne Cobb (the most aggressive and violent, but least cerebral of the group) receives an orange knitted hat from his mother.

    Jayne: How’s it sit? Pretty cunning, don’tchya think?
    Kaylee: I think it’s the sweetest hat ever.
    Book: Makes a statement.
    Jayne: Yeah, yeah!
    Wash: A man walks down the street in that hat, people know he’s not afraid of anything.
    Jayne: Damn straight.

  211. feelthebern

    Isn’t Ken Lay making an appearance.

  212. Tailgunner

    It’s almost like they get off on it.

    Needs more ((()))

  213. Leigh Lowe

    Tubby Nixon fading fast.
    Blood sugar must be dangerously low.
    Very subdued.
    Except when her great and glorious victories are mentioned.
    Like the great racist stubby holder crime at Sunshine, or the stolen footy tipping money at Frankston South station.
    Yes, Christine was all over pleece corruption wherever it was and whether or not it actually existed.

  214. Tailgunner

    I’m right behind Localism,btw.
    Haoles, fk off

  215. JC

    feelthebern
    #3265583, posted on December 18, 2019 at 3:20 pm

    Interesting point vr.
    Up until recently, one of the biggest ESG screening providers in Australia had two banks rated deep green.
    Westpac & Bendigo/Adelaide Bank.
    Macquarie was moved off their RED list to light green.

    PS their rating system is ranked deep green, light green, red light.

    vr , Bern

    Isn’t it wonderful. You can short stocks but never short humanity as there’s too many decent ones. These hedge dudes are doing the lord’s work on earth.

  216. vr

    Bern.

    The ESG ratings are dodgy. So, academic studies by good researchers are few. What little there is find a positive relationship wth performance. I remain sceptical.

  217. Infidel Tiger

    I believe shame was last seen in the 1990’s.

    I tell ya one thing that has changed, when I was lad anyone that couldn’t hold their piss or threw up was deeply shamed.

    The modern yoof seem to consider a chunder as something to be proud of.

    Shameful.

  218. feelthebern

    JC, that ESG screening service consults on over $A250billion of assets, according to their own marketing.
    That is just under 10% of the total superannuation market in Oz.

  219. feelthebern

    Greenwashing is a big business.
    Most companies in the ASX100 would employ an ESG consultant to liaise with the ESG ratings businesses.

  220. Tailgunner

    I was never called a haole in the water. Mostly the boyz were calling me in to waves I probably shouldn’t taken off on….
    Lol, love
    They used to knock on our car window to wake us up for dawn surfcheck. Laughing bastards!
    We lived between Pipe& Rocky’s.
    Hehe
    Good times!
    High 5 to self

  221. I’d like to see Ken Lay on the stand. He mysteriously retired prematurely …

    Spouse was/is crook.

    Not sure that the RC recording facilities are large enough to handle ken’s expected waffle.
    Expect a 4 hour response from ken on the first question*.

    * can you state your name?

  222. Peter:
    yes, of course I was referring to the carbon tax.
    Scrapped in 2014.
    Looking at some news reports from back then it was clear PUP only voted with LNP if an ETS would be put in place, and Abbott was evasive in answering “will there ever be a price on carbon”.

  223. The Barking Toad

    It looks to me like Simple Simon is going to be the fall guy.

    That’s for certain Tom.

    But Dinner Lady and Fatty Ashton won’t get off the hook.

  224. feelthebern

    Mulkearns was able to dial into the child abuse RC.
    Surely Ken Lay can at least dial in.

  225. Tailgunner

    I’m talking older dudes. In plain black boardies. That every ripper used to come to pay respects.
    Me&my boy were somehow smoking joints at Rocky Point with these local legends.
    Fkn waterman stories?
    Oooo

  226. vr

    JC, Bern.

    Here is one of the best responses I have ever read against ESG type behaviour. This is TJ Rogers of Cypress Semiconducters responding to a Catholic nun abput diversity. This is from 1996!

    Can’t find the full link online (though I have the pdf somewhere).

  227. Tailgunner

    Actually, they called us out as ‘haoles’ in the dark morning wakeups.
    Yeh,yeh,fk off,xunt
    😃
    Aloha!

  228. Tailgunner

    I was only…. Young 😎

  229. JC

    vr

    TJ is or was one of my heroes. I haven’t heard much from him over the past decade and a bit. He’s great.

  230. JC

    TJ is a gentleman in his response. Me, I would have told sister Doris to fuck off and stick to praying.

  231. vr

    JC — I have a friend who worked at Cypress in the early days. I remember him telling me that he was quite the character.

    I believe he retired quite a few years ago. I use this in class and recently gave it to someone who teaches investments at UT Austin (and an advisor to TIAA-CREF). They hadn’t heard of this.

  232. Peter, formerly known as Memoryvault

    Yesterday a great column of CL’s was ruined by OmPoida squatting over the blog and disgorging a huge noisome brain-turd. From there he led people who engaged with him off on tangent after tangent and then, as usual, he went back to his first putrescence and started again. The discussion on CL’s post was lost in all the noise.

    Okay, I’m calling bullshyte, Mother Lode.

    I’ve been back over the last five days and I can’t find a column by C.L. that I have commented on at all. I have also been back over the last five days of this thread and can’t find a single post by C.L. that I have commented on in reply.

    I have more than enough character faults for people to rubbish without you making them up and plucking them out of your own arsehole.

    Put up or shut up.

    Merry Christmas.

  233. Hypothetical:

    We have a timeline of incumbents
    Commissioner A
    Commissioner B
    Commissioner C
    Commissioner D

    Q. If A,B and D were corrupt, is it possible for C to be unaware of this?
    A. Only if he was roolly stupid.

  234. Tailgunner

    Lol!
    New owner/manager(?) of the local spot.
    Talking about his car…at the bar.
    Yeah, what you got,m8? (This guy is a 6’6 monster at 50ish, busting out of his fkn button up shirt,no joke. I’d already told the other bar hipster that I could definitely take him in an arm wrestle. He Punk’d out with some shoulder excuse)
    XR6…
    Turbo right?
    Nah…
    Yeh,fkn come talk to me when ya got a fast car,m8…

    Hehe

  235. one old bruce

    Thanks for your very well written comment/posts on neuro matters Mitch.

    I have a personal interest in it and your pithy summaries are very helpful. Please keep it up.

  236. Mitch M.

    Was he not using a metaphor?

    Smoking is a net good. Porn has no redeeming worth.

    Metaphor should be appropriate in providing a realistic demonstration of the potential danger.

    Smoking is not a net good though I recall a Japanese health minister who once stated older people should take up smoking because they will die earlier and hence save on health costs. That’s a reasonable argument but he was forced to retract.

    The problem we face today is that the internet makes so many things available to people that a greater number will succumb and be entrapped if not addicted to those things. For any given stimulus there is percentage of people who will have poor control over their responses to that stimulus. I don’t know how to deal with this issue. It might be a slow change in the culture but that could take a long time. When indigenous peoples are exposed to alcohol the effects can be devastating because the culture has never addressed the issue of how to moderate intake. The problem may be self-limiting.

    I want a culture that embraces shame and responsibility. Far better tools than banning stuff.

    But people hide their porn watching habit and in my experience I can’t recall people extolling the virtues of porn. If anything there is already considerable shame attached to watching porn all the time. I wouldn’t be surprised if a surprising number of people occasionally indulge in some porn watching but they aren’t the problem. It is that certain percentage people who lose control over their porn watching.

    Shame and responsibility can certainly work for most people but is not nearly as effective as those susceptible to a particular habit. Shame and responsibility has led to huge drops in smoking rates not just in Aus, where the cost factor clearly has driven down smoking, but in other countries smoking rates are also declining however there is that certain percentage who will keep smoking.

  237. Tailgunner

    I just did another’straya streets video.
    It was good. Koori flavour too…
    But gunner, as per, was in pause/record reverse.
    Ffs.
    Professionalism,please!!

  238. Tailgunner

    And dude took his shirt off, for Blue Oyster Cats.

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