Open Forum: May 23, 2020

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2,127 Responses to Open Forum: May 23, 2020

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  1. Maj

    Ratcheting up the pressure on Ponygirl.

    Calls for $40,000 new-home buyers grant to avoid industry ‘bloodbath’

    A $40,000 new-home buyers grant needs to be introduced within a month to avoid a potential “bloodbath” in the building industry, and save up to 100,000 jobs across the state.

    The Master Builders Association said the sector was facing an unprecedented crisis, with traffic through show homes down 90 per cent across the country since the start of COVID-19, and conversion rates from those visits at just 50 per cent.

    Grant Galvin, the chief executive of Master Builders Queensland, said a new-home buyers grant was the only thing that could rescue the sector short-term.

    “There is minimal construction work set to carry on beyond August, so if the government does not act now, this sector it is going to fall off a very come September when hundreds of thousands of people find there’s no more jobs,” Mr Galvin said.

    “I wouldn’t want to be the government going in to an election in October if this is allowed to happen. We need a lifeline to avoid what is likely to be a bloodbath in our industry and we need it now.”

  2. Maj

    Britain is officially a Stasi nanny-state:

    Dominic Cummings is reported to police by retired teacher ‘who saw him and his family breaching lockdown by taking trip to town 30 miles away from where he went to self-isolate’

    Top government aide Dominic Cummings now faces a possible police investigation after he was reported to officers by a retired teacher who claims he saw the Downing Street power-broker taking a trip to a town 30 miles away from where he went to self-isolate.

    Retired chemistry teacher Robin Lees, 70, has reportedly made a complaint to the police after claiming he saw Mr Cummings and his family on April 12 walking in the town of Barnard Castle, according to the Guardian and the Mirror.

  3. mh

    Ellie
    #3464107, posted on May 25, 2020 at 11:57 pm
    Please explain, mh. How can cheeks rest easy? You are naive. Smiles.

    Clenched or at ease. This is what cheeks do.

  4. Sydney Boy

    Good news. I received a pass on my PhD. Notified yesterday.

  5. notafan

    Congratulations Sydney Boy

  6. MatrixTransform

    good on ya Doc … you are now required to stand on your printed PhD and tell everybody else what to do

  7. MatrixTransform

    oh, and congrats

  8. Maj

    Good news. I received a pass on my PhD. Notified yesterday.

    Congrats, Dr. Sydney Boy.

  9. Boambee John

    Jupes

    in a just world any civilian casualties are (or should be) the responsibility of the Taliban choosing not to fight in uniform.

    In a just world, the SJWankers would be demanding trials of captured Taliban for breaches of the Geneva Conventions, by not wearing uniforms or a clear distinguishing marking, to protect the lives of the civilians among whom they operate.

  10. notafan

    ME Bank is very woke

  11. Old School Conservative

    The Australian is doing excellent work in profiling the Chinese who have influenced Dan Andrews.
    Today they highlight the achievements of a young woman, Jenny Dong.
    One of her claims to fame include this statement:
    “At the age of 26 I successfully facilitated a mutual and long-term economic collaboration agreement through China-Australia free-trade agreement for both countries,”

    Politicians weren’t the only ones to be swayed by her impressive credentials.
    “At the age of 11, I challenged the old Chinese media rules and opened the doors for thousands of youth to raise their voice.”
    and
    “At the age of 21 I presented and convinced the PwC Australian leadership to consider Asia growth as a priority strategy and to achieve a clear advantage over its competitors,”

    A child prodigy advising Dan Andrews? Here be dragons.

  12. stackja

    Operation Dynamo, the evacuation from Dunkirk, involved the rescue of more than 338,000 British and French soldiers from the French port of Dunkirk between 27 May and 4 June 1940. The evacuation, sometimes referred to as the Miracle of Dunkirk, was a big boost for British morale. Prime Minister Winston Churchill recognised however that the greatest challenge still lay ahead, as Nazi ambitions now turned toward Britain. ‘Dynamo’ began on 26 May.

  13. egg_

    All night Rage programming

    Beats the fvck out of fogeys’ sports commentary.

  14. stackja

    Old School Conservative
    #3464186, posted on May 26, 2020 at 8:04 am
    “At the age of 11, I challenged the old Chinese media rules and opened the doors for thousands of youth to raise their voice.”

    PLA silenced thousands of youth in Tiananmen Square.

  15. Old School Conservative

    Well done Sydney Boy.
    But just a pass? Surely Cats know how to amplify. High Distinction Gold Medallion Top of Year type of elaborations are surely needed.

  16. Maj

    ME Bank is very woke

    Is there a bank that isn’t woke?

  17. Entropy

    A $40,000 new-home buyers grant needs to be introduced within a month to avoid a potential “bloodbath” in the building industry, and save up to 100,000 jobs across the state.

    Notice how it is always a “new home buyers” grant, renovators and extenders need not apply? Perhaps it should be called a “developers’ grant”. Ordinary builders Don’t get in on much of the OPM loot.

  18. Entropy

    Also, remember that median gross earnings in this place are about $53k part. A large portion of the population actually earns less than $40k.

  19. Maj

    None as woke as ME

    Hmmm…

  20. mh

    mh
    #3464176, posted on May 26, 2020 at 7:58 am
    Ellie
    #3464107, posted on May 25, 2020 at 11:57 pm
    Please explain, mh. How can cheeks rest easy? You are naive. Smiles.

    Clenched or at ease. This is what cheeks do.

    And quiver.

  21. thefrollickingmole

    Sydney Boy

    Congrats, what field ?

    (sits back and hopes it Vietnam war studies)

  22. Maj

    Cummings. The Prime Minister is now gambling on what the ’22 does next.

    None the less, punches will certainly be thrown in Cummings’ direction in such an event. Three of the 16 MPs who have come out against him are on the executive: Steve Baker, Jason McCartney and William Wragg.

    So if it meets, those punches aren’t pulled, and the committee formally resolves that Cummings should go, a trial of strength opens up between the Prime Minister and Conservative backbenchers.

    Again, Johnson could gamble that, in these circumstances, the executive would back down. But if it didn’t, he would be in very serious trouble.

    Ultimately, a Conservative leader operates with the consent of Tory MPs. The ’22 is a bit like the Canadian mounties: it always gets its man. Or woman: after all, it eventually did for Theresa May, only a year or so ago.

    His choice, therefore, is either to continue to tough it out, in the hope that the ’22 doesn’t meet and act, or else sack Cummings (which he surely won’t do), or else…send for Mark Sedwill.

    The Cabinet Secretary could authorise an inquiry into whether or not Cummings’ flight from self-isolation in London broke the Special Advisers’ Code of Conduct.

    Since Cummings had a legal case for what he did, and arguably a moral one, such a probe would be unlikely to recommend dismissal.

    We also suspect, given the way the world works, that the top of the civil service is finely attuned to what this Prime Minister wants, for all the tensions between Sedwill and Johnson’s political operation.

    At any rate, an inquiry would certainly stave off any push from the ’22. And Cummings would probably survive it. But that is not the end of the story.

    Ultimately, what counts in the world of interaction between voters and MPs isn’t so much law, or even morality, as politics. And those of this row are problematic for Johnson in one sense and perhaps in another.

    Certainly, and as we argued yesterday, it has dealt a blow to the authority of the lockdown. If so much depends on circumstances, common sense and context, as Ministers now proclaim, people will draw the obvious conclusion.

    Just goes to prove the truth of that classic Churchill quote:

    A newly elected young Tory MP, eagerly taking up a place on the benches and pointing to the benches opposite, said to Churchill, “So that’s the enemy”. Churchill supposedly replied, “No son, that’s the opposition”, and then pointed to the benches behind and said, “That is the enemy”.

  23. thefrollickingmole

    Gee, its almost like the left globally are using this (to steal the execrable Naomi Wolfs terms) to push “disaster socialism”.

    Antifa protests against ending the lockdown in Germany

    &

    This is why we’re proposing a wealth tax in Spain to help us out of this crisis
    Pablo Echenique

    More taxes, more lockdowns and prohibitions…

  24. calli

    🎉🍾🥂 to Doctor Boy!

  25. stackja

    ‘Aggressive’ rats on rise after restaurant shutdowns, CDC says

    May 25 (UPI) — Federal health authorities warned that rats may exhibit “unusual or aggressive” behavior because they have been cut of from food waste due to coronavirus-related closures of restaurants nationwide.

    “Some jurisdictions have reported an increase in rodent activity as rodents search for new sources of food,” the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted on its website Thursday.

  26. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Good news. I received a pass on my PhD. Notified yesterday.

    Congratulations, and well done.

  27. There’s two options when it comes to a war: go hard, or go home.

    There’s three.
    Don’t get involved if your country is not threatened.
    If this principle had been followed, 57000 Yanks and 500 Australians (and millions of Vietnamese) would not have been killed.

    Word.

    There’s no way to win by fluffing around doing a bit here and a bit there … winning “hearts and minds” one day, then murdering people the next day.

    True, but it doesn’t become an issue if the third principle (above) is applied.

    Killing the enemy is not murder.

    Except that assuming unarmed civilians going about their business in their own country are the “enemy” and killing them is morally reprehensible and will always create enemies in their friends and family who then seek revenge. That was why the “body count” was completely counterproductive.

    Instead, the liars in command said that the mission was to get in there quick and grab “Osama bin Laden” and drag him off to justice … except that was never the real mission. The incorrigible meddlers in Washington decided they were off to do some “nation building” and put their Far Quit theories to the test with real people and real military.

    They were doing the same in Vietnam. Nations cannot be built by interference from the outside. They can, however be destroyed. Witness Iraq.

    I agree the mission changed several times and for all I know is still changing. At one point during the Gillard years, apparently Australian troops were there so that Afghan girls could go to school. FMD

    Once you are facing a “no win” scenario, how individuals react depends on the person … you are being kept in the dark, you don’t know who the bad guy is, and you don’t trust the leadership.

    All wars can be won, but not when you have a leadership that has lost the will to wage war properly. Allied leaders in Afghanistan were / are far more interested in winning a ‘moral’ victory than a military one.

    The mission did not change with a change of political leadership.

    Kill everyone? Kill no one? Run away? I’m not pretending I would deal with it better … I cannot say.

    I would put it differently. Should unarmed Afghan fighting-age males in an area controlled by the Taliban be regarded as civilians or fighters? ADF leaders and lawyers regard them as civilians but the blokes who have to confront them obviously see things differently. This is compounded by the fact that many prisoners taken in Afghanistan were released within a few days. Killing them is the prudent and safe option, and may I add, in a just world any civilian casualties are (or should be) the responsibility of the Taliban choosing not to fight in uniform.

    Rules of engagement in Vietnam weren’t all that different. We regarded military age people (both male and female) as potential threats, but we didn’t kill them unless they were armed. There were unarmed civilians killed, but this was almost exclusively accidental. The fact that the task force was 40% conscripts was a factor.

    Tip of the iceberg buddy, if you have not done so already then read the study “Lying to Ourselves” about the extent of dishonesty in the modern military.

    A professional military has a culture which encourages envy, back biting, and entitlement. The more “elite” the units, the more this is a problem. Many members of elite units believe that their reputational status puts them above good order and discipline.

    Yeah nah, probably won’t read that. I assume it’s about the US military, though no doubt there is a lot of corruption and waste in the ADF (submarines anyone?). My concern is more with the Brereton inquiry and the fact that the bloke accusing his former fellow soldiers with war crimes, has in fact just admitted to lying to his superiors in order to keep the enemy alive! To me, that is a worse crime than anything I’ve seen or read about the supposed crimes of our special forces.

    The “crime”, apart from what the SF are accused of,is the reputational damage caused to all serving now, and all who have served.

    Mostly I blame the people who sent him there … and I don’t have a problem with people being anti-war because who would be pro-war?

    That has a familiar ring – except post Vietnam, and until the Welcome Home march, The soldiers (including the conscripts) were largely blamed for the war.

    I am pro war. It beats the alternative: slavery and tyranny.

    Some wars are won by those who visit slavery and tyranny on the conquered population. Historical episodes of this are legion.

    Doesn’t say anything about nation building and invasion and occupation on the other side of the world.

    Gallipoli was an invasion in defence of Australia. Far better to fight in another country than wait till they come to ours.

    The same was touted about Vietnam. You can use it to justify anything.

    Problem is no one had the slightest idea what the plan was in Afghanistan. Not from bottom to top did they have a clue … the troops on the ground didn’t know what they were doing, and the leadership were Far King useless. The politicians pretended it wasn’t happening … the media never talked about it and the citizens back at home sang, “La! La! La!”

    A rerun of Vietnam, and to some extent, Iraq.

    After 9/11 it was the right thing to do to kick the Taliban out of Afghanistan. The invasion was brilliantly planned and executed by US Special Forces. The nation building bullshit started after that. They had two options: get out straight away with the threat of shock and awe if the Taliban returned (the easy option), or occupy (the hard option). However, if the choice was to occupy, then they should have written and enforced a new constitution. To ‘nation build’ and let the Afghans write their own constitution was folly.

    In other words, clean up the Taliban, and leave Afghanistan to the Afghans. Probably a sound strategy, forgetting that the Yanks supplied and supported the same insurgents who were fighting the Russians.

    Now decades later we look for someone to scapegoat. It’s a terrible situation.

    Tell me about it.

  28. notafan

    So many wasted pixels.

  29. min

    Re Dominic Cummings behaving like a true narcissist, I am entitled and the rules do not apply to me .
    So what does one narcissist do about another breaking his rules ?

  30. stackja

    Imperial Germany in Pacific Ocean was not a threat? Imperial Japan in China was not a threat?

  31. thefrollickingmole

    ‘Aggressive’ rats on rise after restaurant shutdowns, CDC says

    Ive read this book.
    It doesnt end well.

  32. lotocoti

    I’m guessing anyone with the social score necessary for the Sichuan Fine Arts Institute
    won’t be fast roping anywhere.

  33. Roger

    “The Wall Street Journal Editorial states that it doesn’t want me to act in an ‘impulsive’ manner in Afghanistan. Could somebody please explain to them that we have been there for 19 years… and… soldier counts are way down now, hardly impulsive.”

    “Besides, the Taliban is mixed about even wanting us to get out, They make a fortune $$$ by having us stay, and except at the beginning, we never really fought to win. We are more of a police force than the mighty military that we are, especially now as rebuilt. No, I am not acting impulsively!”

    President Donald Trump

  34. Ellie

    You’re funny, mh. 🙂

  35. Tom

    Is Dutton Derangement Syndrome a thing yet?

    It sure is, Ed Case. The rule seems to be: the smaller the lefty cartoonist’s brain, the more virulent the derangement.

    The anti-business daily’s David Rowe has the smallest brain ever measured in the Australian cartooning world, so the spasms caused in the space between his ears are epic whenever he thinks about the 45th US president, the British PM and — this week — the most powerful backroom force in the UK government, Dominic Cummings (who, like the rest of the elites thinks rules don’t apply to him, so every British cartoonist, not just the smaller-brained, is giving it to him this week).

    However, among the smaller Australian cartooning brains, nothing makes lefties lose it like Peter Dutton, who took on the mob haters in last year’s election and came out on top.. This has only further enraged the lefty haters among the small brains in the cartooning world like Peter Broelman, who is syndicated by rural and regional Australian dailies and — like David Rowe at the anti-business daily — loathes most of his bush readers.

    Naturally, being a small-brained lefty like Rowe, Broelman is enraged by the 45th US president.

    At least Broelman, unlike Rowe, has the talent to make people laugh at his cartoons — but only very occasionally, when he’s not in the grip of one of his derangements.

  36. Tom

    Congrats, Dr Boy!

    +1 — from the school of hard knocks.

  37. John Brumble

    “The Master Builders Association said the sector was facing an unprecedented crisis, with traffic through show homes down 90 per cent across the country since the start of COVID-19, and conversion rates from those visits at just 50 per cent.”

    Now hang the f/ on. 50 percent??!! That’s massive. Given most people would visit more than one of these sites and numbers are tracked on total number of visits, rather than discrete visits, actual turn-over must be close to 100%. Which you’d expect if only the very serious buyers are visiting.

    Of course, you’d expect an industry lob/// sry crony group to beg for OPM, but to reprint their press release without questioni… oh wait. Nevermind.

    Modern journalism; the butt hole of government.

  38. thefrollickingmole

    Stimpy.

    Nothing weird, sinister or Orwellian about that.

    Advancing a New Economic Paradigm of Happytalism since 2008.

    This sounds like something out of the old game “Paranoia”
    Just remember, Citizen, no matter how high your security clearance, Happiness Is Mandatory! Insufficient happiness will be punished by termination!

  39. OldOzzie

    Old School Conservative
    #3464186, posted on May 26, 2020 at 8:04 am
    The Australian is doing excellent work in profiling the Chinese who have influenced Dan Andrews.
    Today they highlight the achievements of a young woman, Jenny Dong.

    One of her claims to fame include this statement:
    “At the age of 26 I successfully facilitated a mutual and long-term economic collaboration agreement through China-Australia free-trade agreement for both countries,”

    Dan Andrews and China’s Aussie influencer

    RACHEL BAXENDALE
    VICTORIAN POLITICAL REPORTER

    Meet Jean Dong. She is the 33-year-old Chinese-Australian ­businesswoman who by her own description is on a global “journey of influence”.

    A professionally filmed and ­edited YouTube biography provides an extraordinary insight into the life of the young woman who is emerging as a key player in the unfolding political row over Victorian Premier Daniel ­Andrews’s controversial decision to sign up to China’s Belt and Road Initiative.

    In the short promotional film, Ms Dong claims to have played key roles in bringing about the China-Australia free-trade agreement, and Victoria’s Belt and Road Initiative deal, telling the story of her journey from student journalist in Beijing, to rubbing shoulders with Australian prime ministers and premiers and Chinese President Xi Jinping.

    The Australian can reveal that Ms Dong, director and chief executive of the Australia-China Belt and Road Initiative company, was part of a youth delegation sent to China in 2014, alongside Mike Yang, a former adviser to Mr ­Andrews.

    Mr Yang is credited with being the architect of the strong and ­enduring relationship between Mr Andrews and China’s communist government.

    Asked whether the pair met each other on the trip, and ­whether they had an ongoing ­association, Ms Dong’s spokesman said only: “Mike Yang had left the ­Victorian government when ACBRI was asked to advise on BRI opportunities.”

    Mr Yang, who was photographed with Mr Andrews on the Great Wall of China in 2013, has been a vice-president of the Australian Council for the Promotion of Peaceful Reunification of China, an organisation criticised as being a front for spreading pro-Community Party policies and messages in Australia. Mr Yang has defended the group, describing it as nothing more than another Chinese community group.

    The Australian revealed on Monday that ACBRI was awarded two taxpayer-funded contracts valued at $36,850 to advise the Andrews government on the Belt and Road Inititiative.

    Ms Dong’s 2015 promotional video, entitled Journey of Influence, shows her standing on a ­bayside promontory with Melbourne’s skyline behind her, speaking of the people she says have been inspirational “sparks” in her life.

    It was recorded during her time as managing director of Spark Corporation Group — a business she has described as being focused on Chinese investment in Australian agriculture and resources and “expansion of Australian businesses into Chinese markets through strategic partnerships”.

    “It was my mother that first inspired me that nothing comes easy, but never give up. At the age of three, I started playing the piano,” Ms Dong says, as the video cuts to her engaged in a musical performance.

    “It was the first female journalists who lived in war zones and promoted peace through reporting the truth that inspired me to understand that having courage and purpose to always keep me motivated to fight for what I believe.

    “At the age of 11, I challenged the old Chinese media rules and opened the doors for thousands of youth to raise their voice.”

    Ms Dong’s profile when she attended the Australia-China Youth Dialogue in Beijing with Mr Yang in 2014 said she had “enjoyed a rich experience as the editor of Youth newspaper (China) and national reporter for CCTV television station (China)”.

    China Central Television is the predominant network in mainland China, owned and controlled by the Chinese Communist Party.

    It is not clear which newspaper Ms Dong was describing in her reference to “Youth”. Asked whether she was referring to the China Youth Daily — run by the Communist Youth League of China — a spokesman for Ms Dong played down her role. “Jean has never been a career journalist,” he said. “She was briefly a volunteer reporter for a high school student newspaper before she came to Australia as a teenager.”

    Ms Dong studied commerce at the University of Adelaide, graduating in 2009, and gained employment with consulting firm PwC.

    “At the age of 21 I presented and convinced the PwC Australian leadership to consider Asia growth as a priority strategy and to achieve a clear advantage over its competitors,” Ms Dong says in her video as photos are displayed of her with former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull, then Tasmanian Liberal premier Will Hodgman and former Labor foreign minister Bob Carr.

    “At the age of 26 I successfully facilitated a mutual and long-term economic collaboration agreement through China-Australia free-trade agreement for both countries,” she says as a photo appears of then prime minister Tony Abbott, Mr Xi and then trade minister Andrew Robb signing ChAFTA. The Australian has established that in 2014 Ms Dong entered the orbit of Mr Yang. The two emerging influential figures in the Chinese-Australian community were delegates at the 2014 Australia-Chinese Youth Dialogue in Beijing.

    Mr Yang worked for Mr Andrews while he was opposition leader, from 2011 to 2013, and is credited with being the architect of the now Premier’s pro-China strategy. There were only 30 delegates to the Beijing conference.

    While it is unclear if the pair interacted during the conference, it is the first known association between Ms Dong and someone close to the Andrews camp.

  40. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Imperial Germany in Pacific Ocean was not a threat?

    Imperial Germany certainly was a threat in the Pacific. Read the works of Fritz Fischer, former Professor of History at the University of Hamburg, based on research done in the archives of Imperial Germany.

  41. Mater

    A professional military has a culture which encourages envy, back biting, and entitlement. The more “elite” the units, the more this is a problem. Many members of elite units believe that their reputational status puts them above good order and discipline.

    And just how would you know this, Bob?
    Did you have to deal with SASR in the Q Store? Were they rude to you? Call you a Pogo? Demand something you didn’t have, or didn’t wish to give away?

    Perhaps they are just called on to do stuff that is above and beyond what is standard. Perhaps being considered “elite” drives the pursuit of perfection, and hence, results in a dark world. Like everything, it can go too far, but it’s much better that the alternative.

    One minute you’re whinging that slovenly, ill-disciplined, drugged-out artillerymen dropped a H&I mission on your position, and the next, you’re griping about “elite” soldiers, who exemplify commitment.

    You hate “elite” soldiers because you were sub-standard. Truthfully, I think you just hate professional soldiers, full stop.

    Back up your assertion. Fill us in with your many (and personal) interactions with serving “elite” soldiers, and how they demonstrated that they think they are “above good order and discipline”.

    You are WAY outside your lane on this one. Stick to writing memoirs about the difficulty of opening ration tins with a FRED and/or describing Unauthorised Discharges.

  42. Geriatric Mayfly

    Perving telescopes reveal astronomical porn. A bottomless swag of pics to while away the lockdown at star.ucl.ac.uk
    Some may even provoke the unsolved question, “Why the fuck are we here?”

  43. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    You hate “elite” soldiers because you were sub-standard. Truthfully, I think you just hate professional soldiers, full stop

    Game, set and match to Mater.

  44. rickw

    “At the age of 26 I successfully facilitated a mutual and long-term economic collaboration agreement through China-Australia free-trade agreement for both countries,”

    I wonder exactly what that “facilitation” entailed?

  45. Ragu

    just recently took my 10k and sunk it into heating/cooling for the whole house

    First lot went to Lawyers without Mercs. Second lot I’ll use to build a room downstairs and a little left over to keep the auto transmission in the Mazda 626 going.

    Working huge hours on a pay rate that hasn’t moved in ten plus years means I have fuck all super. Be nice if I could cash it all out.

  46. twostix

    Calls for $40,000 new-home buyers grant to avoid industry ‘bloodbath’

    What this is, is for newly landed Chinese and Indian immigrants to be given a $40,000 cash gift from Australians.

  47. OldOzzie

    Benefits of nuclear power are becoming obvious

    TED O’BRIEN

    If our scientists and politicians, along with everyday Australians, can engage in a national conversation about the federal government’s tech­nology investment road map, we will finally break through the ­perennial stand-off on energy and climate change.

    With a discussion paper welcoming active public engagement on different technologies, including small modular nuclear reactors (SMRs), the Coalition govern­ment’s road map marks the next phase in the debate.

    The importance of a “social ­licence” to operate a nuclear facility was the biggest lesson learned chairing the recent par­liamentary inquiry into nuclear energy. The trust of local communities is paramount. That’s why we recommended a national two-way conversation about the prospect of nuclear energy, and why any approval of nuclear fac­ilities must be subject to the informed consent of the local communities involved.

    If we’re to put the Australian people at the centre of the national conversation on energy and climate change, we cannot resort to the old way of framing the debate where climate change is a fight between believers and sceptics, and energy policy is a battle between fossil fuels and renewables.

    A contest of ideas is good, but these debates have centred on a false logic. They encouraged a race to the highest moral ground as passions flared and advocates signalled their virtue by claiming love of the environment, support for humankind and protecting our children’s future, but did nothing to help solve the complex generational problems. In contrast, Australians have been spared ideologically divisive debates about COVID-19. Pragmatism and unity are the order of the day.

    As restrictions are lifted and we start focusing on issues beyond the virus, it is naive to think political debate won’t reignite over climate change and energy policy. However, that doesn’t mean there isn’t an opportunity to capitalise on the spirit of the times and reset the public conversation on energy.

    The technology investment road map takes a system-wide view on low-emissions technologies to deliver a reliable, afford­able and cleaner energy mix. And it was right to include modern nuc­lear technology such as SMRs.

    According to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, SMRs could reduce the build cost by shifting most construction offsite to factories for modular manufacturing and could improve safety by using passive safety features and next-generation technologies.

    Nuclear energy is likely to be the barometer for testing if people are genuine in their desire for a pragmatic and evidence-based ­debate on Australia’s future energy mix, because no alternative technology carries so much emotional baggage while offering such substantive value.

    There has been deep-seated anxiety about nuclear technology in Australia for generations, and it has long been assumed the issue was too divisive to be seriously considered. Whether due to well-documented accidents involving older nuclear technologies at Chernobyl and Fukushima — or pop-culture references from Godzilla to The Simpsons — until recently it has been relatively easy to generate community anxiety about nuclear power.

    The evidence on nuclear power tells a different story. Nothing ­surprised me more than to learn, during parliamentary committee hearings, that nuclear is the safest of all energy sources. According to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, there have been fewer deaths per unit of energy attributed to nuclear than any other method of electricity generation, including hydro, solar and wind.

    No wonder 30 nations collectively use more than 450 nuclear power plants to produce 11 per cent of the world’s electricity, including comparable countries to Australia such as Britain, France, Canada and the US.

    Climate change is the game changer. Under the Paris Agreement, we are obliged to reduce our carbon dioxide emissions by 26 per cent on 2005 levels by 2030. As a zero-emission baseload technology, nuclear is the cleanest form of energy on par with renewable sources such as wind and solar, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In 2018, nuclear power plants around the world produced 50 per cent more clean electricity than wind and solar combined.

    Rather than being perpetually divisive, I believe nuclear technology has the capacity to unite Australians. It is a proposition that brings together progressives and conservatives within the Coalition. Likewise, within the Labor movement, the Australian Workers Union and the Construction Forestry Maritime Mining and Energy Union have been calling for nuclear energy to be on the table for consideration.

    Now a test of leadership lies ahead for Anthony Albanese. Will the Opposition Leader tip his hat in favour of a sensible national conversation with the Australian people, or will he return to the ­politics of old and run a “not in my backyard” scare campaign?

    With so much at stake, we must hope that the public applies old-fashioned Australian pragmatism: let’s hear the evidence before knocking it.

    Ted O’Brien is federal member for Fairfax and chairman of the House of Representatives standing committee on the environment and energy.

  48. H B Bear

    Hats off to McKinsey egghead Fred Hilmer Fauxfacts ex-CEO whose billion dollar purchase of NZ’s Stufwas sold for AUD1.

    It certainly gives Young Warwick a run for his money.

  49. Snoopy

    Rex Mango
    #3464058, posted on May 25, 2020 at 10:40 pm

    Red haired woman who talks really fast, reckons data storage is 10% of the world’s electricity budget. Find that hard to believe.

    Today, data centers consume about 2% of electricity worldwide; that could rise to 8% of the global total by 2030, according to a study by Anders Andrae, who researches sustainable information and communications technology for Huawei Technologies Ltd.

    U.S. data centers consumed 70 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity in 2014, the same amount that 6.4 million American homes used that year.

  50. Roger

    What this is, is for newly landed Chinese and Indian immigrants to be given a $40,000 cash gift from Australians.

    Australians likely facing high unemployment numbers, stagnant wages and high taxes for the foreseeable future.

  51. Sure I’ll take $40k but it is a bad idea for society.

    Thanks for the free money.

    🤡🌏💥🤑

  52. Roger

    Hats off to McKinsey egghead Fred Hilmer Fauxfacts ex-CEO whose billion dollar purchase of NZ’s Stufwas sold for AUD1.

    It certainly gives Young Warwick a run for his money.

    I don’t imagine he’ll be including that particular tale in the talks he gives as a “celebrity speaker”.

  53. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Truthfully, I think you just hate professional soldiers, full stop.’

    Envy. Which, in the natural course of things turned to self-loathing once realisation dawned that certain expectations set out by others couldn’t be fulfilled, which in turn led to the reaction of a toddler denied a toy – ‘didn’t want it anyway!’ – and reached its inevitable conclusion:

    ‘I ended up in the army to do a job, not get a job’.

  54. jo

    notafan
    #3464185, posted on May 26, 2020 at 8:04 am
    ME Bank is very woke

    Took $216k out of our investment loan.Took most of our business to TikTok at nearly half the interest rate. We are positively geared, money guaranteed anyway. Place has doubled in value. I reckon the’re in big trouble, loaned money back to the union funds invested invested in renewables with maybe a reduction in subsidies. Nah, Government too stupid to do that.

  55. egg_

    So what does one narcissist do about another breaking his rules ?

    Don’t they quickly establish a pecking order amongst themselves (according to power)?
    (Anecdotally, witnessed a retired narc Headmaster defer to his golden haired youngest son’s narc missus).

  56. egg_

    Is Dutton Derangement Syndrome a thing yet?

    At TheirABC for sure.
    A favourite parody on Micallef.

  57. calli

    Now hang the f/ on. 50 percent??!! That’s massive.

    Yes. I could only dream about that.

    These things are parasitising the source of their income. Ultimately the end will come, and it won’t be pretty.

  58. Dr Faustus

    Beijing’s English-language mouthpiece, Global Daily, tells us that WA needs to get its shit together, do the right thing, and join Djibouti, Pakistan and Victoria as a BRI client state:

    Some Australian organizations, such as the Australia China Business Council, believed West Australia, which has deep ties with China over minerals trade, should also join the BRI.

    That probably explains Fat Clive’s panic attempt last week to join the WA Billionaires For China.

    Failed Hermit Kingdom.

  59. dopey

    National Sorry Day today.

  60. H B Bear

    Fat Clive would probably have trouble having his local Chinese take his order for sweet and sour pork (extra batter).

  61. Geriatric Mayfly

    dopey
    #3464261, posted on May 26, 2020 at 9:52 am
    National Sorry Day today.

    Damn. And me with no sackcloth and ashes.

  62. Snoopy

    That’s it. I’m sorried out. Sorry.

  63. rickw

    Calls for $40,000 new-home buyers grant to avoid industry ‘bloodbath’

    What a cotton wool socialist hellhole this country is.

    Australian Governments mission is to stop anyone ever getting sick or going broke, all with the few productive people’s money.

    Australian Below Averageness V American Exceptionalism.

  64. Rossini

    Late to the party……….
    Congratulations Sydney boy.

  65. One minute you’re whinging that slovenly, ill-disciplined, drugged-out artillerymen dropped a H&I mission on your position, and the next, you’re griping about “elite” soldiers, who exemplify commitment.

    Care to rephrase that? The only commitment apparent in the current debacle is to personal reputation, both by the accused and the accuser.

    You hate “elite” soldiers because you were sub-standard. Truthfully, I think you just hate professional soldiers, full stop.

    You have no idea how I performed as a soldier. Only people who served with me are entitled to make those judgements. And one of these days you’ll avoid ad hom abuse – that will be a short time after hell freezes over.

    Back up your assertion. Fill us in with your many (and personal) interactions with serving “elite” soldiers, and how they demonstrated that they think they are “above good order and discipline”.

    I could do better than that. I could quote you reams of data garnered from responses to questionnaires completed by Vietnam veterans since the early nineties. Unfortunately it’s confidential, but suffice it to say that it debunks much of the mythology that prevails here, and at reunions and RSLs all over the country.

    You could call it the weathering of memory, or you could be more direct and call it bullshit.

  66. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    National Sorry Day today.

    Sorry for what?

  67. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Not really much of a honey trap, but we are talking about Dickhead Dan:

    https://www.thetvfestival.com/whats-on/speakers/speakers-and-panelists/jean-dong/

    BRI love you long time

  68. rickw

    Sydney Boy

    Congrats, what field ?

    (sits back and hopes it Vietnam war studies)

    Congrats! Please let it be Vietnam war studies!!

  69. Sydney Boy: Please accept my most heartfelt congratulations.

  70. Snoopy

    Legalise Sedition
    #3464248, posted on May 26, 2020 at 9:36 am
    Sure I’ll take $40k but it is a bad idea for society.

    Thanks for the free money.

    I can just picture dot kicking back on 270m2 at Marsden Park.

  71. Dr Faustus

    With a discussion paper welcoming active public engagement on different technologies, including small modular nuclear reactors (SMRs), the Coalition govern­ment’s road map marks the next phase in the debate.

    In 2006, Ziggy Switkowski found the major non-political obstacle to nuclear power in Australia was cost – nuclear power would work out 20% – 50% more than the (then mostly coal-fired) average ~$40/MWh wholesale electricity price (ie $48 to $60/MWh). Industry-crushing increases.

    A smart guy, he also pointed out that these economics would be overturned by the coming focus on CO2 abatement.

    They certainly were; the average NEM power price is now between $70 and $100/MWh – and nuclear relief is still 15 years away.

    Self-inflicted harm by jellyfish.

  72. Entropy

    The Australian can reveal that Ms Dong, director and chief executive of the Australia-China Belt and Road Initiative company, was part of a youth delegation sent to China in 2014, alongside Mike Yang, a former adviser to Mr ­Andrews.

    Mr Yang is credited with being the architect of the strong and ­enduring relationship between Mr Andrews and China’s communist government.

    Asked whether the pair met each other on the trip, and ­whether they had an ongoing ­association, Ms Dong’s spokesman said only: “Mike Yang had left the ­Victorian government when ACBRI was asked to advise on BRI opportunities.”

    That would be a yes the.
    Pity the journo didn’t have time for a follow up q on that one.

  73. Mother Lode

    That’s it. I’m sorried out. Sorry.

    Four people?

    Pretty sorry effort.

  74. Dr Faustus

    Sorry for what?

    Sorry – we’re not going to pony up with a third house of parliament, a standing Guilty Business commission, and free LandCruisers all round for the big men.
    Sorry.

  75. Free Radical

    I received a pass on my PhD.

    Lol. Forget the back-slappers with their false congratulations. A PhD is not well regarded at the Cat. Not really.

  76. Australian Below Averageness V American Exceptionalism.

    Australian Below Averageness = 4 deaths per million from Covid 19.
    American Exceptionalism = 302 deaths per million from Covid 19.
    Australian Below Averageness (share of the population with an income of less than 50 percent of the respective national median income) = 12 percent.
    American Exceptionalism (share of the population with an income of less than 50 percent of the respective national median income) = 17 percent.
    Australian Below Averageness (firearm-related death rate per 100,000 population per year) = 1.04
    American Exceptionalism (firearm-related death rate per 100,000 population per year) = 12.21

  77. JC

    Maybe she was just referring to data storage alone. Perhaps she was referring to the the internet of things.

    Around 10% of the world’s total electricity consumption is being used by the internet, according to a recent research report from Swedish KTH. The numbers have grown from 8% in 2012, illustrating the increasing effects of the internet’s rapid growth.

  78. Tintarella di Luna

    Well done Dr Sydney Boy congratulations and every best wish

  79. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Lol. Forget the back-slappers with their false congratulations. A PhD is not well regarded at the Cat. Not really.

    This from Grogarly, who wouldn’t know a Phd if he fell over one, in the street?

  80. feelthebern

    This is why Trump will win in 2020.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erWEj1GdxoE

    Karen: Someone call the sheriff, someone is being belligerent.

  81. stackja

    free rad·i·cal short-lived

  82. Dr Faustus

    Prime Minister Scott Morrison to warn of hard economic recovery post-coronavirus

    Mr Morrison is expected to warn companies will need to “get off the medication” of handouts like JobKeeper, by declaring, “at some point you’ve got to get your economy out of ICU”.

    “We must enable our businesses to earn our way out of this crisis. That means focusing on the things that can make our businesses go faster.”

    Get off the medication“, WTF.

    Tip, tippy top advice for someone who has just lost a perfectly sound business because of social distancing and panic-closed borders – and faces a repeat dose of CMO-directed government disruption at any time.

    Absolute count.

  83. Tom

    Who was that masked man?

    Behold the new compulsory tribal uniform for the non-thinking anti-intellectual collectivist zombie.

  84. Tintarella di Luna

    I wonder exactly what that “facilitation” entailed?

    I think it’s a spellcheck fail

  85. Mater

    I could do better than that. I could quote you reams of data garnered from responses to questionnaires completed by Vietnam veterans since the early nineties. Unfortunately it’s confidential, but suffice it to say that it debunks much of the mythology that prevails here, and at reunions and RSLs all over the country.

    You COULD quote it, but unfortunately it’s confidential? Right! How do you have access then? This story sounds reminiscent of some of the whoppers produced by pretenders on ANZAC Day. You know, secret missions into Hanoi, which I could tell you about, but would then need to kill you!

    Is “it” specifically about “elite” soldiers, or just a broad spectrum hatchet job on professional soldiers as a whole? You are swinging a bloody broad brush, despite referring to alleged incidents, which supposedly involved a relatively small number of people.

    Putting aside the fact that you are using Vietnam (again) to tarnish everyone, just give me a hint as to what “it” is. The name of the study will suffice, and your reason for complete access to it’s contents will suffice.

    1735099
    #3133246, posted on August 16, 2019 at 5:02 pm
    Hackworth got into trouble in 1971 for saying publicly the war in Vietnam could not be won, and called for U.S. withdrawal.
    He left the army (after threats of court martial because he confronted the US military establishment) and moved the the Gold Coast.
    Eventually he moved to Brisbane where he set up a restaurant (Scaramouche). I remember eating there.
    He was also active in the Australian antinuclear movement.

    A great man

    David Hackworth, the “great man”, established of an “elite” unit which was used to “out-guerrilla the guerrillas” in Vietnam, did he not?

    Evidence, Bob, please. Not assertions from the suburbs of Toowoomba. You have never been part of (or even privy to) the Special Forces world, and you haven’t the foggiest idea of what you are talking about.

  86. rickw

    Australian Below Averageness = 4 deaths per million from Covid 19.
    American Exceptionalism = 302 deaths per million from Covid 19.
    Australian Below Averageness (share of the population with an income of less than 50 percent of the respective national median income) = 12 percent.
    American Exceptionalism (share of the population with an income of less than 50 percent of the respective national median income) = 17 percent.
    Australian Below Averageness (firearm-related death rate per 100,000 population per year) = 1.04
    American Exceptionalism (firearm-related death rate per 100,000 population per year) = 12.21

    Australia does an average job if you believe the “numbers” and if you believe it is Government’s job to protect everyone from everything.

    It is definitely the place to be if you believe in grinding mediocrity and Government meddling in everything.

    In the end Australia will run out of good luck and other people’s money.

  87. Tintarella di Luna

    I saw an interesting comment on Tim Blair’s post about the vulgar termagant du jour the comment referred to the particular individual as being and always being a COAT. Thought it was some sort if grammar fail but looked ut up in ghe urban dictionary anyway weeehhhlll dear me what a surprise!

  88. Bar Beach Swimmer

    Sydney Boy
    #3464178, posted on May 26, 2020 at 8:00 am
    Good news. I received a pass on my PhD. Notified yesterday.

    Congrats, Dr Boy!

    + lots

    To Sydney Boy

    Relish the moment; relish the day,
    And fitted out in gown and hat,
    The beams of light from smiling crowds,
    Fall all on to thee –
    Benevolently.

    Then afterwards with friends and kin,
    hold high that precious work of know-how,
    While all the world doth turn about,
    It falls to thee –
    To search it out.

  89. egg_

    “at some point you’ve got to get your economy out of ICU”.

    Only a 30% at best CV-19 survival rate on ventilators, numpty.

    Probably synonymous with the numpty’s stewardship of da virus/curve.

  90. liliana

    We need a lifeline to avoid what is likely to be a bloodbath in our industry and we need it now.

    No we don’t. We need to allow the market to self correct. There is no housing shortage and there is no need for taxpayers to bail out the building industry.

  91. Bar Beach Swimmer

    National Sorry Day today

    Still Not-sorry.

  92. thefrollickingmole

    I could quote you reams of data garnered from responses to questionnaires completed by Vietnam veterans since the early nineties. Unfortunately it’s confidential

    Mysterious mysteries of the unknown…..

    Warfare by survey.

    Bound to work.

  93. Infidel Tiger King

    Lol. Forget the back-slappers with their false congratulations. A PhD is not well regarded at the Cat. Not really.

    Depends what it was for.

    95% of tertiary degrees are worthless, so I tend to agree.

  94. egg_

    Sorry we didn’t “invade” sooner, Abo Industry.

  95. Johno

    David Hackworth had a policy of sending his officers down to Nui Dat to gain experience with our Rifle Companys. We had a Captain go bush with us for 8 days, huge man, his webbing looked ridiculous on him.
    It was a complete culture shock to him,by the time he left us he had learnt to lower his voice,use hand signals etc. He was amazed by the training we all had.Any one of us could do every job in the section. He was Airborne, supposed to be elite.

  96. Bar Beach Swimmer

    calli
    #3464283, posted on May 26, 2020 at 10:12 am
    Who was that masked man?
    At least it shuts him up

    Calli, that is not the face of a serving potus – that’s the face of his grandfather.

    JC, can that face get up on Nov 3?

  97. egg_

    Sorry about KRuddy, aka Kokoda Kev Kardashian the Tarin Kowt Scout.

  98. thefrollickingmole

    shiny new fred

  99. Putting aside the fact that you are using Vietnam (again) to tarnish everyone, just give me a hint as to what “it” is. The name of the study will suffice, and your reason for complete access to it’s contents will suffice.

    Nope.
    Get in touch with Mark Dapin and ask him if he will make it available to you.
    His Ph D thesis is on line.
    Google is your friend.

    David Hackworth, the “great man”, established of an “elite” unit which was used to “out-guerrilla the guerrillas” in Vietnam, did he not?

    And he disowned them and his country.

    Evidence, Bob, please. Not assertions from the suburbs of Toowoomba. You have never been part of (or even privy to) the Special Forces world, and you haven’t the foggiest idea of what you are talking about.

    I’m not at all disappointed that I’ve never had anything to do with the “Special Forces world” (whatever that is). Judging by your use of the term, you believe that they belong to a different world. That’s exactly the perception that has landed them in the shit they’re in now.
    And I’m wondering what “the suburbs of Toowoomba” have to do with anything.
    Terry Egan hailed from Toowoomba.

  100. Good morning all.
    So ‘Sorry Day’ is today? Wowee.
    He delivered it in 2008 I think? Has there been any improvement in the lives of blacks? Has there been reconciliation? Thinking no would be the answer.
    I believe Rudd called this one of the great things he er, accomplished in government. Says much for his work that symbolism trumps anything concrete.

  101. Dr Faustus

    Eventually he moved to Brisbane where he set up a restaurant (Scaramouche). I remember eating there.

    Scaramouche was set up by Peter Hackworth, before she met and married David Hackworth.

  102. areff

    Hats off to McKinsey egghead Fred Hilmer

    Don’t be too hard on poor Fred, who did much to lift the lot if the challenged and disabled. Had he not plucked godson Mark Scott out of the education round and installed him atop the Silly et al, he would never have acquired the managerial experience to make the ABC what it is today. That same competence is now applying the Fairfax school of management and belief to NSW’s schools.

  103. Mother Lode

    You COULD quote it, but unfortunately it’s confidential?

    In contrast these same survey results are overflowing with praise of the elite Super-8 Projectionist units.

  104. Mother Lode

    Australia does an average job if you believe the “numbers” and if you believe it is Government’s job to protect everyone from everything.

    Numbers is personally reassured by anything that makes being ‘below average’ seem good.

  105. Tim Neilson

    JC
    #3464299, posted on May 26, 2020 at 10:36 am
    He’s out of the basement

    I really thought you were referring to m0nty…

  106. Mater

    Nope.
    Get in touch with Mark Dapin and ask him if he will make it available to you.
    His Ph D thesis is on line.

    So have you read the raw surveys, or just read his thesis. If it’s the latter, why can’t you provide the evidence here? If it’s the former, was confidentiality broken?

    And he disowned them and his country.

    Oh, OK.

    Q: Did your soldiers have any compunction about shooting civilians on the chance that they were Vietcong?

    Hackworth: I think the average American soldier perceived the enemy as ‘but for the grace of God, there go I,’ and they were reluctant to shoot somebody unless they knew that they were the enemy. But if the guy were coming at him at night, if the guy were walking in an area he shouldn’t be in, and had weapons or something like that, the way I trained my soldiers was to react automatically. Don’t get the thinking process going. When you see a right cross come at you, block it with your left and go in with a right hook. I never had problems with soldiers being reluctant to fight.

    Even in his dotage, he doesn’t seem to agree with you.

    I’m not at all disappointed that I’ve never had anything to do with the “Special Forces world” (whatever that is). Judging by your use of the term, you believe that they belong to a different world.

    The fact that you think they don’t operate in a different sphere, shows the limitations of your knowledge. Not a belief, merely a fact.

    The CIA doesn’t have the size or the authority to do some of the things we can do,” said one JSOC operator.

    The president has given JSOC the rare authority to select individuals for its kill list — and then to kill, rather than capture, them. Critics charge that this individual man-hunting mission amounts to assassination, a practice prohibited by U.S. law. JSOC’s list is not usually coordinated with the CIA, which maintains a similar but shorter roster of names.

    If it makes you feel better, I’ll be the first to admit that I have no experience in the world of conscripts who scurried off to the safety of the Q Store at the first opportunity. I don’t think I missed much, but I’m sure it’s worthy of a memoir.

  107. H B Bear

    The Hunchback may have a Dong but I’ll be that ordinary Victoriastanis that end up taking it up the @rse.

  108. Top Ender

    Hackworth’s memoir Steel my Soldiers’ Hearts is well worth reading:

    In January 1969, one of the most promising young lieutenant colonels the US Army had ever seen touched down in Vietnam for his second tour of duty, which would turn out to be his most daring and legendary.

    David H. Hackworth had just completed the writing of a tactical handbook for the Pentagon, and now he had been ordered to put his counterguerilla-fighting theories into action. He was given the morale-drained 4/39th—a battalion of poorly led draftees suffering the Army’s highest casualty rate and considered its worst fighting battalion. Hackworth’s hard-nosed, inventive and inspired leadership quickly turned the 4/39th into Vietnam’s valiant and ferocious Hardcore Recondos.

    Drawing on interviews with soldiers from the Hardcore Battalion conducted over the past decade by his partner and coauthor, Eilhys England, Hackworth takes readers along on their sniper missions, ambush actions, helicopter strikes and inside the quagmire of command politics. With Steel My Soldiers’ Hearts, Hackworth places the brotherhood of the 4/39th into the pantheon of our nation’s most heroic warriors.

  109. woolfe

    Those who have upgraded to the new Apple ios 13.5 operating system for iphone note that it has the new COVID exposure logging built in.

    To make sure it is disabled (or enabled if you chose) go to Settings: Privacy: Health: you will then see COVID -19 exposure logging at the top. Tap to turn on if required. Note the default should be off.

  110. cohenite

    OldOzzie
    #3464240, posted on May 26, 2020 at 9:26 am
    Benefits of nuclear power are becoming obvious
    TED O’BRIEN

    In an otherwise good essay on nukes this shit:

    Climate change is the game changer. Under the Paris Agreement, we are obliged to reduce our carbon dioxide emissions by 26 per cent on 2005 levels by 2030. As a zero-emission baseload technology, nuclear is the cleanest form of energy on par with renewable sources such as wind and solar, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In 2018, nuclear power plants around the world produced 50 per cent more clean electricity than wind and solar combined.

    Man made climate change does not exist. FMD, how much has this lie cost the world. It makes Lysenkoism look like a pimple on an elephant’s arse.

  111. Farmer Gez

    COVID capture and store program in Vicco has five more polluters on the list today.

    More expert scientific opinions are wondering how this virus is so contagious for human to human transmission and yet doesn’t show the same contagion in the bats it came from.

    If the science shows manipulation then Danjing is up the shit big time.

  112. Tailgunner

    Poll: Up to 94 Percent of Americans Want Economic Nationalist Overhaul in Wake of Chinese Coronavirus Crisis

    Up to 94 percent of American voters say they want an economic nationalist overhaul of the United States’ economy in the wake of the Chinese coronavirus crisis, a survey reveals.

    Hehe, great stuff, Maj.
    Are the Saxons beginning to Hate?
    AltRight
    I’m still Wayback, obvs.

  113. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    All you chaps with what you consider to be undersized appendages need to stop blaming half of the human race for your problems.

    we aren’t blaming women for all our problems, we are blaming them for NOT HAVING ENOUGH KIDS and precipitating the downfall of western civilisation

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