Michael Oakeshott. Sinc’s favourite philosopher

Update. Interesting to see that 90 people checked out the Oakeshott story, 27 had a look at the Guestroom, 23 read about Robert Manne, 10 read more about Peter Coleman and 7 checked out Hal Colebatch. Have a look at Padraic McGuinness!

Next week. The Oakeshott/Popper correspondence. A remarkable meeting of minds!

Also Oakeshott as follower of the turf.

A nice piece about Michael Oakeshott in Peter Coleman’s last book. Peter was happy to have several chapters on line in addition to other bits and pieces of his that found a place in the guest room on  my website for people who had no cyberhome of their own.

THE BOOM in Michael Oakeshott studies — all those books, PhDs, seminars (and a Special Symposium at Macquarie University the other day) — owes much of its impetus to the Michael Oakeshott Association in London, which maintains a busy website (www.michael-oakeshott-association.com), organises international conferences every couple of years (next year in New Orleans) and acts as a conduit to publishers of key books. No one would now challenge Ian Tregenza’s statement in one of these new books, Michael Oakeshott on Hobbes, that Oakeshott was “one of the most significant political philosophers of the twentieth century”.
 
Yet despite all these debates Oakeshott remains an enigmatic figure not yet finally located in his intellectual and political tradition. He is, for example, regularly acclaimed as a conservative thinker. But he was not conservative in ordinary usage….Read on.

He had some problems with Germany. “The contemporary cant about Germany being a great nation with a valuable gift for the world is ridiculous. Neither Germany, nor any other nation, has anything to give the world that can compare with what Germany has taken away.”

Another interesting item on the site is Peter’s account of the Robert Manne story – remember Robert Manne? He became the editor of Quadrant on the back of  his honourable conduct in the first Cold War he but changed sides to engage in Cold War II.

As soon as the Cold War ended, according to Irving Kristol, the real cold war began. This is, he said, the war against American-style liberalism—the left-liberalism which has ruthlessly corrupted sector after sector of public and private life. He had in mind political correctness, big government, and the network of radical policies for family, school, “gender”, environment, culture and religion. This cold war would be more spiritually engaging than anticommunism had ever been. He envied those young enough to be fighting it.

 

Andrew Norton meditates on the future of research in the universities.

In this post, I estimate how reliant research is on international student profits. It combines data from multiple sources. None of them were designed to calculate this amount, so my result should be taken as being in a plausible range rather than as a precise total. But it can give us a sense of the scale of reliance on international students.

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7 Responses to Michael Oakeshott. Sinc’s favourite philosopher

  1. Roger

    This cold war would be more spiritually engaging than anticommunism had ever been.

    If only we had the spiritual weapons with which to fight it.

    Of course, we do, but they are largely out of the grasp of the majority of those who would otherwise engage in this war.

    Cf. Ephesians 6

  2. Megan

    99% of the world do not realise there is a Cold War 2. And the current situation proves it.

  3. Lee

    As soon as the Cold War ended, according to Irving Kristol, the real cold war began. This is, he said, the war against American-style liberalism—the left-liberalism which has ruthlessly corrupted sector after sector of public and private life. He had in mind political correctness, big government, and the network of radical policies for family, school, “gender”, environment, culture and religion. This cold war would be more spiritually engaging than anticommunism had ever been. He envied those young enough to be fighting it.

    A pox on the lot of them!

  4. John A

    Roger, they are not beyond grasp but have been deliberately disparaged and set aside as useless relics of a lower stage of human history.

    cf. John 3:19

  5. Left-liberalism has always been there. It’s just that they couldn’t go too far left because communists already occupied that territory.
    Once communism collapsed, the left-liberals have marched into the void in a big hurry.
    Communism is all about class warfare. The left-liberals can’t go there so they use identity warfare instead.
    We allowed them a foot in the door with stupidity like affirmative action and other left-liberal weapons to proliferate.
    Even the richest sheila can scream ‘sexism’ (see the vile Gillard) and the most privileged black fella can scream ‘racism’.
    And they do.
    And they win.

  6. Squirrel

    Stop pretending that a population ponzi scheme and asset price speculation are sustainable bases for our economy.

    So many of the economic and social problems we will be dealing with over the next few years stem from the fact that we have pumped up population well beyond what the productive sectors of the economy need and have relied on ever-increasing debt to fund “services sector”/discretionary spending-related jobs to soak up that excess population.

    The wheels were starting to fall off that economic model before the virus hit, but there are many who are in denial about that and can see nothing but a return to those policies. We would be better to use the virus as a circuit-breaker, deal with the re-set and adopt more robust and sustainable policies.

    The commission of audit reports prepared in the early days of the Howard and Abbott governments would provide some useful ideas for getting federal government spending in line with our new economic realities.

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