Climate bits and pieces

The death of cricket (sarc) reported by Jo Nova.

Extreme heat due to climate change could send cricket’s Boxing Day Test into extinction, researchers say

By Richard Willingham and Joseph Dunstan, ABC, News

The Boxing Day Test may need to be moved to November or March in the future to avoid extreme heat, which is a danger to players and cricket fans, a new report has suggested.

Cricket Australia must also work to help grassroots clubs deal with extreme heat, the report from Monash University’s Climate Change Communication Research Hub has found.

The study, commissioned by the Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF), urges Cricket Australia to use its prominence to push for greater climate action and do more to look after player and spectator welfare.

The looming crisis of  getting rid of toxic junk from windmills and solar panels. A great deal  worse than the industry admits.  Solar-Panel-Waste-Michael-Schellenberger

Perhaps the biggest problem with solar panel waste is that there is so much of it, and that’s not going to change any time soon, for a basic physical reason: sunlight is dilute and diffuse and thus require large collectors to capture and convert the sun’s rays into electricity. Those large surface areas, in turn, require an order of magnitude more in materials whether today’s toxic combination of glass, heavy metals, and rare earth elements, or some new material in the future than other energy sources.

Solar requires 15x more materials than nuclear EP All of that waste creates a large quantity of material to track, which in turn requires coordinated, overlapping, and different responses at the international, national, state, and local levels.

Self-mutilation of the People’s Republic of California. The amazing situation where the state depends on foreign sources of oil due to restrictions on local extraction. For the you couldn’t make it up file plus the security implications – Putin’s delight!

California has chosen to be the only state in America that imports most of its oil needs from foreign countries and relies on the U.S. Navy to pay a steep price keeping an aircraft carrier with escorts on station to deter attacks on oil tanker traffic operating in and around the Persian Gulf.

There are scary similarities between Governor Newsom’s goals for California and Vladimir Putin’s objectives. Both support California being more and more dependent on imported foreign oil, and both support anti-fracking in California as a successful fracking enterprise would lessen the states’ dependency on that foreign oil. Does the Governor know his actions are supportive of California becoming a National Security risk to America?

Climate and energy news roundup

The biofuel wars

Over their full life cycle (from planting, growing and harvesting crops, to converting them to fuel, to transporting them by truck or rail car, to blending and burning them), biofuels emit just as much (plant-fertilizing) carbon dioxide as oil-based gasoline and diesel. Those biofuels also require enormous amounts of land, water, fertilizer, insecticides and energy. None of this is renewable or sustainable.

US ethanol production utilizes 38% of America’s corn and 27% of its sorghum – grown on cropland the size of Iowa: 36 million acres, much of which would otherwise be wildlife habitat. And the fertilizers used to grow those crops, especially the corn, result in nutrient-rich runoff that increases nitrogen levels in the Gulf of Mexico, causing deadly algal blooms. When the algae die and decompose, they create low and no-oxygen zones the size of Delaware – killing marine life that can’t swim away quickly enough.

That brings us back to the fact that America is not producing enough advanced biofuels, biodiesel or renewable diesel. That means refiners have to buy more foreign supplies of these fuels, from Argentina, Brazil, Indonesia, et cetera.

Susana Crockford talks about polar bears

Around the year 2000, it seemed that the polar bear was elevated to a position as icon of global warming because the Arctic amplification effect proposed that the Arctic and the Antarctic would actually warm much faster than the rest of the world. And as a consequence, it was proposed that polar bears would be affected first and more strongly than any other animal. 

But what has happened is that the ice declined in 2007 to a level that the sea ice experts said would not happen until 2050. So, the ice declined several decades before it was expected and has stayed down at that level ever since (with some wide swings year to year). Biologists have continued to collect data in the field, studying bears, and what they’ve discovered is that, in some areas, the bears are in better shape with less ice in summer than they were with more ice in summer. 

So, the long and short of it is that the prediction that the bear numbers would decline by two thirds failed. Not only did the bears not decline, but the global population number rose by at least 16 percent, perhaps more.

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37 Responses to Climate bits and pieces

  1. Tim Neilson says:

    The Boxing Day Test may need to be moved to November or March in the future to avoid extreme heat, which is a danger to players and cricket fans, a new report has suggested.

    They play a test match in Sydney in the first week in January. They also play a Gabba test in summer.

    They really do rely on the media’s dishonesty to push these stories.

  2. Robin says:

    One unappreciated tool in warping the public’s, and especially K-12 students, perception of climate change is digital learning. A recent book from the founding director of the Virtual Human Interaction Lab at Stanford called Experience on Demand: What Virtual Reality Is, How It Works, and What It Can Do lays out how to use engineered visuals from virtual reality to “teach” people about Climate Change.

    More ominously, the touting quote is from Lauren Powell Jobs, the widow of Apple’s Steve Jobs, whose Project XQ is reimagining high school for the 21st century. Climate change then becomes about engineering desired mental images that motivate students to act to create a different future than the present that only exists in their minds. A Guiding Fiction propels action every bit as much as physical reality, especially if it was created to appeal to emotions.

    Something to think about in 2020 as the stage shifts away from what is actually happening to what people believe and feel is actually occurring.

  3. Tim Neilson says:

    Brisbane average November high, 26.9, Sydney average January high, 26.0, Melbourne average December high 24.4.
    So are the Gabba and SGC tests on the verge of being unplayable?

  4. Tim Neilson says:

    Perth December average high 29. Is the Perth test on the verge of unplayable?

  5. jupes says:

    Cricket Australia said it was committed to building its leadership on the issue of climate change

    How for fucks sake?

    Maybe they could hire a teenage imbecile to lecture the crowd prior to the welcome to country at the start of the test. That would go down well I’m sure.

  6. Rayvic says:

    “The study, commissioned by the Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF), urges Cricket Australia to use its prominence to push for greater climate action ….”

    There should be a push to build hundreds of wind turbines in Zali Steggall’s electorate of Warringah, to take advantage of the sea breezes. Undoubtedly, her neigbouring federal Liberal MPs would be in favour of such action, as they are all unquestionable believers of man-made climate change.

  7. RobK says:

    Perhaps the biggest problem with solar panel waste is that there is so much of it, and that’s not going to change any time soon, for a basic physical reason: sunlight is dilute and diffuse and thus require large collectors to capture and convert the sun’s rays into electricity.
    And they don’t last very long. Same for windpower. Add firming/storage costs and disposal and an expensive option becomes more expensive.

  8. stackja says:

    Solar and wind subsidies make some rich now. Future clean up problems mean nothing for these people.

  9. Tom says:

    Question: when it “reports” its comical climate propaganda tryons like this, when will the ABC start using the (sarc.) tag? Answer: you’re kidding! That would require treating its readers like adults instead of gullible children.

  10. bemused says:

    Does the Governor know his actions are supportive of California becoming a National Security risk to America?

    Given that the governor of California is hell bent on turning the state into another Venezuela and well on the way to doing so, nothing should surprise anyone.

  11. Mark A says:

    bemused
    #3274525, posted on December 29, 2019 at 6:27 am

    Makes you think what makes NY and CAL (and a few other states) residents vote for and reelect the pollies they do?

    Is it the climate? Can’t be. The size of populations or what?
    Puzzling, can’t they see the irony or hypocrisy of their actions?

  12. a happy little debunker says:

    The Boxing Day Test may need to … avoid extreme heat

    India responds ‘Bwahahahahahahaha!’

  13. min says:

    Politicians in Australia boast about the percentage of solar panels used for renewable energy in our sun blessed land . Have they been asked to consider the disposal of old solar panels ? Do they know what happens to them here Eg landfill? Are they aware of toxic leftovers?
    I am now wondering what happened to my old solar panels that were replaced last November so now all my virtue feel good because I am doing something, has evaporated . Whatsmore I had even examined the problem of old renewable disposal in relation to turbines and after seeing the decrepit ones in Germany and reading about them in Der Spiegel, I sent a copy of the cover of the magazine with questions about cost, durability and disposal issues to many politicians before last election.
    I know some took it on board but do they think like the alarmists who do not think of consequences but believe there will be a solution found after the disaster eg better batteries will be able to solve storage .

  14. bemused says:

    Makes you think what makes NY and CAL (and a few other states) residents vote for and reelect the pollies they do?

    Much the same reason as to why inner city voters in Australia support the Greens and Labor. They are generally well off and like to support ’causes’, such as climate change, refugees, gender dysphoria etc, rather than real issues affecting employment, education, the economy etc. Go to rural Australia and it’s much the same as in rural America.

  15. yarpos says:

    Who stupider? California with oil imports and electricity generation or us with the way we handle LNG and our electricity generation? A close race methinks.

  16. ACTOldFart says:

    And the City of Sydney is charging ahead with its New Year’s Eve fireworks, despite a petition with over 250,000 signatures asking that the show be cancelled and the money saved, donated to bushfire and drought relief.

    Yes thats right, the same Sydney City Council, that earlier this year declared a Climate Emergency, is now going to let off tons of CO2 emitting fireworks, and encourage the burning of tens of thousands of litres of fossil fuels so that people from near and far can flock to the harbour shores to watch it all. No doubt including international celebrities who will fly in on their private jets, while all the while piously proclaiming their deep concern about climate change and the need for the rest of us to change our way of life.

    Sanctimonious hypocrisy doesnt even begin to describe it.

  17. iamok says:

    Trump should remove California from the Union. Let them fend for themselves, look after their own, and drown in their own bullshit. I’d get the popcorn out as they rip each other to shreds.

  18. Nighthawk the Elder says:

    Wind turbines are another looming environmental waste disposal disaster in waiting. The resins used in the blades at this stage can’t be recycled and have to go to landfill.

    As the structures get taller, the costs and challenges for their decommissioning and demolition also increases. Sure, they can be explosively demolished like old power station chimneys, but there is a lot more that happens after the dust has settled and the environmental clean up begins. Along that theme, there is the question of who is liable and who pays to to remove the old turbines and to what clean up standard? Some of the farmers who eagerly signed up early to host these on their land might want to read the fine print in their agreements.

    This plague of renewables currently infesting the planet is what you get when Arts attempts to do Engineering.

  19. Wil says:

    I was talking to a farmer who has turbines on his property.
    He says that it is written into his contract that he is responsible for the demolition and cleanup when the time comes for decommissioning.
    He is not worried about this while the income is there on a regular basis.
    Perhaps he will apply for assistance from the EPA or his local council for a subsidy of the estimated one million dollar cost.

  20. Zatara says:

    And the City of Sydney is charging ahead with its New Year’s Eve fireworks, despite a petition with over 250,000 signatures asking that the show be cancelled and the money saved, donated to bushfire and drought relief.

    There isn’t likely to be much money saved by cancelling as the costs are sunk at this point.

  21. Tel says:

    Wil #3274563,

    I wonder if it would be patentable to come up with a procedure to convert old and unwanted windmill towers into a bush WiFi mesh network? Tossing the blades away should be the cheap part of the exercise and then stick a little frame on the top to carry a microwave dish or three, and if that EPA subsidy is forthcoming then jam a solar cell on the top for a hat.

  22. Up The Workers! says:

    If cretinous stupidity was an Olympic sport, Leftards would not only occupy all 3 places on the winners’ podium – they would be the only competitors.

    Ordinarily a non-competitive bunch of ignorant no-hopers and under-achievers, Leftards currently seem to be in a race with one another to prove who is demonstrably the most scientifically illiterate, academically unworthy and utterly fact-phobic.

  23. Up The Workers! says:

    To Nighthawk The Elder, at 8.58 am, who said:

    “This plague of renewables currently infesting the planet is what you get when Arts attempts to do Engineering.”

    Perhaps the gillarding geniuses who designed all those intermittent, unreliable “renewable” giant wind-turbine eyesores, should have hung on to their regular Arts-degree jobs at Macca’s?

    They’d have been more use to humanity if they had.

    Where does Bob Brown live these days?

    Surely he should have a massive wind-turbine constructed right in the middle of his driveway as an enduring token of his magnificent contribution to science, honesty, our environment and to ‘saving the planet’.

  24. Roger says:

    Perhaps he will apply for assistance from the EPA or his local council for a subsidy of the estimated one million dollar cost.

    Will nobody think of the poor tax payer who must subsidise these damned things even when they’re dead?

    What a racket.

  25. Mark M says:

    Oil Glut Is Real And Here To Stay

    Summary
    . OPEC’s latest production cuts may not support oil prices in long term.

    . U.S. oil production is expected to increase in 2020.

    . U.S. – China trade deal is market with a lot of uncertainties.

    . A supply glut of around 0.7 mb/ day will put pressure on oil prices.

    https://seekingalpha.com/article/4313573-oil-glut-is-real-and-to-stay

    Carbon (sic) emissions are never going down. Ever.

  26. Nighthawk the Elder says:

    Wil
    #3274563, posted on December 29, 2019 at 9:12 am

    I think this farmer is in for a rude shock and $1 million isn’t going to cut it.

    The decommissioning and demolition costs (which will all be at full CFMEU construction pay rates) are one thing. It’s all the other administrative and environmental clean up costs that will blow this out of the water.

    Up front there will be costs for the demolition permit, including the heritage study (yes some idiot will probably make an application), engineering and design studies on how it will be demolished. If using explosives, there will be computer modelling and third party validation. Without it, various regulators will not allow the demolition to proceed.

    Then there is the detailed site investigations of the surrounding soils and ground water for any contamination, as well as independent audit by an EPA approved auditor (you don’t get to chose who but you get to pay).

    Once demolition commences, the materials that can’t be recycled go to land fill or other processing such as any oils and greases (not all can be recycled). Guess who pays the transport and commercial disposal fees?

    After demolition there will be further testing for contaminated land and further clean up. Then comes the after care period of a number of years for more testing and independent audits. (A serious money making machine).

    The EPA won’t be handing out any money as it’s the EPA imposing a significant proportion of the costs and raking in their cut.

  27. bemused says:

    I think this farmer is in for a rude shock and $1 million isn’t going to cut it.

    He’s going to be in for more than a rude shock. Take whatever the total cost is to build a wind farm and there’s no way that even 10% of that will cover disposal and complete return of land to original state.

  28. Lee says:

    Someone should tell these AGW climate alarmist morons that most solar panels are made in China, using – you guessed it – coal-fired power!

  29. Professor Fred Lenin says:

    Nighthawk , what about the indigenius impact study due to loss of the windmill ? The indigenius hunters use them as landmarks and will get lost when it is gone . Then there the sacred site status of gangrenes and rentiers ,that will be costly ,finally the “Bye Bye to country “ceremony ,that will cost a grand or two .
    You cant leave the people who have lived here for 325,000 years out of these important decisions affecting their land . Albo and di nuttali can make a speech condemning white racism and poofterfobia at the ceremony .

  30. John A says:

    The study, commissioned by the Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF), urges Cricket Australia to use its prominence to push for greater climate action and do more to look after player and spectator welfare.

    Clearly, this is a political matter, having nothing to do with player safety or spectator health. As many others have commented before, don’t follow the waving hand, watch the other one, to see what is really being done.

  31. Fair shake of the Sauce bottle says:

    FMD try playing cricket in south western NSW back in the 70s, 80s. No aircon back then for the lunch break.
    Here’s a tip : wear a wide brimmed hat when playing as per Mark Waugh and Clive Lloyd.
    Oh and don’t forget to get the fluids back into you post game … at the bar

  32. Nighthawk the Elder says:

    Thanks Professor Fred. How inconsiderate of me to overlook our indigenous cousins. I’m now better edumacated on the subject.

  33. Professor Fred Lenin says:

    My use of the word indigenius is nor an error , it is a work of genius to get billions in taxpayers money for absolutely no return or benefit,even less than the climate scam , at least it shows eyesores on the countryside .you actually see something .

  34. Fat Tony says:

    stackja
    #3274488, posted on December 29, 2019 at 1:44 am
    Solar and wind subsidies make some rich now. Future clean up problems mean nothing for these people.

    Clean up in the future won’t be a problem – you’ve seen those pics of 3rd world shitholes where rubbish is just strewn everywhere. No problem.

  35. Squirrel says:

    “The looming crisis of getting rid of toxic junk from windmills and solar panels. A great deal worse than the industry admits”

    We need to hear much more about this, and keep hearing it. The same people who bang on endlessly about a carbon price to “level the playing field” (and who obsess about plastic bags and disposable cutlery etc.) are deathly silent on this issue.

  36. Wil says:

    Yes, I think you may be correct in the estimation of a lot more than one million dollars.
    He did say that all the one hundred tons of concrete in the foundation had to go as well.
    Also the underground cabling and the service road through his paddock.
    The deal was to return everything to original so the land could be used for all over cropping.

  37. Up The Workers! says:

    The A.L.P.B.C. cast of thousands and its whole Sheltered Workshop of failed and retired A.L.P./Green pollies, needs to be relocated to Antarctica to prevent all of “Chicken Little” Buttrose’s tribe of lying Leftard luvvies, propagandists, toadies and grovelling scientific-illiterates from being fried to a crisp in the dry, waterless searing heat, and then being poisoned to death in the lethally toxic carbon dioxide and then being drowned under the rising sea levels which are almost up to our nostrils.

    After the relocation, we should undertake to check on their welfare once a century or so…if revenue and memory and willingness allows.

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