A man in his 90s has died. Round up the usual beachgoers

 
“A man in his 90s has died with COVID-19 in a Victorian hospital, taking the state’s virus death toll to 17.”

May this dear gentleman rest in peace. But at that age, people die “with” many illnesses and conditions.

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23 Responses to A man in his 90s has died. Round up the usual beachgoers

  1. Robber Baron says:

    People are dying just as #BeijingDan has forewarned us if we don’t remain in home detention. Looks like Stage 4 will be implemented. We Victorians need tougher restrictions each time someone dies with flu.

    North Korea will be freer and more prosperous than Victoria when the reign of terror by the Tyrant #BeijingDan is over.

  2. Adelagado says:

    In a few months I will be at ‘retirement age’. I can easily think of 6 other friends of similar age who, like me, had all intended to keep working beyond retirement age but who are now probably reconsidering this decision. Months of relative idleness is easy to get used to, and this reminder of our mortality makes us weigh up our priorities.

    I predict a massive jump in the numbers of ‘age pensioners’ after all this. Where will the money come from?

  3. cuckoo says:

    Maybe it’s just me but over the last few days, road traffic in my Melbourne suburban neighbourhood has noticeably increased, and my local supermarket, which has been very quiet was suddenly yesterday as busy as it’s ever been, distancing be damned. A sign of people getting fed up with seclusion kabuki?

  4. bemused says:

    How many are dying because they fear to go to a hospital, or can’t go, with such deaths being ignored? This is happening in the UK and the US, but not talked about very much in the media.

  5. Dasher says:

    This is really becoming crazy…….

  6. Terry says:

    @Dasher
    Only ‘becoming’ crazy?

  7. Botswana O'Hooligan says:

    Install the app is the cry far and wide, your security will be safe with us. Yairs, just like it was if you joined that health scheme that was hacked by anyone who could use your details. This is the worst (insert whatever calamity of your choice) the World has seen and is so deadly that we are shutting the country down and buggering the economy. OK, if this virus is so deadly and kills us on sight, how come anyone afflicted by it would be fit enough to carry a mobile telephone and wander the highways and byways infecting all and sundry hiding around corners and sheltering behind tall buildings? The voices of reason most of us heed opines that it isn’t anywhere near as deadly and logic should dictate that we don’t need another bloody useless government idea that will be used for anything but somewhere down the track to hinder us.

  8. Tim Neilson says:

    Maybe it’s just me but over the last few days, road traffic in my Melbourne suburban neighbourhood has noticeably increased, and my local supermarket, which has been very quiet was suddenly yesterday as busy as it’s ever been, distancing be damned. A sign of people getting fed up with seclusion kabuki?

    Ok, I’ll admit it, as long as everyone promises not to dob me in to Graeme “Fatty” Ashton.

    I made a sanctions-busting rebel trip to the supermarket to purchase a non-essential item.

    Somehow I eluded the Hunchback of Spring Street’s terror squads and made it safely back home.

    One day my exploit will be made into an Oscar winning suspense thriller.

  9. NoFixedAddress says:

    Tim Neilson
    #3430038, posted on April 26, 2020 at 2:14 pm

    Can I have your sanitised autograph please?

  10. Stanley says:

    Maybe it’s just me but over the last few days, road traffic in my Melbourne suburban neighbourhood has noticeably increased, and my local supermarket, which has been very quiet was suddenly yesterday as busy as it’s ever been, distancing be damned. A sign of people getting fed up with seclusion kabuki?
    Cuckoo.
    Over here in the most mostest isolated city in the universe, the isolationists have flown the cuckoo’s nest and its bordering on chaos on the shared paths around the mighty Swan. Lots of walkers, cyclists and sweaty active wear on display, lining up for java jive and looking wistfully at the empty footy stadium.
    Mac, Let my people go!

  11. John A says:

    One day my exploit will be made into an Oscar winning suspense thriller.

    Tim, you should line up the rights to the Mad Max series for that very purpose.

  12. HT says:

    Botswana O’Hooligan
    #3430030, posted on April 26, 2020 at 2:10 pm
    Install the app is the cry far and wide, your security will be safe with us. Yairs, just like it was if you joined that health scheme that was hacked by anyone who could use your details.

    I don’t really doubt the App just does what they say; no geolocation and tracking my movements etc. It’s not the Commonwealth I don’t “trust”, it’s the States. Nobody surveills like the States! What I object to and the reason I will not download the App is because I simply do not trust some wannabe tyrant who happens to be doctor to not pass on my details to the state police for the crime of having passed by a complete stranger who happened to have later tested positive for the virus. And of course, the Dr’s currently running the country and our police forces have been so considered, and so worthy of our trust and haven’t revelled in thier new found power. At all.
    If I’m forced to show my phone before being allowed to participate in society (the non-mandatory way to make it mandatory), I’ll download it, acquire a screen shot and then reset and rebuild my phone without the App, and just show the photo to any goon that demands proof of having downloaded it. It would be true, I did download it, I’ll just leave out the bit where I deleted it with attitude.

  13. Hay Stockard says:

    HT,
    Any government or privately hired goon can look at my phone when they pry it from my cold dead hand.

  14. nfw says:

    A man in his 90’s died WITH not of Wuhan Virus Flu. So what else did he have which may have been responsible? It’s great when Wuhan Virus Flu can be blamed for everything, so very Italian or New York. Next thing you know the sissies running the shows various will blame it for them not confiscating all Chinese government, which is any business from China, property. They will probably blame Wuhan Virus Flu for them not chasing down the shelf-strippers who started the panic buying and the rest of the stupidity. I’ll bet plenty of goods are still heading for China every day.

  15. mareeS says:

    I am age 63, I died TWICE in ICU in an induced coma some years ago in my 50s, but was brought back both times thanks to expert medical care. It had nothing to do with this virus, it was a flesh-eating bug, but here I am, and death is not the light at the end of the tunnel, it is a fading, from what I seem to recall, nothing to be scared of. Death holds no fear for me, it awaits us all.

  16. HT says:

    Hay Stockard
    #3430224, posted on April 26, 2020 at 4:18 pm
    HT,
    Any government or privately hired goon can look at my phone when they pry it from my cold dead hand.

    Fair enough. I won’t (literally) die in a ditch over it, but it’s certainly fair enough to demand they produce a warrant to search your phone.

  17. Entropy says:

    I predict a massive jump in the numbers of ‘age pensioners’ after all this. Where will the money come from?

    I expect there are a lot of older public servants and workers in large corporations thinking it might be an opportunity for another round of VERs. They have been a bit lean the last five or six years.

  18. Chris M says:

    It’s sad when life is cut short like this.

  19. Hay Stockard says:

    My pacemaker won’t even make 90

  20. Squirrel says:

    Today’s TV news highlight for me was an old woman, beach towel draped over the shoulders, looking into the camera and righteously announcing that people (i.e. other people, particularly if they are younger than her) “don’t have a right to go for a swim if it means putting the health of other people at risk”.

    That’s the sort of riding the shark (of irony) comment that probably does deserve the “OK, Boomer” retort – with a few colourful expletives added.

    The elderly Gidget was followed by a grab of Hazzard reminding the proles that they don’t own the beach – lots of TVs must be getting lots of things thrown at them.

  21. Davey Boy says:

    Remember the metadata logging laws? In 2015 only those who needed it were given access:
    Essentially all law enforcement and security agencies, including your local police station all the way up to the Australian Federal Police and ASIO.
    “There are only three different justifications (where) we have to access metadata; if someone’s life is being threatened, protection of government income, and (an) investigation of a crime punishable with at least two years in prison,” the police insider said.

    And now in 2020:
    During a public hearing regarding Australia’s metadata retention laws on February 7 [2020], Commonwealth Ombudsman Michael Manthorpe admitted the legislation’s ambiguity meant law enforcement officials were able to access more metadata than originally promised when the laws were passed back in 2015. Manthorpe said the law’s lack of clarity meant telcos sometimes provided the full URLs to law enforcement officials — something that was supposed to be excluded.

    But wait, there’s more: Australian government officials accused of ‘cavalier disregard’ for unauthorised metadata access
    Parliamentary committee hears state and government agencies sought data 8,432 times in 2018-19. Under the mandatory data retention legislation passed in 2015, the number of agencies allowed to access the data was narrowed down to just 21. But the telecommunications industry organisation Communications Alliance has revealed that at least 87 other state and federal organisations – including city councils, the RSPCA and the South Australian fisheries department – have accessed the data under section 280 of the Telecommunications Act.

    This gives us all a high degree of confidence in the assurances from govt and media that the virus tracking app will only be used for its intended purpose and that the data from it will be secure. (/sarc)

  22. Kneel says:

    “Any government or privately hired goon can look at my phone when they pry it from my cold dead hand.”

    Your proposition is acceptable. What is your preferred method of death?

  23. Kneel says:

    “don’t have a right to go for a swim if it means putting the health of other people at risk”

    Also:
    “you don’t have the right to drive if it puts the health of other people at risk”
    “you don’t have the right to drink if it puts the health of other people at risk”
    “you don’t have the right to vote if it puts the health of other people at risk”
    “you don’t have the right to free speech if it puts the health of other people at risk”

    Slippery slope indeed, and it’s definatly all down hill.

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