Irresponsible scare mongering

The Victorian chief health officer Brett Sutton in the Sunday Herald Suntoday urged shoppers to have a “two-week supply of food and a 60-day supply of prescription medication”.

I just had someone on Facebook telling me that if I didn’t stay home for the next 60 days I would be responsible for the deaths of 20,000 people.

Panic is going to impose greater costs on Australia and the world generally than is the virus.  There is a huge difference between taking sensible precautions and widespread panic.

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81 Responses to Irresponsible scare mongering

  1. Judge Dredd

    Agreed. You can see the supermarket shelves are getting emptied by the minute (which is only going to impact the poorest). Further you can feel the anxiety in the air.

  2. Docket62

    I just had someone on Facebook telling me that if I didn’t stay home for the next 60 days I would be responsible for the deaths of 20,000 people.

    Meh….. the way the government looks at it, 99% are likely to be pensioners and it could return the budget to surplus.

  3. notafan

    Everyone is at the supermarket.

    I went for a loaf of bread.

    Only bresds left were weird stuff like gluten free and baguettes.

    I bought the baguette.

  4. C.L.

    The media in this country have been stoking panic from the start.
    The trick – the same old trick – is to swamp-report, say, a T-P rush or some full-on shopping frenzy somewhere and then splatter it all over the papers and TV screens. They cover themselves by saying they’re only reporting what’s happening but the truth is they’re causing what’s happening over time.

    With all of the new police measures being announced by the hour, I wonder what journalists would hink of a corona-censor to control what they can report?

    Hey, why not? Freedom of association and assembly are already out the window.

  5. calli

    The Victorian chief health officer Brett Sutton in the Sunday Herald Suntoday urged shoppers to have a “two-week supply of food and a 60-day supply of prescription medication”.

    So the morons all leap into the shopping frenzy thinking they’re protected from infection by…dunno.

    With their little children.

    They aren’t taking it seriously. They are excited by the novelty, soon to wear off.

  6. Robbo

    The Sunday Herald Sun tells us to stockpile two weeks supply of food but not to panic buy. Which idiot at that paper failed to understand the stupidity of those conflicting statements? It is bad enough that we have so many stupid morons out there stripping supermarket shelves of bloody near everything without adding into the scenario the gross irresponsibility of the largest circulation newspaper in Victoria.

  7. C.L.

    The other thing that has to be said and all of us have to admit (because we’re part of the ‘problem’) is that the world created by the internet – of constantly being plugged in to news and ‘developments’ – creates an artificial frenzy around everything. If this was happening in the 1990s, what would it look like? TV news coverage, people discussing what they saw on the news; supplements in newspapers with a few tips and advice. That’s about it. I doubt there would have been a rush on toilet paper and groceries.

  8. Cassie of Sydney

    I went to Coles, Woollies and IGA today…NO toilet paper, NO hand towels, NO tissues, NO dried pasta, NO s/r and plain flour, NO hand sanitisers, NO canned tomatoes, NO tomato passatas, NO frozen peas and beans and today…NO eggs. I actually became a little distressed today about the whole thing.

  9. Squirrel

    In his mid-afternoon press conference, the PM said that Brett Sutton had been mis-quoted – but panic is panic, and no amount of clarification, even when it’s bipartisan, will stop people from going crazy.

  10. C.L.

    I went to Coles, Woollies and IGA today…NO toilet paper, NO hand towels, NO tissues, NO dried pasta, NO s/r and plain flour, NO hand sanitisers, NO canned tomatoes, NO tomato passatas, NO frozen peas and beans and today…NO eggs. I actually became a little distressed today about the whole thing.

    This will end in policed shopping – or kind of rationing.
    Watch.

    Spare a thought for the poor, welfare receivers, down and outers.
    They have virtually no money and are now hard-pressed to by a few days’ food.

  11. sfw

    Our supermarket in Mt Beauty had no flour at all except for wholemeal, nobody likes wholemeal flour.

  12. Arky

    Make sure you have enough cash on hand.
    Get in before the retards this time, please.

  13. Bear Necessities

    A lot of the decisions are being made by people who will still get paid when businesses get shut down, staff layed off etc. They have no skin in the game so to speak. That is the issue. The war on the corona virus will probably be won, you would hope, but what damage will be left behind.

  14. Bruce

    Then, there’s this from a medical contact in the US:

    “It is only like “the flu” in some of its clinical symptoms. That’s where the “flu” similarity ends. It’s more contagious than influenza, and has a higher mortality than influenza.

    In addition to the higher mortality, there seems to be a unique hospital course that is being reported in some of my email traffic from the west coast (I have not yet seen this myself, but it’s just a matter of
    time). Most hospitalized cases just require supplemental oxygen in varying amounts, up-to-and-including non-rebreather masks. About a third progress to ARDS, with total respiratory failure… and this happens quite rapidly. They end up in the ICU on vents. Interestingly, there doesn’t seem to be the Multi-organ-system-failure we often see accompanying the ARDS. Also, it’s not only the elderly…. they have also seen it in younger patients.

    Heavily-impacted hospitals have had to clear the decks. Their ICUs are literally 100% full of COVID patients. They’ve converted as many other units as they can to ICUs, and step-down and other units are also mostly full of more-stable COVID.

    There also seems to be a contingent of these patients who appear to be recovering, weaning off the vent, etc… who suddenly decompensate to hypotension, severe cardiogenic shock and V-fib/Asystole. These patients very rapidly die, and they’re not sure of the mechanism. Echocardiogram has shown severely depressed Ejection Fractions of less than 10%, from previously normal hearts… so the theory is that there is some sort of rapid-onset post-viral cardiomyopathy in a small number of patients.

    It also seems to hit the liver a bit too… but not badly. No fulminant hepatic failure… transaminases are only in the range of a couple-hundred.

    That’s what I’m hearing so far… apologize for the medical-ese.

    It’s a weird virus… it is not “the flu.”

  15. BorisG

    I’ve just come back from Coles and Woolies. While there is no toilet paper and no hand sanitizers, most other items are available, like pasta, eggs, bread etc. Also not crowded at all. The queues were short and people nice and courteous.

    Maybe the panic is exaggerated.

  16. egg_

    It’s a weird virus… it is not “the flu.”

    HIV component?

  17. Cassie of Sydney

    “I’ve just come back from Coles and Woolies. While there is no toilet paper and no hand sanitizers, most other items are available, like pasta, eggs, bread etc. Also not crowded at all. The queues were short and people nice and courteous.”

    Well isn’t that just dandy….BolshevikG says nothing to worry about because he had no problems. Well BolshevikG…….the story you have just told is NOT the story that most Australians are facing and it is NOT what I faced this afternoon at Bondi Junction. Oh and long…long queues in both supermarkets.

  18. NuThink

    Irresponsible scare mongering

    as opposed to responsible scare mongering?

    I chuckle every time on TV when gambling is advertised they add “Gamble Responsibly”. I thought that to gamble was irresponsible.

  19. Roger

    If this was happening in the 1990s, what would it look like?

    Prior to mass immigration from China?

    Considerably different, I should think.

  20. mh

    BorisG
    #3357987, posted on March 15, 2020 at 6:09 pm

    I shopped in Coles last night, situation normal.

    However I got told Aldi was feral today.

  21. Roger

    This will end in policed shopping – or kind of rationing.
    Watch.

    Already happening in my local Coles, where the affable Indian asst manager is the chief of shopping police.

  22. Stimpson J. Cat

    Libertarians and Globalists should be scared.

    Scared of their ridiculous positions being exposed for all to see!

    Ha ha ha ha ha ja ja!

    Also Delete Your Facebook.

    It is 2020 now, seriously.

  23. Lee

    I reckon I have enough food for 4-6 weeks.

    And that’s without going ape-droppings.

  24. notafan

    Why would you go to Coles and Woolies?

  25. notafan

    BorisG

    Not living fairly close to Chinese dominated suburb.

    Im in Gladys Liu’s electorate…

  26. stackja

    The gullible people believe the hype about anything. The Internet can be a great source of information and a good source for disinformation. I don’t believe many people. MSM in particular.

  27. Iampeter

    Great.
    Now the food isles will be as empty as the toiletries.

    At least we’ll still have the internet.
    If anything happens to that though…well…then things are gonna get real.

  28. mundi

    Fake news is out, and media are once again pushing every sound bite.

    Lets see… Claims Italy have stopped mortgage payments are completely untrue. One politician mentioned it as something they might do, but google it, and thousands of news stories claiming Italy have suspended mortgage payments.

    Now we have stories about schools being closed in VIC, only for the vic government to come out not even an hour ago and say schools are still open…

  29. stackja

    WHO reassured us Wuhan virus was not a pandemic. Measures to control Wuhan virus were called racist.

  30. stackja

    Petering out adding to the confusion.

  31. mundi

    The shortages are just people over-buying. There is no actual supply shortage. Consumption also hasn’t gone up. So its just temproary shortages while people gain inventory.

    Example: Toilet paper production is up and so are imports. In a week or two the shelves will be full again.

  32. Elderly White Man From Skipton

    The risk is apparently markedly higher than SARS, which Australia managed to avoid but Singapore did not. Singapore trebled the number of isolation wards in a week when CV-19 showed up because they designed that option into their system after SARS. Korea has drive-in testing. Vietnam, Singapore and Korea have close tracking of travellers.
    So far Australia has little domestic hand off infection. But we also do not know what the virus does or how it mutates. It is not clear that recovery is the same as cured. It is highly infectious and places like universities will be hazardous for the simple reason that the virus emerged during the lunar new year holiday.
    Why people are buying toilet paper is one of life’s mysteries. But it does seem China’s industrial disruption is extensive and persistent, so supply of some things will become uncertain.
    I’d be more worried about the risk to banks etc of extended disruption to employment, given the overall picture of debt.

  33. stackja

    MSM told us AGW would destroy the world. MSM told us bush fires would destroy Australia. Now if we don’t panic the Wuhan virus will destroy us.

  34. stackja

    Red China Ministry of Truth reassured us Wuhan virus was not a problem.

  35. JohnL

    The Victorian chief health officer Brett Sutton in the Sunday Herald Sun today urged shoppers to have a “two-week supply of food and a 60-day supply of prescription medication”.

    These guys are fucking idiots!!!!!!!!!!!

  36. Iampeter

    Petering out adding to the confusion.

    But you have no other state besides total confusion.

  37. There are a number of feckin idiots in positions of authority – add Brett Sutton to the list.

  38. Chris M

    NO toilet paper, hand towels, tissues, dried pasta, s/r and plain flour, hand sanitisers, canned tomatoes, passata, frozen peas and beans… eggs

    All very predictable, you should have shopped earlier I’m afraid. Bought a good months worth of all this and more in a very relaxed manner over several weeks in February, on top of the regular pantry full. Haha didn’t buy a giant toilet paper stash, just proportional quantities of everything we use.

    I haven’t seen any ‘panic buying’ just people stocking up. The only possible panic were were some fights among ferals shown on the media. If Sinc and other have faith in the government and retailers that shops will be open and groceries are going to available everyday going forward then don’t bother stocking of course.

  39. vlad

    Brett Sutton should be told: don’t come Monday.

  40. vlad

    And I refuse to panic buy. I’ll live on corn flakes if need be. Go thou and do likewise.

  41. Dan

    I bought a months food a month ago as soon as I heard doctors were being put into isolation. I’ve been to a couple of supermarkets, this afternoon was calm but busy and there was a ton of bread and everything else except bulk rice and I assume toilet paper. But screw that, I lived in west Africa for a bit and they hadn’t discovered it yet.

  42. JohnJJJ

    Mathematically we need to sacrifice the young – young will just feel sick – so the old – politicians and leaders – don’t die. Simple herd immunity and flattening the curve. Assuming the integration of the two curves is the same. Ahhh….William Farr, are you correct?

  43. Iampeter

    Why people are buying toilet paper is one of life’s mysteries.

    Apparently this particular strain does cause gut problems. But I think more than just toilet paper is being purchased. The canned foods isles are in bad shape too. I think it’s just bad reporting creating a lot more of a panic than is necessary.

    For those interested in a more rational assessment, I’d recommend Dr Amesh.

  44. Robber Baron

    Panic is good for the economy. Josh needs a good GDP print.

  45. Panic is going to impose greater costs on Australia and the world generally than is the virus. There is a huge difference between taking sensible precautions and widespread panic.

    The problem is that, strictly speaking, panic buying is the economically rational course of action for the average shopper who lives a normal life without a fully-stocked nuclear bunker in the backyard. If we have a weeks-long national shutdown with no restaurants operating and no supermarket home delivery, then stocking up on food and other essentials so you can survive in isolation is undeniably prudent.

    Not sure how to solve that conundrum, but the papers are just informing the public of the facts.

  46. mh

    Iampeter, just letting you know food isles is food aisles.

    You’re welcome.

  47. BorisG

    I think it is absolutely appalling that cabinet did not self isolate after coming into contact with Dutton.

  48. BorisG

    Not sure how to solve that conundrum, but the papers are just informing the public of the facts.

    Toilet papers ?

  49. Richardf

    I was fortunate; 8 weeks ago I placed an order for PCBs in China. Therefore I’ve been watching this pandemic unfold (you don’t know most of it)

    The larger failure is that of our public service. Years of taking generous overseas trips to pandemic conferences but still no sensible advice. They know little, or they don’t care. Police and health care workers already squealing they’re required to do their job. They won’t, but they’ll still be paid.

    2-weeks food is sensible advice (a month ago!). Not going to hospitals unless acute respiratory issues will be next, but it’ll take them weeks. Italy “public health” still in denial. Testing now a waste of time, pandemic response long passed.

    Best of luck to everyone:-)

  50. mh

    Monty is right.

    Australians are increasing their grocery inventory because they are determining the risk of future supply.

    Can’t knock them for that.

  51. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The problem is that, strictly speaking, panic buying is the economically rational course of action for the average shopper who lives a normal life without a fully-stocked nuclear bunker in the backyard

    You’d be helpless in the face of a real emergency, wouldn’t you, monty?

  52. Archivist

    You can’t blame people for stocking up on toilet paper and baked beans when there’s a possibility that they might be put under house arrest in the near future.

    And when it’s obvious that the government is withholding information of life-and-death significance, it’s natural that people will draw their own conclusions and act accordingly.

  53. Matt

    Some thoughts on coronavirus:

    ‘Everything we do before a pandemic will seem alarmist. Everything we do after will seem inadequate.’

    There’s a fine line between panic and preparedness, which we are all beginning to discover. People buying a year’s supply of toilet paper and fighting in the supermarket aisle for the last roll for no apparent reason clearly fits into the unnecessary panic category. But over the past 3-4 weeks we have been hearing from people that flu killed more people last year (we’re at the start of this pandemic, so comparing it to annual flu data is not really valid), it’s not as deadly as SARS or there is no need for drastic lock down measures miss the point.

    Severity and Mortality
    Seasonal flu has a reported mortality rate of about 0.1%. Australia had 313,000 cases of influenza in 2019 with about 1,000 deaths attributed to influenza (but only 58,570 cases the year before), which would suggest a case fatality rate of about 0.3% (noting that many more people are infected with influenza but are not tested). COVID-19 has a mortality rate of 3-4%, although there is a level of uncertainty about that with different figures reported around the world. Mortality is a function of the spread of the disease, the age and co-morbidity of the population and the health care system capability. Even though SARS had a mortality rate of around 10%, the overall transmission was low. As important as mortality is disease severity. Early estimates are that 15% of people infected with COVID-19 will require hospitalisation and a further 5% will require intensive care. Older people and those with co-morbidities are at greater risk, with mortality rates of up to 15% reported.

    That is why the health system is so important, because rapid spread in a population where around 17% are aged 65+ years and with a high prevalence of co-morbidities will start to put huge strain on hospitals and primary health care systems. Spread of the virus to healthcare workers will further stress the system.

    Transmission rate
    Transmission of a disease is measured by the reproductive number (R0) – the average number of people that are infected from an infectious person. This is a function of the how many people an infectious person comes into contact with, the risk of transmission per contact, and the duration of infectiousness.
    The reproductive number for COVID-19 is estimated to be between 2-4. For comparison seasonal flu sits just above 1, MERS and bird flu less than 1 and SARS about 3. So on that basis, COVID-19 has the ability to spread more rapidly than seasonal flu.

    One of the most effective ways to limit the spread of disease is to reduce the reproductive number by minimising the number of contacts between people. This is why social distancing is being seen as an important measure – working from home, avoiding large gatherings or limiting use of public transport. It is why we will likely see school and university shut-downs, sporting events held with no crowds (as the AFL and cricket have already announced) and cancellation of large meetings, conferences, music festivals and other events.

    Is all this necessary or is this inducing panic?
    The data from around the world suggests that this is something we should be concerned about. Countries like the USA (2,952), Germany (4,585), Spain (6,391) and France (4,481) now have now seen rapid spread (as at 9pm 15 March 2020). Italy went from to 124 cases to 1128 in six days, and then to 4636 in the next six days and then to 15,000 in the next six days, and now they have 21,157 cases. Australia is still 4-5 months from peak influenza season, so we may see a different pattern here than in the northern hemisphere. But we have more than doubled the number of cases in Australia in the past 2 days, and now have 300 cases.

    That shows what can happen if appropriate measures aren’t put in place early and effectively. South Korea is being held up as an example of effective containment, with spread of new cases slowing. But they have more than 16 cases per 100,000 population and are still increasing (albeit slowly), whereas Australia only has 1.2 cases per 100,000. If we can be as effective as South Korea then we might contain the spread. If we follow the pattern in Italy, that would mean significantly more cases and deaths. And Italy has not come close to reaching their peak yet. There are also a lot of unknowns with this virus that may yet prove to be problematic.

    While we are going to see significant disruption to our daily lives, all of the evidence suggests that these measures are necessary to try and minimise the spread and impact of the disease as much as possible. Things are going to worse before they get better – the question is how much worse?

  54. JR

    Do any of you chaps know if Mike Carlton’s book is still available at Big W? Im after 3 pallet’s worth.

  55. JR

    My dear mother went to the chemist yesterday and, whilst ‘checking-out’ overheard another customer saying to an attendant, in hushed tone, “Have you got any toilet-paper? There’s something in it for you…”

  56. JC

    Plodes
    Nice comment and good link. Keep it up.

  57. JR

    “Not that fancy quilted kind…” Give me the Carlton Light:

    https://youtu.be/-9Nw4DM-yck

  58. Up The Workers!

    To J.R. at 10.32 pm:

    The same thought occurred to me but was quickly rejected.

    I’m the D-I-Y type.

    If I am going to buy a load of expensive lavatory paper, I very much prefer to fill it with crap myself and not buy the stuff all pre-loaded by the likes of Mike Carlton.

  59. Porter

    This is an excellent video that explains why the UK is not locking up people. This is the sort of communication strategy our authorities should be adopting: forget all the official speak and the interviews with sneering ABC people who talk over you, talk to people in plain language and not only tell them what you’re doing that explain why you are doing it. This also builds confidence. https://mobile.twitter.com/NadineDorries/status/1238949499302748165

  60. Chris M

    Porter the UK is our lab rat then, I think its a sad joke. They think they can fiddle the numbers once the train is heading down that exponential slope with a health system so many of them already complain bitterly about. It’s more likely part of their cull strategy to facilitate the pagan aka mud invasion and curtail pension costs.

    It will be interesting to see if China has a resurgence as some are predicting now they are apparently going business as usual.

  61. Boris

    You can’t blame people for stocking up on toilet paper

    Sorry don’t understand why toilet paper in particular.

  62. Tom

    I’m glad you posted this, Sinc. It was the most irresponsible front page splash in the Herald Sun‘s history. Unless tabloid journalism is controlled by editors who actually understand the public interest and recommit to it daily, it can’t help making an arsehole of itself. This episode has done the paper real damage.

  63. duncanm

    Bruce
    #3357985, posted on March 15, 2020 at 6:05 pm

    Interesting stuff Bruce.

    Do we need to revisit the Chinese biological weapons escape angle?

    When it all washes out, will this be lost down the memory home?

  64. Porter

    Chris M. There’s a long article in the Age today explaining the UK’s strategy. It seems the UK think it has gotten away from them, so they are trying to control the spread (and perhaps build up herd immunity) – or flatten the curve as others are wont to say – by protecting the most vulnerable and letting the younger ones fight it (most people will have just mild symptoms). They are doing what is best of them given their demographics and population density and their god-awful NHS.

    What I appreciated is the attempt to explain in it simple terms. I was a bit horrified to hear Greg Hunt on TV over the weekend talking about “t minus 24 hours” etc. This is jargon from briefings and people lapse into that talk as if that somehow conveys more authority. It will be interesting to see if the Morrison government will start some sustained PR to get a consistent message across (and how idiots like the tabloid press or Dan Andrews will undermine it).

  65. Porter

    It was the most irresponsible front page splash in the Herald Sun‘s history.

    Only two or three days ago the Daily Mail was running a huge headline “Panic stations”, whipping up the panic buying. Morrison is too cowardly to call out the media as Trump does.

  66. jupes

    Do any of you chaps know if Mike Carlton’s book is still available at Big W? Im after 3 pallet’s worth.

    Lol! Now that is FAF (Funny As Fuck).

  67. jupes

    A week or so ago, here in Frogland, I had the tele on watching a political / comedy program similar to the Project. I couldn’t understand a word they were saying but next thing I know, I’m looking at Rita Panahi! She was dubbed, but it soon became obvious that she was talking about the Australian dunny roll rush. How the Frogs on the panel laughed!

    Anyhoo, last night, Frogland went to Level 3 restrictions which meant all schools, restaurants and bars have to close. What next? Who knows? So the darling wife and I decided to do the Aussie thing and panic buy as much as we could carry back to our humble abode.

    We got to the shop five minutes before opening and there were only a dozen other people there, so good; no panic. Funny thing was when we got inside we could get everything we wanted except one product had empty shelves. No prizes for guessing which one.

    Australia – leading the world!

  68. Porter

    UK Telegraph shows current UK stats of 1372 infections, 35 deaths (total population 66.5 million). Youngest victim aged 59.

  69. calli

    This morning on the Coronastan Bugle, David Koch is breathlessly wallowing in the crisis. We have visions of empty shelves, hazmat suits, many…many “specialists” giving their opinions.

    And in a rare moment of clarity, Barnabub and Coal Fitzgibbon agree that Parliament may be a virus super-spreader.

    But we knew that already.

  70. calli

    And in another rare moment of clarity, brought about by private, not government mandate – shops will open early for the elderly and immobile to get in before the greedy hordes.

  71. Twostix

    Having a fortnights worth of extra food on hand was an absolute given up until boomers arrive with their glonalist JIT idiocy.
    Genx are just rediscovering a thousand year foundationstone of responsible home making.

    Our grandparents approve. Nobody.cares if the people who got us into this mess don’t.

  72. Chris M

    the UK think it has gotten away from them, so they are trying to control the spread (and perhaps build up herd immunity)

    They intentionally allowed it to ‘get away’ and spread. There is no evidence of ‘herd immunity’ with this virus, you can catch it a second time and the clinical outcome is worse then.

    Doubt Boris will last long. This is like letting Nazis in but hey, just a trickle and he has a signed agreement.

  73. Archivist

    UK Telegraph shows current UK stats of 1372 infections, 35 deaths (total population 66.5 million). Youngest victim aged 59.

    Those numbers will change rapidly. Be prepared to admit, in the near future, that you underestimated the scale of this problem.

  74. Bought a good months worth of all this and more in a very relaxed manner over several weeks in February

    ChrisM, Dan, Richardf et al are right. In spite of the the incompetence of WHO, the warnings were all there for anyone who watches global news, from the beginning of January when the Wuhan emergency became public. In particular, the astonishing infectiousness of this virus indicated its potential to become a pandemic, even if the mortality rate appeared low. Two things certainly caught my attention – firstly, its exponential growth (because of the high R0) and its specificity in its targeting of the aged (but not infants or children).

    I stocked my larders well in advance, and am now in the process of moving finances around in preparation for the economy and banking shocks that will probably follow.

  75. It will be interesting to see if China has a resurgence as some are predicting now they are apparently going business as usual.

    Not sure if that is so. Saellite imaging suggests country highways still not carrying the normal amount of heavy transport. There is also disturbing accounts that after Shenzen factory workers released from 14 day quarantine there was a new spike in numbers.

  76. Ellie

    Toilet paper available at my local little supermarket in Waverley. Limited to one roll per customer. Also pasta left. Expensive, but it’s there.

    A friend just informed me he has 100 rolls. So I have a good loo paper source.

  77. Calli:

    And in another rare moment of clarity, brought about by private, not government mandate – shops will open early for the elderly and immobile to get in before the greedy hordes.

    There will be fights over this, and you won’t be able to guess which two demographics will be over represented.
    Of course the race card will be used often.

  78. Ellie:

    A friend just informed me he has 100 rolls. So I have a good loo paper source.

    I hope you gave him a good kick in the nuts for being a selfish bastard.

  79. Ellie

    Winston – I got particularly cranky with him. Told him he is part of the reason the shelves are empty, that if only he and others just got what they needed. As a consequence, people like me, who didn’t panic, are now scrambling to find any and when we do find some can only purchase one roll at a time!

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