Thursday Forum: April 2, 2020

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1,385 Responses to Thursday Forum: April 2, 2020

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  1. Old School Conservative

    Bazinga.

  2. feelthebern

    Please be alert to public servants trying to infect the new thread with coronavirus.
    They know they need to import more cases to bump up the numbers.

  3. Confused Old Misfit

    This is a change!

  4. Some History

    Just awaiting The Hunchback’s presser.

    Today he will be going through the 43 exemptions to yesterday’s rule and 4 clarifications to the 28 exemptions to the rule from the previous day. Of course, he’ll be declaring today’s rule and that he has POWER.

  5. A new one of these seems to magically appear at the same time – everyday.

  6. Infidel Tiger

    China did this.

  7. Infidel Tiger

    Can we get back to work yet?

    Australia dodged it.

  8. Gilas

    Phew!

    The stench from the previous OT wafting away..

  9. It may be a self replicating organism oozing out of the primordial swamp…

  10. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Some cruise ships ‘lying’ about virus on board

    Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton says some cruise ships have been lying about the COVID-19 situations on board, as he prepares to work with state authorities to rescue crews.

    The Australian revealed on Thursday that a military-style operation is being planned to helicopter doctors on to eight cruise ships stranded off the NSW coast to test more than 8000 people in a bid to end a standoff that police fear could overwhelm Sydney’s intensive care units.

    Sky News host Peter Gleeson says the Ruby Princess cruise ship will “go down in history, when the post mortems are done, as being the real trigger” for many of Australia’s com…

    The Home Affairs Minister told Sydney’s 2GB radio that he would also get several state health bodies to do a proper assessment of the ships due to cruise companies “lying.”

    “Some of these ships will move off and go back to their point of origin. Some of them we might able to extract crew and fly them back to their country of origin,” he said.

    “It’s clear that some of the companies have been lying about the situation of the health of passengers and crew onboard.

    “I need to get an honest picture of what’s happening. We are going to have a health company by the name of Aspen – as well as NSW Health, Queensland Health and WA Health – do a proper assessment of what’s happening onboard.”

    Mr Dutton warned against moving cruise ships out of Australian waters too quickly, as those same vessels might simply return if people get sick or die onboard.

    From the Oz. I thought maritime law was fairly strict about these matters?

  11. feelthebern

    Australia has no fucking border control thanks to the cockheads in Government.

    I’d also attribute a chunk of it to the public service.

  12. jupes

    Shit. USA just cracked 1000 Bat Flu deaths in a day.

  13. feelthebern

    The AFR is running a story today how the new Optus CEO is “managing” this new work paradigm.
    Considering her 7 figure package, I expect she’s managing ok.

  14. Confused Old Misfit

    Skye New’s Tom Whathisface really pisses me off with his supercilious attitude. Typical of the late 20’s know it all. The female so so low energy. Makes the program a waste of time but for the occasional interesting guest.

  15. win

    What happened to Toms 4am stint?

  16. Amadeus

    Trying to do the right thing and keeping 1.5mtrs from the bride but she keeps rolling over and fooling around under the sheets.
    Is there a new regulation yet on this dastardly behaviour?
    Should I submit this to the fictitious/factitious “National Cabinet”? Please, I need guidance from this new august body.

  17. Infidel Tiger

    US might have recorded a big jump in deaths in certain places but in most US hospitals they are currently laying off workers because there is nothing to do.

    Strange times.

  18. Rossini

    Early start to day ……….No work no reason to get up so early

  19. feelthebern

    The female so so low energy

    You’re looking in the wrong place.
    If you want high energy, get some Exotic Joe into you on Netflix.

  20. Farmer Gez

    A new Fred.

    As fresh as a disinfected sippy cup.

    Shop closed though.
    Where can Numbers bully another barista with his virus vessel?

  21. lotocoti

    I thought maritime law was fairly strict about these matters?

    Yes, but no one wants to go all Alexander Marinesko on the cruise ships.

  22. https://aatishb.com/covidtrends/

    The numbers still don’t make sense to me.

    Looking at the graphs in the link above we have NY as a special problem. The other states, not so bad.

    I’m thinking the data is garbage.

  23. Amadeus

    According to the communist government of Queensland, our 228,000 state public servants are doing it tough during this “crisis” – some pubics are even having to work from home.
    The kind and generous Palletshack is rolling out a 3% immediate pay rise plus a $1,250 (?) cash payment to ease the burden on the poor souls.

  24. Ellen of Tasmania

    Shit. USA just cracked 1000 Bat Flu deaths in a day.

    CNBC – Feb. 3, 2020:

    “While the new coronavirus ravages much of China and world leaders rush to close their borders to protect citizens from the outbreak, the flu has quietly killed 10,000 in the U.S. so far this influenza season.

    At least 19 million people have come down with the flu in the U.S. with 180,000 ending up in the hospital, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The flu season, which started in September and can run until May, is currently at its peak and poses a greater health threat to the U.S. than the new coronavirus, physicians say.”

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/02/03/the-flu-has-already-killed-10000-across-us-as-world-frets-over-coronavirus.html

  25. Some History

    Coronavirus Sound of Music parody

  26. Roger

    The kind and generous Palletshack is rolling out a 3% immediate pay rise plus a $1,250 (?) cash payment to ease the burden on the poor souls.

    I wouldn’t begrudge a pay rise to the medical staff the government is ordering to work in unsafe conditions without essential equipment such as masks and goggles.

    The cost could be borne by a modest sacrifice from the rest.

    ‘We’re all in this together.’

  27. Bar Beach Swimmer

    From the OT

    Beach Swimmer
    #3388877, posted on April 2, 2020 at 10:47 am

    those cruise ships sheltering in Australian waters. We can do something to help, and morally should do so

    Lizzie, they’re not sheltering, like in a storm. They’re attempting to do what the Tampa tried to do, which another poster pointed out further up the thread. Unless there are really sick people on board who need to be in intensive care, we are not required to assist. And nor should we, apart from provisioning the ship, but that’s all.

    The hatred towards and denigration of people who have enjoyed cruises is fairly extreme here at the moment

    I don’t see hatred of this cohort here. I see reasonable people pointing out the true situation: we are being forcibly locked down; we can not visit anyone; we are being moved on from doing the most everyday things. People have lost their jobs and businesses have been forcibly closed because of this. Whether the govt is right or wrong, no-one knows as yet. But the one thing we do know is that it is costly, extremely costly, for everyone. While we’re in uncharted waters, so to speak, those cruise ships are not. They know where their home ports are and they should go.

    They cop though the usual tall poppy syndrome at play

    This is not a tall poppy syndrome. The average Australian is sick and tired of a particular group of people having one rule for them and another for everyone else. Mostly it’s because they flaunt their supposed moral superiority over the plebs. These are the very people with education, abilities and experience and who are the ones that make the policies and regulations for everyone else.

    their business selling cruises is legitimate, and as I have pointed out earlier, the passengers from the cruise conference they organised actually flew in BEFORE the cut off date for permitting home isolation

    This does not get them off the hook. The China Pestilence has been on the radar for weeks; at least since the end of February. I had a couple of conversations with friends, who despite the situation at hand were still going overseas. These are much older people than me, people whose age group and health would make them the right demographic for getting complications from the disease, but they wouldn’t change their plans.

    These passengers, who happened to be medical workers (and thus subject here and elsewhere to a disgraceful ‘tall poppy’ ire), were caught in a nightmare of bureaucratic misunderstandings about the timing of the edict and have every right to feel distressed by that

    No, they were hoisted on their own petard, despite the bureaucratic antics. They have no more right to feel distressed than everyone else in Australia. While they’ve been momentarily stymied most everyone else have years of rebuilding ahead of them.

  28. min

    Does anyone know if the flu deaths were those who had vaccinations?

  29. woolfe

    Lizzie, they’re not sheltering, like in a storm. They’re attempting to do what the Tampa tried to do, which another poster pointed out further up the thread.

    They are not doing any harm and trying to link to Tampa is ludicrous. If they have any sick they are close to medical treatment. Some here are still human.

  30. Not Uh oh

    Wife and I tried to book in with our local GP practice (12 doctors) for flu shots but they say they’re not doing any due to the China virus. Suggested we keep an eye out for updates on social media. We’re getting them done at the local chemist tomorrow. Anyone know what’s going on? not like a GP clinic to pass-up the opportunity for some quick money.

  31. stackja

    Some History
    #3388892, posted on April 2, 2020 at 11:00 am

    Yes!

  32. Infidel Tiger

    NSW social distancing laws end in 90 days.

    They should end in 9 days but at least we have a deadline.

    WA should restart next week. Apart from cruise filth and health department officials trying to infect Aboriginals, no one has it here.

  33. woolfe

    85 year old passes in Queensland. How long till they stop publishing the ages of the deceased. Plus they won’t release their modelling.

  34. woolfe

    Quarantine over, on the plane back to work tomorrow.

  35. Infidel Tiger

    New theory:

    China Flu is extending these people’s lives.

    Without the medical attention these octogenarians would have died much sooner.

  36. Hay Stockard

    From the other thread as I would like to share some facechooking with you all.
    Woke up this morning with the missus holding a pillow over my face.
    She wanted to protect me from the bat flu.
    How sweet.

  37. Top Ender

    Bolta’s article from the old fred:

    Australians need to know when this lockdown will end

    The Prime Minister and premiers have told us the coronavirus restrictions that have put businesses in “hibernation” and people into isolation will last six months. They can’t be serious. This is why Scott Morrison must tell us his exit strategy now, writes Andrew Bolt.

    There is no way we can go on like this for six months. So today is when the Prime Minister must tell us his exit strategy.

    Just when will Australians be allowed to leave their homes? When can we ask a friend over for dinner without risking jail?

    When will police stop chasing people out of parks and off beaches? When can we play sport, go to church or reopen the thousands of businesses that have been shut?

    Scott Morrison and the premiers talk of these restrictions lasting six months until this coronavirus crisis ends, but they can’t be serious.

    How do they measure that end? When not one more person dies? What if people are still dying in September?

    We don’t know. But until then, the Prime Minister says businesses can go into “hibernation” — helped by the $130 billion he’s giving to subsidise wages — and then “bounce back”.

    Why do so many journalists repeat this fantasy? Businesses do not “hibernate” when they have no customers for six months. They die.

    There will be no “bouncing back”. The economy will be shattered, unemployment will be massive and the government will be buried in debt.

    And what of the people the government has just sentenced to six months of home detention?

    In homes across Australia there are already 100,000 people who’ve just lost their jobs.

    They’ve been humiliated. They are running out of money for their families and losing their savings.

    They’ll be stuck in their apartments or houses, unable to leave except for essentials, and in most states banned from inviting anyone home.

    The frustration, misery and isolation will make many such homes pressure cookers, despite Morrison’s bubbly advice to seize the chance to do more jigsaws with the kids, many of whom can’t go back to school.

    That’s why the phone lines to some domestic violence units are already ringing off the hook. That’s why Victoria’s government has just banned gun sales.

    Then there’s the loneliness.

    I had an email on Wednesday from a Victorian widow who has no job and lives alone.

    She writes, “I rely on my partner’s relatives and close friends for social interactions. However I am losing hope and feel I am being punished, put in a solitary confinement.

    “I feel I am completely isolated, forgotten and cannot reach out to my family and friends.”

    The national response to the coronavirus is itself a humanitarian disaster. We’re stopping thousands of people from getting infected by putting millions of Australians under an extreme pressure that will break many.

    I backed the early bans. In fact, I said we banned flights from infected countries too late. Our airport checks on people flying in or disembarking from ships were too slack. We still don’t do enough to make sure infected people stay in their home quarantine.

    True, Australia has nevertheless done extremely well to slow the spread of the virus and limit the deaths. Predictions of “150,000” dead already look hysterical.

    Our toll was just 20 as of early on Wednesday. But this low figure and the pattern of those deaths suggest there may be now a way to keep people safe that doesn’t come at this horrendous social cost.

    The latest dead was a 95-year-old woman. She was the fifth to die at Sydney’s Dorothy Henderson Lodge, the youngest 75.

    Of the other 15 dead, eight caught the virus on a cruise ship. The youngest was 73.

    The remaining seven were aged between 68 and 86. The youngest had “serious underlying health issues” and at least two were in hospital with cancer.

    Yes, the young can also die from this virus, but in Italy the median age of the dead is around 80.

    So doesn’t it make more sense to focus intensely on monitoring people who leave ships and planes and doing more to keep safe the elderly and frail, particularly those in old-age homes? To step up quarantine controls, but relax the home detention of everyone else?

    Another way is possible, and Morrison must explain it before people crack and businesses close, thinking six months of pain will be too much.

    That other way is what we see in Taiwan, which is militant in quarantining the potentially infectious and protecting the vulnerable, yet lets citizen go out, shop and even eat at restaurants.

    It’s had just three deaths, and its economy still works. People aren’t going mad from loneliness and despair — as they will here, if these restrictions last six months.

  38. feelthebern

    85 year old passes in Queensland. How long till they stop publishing the ages of the deceased. Plus they won’t release their modelling.

    They already suppressed the details of the one who died in Orange yesterday.
    “At the wishes of the family”.
    It stinks.

  39. Infidel Tiger

    They already suppressed the details of the one who died in Orange yesterday.
    “At the wishes of the family”.
    It stinks.

    99 and run out is my guess.

  40. dover_beach

    From OOT:

    Unsubstaniated allegations for which Pell has an alibi; i.e. he was never at the orphanage until the day of its closure, which has been corroborated by witnesses who worked there, which is why the allegations were originally rejected by authorities.

    I understand that the Cardinal is reluctant to sue certain media outlets, regarding it as his Christian duty to bear the cross that their Christophobia viciously imposes on him, but I would argue that when and if the High Court orders his release he has a public duty – on behalf of us all – to pursue justice against the ABC in particular.

    Indeed. This has gone way beyond ‘poisoning the wells’. I haven’t watched the series but if they fail to mention that this person’s claim where investigated by police, could not be corroborated, contradicted even, and the charges withdrawn or dismissed, Pell ought to sue them for malicious libel for our sakes.

  41. feelthebern

    99 and run out is my guess.

    Or cruise related.

  42. woolfe

    Hey Sinc your twitter account name is showing as your email address. Good idea???

  43. Hay Stockard

    Infidel Tiger,
    Ninety effin days? The grubs havemruined Anzac Day already. Now they want to ruin my birthday. And if I happen to run amok it’s their fault for closing the pubs. By golly there’s going to be a get square.

  44. hzhousewife

    Am I wrong in thinking that the Ruby Princess was bringing in a desperately ill woman who subsequently died when they made their middle of the night run into Sydney Harbour?

  45. feelthebern

    How long before the Oz gets a talking to from some bigwig about the Brad Norington article today?

    Three-quarters of all deaths in Australia resulting from the corona­virus pandemic are linked to just three sources of infection — the Ruby Princess and three other returning cruise ships, an aged-care facility and the cancer treatment ward of a major metropolitan public hospital.

    As the national death toll reached 21 on Wednesday, it emerged that eight of the dead had recently been on a cruise.

    A further five were residents of the Dorothy Henderson Lodge aged-care facility at Macquarie Park in Sydney’s northwest, and two were patients in the oncology and ­haematology ward of Melbourne’s Alfred Hospital.

    The infection source for six other deaths out of the total in Australia so far remains unclear.

    Health authorities have been ­reluctant to release information about their identities, how they might have become infected and whether they came into contact with others. However, they appear to be standing by analysis indicating most of the nation’s confirmed cases, and deaths, are connected to overseas travel.

  46. Bar Beach Swimmer

    Me: Lizzie, they’re not sheltering, like in a storm. They’re attempting to do what the Tampa tried to do, which another poster pointed out further up the thread. Unless there are really sick people on board who need to be in intensive care, we are not required to assist. And nor should we, apart from provisioning the ship, but that’s all.

    woolfe
    #3388901, posted on April 2, 2020 at 11:08 am
    Lizzie, they’re not sheltering, like in a storm. They’re attempting to do what the Tampa tried to do, which another poster pointed out further up the thread.

    They are not doing any harm and trying to link to Tampa is ludicrous. If they have any sick they are close to medical treatment. Some here are still human

    They’re trying to force the govt of sovereign nation to make changes to the current Australia-wide policy. That is the connection with the Tampa
    No one said they’re not human – have a look at my full comment which is reposted for your convenience.

    Ps – I’m off for a swim so if you reply, I’ll get back to you later.

  47. dopey

    Pell decision next Tuesday

  48. calli

    No wonder the ABC is running hard on the trumped up accusations.

    They are scum.

  49. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Am I wrong in thinking that the Ruby Princess was bringing in a desperately ill woman who subsequently died when they made their middle of the night run into Sydney Harbour?

    IIRC, she was taken ashore by ambulance, and subsequently died ashore. Happy to be corrected.

  50. calli

    Speaking of which, I found this article interesting. Until the last lines.

    They just can’t help themselves. Anything profound is lost in the deceit and wilful ignorance.

  51. Dr Faustus

    I wouldn’t begrudge a pay rise to the medical staff the government is ordering to work in unsafe conditions without essential equipment such as masks and goggles.

    The cost could be borne by a modest sacrifice from the rest.

    Yes. Should be pretty easy to detect the 10,000’s of public servants without any function to perform due to shutdown of non-essential services. If it is really, really necessary to preserve the services of Director Customer Experience in the Department of Innovation and Tourism Industry Development, pop the bastard on $1500/fortnight ‘Jobsworthkeeper’ payment.

  52. Infidel Tiger

    If this lockdown continues much longer…

    “I will never financially recover from this”

  53. When you surround the enemy
    Always allow them an escape route.
    They must see that there is
    An alternative to death.
    —Sun Tzu, The Art of War

    Scotty does not have a line of retreat nor does he provide business with a line of retreat.
    He must provide a plan of how to get things moving again. Lest there be a massacre.

  54. Eyrie

    Now we know how thoughtful Germans felt in the late 1930’s.

  55. BorisG

    Good news: the world death rate from the virus is slowing. It was doubling in 6 days, but now it is 7 days. This does not seem like a lot but it is a good sign (note that the fraction of REPORTED data from China and Iran, which was has not been growing for a while, has diminished, which could lead to faster global growth, but it did not). The doubling of fatalities in Italy is now 8 days, which is probably what drives the global slowdown. They are still doubling in 5 days in Spain (was 4 days) and France, and in 4 days in the UK and the US.

    It will still get a lot worse before it gets better, but lockdown measures appear to be having some impact, especially in Italy.

  56. Eyrie

    “When you surround the enemy
    Always allow them an escape route.”
    Nah, just nuke them.

  57. Leo G

    The numbers still don’t make sense to me.Looking at the graphs in the link above we have NY as a special problem. The other states, not so bad.

    The numbers in Australia won’t make sense until the number of clinical cases increases significantly.
    It appears that increases in deaths has been lagging short-term accumulated active cases by about 3 weeks. In the past 30 days there has been 17 deaths. At the beginning of that period there were 91 active cases. There are now about 4400 active cases.
    If the premise is correct then there may be 800 more deaths over the next 3 weeks.

  58. cohenite

    Top Ender
    #3388915, posted on April 2, 2020 at 11:19 am
    Bolta’s article from the old fred:
    Australians need to know when this lockdown will end

    Good article by Bolta; he’s such a mixed bag; can be right on the money and next minute he’s sooking up to the left or finding offence at someone calling the left kunts because uncouth.

  59. Infidel Tiger

    There are now about 4400 active cases.
    If the premise is correct then there may be 800 more deaths over the next 3 weeks.

    Yeah, nah.

    Not happening.

  60. feelthebern

    The deep state are acting as gatekeepers to the data.
    This is like building self-certification.
    What could possibly go wrong.

  61. Fat Tony

    Roger – regarding morphine
    What you said is the standard operating procedure.
    What i said is what actually happened – I was there.

  62. feelthebern

    Im still short 100 Aussie deaths as at the end of April.

  63. areff

    Pell decision next Tuesday

    Link?

  64. Armadillo

    Some here are still human.

    Speak for yourself. Although I find it rather ironic that someone who’s called “Woolfe” would be posting such a comment. Mirror, dude.

  65. yarpos

    ‘”Does anyone know if the flu deaths were those who had vaccinations?”

    Vaccination isnt a gaurantee or a talisman against evil , so its entirely likely some were. Its also highly likely they were less well represented than the general population % wise.

  66. Infidel Tiger

    Next stage is that Australia will withhold the flu shot in order to get our oldies dying at the required rate.

  67. dover_beach

    Canberra Times reporting that, areff.

  68. notafan

    People aren’t going to admit to euthanasiasing someone by giving them an overdose of morphine.

    There would have to be an enquiry.

    And that is not the same as someone being treated for cancer and having their death hastened by another illness.

  69. Nah, just nuke them.

    I checked my old copy of Sun Tzu, in essence:
    leave line a line of retreat unless you want a massacre.

  70. Armadillo

    Next thing you know, the resident Meer Cat will be claiming to be human.

  71. Armadillo

    Trust me, no one is going fall for that one.

  72. Pell decision next Tuesday

    And they have not ordered his immediate release?

    Therefore, a decision GP won’t like or the HC are sick bastards.

  73. Geriatric Mayfly

    No wonder the ABC is running hard on the trumped up accusations.
    They are scum.

    Any minute now that po faced harpy, Ferguson, will be elevated into the ranks of ‘Brave Wimmin.’

  74. Good morning all.
    Andrew Stuart, co founder of real estate giant Hocking and Stuart, sez lay off the Aspen partygoers. They are in the firing line apparently of vitriol. From the Hun:

    “All he did was have a party,” he said. “Some people from the party proved to be positive. I can understand why he wanted to clear the air, as it almost sounded like he was the purveyor of the virus. He was a bit stiffed – has the generosity of having a party, then he gets clobbered.”

    Stuart is of course referring to Andrew Abercrombie.

  75. hzhousewife

    IIRC, she was taken ashore by ambulance, and subsequently died ashore. Happy to be corrected.

    Sounds right ZK2A

    I am staggered to discover that so many people have NO SAVINGS !

  76. Tel

    I checked my old copy of Sun Tzu, in essence:
    leave line a line of retreat unless you want a massacre.

    The Mongols used to leave a line of retreat in order to encourage the enemy ranks to break, but they also followed up to slaughter the retreating soldiers.

  77. Fat Tony

    Armadillo
    #3388958, posted on April 2, 2020 at 11:45 am
    Next thing you know, the resident Meer Cat will be claiming to be human.

    Are you referring to that one-eyed ferret with the pipe sticking out of his bum?

  78. John Comnenus

    HC won’t find in favour of Pell. If they did find in his favour, why wouldn’t they release him now?

  79. John Comnenus

    Looks like the HC is willing to sacrifice the need for actual evidence over hearsay in an effort to destroy Australia’s most senior Catholic.

  80. woolfe

    They’re trying to force the govt of sovereign nation to make changes to the current Australia-wide policy. That is the connection with the Tampa

    How do you know this? Sounds like they may have been denied entry to a port which is fair enough if not necessary. They are now sitting in international waters close to a 1st world port which is sensible in this situation.

  81. Armadillo

    Are you referring to that one-eyed ferret with the pipe sticking out of his bum?

    That’s the one.

  82. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Australia will withhold the flu shot in order to get our oldies dying at the required rate.’

    *shivers*

  83. areff

    The Orange woman was 67.

    https://www.centralwesterndaily.com.au/story/6708101/woman-in-60s-confirmed-as-first-coronavirus-death-in-orange/?cs=103

    The curious might want to keep an eye on the local rag’s death notices page. Given her age and the known date of her death, it shouldn’t be hard to figure who she is, allowing that her family place an ad.

    https://tributes.centralwesterndaily.com.au/obituaries/centralwesterndaily-au/browse?type=paid

  84. cuckoo

    I’m no statistician, but the government graph of new COVID-19 cases looks to me like we are already well on the downslope of a bell curve. If this is true, I wonder why we don’t hear about it on the news, which instead insists on the overall total increases of current cases.

  85. Chris

    Sometimes I am just furious that the ABC doesn’t have comments under articles like the Australian. Then I remember the shithole that The Drum website became before they closed it in disgust.

  86. Bear Necessities

    Can the HC direct the case to retried?

  87. The Beer Whisperer

    Is the Chinese government going out of its way to spread the Chinese virus?

    It certainly looks like it.

  88. Fat Tony

    notafan – If I wanted to hear from an arsehole, I’d fart.
    Fuck off, Witchfinder General

  89. bespoke

    Just escorted the wife to the shops picked up some TP for us and the kids no jackboots in sight.
    ‘Going to the shops’ is not something I should have to do in a first world country. I blame Arky

  90. min

    I am in isolation ,only see others when I walk in the park or collect mail .Everyone that comes into building is temperature tested so wondering if this lifestyle will also prevent flu.

  91. JC

    But bespoke, the stores have been stripped bare, especially in the countryside. Ronery told us so yesterday.

  92. Farmer Gez

    The bad news is South Korea is just bumping along the bottom with new cases at around 100.

    What has been achieved as the virus is still present and any lifting of restrictions will see it jump up again?

    A vaccine is the answer but we can’t wait for that. We’re playing a losing game in order to save elderly lives and protect medical facilities from being overrun.

    More ICU’s, create new virus wards and test as many as possible is the only sensible strategy.

    Dan Andrews has the police chasing ordinary law abiding citizens while Victoria has the worst testing ratio in the country. ‘Costing lives’ indeed.

  93. It certainly looks like it.

    Of course. Getting good value out of the deliberate release is imperative.
    It won’t last forever.

  94. Bdf

    The growth of confirmed cases appears to be slowing at a statistically significant rate. Australia as a whole is trending down from a peak growth rate on the 21st March, as are NSW, QLD, and Vic individually. This important development is woefully undereported where the focus is on total new cases and deaths instead.

    Even NY where catastophists continually point to and declare a doubling etc is showing a strong decline in growth rates of both confirmed cases as well as deaths.

    From all of the examples we have seen so far it appears this virus peaks quickly and declines almost as quickly.

  95. calli

    I made the same observation as James Woods about four weeks ago.

  96. Infidel Tiger

    They are so furious in WA that the stats aren’t going nuts that they have now opened testing to whoever feels like getting one.

    By hook or by crook, we will get there!

  97. I blame Arky

    Well he is a self-confessed Armadildo eater.

  98. C.L.

    Pell decision next Tuesday

    Does this flagging of a decision five days hence (during a pandemic) signify that a) his appeal has been rejected and, ergo, there is now rush to release him? Or b) they are finalising the complex case still and wish to assure interested parties that they don’t have much longer to wait?

  99. calli

    The Little Virus That Could.

  100. jupes

    The growth of confirmed cases appears to be slowing at a statistically significant rate.

    Confirmed cases are meaningless. We don’t how many have it who haven’t been tested.

    The only reliable stats are deaths and deaths / million of population and even those aren’t reliable in many countries.

  101. Tel

    They are so furious in WA that the stats aren’t going nuts that they have now opened testing to whoever feels like getting one.

    Walk into a classroom and start testing the kids in school, you will find heaps.

  102. woolfe

    In Cat shopping news I went to my local IGA at 7 am and got 4 rolls toilet paper (limited per customer) , mince, chicken breasts, pasta, some sauces, camembert, smoked salmon, sliced ham and a Terry’s Orange.

    Terry’s orange seems to have been lost on the way home.

  103. jupes

    Does this flagging of a decision five days hence (during a pandemic) signify that a) his appeal has been rejected and, ergo, there is now rush to release him? Or b) they are finalising the complex case still and wish to assure interested parties that they don’t have much longer to wait?

    Smart money is on a).

  104. Ed Case

    A vaccine is the answer but we can’t wait for that. We’re playing a losing game in order to save elderly lives and protect medical facilities from being overrun.

    Being a tad hysterical? Medical facilities aren’t being overrun, they]re laying off casuals because it’s so quiet.

  105. jupes

    The case is only complex if you try to find holes in the defence case. Blind Freddy can see the holes in the prosecution’s.

  106. Tim Neilson

    I’m no statistician, but the government graph of new COVID-19 cases looks to me like we are already well on the downslope of a bell curve. If this is true, I wonder why we don’t hear about it on the news, which instead insists on the overall total increases of current cases.

    The graph looks nothing like the numbers they report each day.

    It’s hard to make an exact match because sometimes they report 6am to 6am daily cases, and at other times 3pm to 3pm, but in either case the graph seems lower than the reported numbers over the last few days.

    Can anyone reconcile the graph with the numbers?

  107. Farmer Gez

    Terry’s Orange.

    Bloody Terry’s Orange!
    I had to read that Pommy book to the kids over and over again.

    Dougal the Garbage Dump Bear (Matt Dray) was a cracker of an Aussie yarn which we all enjoyed.

  108. Ed Case

    Without oldsters and hypochondriacs clogging up the casualty plus closure of pubs and clubs and cancellation of elective surgery hospitals are like ghost towns.

  109. Nick

    My mail on GP is that the HC won’t release him early without having made a public decision first

  110. C.L.

    The case is only complex if you try to find holes in the defence case. Blind Freddy can see the holes in the prosecution’s.

    Yes, I realise that but it takes time to write up several judgements in a case with precedent repercussions of this magnitude. It’s not just a thumbs-up/thumbs down process. This is forever. Previously on this forum, a few people have said the HC would tend to release a man ASAP while undertaking to publish the findings on a given furure date. Especially now, that rings true. Ergo: the appeal has almost certainly been rejected. Any lawyers with knowledge on conventions on this – please weigh in.

  111. C.L.

    My mail on GP is that the HC won’t release him early without having made a public decision first

    Thanks, Nick.
    What’s the thinking behind that?

  112. bespoke

    incoherent rambler
    #3388999, posted on April 2, 2020 at 12:15 pm
    I blame Arky

    Well he is a self-confessed Armadildo eater.

    This isn’t a family blog you can say what is really going on between them.

    Maybe not it’s to disgusting to even type.

  113. DavidH

    Re flu shots. Our GP’s office rang and offered to make an appointment for all 3 of us to get the shots. We booked for next week. So not everyone refusing to do it.

  114. Bdf

    Agree Jupes. The confirmed cases are simply the minimum number of cases. Which means you can infer the death rates quoted to be a maximum rate.

  115. Can anyone reconcile the graph with the numbers?

    Nope.

    Have the numbers been homogenized?

  116. The Beer Whisperer

    jupes
    #3389005, posted on April 2, 2020 at 12:17 pm
    The growth of confirmed cases appears to be slowing at a statistically significant rate.

    Confirmed cases are meaningless. We don’t how many have it who haven’t been tested.

    No, Hypes, they’ve made a huge narrative about case deaths being equal to infected deaths.

    Therefore, seconds before you test positive to Wuhan bioengineered flu, you didn’t have it. Because you hadn’t been tested yet.

    That’s a hell of a lot of piss they’re passing off as rain.

  117. Nick

    What’s the thinking behind that?

    With such a high profile case and an appeal, they will need to give strong justification for any release. That could only come from their formal decision.

    My nail could be wrong, though it sounds logical. It comes from an old friend of GP’s.

  118. dover_beach

    Roger – regarding morphine
    What you said is the standard operating procedure.
    What i said is what actually happened – I was there.

    If the death certificate reads ‘Liver Cancer’, in Roger’s scenario, the palliative measures are used to ease pain as the cancer takes its course so the certificate is accurate; whereas, in your example, if the patient is given an unusually large dose of morphine, beyond what would normally be given in any gradual increased dosage, then the death certificate is inaccurate, and should read death by euthanasia. But how does this help us understand whether someone with cancer (co-morbidity), who maybe going through chemo and whose immune system is compromised, catches Wuhan flu, dies? Does it really matter isolating any one cause? Lots of people who contract viral infections, and are severely weakened by them, often catch secondary bacterial infections and die. Does it really matter isolating a single cause in those instances or should we treat them as deaths arising from multiple causes?

  119. Leo G

    If this is true, I wonder why we don’t hear about it on the news, which instead insists on the overall total increases of current cases.

    I think perhaps the media is reflecting the apprehension in the public hospital system.
    They are expecting a large increase in clinical cases (and consequential serious case loads) just from the current number of active cases. This differs from otherwise similar situations that occur regularly with major influenza outbreaks- by the higher proportion of serious cases and the degree of risk to hospital workers.

  120. jupes

    My mail on GP is that the HC won’t release him early without having made a public decision first

    It’s been weeks. War and Peace was written in less time than this.

  121. NoFixedAddress

    Fat Tony
    #3388947, posted on April 2, 2020 at 11:39 am

    Roger – regarding morphine
    What you said is the standard operating procedure.
    What i said is what actually happened – I was there.

    Same Fat Tony

    Father had lung cancer and a morphine pump ‘thingy’. District Nurse came around and regulated it for him.
    I was holding his hand, the poor old bugger.

  122. Some History

    Nitwits gotta nitwit

    Cancer Council WA calls out alcohol industry for opportunistic marketing during COVID-19 pandemic

    https://www.miragenews.com/cancer-council-wa-calls-out-alcohol-industry-for-opportunistic-marketing-during-covid-19-pandemic/

  123. WDYSIA

    I’m afraid I agree with you, C.L. If the appeal was successful, they would have let him out now and handed down their reasons later. The only other possibility is that he has been released very quietly and secretly but given the Victorian prison system leaks like a sieve, we would have heard about that by now. No, I think his appeal has been rejected. I would be very surprised, however, if it were a unanimous decision. I suspect one judge at least will find in his favour and I would be disappointed if that particular judge didn’t.

  124. dover_beach

    I’m so far past trying to predict the decisions of Courts.

  125. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The High Court will hand down its judgment on George Pell’s appeal next Tuesday.

    The court announced today it would be delivered in Brisbane, offering the cardinal a final chance at freedom.

    There are several options that could flow from the judgment, including potential early release, or even being referred back to the Victorian Court of Appeal.

    From the Oz.

  126. Geriatric Mayfly

    Is the betting market open on the Pell case? My $750 bonus from Scottie has just come through. It’s either this wager, or down to the pokie.

  127. Graham

    The Pell appeal decision will be handed down on Tuesday 7 April at 10.00 am. The High Court has announced this.
    For all the dark conspiracy theorists out there, I would say that this is a very expedited delivery of judgment by the High Court given that the hearing will have been less than 4 weeks earlier. Complex judgments would not ordinarily be written in less time.
    I remain of the view having read the transcript of the hearing that the most likely outcome is 7 to nil in favour of upholding the appeal and entering an acquittal.
    I hope my confidence is not misplaced.
    That is not to say that the ABC won’t tip a bucket of slime over him tonight in their programme – which I refuse to watch as a matter of principle. It should have no impact on the judgment.

  128. Farmer Gez

    If Pell is not acquitted then the written ruling from the HC will be quite a read.
    Their justification for the dismissal of reasonable doubt would be a landmark in the law, though we’re now used to our rights and freedoms under the law being erased with a media conference.

  129. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From jupes at 12:33 pm:

    ” My mail on GP is that the HC won’t release him early without having made a public decision first

    It’s been weeks. War and Peace was written in less time than this.”

    This is the High Court, jupes. It can take months, many months. People confuse their expectations and their impatience with reality. 😉

  130. Graham

    The Pell appeal announcement is on the High Court of Australia Twitter page.

  131. lotocoti

    Things aren’t looking too flash in Ecuador.

  132. Infidel Tiger

    The Vibe Court will come up with something ridiculous. These are not serious jurists.

    Pell is going to die in jail.

  133. jupes

    For all the dark conspiracy theorists out there, I would say that this is a very expedited delivery of judgment by the High Court given that the hearing will have been less than 4 weeks earlier. Complex judgments would not ordinarily be written in less time.

    Oh, and here’s me thinking that HC judges were the best and smartest of the legal profession.

    I remain of the view having read the transcript of the hearing that the most likely outcome is 7 to nil in favour of upholding the appeal and entering an acquittal.

    We can only hope. But if that is the case, then they should have released him as soon as they came to that decision, in reality that was probably before the appeal had finished. Depriving a man of his liberty so they can write some lovely words is fucking criminal. (Well it would be if I did it).

  134. C.L.

    This short piece at First Things by Professor Carl R. Trueman is one of the most profound and beautifully written about this time: Deaths Delayed.

    He gets at something I’ve been feeling about what’s really going on here.

  135. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    Now I see this from Graham at 12:38 pm:

    “The Pell appeal decision will be handed down on Tuesday 7 April at 10.00 am. The High Court has announced this.

    … I would say that this is a very expedited delivery of judgment by the High Court given that the hearing will have been less than 4 weeks earlier. Complex judgments would not ordinarily be written in less time.

    (paragraph omitted because I don’t want to be disappointed)

    I hope my confidence is not misplaced.

    That is not to say that the ABC won’t tip a bucket of slime over him tonight in their programme – which I refuse to watch as a matter of principle. It should have no impact on the judgment.”

    I pray for His Eminence.

  136. jupes

    This is the High Court, jupes. It can take months, many months. People confuse their expectations and their impatience with reality. 😉

    I get that Mick. I just like to rail against it.

    The legal industry has conditioned people to accept the massively long time to conduct investigations, court cases and judgments as best practice. I don’t, it ridiculous and unacceptable.

  137. All those people done in by terrorists.
    Woulda died anyway.

  138. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Oh, and here’s me thinking that HC judges were the best and smartest of the legal profession.

    That’s an old fashioned view of the legal system, jupes.

  139. Fat Tony

    NoFixedAddress
    #3389037, posted on April 2, 2020 at 12:34 pm
    Fat Tony
    #3388947, posted on April 2, 2020 at 11:39 am
    Roger – regarding morphine
    What you said is the standard operating procedure.
    What i said is what actually happened – I was there.
    Same Fat Tony
    Father had lung cancer and a morphine pump ‘thingy’. District Nurse came around and regulated it for him.
    I was holding his hand, the poor old bugger.

    There’s a difference, isn’t there NFA, between those who have actually been there and the “experts”.
    Even though losing them is terrible, seeing them suffer like that – wasting away in front of you – is worse.

    dover beach: Does it really matter isolating a single cause in those instances or should we treat them as deaths arising from multiple causes?
    Yes, you are correct. And some of those deaths bring blessed relief to all concerned.

  140. Geriatric Mayfly

    Already ordered. Multiple water coolers for the ABC to be installed by next Tuesday. Automatically serve only two at a time and will be placed at socially respectable distances. Wretchedness or elation will be shared between coolers by electronic devices.

  141. Rex Mango

    Golden rule of the legal profession is self preservation. Cases, virii like expand to consume all available money. High profile case like GP means plenty of dollars on offer & High Court will kick it back to Vic Court of Appeal so the lawyer’s picnic can continue. Besides, too many judial reputations at stake.

  142. Infidel Tiger

    How’s the China Century working out for everyone?

  143. John Comnenus

    SCOMO, the Premiers and their Departments of Health are offering a steady diet of panic inducing fear by concentrating on the almost irrelevant number of new cases. The real issue is how close are we to overwhelming the Public Health System? On that point they have nothing to say and no one seems to know, and if they do, they certainly aren’t telling us..

    I was speaking to a local very senior State Health Dept bureaucrat (who is a clinician) who can’t believe what is happening. In the largest hospital in the area the ED is empty and the place is like a morgue with little to do. He thinks the current measures are an over reaction and I think there are 6 COVID cases locally that have shut down the whole health system. Private companies are being contracted to build temporary ED when the actual one is at almost 0% utilisation.

    Note, I do not dispute the disease is serious and things needed to be done. It is the economy crushing measures post 22 March that I am referring to. The measures pre 22 March seemed targeted and effective. We will never be told if they were working or not before SCOMO and the Premiers implemented the measures that caused the depression we had to have.

  144. Mother Lode

    The Judges in the HC would usually be sharp enough to see through tendentious programs from the ABC. I don’t think tonight’s steaming turd will have any effect, but for some reason they feel the need to keep heaping muck on the Cardinal – it would hardly be a pressing matter if they were confident the appeal would be rejected.

    The judges are ruling on whether the trial already held, not whatever new case the ABC is trying to drum up.

  145. bespoke

    C.L.
    #3389056, posted on April 2, 2020 at 12:47 pm

    Cheers CL. I read it all if that means anything.

  146. Geriatric Mayfly

    The judges are ruling on whether the trial already held, not whatever new case the ABC is trying to drum up.

    Exactly. The minute Mizzzz Judd tried to shift the goal posts ever so slightly, she copped a whack from the Bench.

  147. JC

    I thought as much. If you need to go onto one of those contraptions, you’re basically a corona-bug stiff in waiting.

    ANDREW CUOMO: ‘Four fifths of coronavirus patients who need ventilators will end up dead.’ “Governor Cuomo said: (The New York coronavirus death toll) is people who have been on a ventilator for a period of time. ‘If you go on a ventilator there is only a 20% chance you will come off it.’”

    So why’s he making such a big deal about ventilators?

  148. John Comnenus

    If Pell is released I expect the Victorian Stasi Police to arrest and charge him again straight away. Dan and his thug police and their left winger boosters intend to kill Pell.

  149. Infidel Tiger

    Sarah McCammonRadio
    @sarahmccammon

    There is no longer AM and PM. There is just “coffee time” and “wine time.”

  150. Fat Tony

    Mother Lode
    #3389072, posted on April 2, 2020 at 12:59 pm

    Maybe the ABC is trying to work up a frenzied mob to attack and injure/kill the Cardinal if he is released.

  151. JC

    jupes
    #3389074, posted on April 2, 2020 at 1:00 pm

    Donald Trump Responds to Illegals Not Getting Stimulus Checks: ‘They Came in Illegally’

    Wow. Imagine living in a world where that has to be explained to people.

    You know, his answer wasn’t tough sounding. He sounded worried about how these people get through this too. He recognized they’re illegal and also gave recognition to their plight.

  152. feelthebern

    From the Oz.

    About 16,000 Australians flew out of the country in the fortnight after Scott Morrison told everyone not to go overseas, triggering calls for defiant international travellers to foot the bill for their forced quarantine when they return home.

    The Australian can reveal the 16,000 citizens went overseas by plane between March 19 and 30 even though the Prime Minister gave a very clear instruction to “not travel abroad” on March 18.

    In addition, 3800 Australians flew out from March 25-30 after an official ban on all overseas travel came into force on March 24.

    I wonder if all these travellers realise that travel insurance doesn’t cover them costs incurred by coronavirus.

  153. Dan of the Dead and the Vikstasi will be too busy checking to see if Viktoristanis are porking their girlfriends to be bothered with the Pell case.

  154. areff

    If Pell is released I expect the Victorian Stasi Police to arrest and charge him again straight away

    Hence the latest ABC crap dump, just to put the acquittal — if such be the case — “in perspective”.

    Notice, too, that it’s being helmed by Ms Ferguson, rather than Catholic-Horrors Roundswoman Milligan. Makes it look independent that way

  155. jupes

    Lol. This is comedy gold from the great man: Check out all the backhanders.

    President Donald Trump said Wednesday at the White House that he would welcome a phone call from former Vice President Joe Biden about fighting the coronavirus.

    Trump was asked by a reporter at the White House press briefing room whether he would speak with Biden.

    “Absolutely,” Trump replied. “I’d love to speak with him too … I always found him to be a nice guy, I don’t know him very well frankly, but I think he’s probably a nice guy.

    The president indicated, however, that the Vice President should call him, not the other way around.

    “If he’d like to call, I’d absolutely take his call,” Trump said. “You can tell him.”

    Biden’s campaign told Fox News reporter Brooke Singman that the former Vice President was willing to speak with him about defeating the coronavirus.

    “Did he write the statement or did some PR person write it?” Trump asked reporters in the briefing room, regarding the Biden outreach.

    On Tuesday night, Biden said that Trump should call former President Barack Obama to ask him about how to handle pandemics.

    But Trump previously indicated that he would not be calling Obama or Bush about the coronavirus

    “I don’t want to disturb them, bother them. I don’t think that I’m going to learn much,” Trump said last week, adding, “There’s probably a natural inclination not to call.”

  156. feelthebern

    The media prefer the “human tragedy” angle of these selfish fools.
    They real story is they need to be used as examples.

  157. Real Deal

    This short piece at First Things by Professor Carl R. Trueman is one of the most profound and beautifully written about this time: Deaths Delayed.

    He gets at something I’ve been feeling about what’s really going on here

    Thanks so much for the link, CL. I’ve read Professor Trueman on and off for some years. He has the great gift of at the same time confirming my biases and challenging my prejudices. Not bad for a Presbyterian!

  158. thefrollickingmole

    It is possible for a person to be palliative cared to death.
    Pain relief is titrated to achieve pain relief, preferably without killing them.
    It’s not uncommon for the amounts of morphine used to deliberately lower a persons consciousness level because semiconscious is closest to controlled the pain will get.
    Very little deterioration is needed to tip them over.

  159. Farmer Gez

    Infidel Tiger
    #3389070, posted on April 2, 2020 at 12:57 pm
    How’s the China Century working out for everyone?

    Gold!

  160. jupes

    He recognized they’re illegal and also gave recognition to their plight.

    Sure, he’s a compassionate man. They’re still not getting any money though.

  161. Pedro the Loafer

    Country supermarkets (at least in WA) were not “stripped bare”, but they were invaded by city dwelling locusts who bought up all the toilet paper, hand sanitiser, bath soap rice, pasta, flour, and made a huge hole in the tinned foods and frozen vegetable sections. This was particularly rife in the Wheatbelt, South West and Mid West regions, all being closest to Perth on good highways.

    While the panic buying was happening the supermarkets did not have purchase limits and were obliged to sell to anyone with the money to pay, so the locusts got away with it.

    That sparked locals into snapping up all the above mentioned goods as soon as the weekly supply truck came in and so the shortages continued.

    It seems that the panic buying has eased, although hand sanitiser is still unobtainable and bog roll only appears in limited quantities, and shelves are slowly being re-stocked to full capacity.

    The travel ban between local government regions in WA will help smooth out the dips in the supply chain with the police and Army manning checkpoints and turning back non essential travellers.

    A startling revelation of just how thin is the veneer of civilisation in multi-culti Australia.

  162. notafan

    Nice piece at first things CL.

    I’m not frightened by covid19 or panicking or any such thing. (I have far more important things to worry about)

    I accept that it will result in the hastened death of many and the vunerable ones in my family have been protected, as far as possible.

    All I’ve been saying it is a real pandemic and you are right the government response is probably driven by no one must ever die accept in circumstances of their own choosing (dan dan euthanasiasing man)

    But we still have, or should have, a culture that doesn’t throw the weak off cliffs or dismiss the death of the sick elderly because they are past their use by date.

  163. Helen

    I demand another forum. These forums are not mutating fast enough! Thanks, Sinc!

    From OT

    OK cannonball run to town. One checkpoint manned by a girl in morning, who was waving trucks through with out checking them, but wanted my Dl, my pass for essential person on letterhead, and wanted to know where and how far away the property was.

    Coming back, boy checked me, didn’t want my DL, just the letter saying I was essential was sufficient. The other boy was snoring gently ion the warm afternoon shade.

    Picked up my Woolies order (limited to 2 of pretty much anything) some things are ones but they dont have them anyhow, then went around the front door and got 2 more of whatever I needed, like bags of spuds. Noticed the TP shelves completely empty, no tissues, no paper towel. No Glen 20 or anything like that that you could disinfect a surface with. Didn’t need any as I had managed to score 20 L of sanitiser/disinfectant from my wholesaler that day, and got 2 ctns of TP the week before.

    Got some more bread from Brumbies, then headed to the bottlo, where only 10 were allowed in at a time. One out, one in. The girl Police person wanted to know where the station was, how far away what road was I going directly there. I am used to the bottlo DL thing as we have had this for many years now, trying to control the problem drinkers. The aboriginal man ahead of me was even more closely questioned.

    I was a bit jittery there wouldn’t be much in there. When I was picking up my bush-order I noticed the cage where they have all the spare grog supplies was practically bare, but there seemed to be the usual on the shelves in the shop itself. We are limited to 12 of wine of all varieties, 4 of spirits I think 1 of fortified and 1 slab of beer per visit. So I got a dozen reds and 4L of Jamesons, because the 750 ml bottles were sold out.

    Returned back through the checkpoint again and home. Madness.

    All our staff are here now, the last arrived last night. As of midnight last night every single person coming into the NT needs a permit from the Chief Medical Officer.

    My son in law and also my son are desperately trying to save their businesses, one will have to let staff go.

    It is a total root. People who dont live in the real world making decisions that they have no idea how the real private world will react to and are thoroughly surprised when the market (business) reacts the way it does. I find the disconnect utterly astounding.

  164. Helen

    From OT

    It occurred to me if we are going to split death out into died with vs died of, that the same must be applied to normal flu – died with vs died of. We cannot do for one which we dont do for the other.

  165. Helen

    From OT

    They are going to drag this on for years.

    Yep, they wont let that bone they are chewing go in a hurry.

  166. Helen

    From OT

    We should know when our hibernation ends.

    Dead right John. We are told – not asked for trust and there is no attempt to show us the plan and ask us to go on that journey. If we could see the plan we might agree.

    I worry they dont actually have a plan.

  167. Anthony

    What should be most important to the HC judges will be their ‘place’ in history. I pray they are not as stupid as the members of the judiciary who displayed such unbelievable stupidity in the original trial and appeal.

  168. jupes

    Wow. This is a surprise.

    Rock musician Sean Lennon, the son of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, is slamming the news media for its coverage of the coronavirus pandemic, saying that they are spreading Chinese Communist propaganda and engaging in double standards.

  169. C.L.

    About 16,000 Australians flew out of the country in the fortnight after Scott Morrison told everyone not to go overseas, triggering calls for defiant international travellers to foot the bill for their forced quarantine when they return home.

    Because they’re the major beneficiaries of state-paid bills these days.

  170. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From jupes at 12:50 pm:

    ” This is the High Court, jupes. It can take months, many months. People confuse their expectations and their impatience with reality. 😉

    I get that Mick. I just like to rail against it.”

    Good!😋

    “The legal industry has conditioned people to accept the massively long time to conduct investigations, court cases and judgments as best practice. I don’t, it ridiculous and unacceptable.”

    Yes³.

  171. JC

    You really have to think there’s a possibility we’re living in a simulation. Almost 100 years to the year and there’s another pandemic.

  172. bespoke

    A all to rare but rational commentary, Peter

    👍

  173. areff

    Free childcare now! Lemmings.

  174. bundyrum

    Just looking at that flight radar site, I notice an Air China flight due to arrive from Shanghai into Sydney just after 2pm….WTF.
    Maybe it is just bringing in a top up of ALDI bags?

  175. Farmer Gez

    My wife did a victory lap after returning home with an 8 pack, yes that’s right, of Sorbent long roll.
    The other women she elbowed across the nose is doing OK they say.

  176. Sinclair Davidson

    Pell judgement being handed down next Tuesday at 10am.

  177. JC

    Pedro

    A couple of points.

    1. Ronery made the comment that supermarket shelves in rural districts are currently bare. That is patently false. There are continuing shortages of this or that, but on the whole there is plenty of food and basic needs on shelves – even in non-urban areas like where I am at the moment.

    2. Because I live in the city for the most part, we have to also shop in this non-urban locality too in order to live. I don’t consider it an issue if we’re down here and need to stock up. The locals can fuck themselves for all I care and I don’t care.

    3. Although I find behavior a few weeks ago of people hunting around for grocery items in rural areas questionable, you should also take stock of what you and others are implying. Those stacked shelves DO NOT belong to you or anyone else because of your residential postcode. You have as much claim as anyone else – either with straight out cash or a plastic card.

  178. Leigh Lowe

    JC

    #3389104, posted on April 2, 2020 at 1:17 pm

    You really have to think there’s a possibility we’re living in a simulation. Almost 100 years to the year and there’s another pandemic.

    We have had four decent outbreaks in the last century.
    1918/19.
    1957.
    1968.
    2020.
    Almost without doubt, all originated in China due to co-mingling of incompatible farm/food animals, primitive slaughtering practices and rubbish food hygene.

  179. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Beach Swimmer
    #3388877, posted on April 2, 2020 at 10:47 am

    those cruise ships sheltering in Australian waters. We can do something to help, and morally should do so.

    Lizzie, they’re not sheltering, like in a storm. They’re attempting to do what the Tampa tried to do, which another poster pointed out further up the thread. Unless there are really sick people on board who need to be in intensive care, we are not required to assist. And nor should we, apart from provisioning the ship, but that’s all.

    They are sheltering as in a storm, a viral storm. Some may have been refused entry elsewhere (I am not up on these details). The Tampa was picking up ‘refugees’ and is irrelevant here in a time of world pandemic: a plane crash in our waters is the better comparitor. We should help where we can. I am pleased some doctors are being sent on board now to test the sick and treat them. International diplomatic efforts also should be being made regarding their home ports. I read that three of these ships were registered in NSW.

    The hatred towards and denigration of people who have enjoyed cruises is fairly extreme here at the moment

    I don’t see hatred of this cohort here. I see reasonable people pointing out the true situation: we are being forcibly locked down; we can not visit anyone; we are being moved on from doing the most everyday things. People have lost their jobs and businesses have been forcibly closed because of this. Whether the govt is right or wrong, no-one knows as yet. But the one thing we do know is that it is costly, extremely costly, for everyone. While we’re in uncharted waters, so to speak, those cruise ships are not. They know where their home ports are and they should go.

    If you don’t see the hatred being expressed here towards people who take cruises then you are not looking very hard. A lot of the more vicious commentary is far from reasonable; it is shamful and barbaric (and note that Calli used that latter term, not me, the approved bete noir here). Our world may be currently stalled but we are a rich country, a supposedly civilised one, and we do have responsibilities towards others in a crisis. We would help in a tsunami, or an earthquake, and we are not yet beyond offering help to these people in whatever way we can, through diplomacy, through flying some of the most needy to quarantine on Christmas Island, through reprovisioning and medical aid, or even through putting them up for a fortnight in army camps before sending them on their way by air, all of which they pay for if and when they can. We are not short of planes and pilots to fly them home. lol

    They cop though the usual tall poppy syndrome at play

    This is not a tall poppy syndrome. The average Australian is sick and tired of a particular group of people having one rule for them and another for everyone else. Mostly it’s because they flaunt their supposed moral superiority over the plebs. These are the very people with education, abilities and experience and who are the ones that make the policies and regulations for everyone else.

    You need to demonstrate more fully that the rules have been differentially applied regarding quarantine. The real issue is that the public health providers have been acting like chooks with lost heads. They have not put in place useful quarantine protocols. They were clearly most unserious about it when we flew in on the 25th March. They could easily have put big obvious red tag bracelets on people in quarantine, which would have signal to anyone if quarantine was being broken, and offered a pamphlet stressing the importance of it, with teeth in it against those who break it. Most people would have been better off quarantined in their own homes, with far less risk of cross-infection than in airless hotels.

    What you are noting with this situation is that people everywhere are distressed. Blaming particular groups of people is what happens when social distress reaches a peak. Australians have historically tried to pull down others to one level – the ‘egalitarian mateship’ ethos – and this is a good thing if achievement is still recognised – but not a good thing in a fracturing crisis when social groups are turned against social groups. Putting political blinkers on to this distress is what happens and what is happening here with the ‘tall poppy’ anguishing we see going on. If people hate the virtue signalling of The Left, they should make it clear that it is the left they wish to attack, nor just ordinary people who are citizens going on cruises and otherwise expressing their rights as free citizens until edicts emerge curtailing these rights.

    their business selling cruises is legitimate, and as I have pointed out earlier, the passengers from the cruise conference they organised actually flew in BEFORE the cut off date for permitting home isolation

    This does not get them off the hook. The China Pestilence has been on the radar for weeks; at least since the end of February. I had a couple of conversations with friends, who despite the situation at hand were still going overseas. These are much older people than me, people whose age group and health would make them the right demographic for getting complications from the disease, but they wouldn’t change their plans.

    What ‘hook’? See the above about free citizens in a free society. I went on a cruise, as was my right at the time. We returned after completing some of it, and after visiting an elderly relative who was anxiously awaiting our visit. We have not charged the Australian taxpayer a cent for it, and have willingly paid exorbitant fares to return. We are currently doing well inside our front door.

    These passengers, who happened to be medical workers (and thus subject here and elsewhere to a disgraceful ‘tall poppy’ ire), were caught in a nightmare of bureaucratic misunderstandings about the timing of the edict and have every right to feel distressed by that

    No, they were hoisted on their own petard, despite the bureaucratic antics. They have no more right to feel distressed than everyone else in Australia. While they’ve been momentarily stymied most everyone else have years of rebuilding ahead of them.

    Again, they were free citizens in a free society, not hoist on any petard but messed around and put into social ire and ‘blaming’ due to bureaucratic ineptitude. They became subject to extreme and unwarranted vilification through no fault of their own, and merely because of who the hating groups thought that they were. They were claiming NO special privileges, but were shouted from the rooftops as having done so. This. Is. Wrong. It is simple psychological deflection by people here who should know better.

    Also – Winston.
    Pointing out the complexity of a situation and calling out the sheer brutality of “I’m all right Jack” barbarism is not virtue-signalling. It is being honest and living by the standards that I have found worked in a long life living in many different circumstances and seeing the behaviour of people in times of crisis and distress. If that sounds precious, then so be it.

    If you doubt my starting point in life, definitely not in the ‘tall poppy’ class, then I refer you to my essay ‘On Becoming Elizabeth’ in Quadrant 2018.

    This crisis will pass soon enough, and recriminations will be deserved and plentiful.
    I just don’t want to support the unnecessary adding to them here. These people on our seas have done nothing wrong nor have those who had a quarantine edict sprung on them before it was even due.

  180. JC

    Leigh

    Sure, but the really big one where there was a semblance of lockdowns and the crap we’re going through was the Spanish flu, no?

  181. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    This was particularly rife in the Wheatbelt, South West and Mid West regions, all being closest to Perth on good highways.

    Brookton, Denmark, Moora, Merredin, Jurien Bay, Lancelin, Bindoon, Pemberton, Manjimup, Nannup, Harvey and Toodyay. Indeed.

  182. Leigh Lowe

    Notice, too, that it’s being helmed by Ms Ferguson, rather than Catholic-Horrors Roundswoman Milligan. Makes it look independent that way

    I wondered about that.
    Is it a case of the ageing dowager getting a trifle shitty that the upstart at court is drawing the spotlight?

  183. Leigh Lowe

    JC

    #3389120, posted on April 2, 2020 at 1:36 pm

    Leigh

    Sure, but the really big one where there was a semblance of lockdowns and the crap we’re going through was the Spanish flu, no?

    It is called the “Spanish flu” only because the most publicized sufferer was the King of Spain.
    That 1918/19 one originated either in China or around a hospital in France during WW1. It is considered more likely to have originated in China.
    The 1957 and 1968 pandemics definitely originated in China (one was called “Hong Kong Flu”).

  184. JC

    Do we really have to go back to the tape? Okay lets.

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #3387871, posted on April 1, 2020 at 4:40 pm

    Even renting buses to travel far and wide to communities already struggling

    My local member cites a dozen country supermarkets as being stripped here, in the Wild West.

    Present tense, not past and this applied to supermarkets across the country as people began to hoard. Presently, there are no great shortages of anything.

    There are no supermarkets in the country that have been stripped bare in the past week or so.

  185. Mother Lode

    why wouldn’t they release him now?

    The law is fraught with procedures and protocols and, to paraphrase Othello, ‘the pride, pomp and circumstance of glorious law’.

    There would be proper procedures that need to be undergone, and people who have made it to the pinnacle of law in Australia would be heavily invested in seeing juridical integrity maintained. And likely more than a little inclined to the theatrics of the stately and majestic, unhurried pace of justice – in the person of their esteemed selves.

  186. Dr Faustus

    We have had four decent outbreaks in the last century.

    We had a fairly decent outbreak in 2009 with the (H1N1)pdm09 Swine Flu.

    CDC estimated that 151,700-575,400 people worldwide died from (H1N1)pdm09 virus infection during the first year the virus circulated.** Globally, 80 percent of (H1N1)pdm09 virus-related deaths were estimated to have occurred in people younger than 65 years of age.

    Not specifically traced to China, but the same turd world conditions contributed to its creation.
    Our problem now is we have set a trouser-filling precedent with C19 that we won’t be able to repeat in 10 years when the next one comes along.

  187. The Beer Whisperer

    This short piece at First Things by Professor Carl R. Trueman is one of the most profound and beautifully written about this time: Deaths Delayed.

    He gets at something I’ve been feeling about what’s really going on here.

    I said basically that a few weeks ago, that the illusion of living to old age has been shattered.

  188. The Beer Whisperer

    Present tense, not past and this applied to supermarkets across the country as people began to hoard. Presently, there are no great shortages of anything.

    Tell that to the toilet papers kings, JC. I haven’t seen a dunny roll in a supermarket for 6 weeks, with no toilet paper in sight.

  189. Eyrie

    Yep, no point pumping air in and out of your lungs if the alveoli are stuffed as the oxygen doesn’t get into the blood.
    https://www.market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=238757
    The ventilators aren’t for the poor bastards that get on them. They are for the politicians to cover their arses with. “We did everything we could”. Just like the destruction of the West’s economies and way of life in the name of “safety”.

  190. JC

    One other thing. If there was hoarding in the large cities, why should we automatically assume that this didn’t happen in rural areas – with the locals hoarding as well?

    In fact I’ll pose this. The vast amount of hoarding causing supermarkets to go empty were the locals and not anecdotal evidence on twitter of two or three pics of a couple of mini-buses taking people out for a ride to the country for toilet paper supplies.

  191. dover_beach

    This short piece at First Things by Professor Carl R. Trueman is one of the most profound and beautifully written about this time: Deaths Delayed.

    He gets at something I’ve been feeling about what’s really going on here.

    Indeed. It brings to mind Holbein’s The Ambassadors and its memento mori, although these can be found everywhere in medieval and early modern art.

  192. woolfe

    Correct Lizzie,
    I’m really looking forward to the Crane trials. Judges to be rotate through KD and Tail Gunner with maybe a guest appearance from Arky and Armadildo in joint session?

  193. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    Tend to agree with you re the hoarding being mostly locals, JC.

    It is understandable that people wanted desperately to protect their families.
    Now that they feel they have done so, normal supermarkets may be the result.

    Let’s hope.

    And there are always main chancers, profiteers, and carpetbaggers in times of war and pestilence.
    History lessons tell us that.

  194. calli

    anecdotal evidence on twitter of two or three pics of a couple of mini-buses taking people out for a ride to the country for toilet paper supplies.

    It happened here on Tuesday, March 17. I was told by a reliable person.

    On Sunday the shops were full. As they were on Monday. By the time we returned from Sydney on Tuesday afternoon, they were stripped bare.

    The following Monday, I asked a friend what had happened. She told me that on Tuesday, many…many mini-buses came through. She did not know where they came from, except for “Cabramatta” (must have been on the side of one). The locals were dumbfounded.

  195. Infidel Tiger

    More reason to hoard in the bush than the city.

    A mate of mine who runs a station in the Gascoyne is absolutely spewing about the alcohol restrictions.

    It’s a fair drive to get one carton of piss.

  196. Mater

    In fact I’ll pose this. The vast amount of hoarding causing supermarkets to go empty were the locals and not anecdotal evidence on twitter of two or three pics of a couple of mini-buses taking people out for a ride to the country for toilet paper supplies.

    Sorry, JC. We saw it here before COVID19 was really a focus. First came the SUVs with cage trailers with their occupants doing shuttle runs in and out of the store, with trolleys full of toilet paper. As Pedro expressed, no limits at that stage so nobody (including Store Managers) felt they had the legal right to stop them – nor did they wish to be the focus of the next #illshopwithyou episode on ACA.

    The resulting empty shelves started the panic buying, but even then, it was somewhat limited. Locals don’t like getting a bad rep within their own stomping ground. The local FB page would have named and shamed.

    It happened, let’s not try to white wash it.

  197. teddy bear

    Morrixing is now praising china for their handling of the virus…

  198. JC

     Get a load of this. After the fin crisis, the regulators imposed much stricter capital/reserve requirements on the banks to avoid another bank default in a recession.

    The Fed is now loosening up on those regulations because of the recession.

    I’m becoming more convinced than ever that we are in a simulation.

    The Federal Reserve on Wednesday eased rules around how banks account for their supersafe assets, a move meant to boost the flow of credit to cash-strapped consumers and businesses during the coronavirus slowdown.

    The Fed said it would exclude for one-year Treasurys and deposits held at the central bank from banks’ supplementary leverage ratio calculation. The ratio measures capital—funds that banks raise from investors, earn through profits and use to absorb losses—as a percentage of loans and other assets.

    Big U.S. banks must maintain capital equal to at least 3% of all of their assets, including loans, investments and real estate. By holding banks to a minimum ratio, regulators effectively restrict them from making too many loans without increasing their capital levels.

    The banks are sitting on giant stockpiles of cash, U.S. government debt and other safe assets. By tweaking how the ratio is calculated, the Fed is effectively trying to engineer a swap. Remove Treasurys and central bank deposits from the calculation, the thinking goes, and banks should be able to replace them in the asset pool with loans to consumers and businesses.
    Stay Informed

    Get a coronavirus briefing six days a week, and a weekly Health newsletter once the crisis abates: Sign up here.

    The Fed made it clear that tweak is designed to give banks more flexibility to grow their assets rather than shrink their capital by increasing shareholder payouts.

    “Banks have saved their pennies for a rainy day and this is the rainy day,” said Mike Mayo, an analyst at Wells Fargo.

    Relaxing these particular rules likely wouldn’t lead to a buildup of risk in the financial system, said Barclays PLC analyst Jason Goldberg, because both cash and Treasurys are very safe. Before the recent market turmoil, there had been discussion about excluding these assets from the leverage ratio.

    “It certainly doesn’t hurt,” Mr. Goldberg said.

    The Fed also said its move would help prevent further trading hiccups in the market for U.S. Treasurys. Banks’ tight balance sheets have made it difficult for them to act as middlemen in the market in recent weeks, contributing to unusual price swings.

    By relaxing these rules, the Fed is recognizing that despite its historic intervention in the financial markets, banks are still best equipped to keep credit flowing through the economy, analysts say.

    “At this point in time, the Fed needs banks to have bigger balance sheets,” said Brian Kleinhanzl, an analyst at Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Inc.

  199. woolfe

    Looks like the USA maybe going in right direction?
    https://imgur.com/Wxa0SiA

  200. candy

    through flying some of the most needy to quarantine on Christmas Island,

    I agree with you Lizzie, there’s folk out there on ships needing help. Probably not real young and probably needing meds etc.
    Christmas Island could be outfitted and a makeshift hospital built. The Chinese built a hospital in one week. Quarantined, treated, well enough to be flown home.

    Also Christmas Island would be ready for a next pandemic, if the locals are okay with that idea. They did not mind Chinese Australians stranded in Wuhan being sent there – accommodation looks adequate and clean, seems no complaints from anywhere. Turns out to have been a good move.

  201. JC

    Mater

    I’m not denying there was hoarding going on. But please explain to me how you know all those people walking into the supermarkets weren’t locals? There could have been lots of people who own country properties decamping in rural areas.

    Also, the supermarkets aren’t empty anymore, which is the point.

  202. Fisky

    Serious commentators increasingly drawn to bioweapon theory of virus.

    John Blaxland
    @JohnBlaxland1
    So I’ll say it:#Coronavirus could be construed as an eg of“unrestricted warfare”:plausibly-deniable hostile acts below threshold of war to which USA & allies can’t respond kinetically yet imposes crippling consequences.Was it planned that way or just an extraordinary coincidence?

  203. calli

    I did not see it with my own eyes. I wish I had.

    After that, it was just shock. No meat on the shelves at all. All the pasta and tinned goods gone. No paper goods, toothpaste, soap and other necessities. They had gone through like a dose of salts. The big supermarket managers were caught in the hop, as I mentioned a day or two ago, all this stuff is programmed into the warehouse picking.

    So the locals here started buying a little extra, like they do just before the holiday hordes. And strict limits were applied.

  204. Lilliana

    Morrixing is now praising china for their handling of the virus…

    must be worried about a dip in donations

  205. JC

    Calli

    All supermarkets were emptied in the middle of last month. Are they now?

  206. calli

    They did not mind Chinese Australians stranded in Wuhan being sent there –

    They were Australians of all varieties and ages. I watched a number of them interviewed. They were as Chinese as I am.

    I wondered a few days ago if Christmas Island was being kept on stand-by.

  207. JC

    Fisk

    Make a note that all conspiracy theories end with the loaded up open question. You learn this in Conspiracy Theory 101.

  208. NoFixedAddress

    Eyrie
    #3389132, posted on April 2, 2020 at 1:48 pm

    Yep, no point pumping air in and out of your lungs if the alveoli are stuffed as the oxygen doesn’t get into the blood.
    https://www.market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=238757

    Eyrie

    That post needs its own thread

    Sinclair or CL?

    And they are US numbers but it applies here.

    Is it worth destroying the economy, 30% of all small business restaurants and bars, millions of jobs and millions of lives — literal millions folks, not 10,000 or 20,000 — in this attempt? Is it worth the risk of a critical supply chain disruption that leads to mass civil unrest, riots and potential destruction of one or more American cities? Is it worth real martial law — not a “lockdown”? Is it worth the destruction of our civil society, our willingness to be social with other people, the permanent impact on our economy and the inevitable depression, suicides and overdoses?

    And finally, for those of you who think this is all about protecting Granny, listen up:

    There are 2.8 million people in the last year of their life in the United States right now. Some of those people know it’s their last year and some do not. By definition every single person who dies in the next 12 months is in the last year of their life right here, right now.

    These constraints are, right here, right now, today, preventing those people from socializing and spending time with the people they love and would otherwise like to spend that time with.

    In Trump’s 15 days to “slow the spread” over 115,000 Americans died while having had robbed from them the small, simple pleasures of being with the people they love and want to be around by government diktat. If we continue this insanity until April 30th over 345,000 of those people in the last year of their life will have died and they will have been prohibited the social interactions they would otherwise choose.

    Our government — backed by the vast majority of our population and all the scolds on CNBC and elsewhere — are consigning 345,000 people to die literally locked in a prison.

    All of this because you’re not content to take your own precautions and calibrate your own risk. You’re not content to tell people honestly up front that if the health system overloads we will triage and those who are older and are felled by this virus will have to face Brother Grim and then let them make the choice for themselves as adults.

  209. calli

    No, JC. Not here. There was a TP shortage at the end of Feb – my friends and I had a laugh about it. The really serious stuff started in mid-March.

    It seems like aeons ago, doesn’t it?

    If you recall, right at the beginning of Feb Cats were talking about stocking up just in case. I had a two-week window to get up and running. I even had the Beloved buy a couple of packs of Panadol and have the extra scripts filled in. And soap and toothpaste. He wondered why.

    I think it’s been patchy. My kids reported clearing in Sydney at least three weeks before anything happened here.

  210. Mater

    But please explain to me how you know all those people walking into the supermarkets weren’t locals? There could have been lots of people who own country properties decamping in rural areas.

    Sorry mate,
    The cultural mix here is more mono than The Shire. It’s a tight knit community and there is only about two degrees of separation between anybody.

    It happened, and it happened in a big way. Nobody who lives here is denying it, or trying to paper over it. We’ll leave that to The Guardian.

    No, they are not empty anymore, though some severe shortages. However, that doesn’t negate Pedros point about the ‘veneer’ of our society.

  211. JC

    Lastly, 1000’s of scientists have looked into the China Bug and there is zero evidence it was manufactured in a lab. None!

  212. JC

    However, that doesn’t negate Pedros point about the ‘veneer’ of our society.

    The veneer in our society is compounded by the fact that if any large retailer or producer raised prices to counter the demand shock with higher prices the senior executives would be in jail by now.

  213. calli

    Sorry JC. I misinterpreted your question.

    Coles here has plenty of meat and other good things. A bit short of tinned stuff, but manageable. Woollies is a little lighter on. I won’t go to Aldi because it’s a zoo-like cul-de-sac and people refuse to keep their distance. The little independents report good stock numbers. All very little TP, which makes me wonder where it’s all gone as they were producing 24/7.

  214. Tel

    Lastly, 1000’s of scientists have looked into the China Bug and there is zero evidence it was manufactured in a lab. None!

    Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. What were they ‘looking into” exactly? How did they measure the probability of manufacturing, vs natural evolution?

    If they really can measure such a thing, it would mean these doctors have once and for all solved the question of “Intelligent Design” because they can categorically observe the absence of design in a living thing.

  215. Infidel Tiger

    The idiots in charge are talking about the current situation lasting 6 months.

    Good luck self isolators!

  216. Mater

    The veneer in our society is compounded by the fact that if any large retailer or producer raised prices to counter the demand shock with higher prices the senior executives would be in jail by now.

    You may be right, but prices are quite high now. Supply/demand is definitely kicking in.

  217. JC

    Actually there is evidence, Tel. The scientists are all saying it has all the hallmarks of being natural. There are unmistakable telltale signs if it had been made in a lab.

    I don’t dismiss the possibility it got out by accident though.

  218. calli

    That Guardian piece is a hoot.

    Facebook feeds are full of stories about someone’s sister who saw a minibus pull up outside a grocer in Deniliquin, or Kyneton, or Gulgong, but no one has a photo to prove it.

    Yes. Because every shocked local is about to pull out their phone and take a snap. Often, you don’t realise what you’ve just witnessed until you go home and process it.

    Just as well verbal testimony is still permissible in our courts.

  219. Fisky

    Dan Garrett
    @DanGarrett97
    So a hostile, revolutionary anti-Western political entity intent on transforming the world order exports – unintentionally or otherwise – a global pandemic resulting in trillions of dollars of damages, worldwide financial market volatility, unprecedented disruption of the

    Dan Garrett
    @DanGarrett97
    ·
    Mar 30
    Replying to
    @DanGarrett97
    international system, forced decoupling and shuttering of a globalized world, regime destabilization via infection of political leaders and elite, and tens-of-thousands of deaths with the potential for millions, and some people don’t think politics or national security will be

    Dan Garrett
    @DanGarrett97
    ·
    Mar 30
    Replying to
    @DanGarrett97
    part of the discussion – especially when PPE have become a strategic commodity for survival? And that now is not the time to have the discussion (while something can be done about it)? ROFL Come on children …

  220. Infidel Tiger

    Lastly, 1000’s of scientists have looked into the China Bug and there is zero evidence it was manufactured in a lab. None!

    This is demonstrably untrue.

  221. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘You need to demonstrate more fully that rules have been differentially applied regarding quarantine.’

    33 doctors who are too special for normal people, knowing full well what they were required to do, instead giving a giant middle finger to said normies and pissing off to untold locations. Via the Sydney domestic terminal.

    Who went on cruises during a dangerous period of time, which they also knew.

    If Cardimona’s daughter (DIL?) wants to go through to QLD from Vicco she is compelled to do two sets of 14 days in the hole, though.

    The Ruby Princess, its passengers and their administrators are solely responsible for 180 odd confirmed transmissions that we know of, and are one of the big three C19 clusters in this land.

    The Eurotrash on the one off WA have been deliberately vague and contradictory. Of course their owners want to offload their plague rats somewhere else.

    So no. Why should we keep sticking our fingers into that bear trap?

    You mentioned going on your cruise as a right, Lizzie.

    I note you didn’t mention any concomitant responsibility.

  222. Mater

    Yes. Because every shocked local is about to pull out their phone and take a snap. Often, you don’t realise what you’ve just witnessed until you go home and process it.

    Yes! And not to mention that taking unsolicited photos of others is considered rude, and country people tend to concern themselves with their own business (Bob being the exception!).

  223. Knuckle Dragger

    Vaucluse, you say?

    Roddenmarg!

  224. calli

    What were they ‘looking into” exactly?

    Maybe the same way The Guardian “looked into” the stories about daigou.

    Stories from all over the countryside, from many different people, all reporting the same thing. But pictures. I wonder if they write their stories in crayon.

  225. JC

    This is demonstrably untrue.

    Links please.

  226. Mark from Melbourne

    All supermarkets were emptied in the middle of last month. Are they now?

    No, JC, they are certainly not, at least in Toorak. Yoghurt’s a bit short, and rice has yet to make a serious comeback, but most everything else is is full supply.

    But I actually watched about 7 or so strip the canned goods section a couple of weeks ago on a Saturday (?) afternoon. So not second hand in any way. Own eyes. Took them less than half an hour. Probably more like 15 minutes. This was not shopping, it was dragging the whole lot into trolleys. Took them twice as long to check out as it did to “shop”.

    Why, I have absolutely no idea. Because there are only so many canned beans, tomatoes and assorted other crap one could possibly want.

    Luckily, they have left the scotch alone.

  227. Bar Beach Swimmer

    Hi Sinc,
    please check your email.

  228. JC

    Fisk

    That’s a dude in his basement with a twitter feed.

  229. Infidel Tiger

    1000’s of scientist have said they have no idea of its origin, except that it came from China.

    The only consensus opinion of the scientific community seems to be that they have never seen anything like it before.

    Let us not allow the degenerate libertarians to give China yet another get out of jail free card.

    For shame!

  230. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From Knuckle Dragger at 2:19 pm”

    “… you didn’t mention any concomitant responsibility.”

    Con-bloody-comitant!? Is that a lager or a Coopers-like pale ale?

  231. C.L.

    Why are the Chinese so dirty?
    Legitimate question.

  232. Fat Tony

    JC
    #3389169, posted on April 2, 2020 at 2:16 pm
    Actually there is evidence, Tel. The scientists are all saying it has all the hallmarks of being natural. There are unmistakable telltale signs if it had been made in a lab.

    These wuldn’t be related to climate scientists, would they?

    You know – the ones for sale.

  233. JC

    No, JC, they are certainly not, at least in Toorak. Yoghurt’s a bit short, and rice has yet to make a serious comeback, but most everything else is is full supply.

    The one in the village? That’s a very busy supermarket. Try the one on Chapel Street in the “Vogue” building. There’s plenty of crap there.

    Try the bread in that small bread shop facing the village supermarket. It has the best rolls in Melbourne. 🙂

  234. John Comnenus

    Just went to local Woolies. Interesting change in what is in short supply. Meat was well stacked, fruit and veg was well stocked except for onions and potatoes. Tinned spaghetti, tomatoes and baked beans were very short, no TP or hand wash.

    But shelves were looking fuller than they were a week ago.

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