Living alone in lockdown? Five tips for staying healthy (and happy)

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38 Responses to Living alone in lockdown? Five tips for staying healthy (and happy)

  1. stackja

    With “The Cat” who is isolated?

  2. Robber Baron

    If you call beyond blue you hear a recording of Julia Gillard. Oh dear!

  3. DrBeauGan

    For those with an inner life, it’s no problem. One of the claimed advantages of doing a university degree in the arts, was that it gave you the inner resources to be happy in the poverty it condemned you to. Of course, that was before the government started hiring you to tell everyone what to do.

  4. How can you stay healthy and happy if you’re home alone?

    Is anybody ever alone in the age of the Internet and mobile phones?

  5. Bazinga

    Learn to enjoy your own company.

  6. Sinclair Davidson

    Even in an age of mobile phones and the internet people can be alone. We are social creatures. For many people this lock down is the equivalent to being in solitary confinement.

  7. candy

    It’s a bit hard on younger people. No gym or regular sports activities. Or students used to meeting up with their peers etc, tutorials etc. Studying on one’s own is not good.

    Bit harder for them to see a couple months ahead but can get caught up in the loneliness of the present.

  8. stackja

    Sinc – In ICU hallucinating, not alone!

  9. Fred

    Just get on Tinder. Plenty of people are breaking the lockdown to visit their ‘partner’. Isolation is making chicks so horny, it’s not even fair. It’s like fishing with dynamite.

  10. shatterzzz

    It’s a bit hard on younger people. No gym or regular sports activities.

    Rubbish! .. I’m 72 .. admittedly live with my youngest daughter but she’s at work 5 days a week so almost alone .. I hop on my bike and ride a 30kms loop every morning ..
    Ridings not for everyone but nothing stopping anyone walking for exercise!

  11. lotocoti

    Lockdown?
    I call it SOP.

  12. Frank

    but nothing stopping anyone walking for exercise!

    Arthritis?

  13. areff

    We are social creatures

    We’re born alone, we die alone. The bit in the middle bit is a sine-wave chart of soaring, misplaced optimism about one’s fellow humans, followed by the relentless crushing of those delusion. Rinse and repeat often enough and the truth eventually sinks in

  14. Bruce in WA

    We’re born alone, we die alone. The bit in the middle bit is a sine-wave chart of soaring, misplaced optimism about one’s fellow humans, followed by the relentless crushing of those delusion. Rinse and repeat often enough and the truth eventually sinks in

    Jeeeebus! Pass me the razor blades now, willya?

  15. Rafe Champion

    Phone anyone you know who might be short of contacts.
    Catch up with all the people who you said you would call up some time (and meant it) but didn’t quite get around to.
    Phone up all the talkback hosts and tell them about the choke point or Karl Popper and the synergy of Karl Popper and Austrian economics.
    Start reading War and Peace by Tolstoy and Ulysses or The Magic Mountain.
    Better still take Sinc’s suggestion and read some Yaval Noah Harari, there is a trilogy but you can cheat by starting with the second Sapiens: A brief history of humankind.
    If all else fails https://www.amazon.com/Australiana-Rafe-Champion-ebook/dp/B00FMNO7MM/ref=sr_1_11?dchild=1&keywords=rafe+champion&qid=1586397608&sr=8-11

  16. WDYSIA

    The issue for people is not whether they live alone. It’s the extent of their social networks. I think there is a big cohort amongst that 1 in 4 who were already socially isolated.

    They’re usually (but not always) at the lower end of the socio-economic scale and don’t have the internet. Living very much hand to mouth they use prepaid phones – if that – and can’t afford 5 much less 20 minutes of chat time. Even if they could they had no one to talk to and most would rebuff any attempts for them to reconnect.

    The video’s images of photogenic women clutching cups of coffee and-or staring blankly into space in stylised homes would be far from the reality of many of these people. (This, along with the music was so annoying that I had to fast forward through video I just read the captions).

    A key factor in disaster preparedness and response (a pandemic would be defined as a disaster) is to use social networks. Family, friends and neighbours. May sound easy for someone who is a member of the middle class family, with school, work, social and family networks. But not for this cohort. It is here where you see the outcome of the constant assault on the family and the impacts of divorce, particularly on working class men. Drugs and mental illness are also contributing factors.

    I found it interesting that New South Wales is setting up a Commissioner for resilience. Good luck with that because that’s something you can’t engineer from above.

  17. Louis Hissink

    It’s never a problem when I am in two minds.

  18. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    It is astonishing how swiftly people reach for “depression” to feel fashionable. They have been isolated to some degree for a few weeks – big deal.

    The generations before them got depressed too, as the bombs and shells fell on Pristina and London and Warsaw, and as they watched their parents being hauled away by the mongs in charge, never to be seen again. Then they had to get over it and focus on foraging for food and hiding from murderers night after night for years.

    Then I see this vacuous claptrap from candy at 11:11 am:

    “It’s a bit hard on younger people. No gym or regular sports activities. Or students used to meeting up with their peers etc, tutorials etc. Studying on one’s own is not good.

    Bit harder for them to see a couple months ahead but can get caught up in the loneliness of the present.”

    They can grow up, or go back to pre-school.

    “hard on younger people”: Is there a government policy stating that young people must not experience “hard”?

    “no regular … activities”: Situation normal for most of them. Have a look at the obese young mothers who value their special cripples car spaces at the supermarkets, close to the door so that they can get to the lollies array quickly. There are others who squeeze into attractive (?) lycra so that they can jog conspicuously out to the kerb to collect their wheelie bin, and a remaining 7.23% who know that an old fashioned run around the block is effective enough.

    “meeting up with their peers”: standing in a group together with each one resting their chin on their chest, staring at a tiny phone screen is not “meeting up with their peers”!

    “Studying on one’s own is not good”: this is a timely reminder as to why you are so stupid.

    “harder for them to see a couple months ahead”: let them know their parents may well die from cruise ship leprosy and they will soon cheer up in anticipation of the reading of the will

    “can get caught up in the loneliness of the present”: what are you talking about?! They have thousands of friends in the palm of their hands!

  19. Ellie

    I’m doing jigsaw puzzles (quite therapeutic), reading and writing. Very much alone. I have my ageing cats – 17 and 16. They keep eying up my corpse though.

  20. Tim Neilson

    As we all know, sunshine, fresh air, the murmur of ocean waves and the rustle of leaves in trees are very inimical to mental health.

    So it’s good that with all these mental health problems emerging the Hunchback of Spring Street and Fatty Ashton are cracking down on people going for a surf, sitting on a beach, or loitering too long in a park.

  21. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    I’m doing jigsaw puzzles (quite therapeutic), reading and writing. Very much alone. I have my ageing cats – 17 and 16. They keep eying up my corpse though.

    As long as you keep that sense of humour of yours, Ellie, you are doing

    Cats are excellent companions; my son is saying now how much he’s going to miss Attapuss.
    Putting the pressure on me to leave him there.

  22. mareeS

    Spouse and I are happily living in lockdown, get out of bed any time we please, reading lots, can spend the days in PJs or sweats, make the grocery run every few days for us and the cat. Answer the phone only when we recognise the ID. Quite a relaxation, really.

  23. twostix

    “hard on younger people”: Is there a government policy stating that young people must not experience “hard”?

    Being a boomer you never experienced a single time of mass and enduring hardship or national crises in your life (but Vietnam!!!) and you seem intent on demonstrating that again and again by reaching for your parent’s generation’s experiences to steal as your own to find the nearest example of hardship that you can beat the shit out of the younger generations today with (who already have endured more growing up than boomers ever did in their whole blessed lives).

    Thanks for the comparison with the GG though. It’s they and their actions and behaviour who we look to for guidance and as role models, not you boomer softcocks.

  24. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

    ooops. There should be an OK on there, Ellie, and I certainly hope you are. My computer fails to respond to keyboard sometimes.

    Cats do earn their keep. My second born son minding Attapuss is very alone too, has few friends these days unlike when he held a good job some years ago now, and finding some solace lately in doing artworks. He’s actually quite good at it. People often have hidden talents like this.

    You are never alone with the internet, and for some of us, the Cat, which is very rough and tumble but also a very forgiving place that ticks over on everyone at Tom’s Toons and starts all over again.

    Telephones too are a great way to keep in touch as it’s good to hear someone’s voice.

    Girlfriend of mine living alone in Tassie rang this morning for a 30 minute chewing of the fat. She just beat me to it, as I was intending to ring her this morning, but did the hauling back to bed thing instead. Hairy slinks out of the room when she rings as girl talk is sometimes too much for him to bear as it is so flitting from subject to subject and largely so inconsequential. When I retired from the seriousness of academia I found girl talk with a new group of non-academic girlfriends very refreshing and couldn’t do without it now.

  25. twostix

    My grandparents would never in a million years have asked their children and grandchildren to ruin themselves financially and cripple the nation they worked their fingers to the bone to create to protect them from some flu. Everything they did was to lift us up and improve our lives at any cost.

    As a generation they didn’t even complain when their terrible selfish children dumped them in aged care prison homes.

    Truly the greatest generation. Gen x/y draw great inspiration from them as we endure the next 30 years in war and existential national crises as they did.

    My only prayer is we don’t go as wrong with our children as they did. We promise GG that we learn from your one mistake: No spoiling them!

  26. Ellie

    I wish it was that easy, Maree. Essential service providers who have been fucked over by their leaders still have to front up. From home in your PJs is difficult. I still suit up.

  27. Ellie

    Hi, Lizzie. I am ok. Trying to work out the zoom thing for work.

  28. Mitch M.

    The generations before them got depressed too, as the bombs and shells fell on Pristina and London and Warsaw, and as they watched their parents being hauled away by the mongs in charge, never to be seen again. Then they had to get over it and focus on foraging for food and hiding from murderers night after night for years.

    Perhaps not, the asylums were bursting at the seams through the 50’s and 60’s. The remarkable decline in Alzheimer’s incidence in Europe is by some attributed to the passing of the war generation and the traumas they experienced. That makes sense to me because I asked a friend who managed a dementia ward and she said to me that emotional trauma was one of the common characteristics in the patients. What is not well known is that emotional distress induces inflammation and high CORT levels and if that happens in childhood it can have implications for atrophy is an area of the brain often first impacted by Alzheimer’s, the hippocampus.

    Rural rates of suicide are higher than in the cities, in the cities suicide rates are falling though perhaps that is because city people are too stupid to do it properly. Why is suicide higher in rural regions? Loneliness? Failure to be realistic about one’s limits? I thought country people were supposed to made of stern stuff so what is going on?

  29. Mitch M.

    Tim Neilson
    #3402286, posted on April 9, 2020 at 1:56 pm
    As we all know, sunshine, fresh air, the murmur of ocean waves and the rustle of leaves in trees are very inimical to mental health.

    So it’s good that with all these mental health problems emerging the Hunchback of Spring Street and Fatty Ashton are cracking down on people going for a surf, sitting on a beach, or loitering too long in a park.

    I think the government is being way too strict on these matters. Natural environments are good for everyone and numerous studies point to benefits for those with mental health issues. I’m mad as hell because I was planning to buy a motorcycle not for commuting but for the country rides, in my younger days it was my Sunday mental health restoration activity while others sat in pews being bored by preachers I blazed along country roads. Now we can’t even go for a drive unless it is “essential”.

  30. Delta A

    This is a Cat community service brought to you by the management.

    Thanks, Professor D.

  31. Hay Stockar

    The Mrs. is working from home. I envy those home alone.

  32. calli

    We’re born alone, we die alone. The bit in the middle bit is a sine-wave chart of soaring, misplaced optimism about one’s fellow humans, followed by the relentless crushing of those delusion. Rinse and repeat often enough and the truth eventually sinks in

    The bit in the middle is great, areff! Triumphs, disappointments, riches, brokeness, steak and mince. And the people – delightful, horrible, embarrassing, selfish, giving, every type you can imagine.

    As an off-the-scale introvert, no probs for me. I don’t have to meet people, just talk in the phone or email. Sweet. Music, a bit of therapeutic tv, and the Cat. Books. The garden. Cleaning. Work and more work.

    The danger is that I could get used to it.

  33. calli

    And I can’t seem to get Facetime to work.

    Sad.

  34. C.L.

    Ellie, what is your essential service?
    Asking respectfully.

  35. Bad Samaritan

    As the Nobel Laureate wrote…49 years ago…..

    “Sometimes I think this whole world
    Is one big prison yard
    Some of us are prisoners
    The rest of us are guards”

    The whole CV BS is aimed at driving people crazy: making them compliant. What’s prison about, and especially… why is solitary confinement such a “torture-like” punishment?

    In the past few days we’ve seen reports that govt ministers around the world are being caught breaking the confinement rules. Suck-holes are declaring this is disgraceful because these rebels are acting as if they are “above the law” when in reality they are merely letting us know that CV and the CV law is BS!

    You’ll find that even the most arrogant prick does not drink poison to show his or her disdain,…because they actually know that poison will kill them. Meanwhile we get “lockdown escapees” who know it’s a fake emergency. We get F’wits holding press conferences where they…and the press…couldn’t care a fig about social distancing. and so on, while hectoring the feeble-minded that it is.

    Anyhow enough. Tomorrow I’m driving 80 ks to stay at a mate’s place on the waterfront for three nights while another mate is coming 50 ks from the other side. Then we’ll be risking our lives for real getting around in ultra-lights with a couple of mutts for company in the twin seated ones. My hound actually has a helmet!

    Hope I don’t crash-land onto someone down below camping on a beach. Wouldn’t like to upset their delusion that CV is the new Night of The Living Dead; that the other 28,000 people who died in Australia in the past 10 weeks didn’t die at all since they missed out getting their deaths mentioned on national TV. Who doesn’t dream of that, eh?

  36. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From twostix at 3:37 pm:

    ” “hard on younger people”: Is there a government policy stating that young people must not experience “hard”?

    Being a boomer you never experienced a single time of mass and enduring hardship or national crises in your life (but Vietnam!!!) and you seem intent on demonstrating that again and again by reaching for your parent’s generation’s experiences to steal as your own to find the nearest example of hardship that you can beat the shit out of the younger generations today with (who already have endured more growing up than boomers ever did in their whole blessed lives).

    Thanks for the comparison with the GG though. It’s they and their actions and behaviour who we look to for guidance and as role models, not you boomer softcocks.

    You really need to ditch the chip on your shoulder about “boomers” and your invention about what I am intent on. It would help demonstrate your objectivity, education and knowledge; and that discussing matters with you is a worthwhile use of one’s time.

    I used a couple of historical events to illustrate my point. You are too dim to see that, contorted with rage as you are. You lost me before I got half way because your diatribe makes no sense – lose the chip on your other shoulder too about younger generations comparisons – that may improve your lucidity.

    Lord knows what “GG” is supposed to mean. You are quite rude, demonstrably so – you deserve a swift kick up the clacker for your impudence.

  37. Ellie

    Ellie, what is your essential service?
    Asking respectfully.

    You are a gentleman, CL. You are on my list of people I would like to have dinner with and pick your brain.

  38. Chris M

    Well that clip is a bit odd… was expecting it to mention online study or learning – then blow me down if it isn’t from RMIT!

    Denis Prager has a vastly much better take on what to do and what not to do. Smart guy.

    We’re born alone, we die alone.

    This is grim reading. Unless we were hatched in an incubator our birth was very much in company. To die alone is indeed sad but it doesn’t need to be. If you have faith in God you will never be alone and your life will have meaning, a purpose and a goal.

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