Open Forum: May 23, 2020

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2,127 Responses to Open Forum: May 23, 2020

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  1. Infidel Tiger King

    Fuck China.

  2. Zyconoclast

    P0rn lovers of the world can rejoice.

    Researchers in Australia claim they have recorded the fastest ever internet data speed.
    A team from Monash, Swinburne and RMIT universities logged a data speed of 44.2 terabits per second (Tbps).
    At that speed, users could download more than 1,000 high-definition movies in less than a second.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-52769796

  3. Vomit in terror.

    A good argument for sortition ands ostracism.

    We didn’t vote for the Bourbons, why do we get third rate impostors?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_families_of_Australia

  4. Zyconoclast

    Schoolgirls in India are facing a massive shortage of sanitary napkins because schools – a critical part of the supply chain – are closed during the coronavirus lockdown. This has left millions of teenagers across the country anxious, writes the BBC’s Geeta Pandey in Delhi.

    It’s an important campaign in a country where only 36% of its 355 million menstruating females use napkins (the remaining use old cloth, rags, husk or ash to manage the flow) and nearly 23 million girls drop out of school annually after they start their periods.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-52718434

  5. stackja

    Nine against the world?

  6. JD

    Let’s get into the swing of things 🙂

  7. Bruce of Newcastle

    I’m up too late, so here’s a clip.
    When I was a kid a granny from across the road gave my brother and I her husband’s bandolier and belt. He’d been a light horseman. She’d kept them. We did not respect his memory since we knew nothing. Now I’m a scientist and my brother is a CEO. Not sure we know anything now, still.

  8. Rex Anger

    Damn good film, the Light Horsemen. Bit Victorian-centric though. Yes it was the 4th that got the job of charging the Eastern side of town across an open field, straight down the throat of the Turkish defences, and that makes good filming. But the 12th from NSW (Predecessors to my old regiment) got the interesting approach on the more westerly side though much tighter country.

    I remember we had a hand-drawn map of the charge, produced by a 12ALH member after the war (He’d been a civil draughtsman). Remarkable stuff.

    Ditto the surviving period photos from the Desert campaign of Palesrinian towns, a captured Albatros fighter, etc.

  9. Knuckle Dragger
    #3461358, posted on May 23, 2020 at 12:41 am
    Farter time. 19 hours today’ll do me.

    For early morning Cats – a reminder that 18 hours ago Liability Bob claimed Helen Keller was a titan of socialism.

    ????

  10. areff

    If China was miffed with us before, this is going to get their pigtails in a bigger twist. (Via instapundit)

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2020/may/21/australian-researchers-see-virus-design-manipulati/

  11. Cpt Seahawks

    Stuff China, the Aussies around me are Fn scary. Blind to all but super balance. Economy is not a consideration. Karen World.
    Meanwhile had a VB on north wall of Hillarys this arvo, nice.

  12. Steve trickler

    Behind the Scenes.



  13. Steve trickler

    A shame we don’t get to see the vocals.



  14. Tintarella di Luna

    Tom thanks for your efforts just letting you know Mark Knight link not working

  15. rickw

    Thanks Tom!

    Gary Varvel.

  16. rickw

    Gotta love the DC-3! First aircraft I ever got to go aboard!

  17. rickw

    Mark Knight
    Url fixed up.

    Thanks Bruce, wondering when Victorian’s will wake up to these to traitors. Perhaps they’re on board with the program?

  18. calli

    From the OOT. DrBeau’s fishcake fiasco.

    Bruce from WA has the right idea. Don’t over-mash the spuds, and don’t overcook them so they’re watery. You want them dry and starchy. If the mixture looks a bit wet, add a little sifted cornflour to dry it off, not too much as the mixture as he described it goes in the fridge to harden up. A couple of hours should do it.

    Pull it out and make up the rissoles. At this point you can put them in beaten egg and panko breadcrumbs to make them cheffie. Back in the fridge. You can also freeze the excess for later.

    Cooking – you can fry them off in oil/butter if you’re game. Remember all the contents are already cooked – all you want to do is brown them and heat them. Or…you can spray them generously with olive oil and do them in a 180C oven on baking parchment. They will never fall apart this way.

    My secret ingredients (don’t let anyone know) are a dash of vinegar and a double dash of tabasco in the mix.

  19. rickw

    Daily dose of Vietnam!

  20. rickw

    Pandemic advice from Phil Robertson:

  21. I am dying to know Helen Keller’s contributions to socialism.

  22. calli

    Yes, Varvel for me too. Gone to glory.

  23. calli

    Knight! He does a great Dan the Man. And the two Queensland Karens from Leak are pretty good too.

  24. One of the parrot’s many on-air apologies –

    On 28 April 2005, on my breakfast program on Radio 2GB, I broadcast comments about Lebanese males, including Lebanese Mus lims. The comments were made following a Channel Nine television current affairs show about the conduct of young Lebanese men in Hickson Road at The Rocks. The Administrative Decisions Tribunal has found that my comments incited serious contempt of Lebanese males, including Lebanese Mus lims. Those comments were in breach of the New South Wales Anti-Discrimination Act. I apologise for making those comments, which I recognise were unlawful. I also apologise on behalf of Radio 2GB.

    [Edited. Sinc]

  25. Legalise Sedition #3461413, posted on May 23, 2020 at 6:48 am
    I am dying to know Helen Keller’s contributions to socialism.

    FYI, Helen Keller was a communist.
    The woman was a fervent believer & a lifelong advocate of extreme socialism.
    She never wavered.

  26. I am dying to know Helen Keller’s contributions to socialism.

    If Keller were alive today, she would be labelled by some as a “bleeding heart”.
    Her contributions to socialism were many.
    From Wikipedia-

    Keller went on to become a world-famous speaker and author. She is remembered as an advocate for people with disabilities, amid numerous other causes. The deaf community was widely impacted by her. She traveled to twenty-five different countries giving motivational speeches about Deaf people’s conditions. She was a suffragette, pacifist, radical socialist, birth control supporter, and opponent of Woodrow Wilson. In 1915, she and George A. Kessler founded the Helen Keller International (HKI) organization. This organization is devoted to research in vision, health, and nutrition. In 1916 she sent money to the NAACP ashamed of the Southern un-Christian treatment of “colored people”. In 1920, she helped to found the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Keller traveled to over 40 countries with Sullivan, making several trips to Japan and becoming a favorite of the Japanese people. Keller met every U.S. President from Grover Cleveland to Lyndon B. Johnson and was friends with many famous figures, including Alexander Graham Bell, Charlie Chaplin and Mark Twain. Keller and Twain were both considered political radicals allied with leftist politics and, as a consequence, their political views have been forgotten or glossed over in American high school textbooks and the popular mind.

    Keller was a member of the Socialist Party and actively campaigned and wrote in support of the working class from 1909 to 1921. Many of her speeches and writings were about women’s right to vote and the impacts of war; in addition, she supported causes that opposed military intervention. She had speech therapy in order to have her voice heard better by the public. When the Rockefeller-owned press refused to print her articles, she protested until her work was finally published. She supported Socialist Party candidate Eugene V. Debs in each of his campaigns for the presidency. Before reading Progress and Poverty, Helen Keller was already a socialist who believed that Georgism was a good step in the right direction. She later wrote of finding “in Henry George’s philosophy a rare beauty and power of inspiration, and a splendid faith in the essential nobility of human nature”.

    Keller claimed that newspaper columnists who had praised her courage and intelligence before she expressed her socialist views now called attention to her disabilities. The editor of the Brooklyn Eagle wrote that her “mistakes sprung out of the manifest limitations of her development”. Keller responded to that editor, referring to having met him before he knew of her political views:

    “At that time the compliments he paid me were so generous that I blush to remember them. But now that I have come out for socialism he reminds me and the public that I am blind and deaf and especially liable to error. I must have shrunk in intelligence during the years since I met him. … Oh, ridiculous Brooklyn Eagle! Socially blind and deaf, it defends an intolerable system, a system that is the cause of much of the physical blindness and deafness which we are trying to prevent.”

    Keller joined the Industrial Workers of the World (the IWW, known as the Wobblies) in 1912, saying that parliamentary socialism was “sinking in the political bog”. She wrote for the IWW between 1916 and 1918. In Why I Became an IWW, Keller explained that her motivation for activism came in part from her concern about blindness and other disabilities.

    It’s interesting that her good works were forgotten and ad hom attacks were directed at her once some in the media discovered she was a socialist. Now where else does that occur…..

  27. Dickhead gleefully asserts a comment was “unlawful” (Hi, fellow People’s Republic of Germany citizens) and then defamed two people in one hit, also making a mockery of alternative lifestyles.

    The tolerance is just egregious but the facade is failing. It’s always a mask for ragaholic NPCs.

  28. This Samsung spellwrecker is appalling, just appalling.

    It is nearly as bad as a clueless rich boomer from Melbourne using an iPad. 😂

  29. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Bridgewater founder Ray Dalio says the new world order is changing, with China rapidly closing in US as “the most powerful empire” on the globe.

    Dalio is full of shit. Perhaps he might show us where any communist regime has survived much more than 75 years? Secondly all the empires he refers to where capitalist, not nazi style fascist pseudo capitalism. Each empire ushered in an era of innovation and prosperity. The only thing china ushers in is an era of totalitarian repression and hyper micro management. The lack of freedom kills innovation and prosperity. The only prosperity china has built is based on pilfering by any means innovation and know how from the west. The renminbi as a reserve currency? spare me. nobody wants to hold this piece of shit currency.

    china is a not a rising power, its demographics are worst than shit. It is a totalitarian regime that has overreached, totally depended on the US with a repressed and ageing population.

    If somehow the ultra lame chinese could muster enough balls to overthrow the ccp, then dalio might have a story to tell. unfortunately the chinese people seem to be the lamest on the planet.

    it’s time to starve china of US dollars and watch it implode.

  30. calli

    Dot, the idea is to have the place closed down. Now Jones has gone legal, it’s possible some busybody alerts him to comments made here that Sinc hasn’t tidied up.

    Suggest you look at point 1. in the “rules” section above.

    Nice try Numbers.

  31. I think it’s time to ban Robert Whittaker (Numbers) from this site.

    He is clearly trying to do as Calli asserts.

    For too long this deranged mental patient and military impostor ( “I was conscripted” – no you were not) had been given free reign to semi-anonymouusly promote his shit book no one wants to read and pollute us with bizarre fantasies that contradict each other.

    Along with that he’s clearly a Moby who puts Sinclair’s hobby and livelihood in jeopardy.

    Get the fuck outta here you bitter old poseur.

  32. The struggle for the soul of Israel –

  33. Legalise Sedition
    #3461413, posted on May 23, 2020 at 6:48 am
    I am dying to know Helen Keller’s contributions to socialism.

    Butt-hurt because you displayed your ignorance upthread old mate?
    You’ll get over it……

  34. No one cares if Helen Keller was a socialist you dolt.

    It beats your bullshit stories about a war you were not conscripted into.

  35. If you want to get married in Israel, and don’t want an orthodox Rabbi to conduct the wedding, you have to go to Cyprus. This orthodox rump keeps Netanyahu in power (see 18:00 above).

  36. pete m

    Numbers is Sinc’s problem to deal with. He can in 1 swoop delete all his comments if he wants to.

    dot – you’d like what Taiwan is doing during the virus fight, and how they require government to respond to citizen polls. They also get citizens to create better government websites for them. Amazing stuff.

  37. Oh my. The RSL dodger certainly hates O.J. Simpson.

  38. Taiwan is the good bit of China. It’s why I can’t stand the anti Chunk stuff here.

    China could have been a modern democracy and fully capitalist.

    You’d basically have a pro American country with 1st world wealth, a huge anti Soviet ally in the past, 1.2 bn people and one of the oldest cultures on earth.

    It was a close run thing. Look at how much culture and self reliance the CCP crushed with their Cultural Revolution and Great Leap Backwards.

    They also do democracy better than us.

    I am not surprised with Quisling “Peking Duck Dan” Andrews in Merubin.

  39. calli

    Channel 7 getting excited over all this extra money from Jobkeeper form-filling mistakes.

    Real payday loans mentality. These are supposed to be sophisticated people, not bones or their bums westies whom they despise. Yet here we are.

    We need to shell it out because “fairness”.

  40. Calli

    How much debt are they in?

    I don’t want financial advice from Karl Stefanovic or Bandanaman.

  41. BrettW

    From the Courier Mail. I also noted elsewhere Setka trying to get Mike O’Connor ousted as CFMMEU boss and install Cain. Marshall’s doing well !

    “The Registered Organisations Commission disclosure log shows CFMEU Queensland construction secretary Michael Ravbar was on $244,017. In the mining division Timothy White was listed as receiving $276,178, Stephen Smyth $234,133, Mitch Hughes $230,910 and Glenn Power $223,271.

    The highest paid union leader is United Firefighters Union secretary Peter Marshall ($419,697)”.

  42. Tel

    Taiwan is the good bit of China. It’s why I can’t stand the anti Chunk stuff here.

    China could have been a modern democracy and fully capitalist.

    That’s why Taiwan calls itself “Republic of China” because it represents the last democratically elected elected government of China … driven by Communist military force into hiding on a little island. That’s also why the ChiComs are so determined to finish the job and destroy that vestige of legitimacy.

  43. Cassie of Sydney

    “1735099
    #3461458, posted on May 23, 2020 at 7:51 am
    If you want to get married in Israel, and don’t want an orthodox Rabbi to conduct the wedding, you have to go to Cyprus. This orthodox rump keeps Netanyahu in power (see 18:00 above).”

    Oh dear…our own little Nazi is spewing his Jooo hatred this morning. Perhaps it is cold in Toowoomba today and he needs to blame the Jooos.

  44. Why is a union official paid as much as a High Court Judge or a SME CEO?

    They must really be looking after the workers, it isn’t a scam at all and has nothing to do with being obsessed with political power.

  45. pete m

    Flynn case now used for show cause to current serving FBI involved to get the F out and stay out swamp rats!

    Durham after the ones gone, Wray after any remaining.

  46. thefrollickingmole

    The editor of the Brooklyn Eagle wrote that her “mistakes sprung out of the manifest limitations of her development”. Keller responded to that editor, referring to having met him before he knew of her political views

    Well to be fair she was endorsing the stupidest idea on earth at the time, socialism.

    And yes its fairly obvious Wang is trying his little shrivelled heart out get a response he can selectively snip or gin up and let him run to some daddy organ of the government to dob.

    https://img.fireden.net/co/image/1539/15/1539158544273.jpg

  47. calli

    The JobKeeper numbers were a simple tallying error in the computer program. Punters filled in the form on line and, instead of putting the number of employees requiring assistance, they put the $ value of the assistance they sought. The system had no way of differentiating until each claim was physically assessed.

    It isn’t rocket science, and it isn’t gross incompetence. It’s a simple error in a rushed program that has since been fixed. No money was lost, no fraud detected, but the outlay has been adjusted downwards and apparently this constitutes a scandal of epic proportions.

    It must be one of the silliest beat-ups in the entire Covid media fiasco.

  48. OldOzzie

    No Matter Who Biden Picks, His Running Mate Will Be A ‘Karen’

    I & I Editorial Board
    May 22, 2020

    We’re still at least a month away from Joe Biden announcing who his running mate will be for the 2020 election. It’s hard to tell which way he’s leaning, but no matter who he chooses, it will be “Karen.”

    Applying “Karen” as a pejorative is not as fresh as it might seem. Some uses of the name to describe a spiteful, unpleasant woman go back maybe as far as three decades. But the name has been more widely used as a cultural meme in recent months.

    With apologies to those named Karen but aren’t “Karens,” a “Karen” in 2020 is, “an entitled, obnoxious, middle-aged white woman,” says dictionary.com. Wikipedia says a Karen “displays aggressive behavior when she is obstructed from getting her way.” She often wants to “speak to the manager” because it’s her nature to complain, hector, and rage. During the pandemic, we’ve seen Karens all over, screeching and nagging about masks, social distancing (both for and against it and on occasion taking both sides simultaneously), and any conduct she doesn’t agree with.

    A Karen is a tattletale and a snob, mean girl who got older but didn’t grow up. And her defining traits, bullying, a desire to subjugate others, and rank hypocrisy, fit snugly with progressive-left politics.

    Biden, guided by the identity politics of his party, has promised that his choice for running mate will be a woman. It’s said he’s looking hard at at least five candidates and maybe as many as eight. So who makes up this field of possibilities?

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren. Maybe the most Karen of them all. Given the pulpit of a vice presidential candidate, and, Heaven help us, possibly the soapbox of the vice presidency, she will constantly howl about economic inequality, Wall Street, profit, and just about any principle that has made America the exceptional nation it is.

    “She is a nag. A scold. An ideologue,” law professor Michael Greve wrote in 2012 when Warren was running for U.S. senator in Massachusetts. “An advocate of a nanny state beyond a Swedish socialist’s wildest imagination. A bureaucratic Bruegel who paints an America of victims — pathetic figures in a landscape of unremitting hostility. Also, professor Warren is an economic idiot.”

    Sen. Kamala Harris.

    Sen. Amy Klobuchar

    Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.

    Others who’ve been mentioned as possibilities – Catherine Cortez Masto, one of Nevada’s U.S. senators; New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham; Wisconsin U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin; Illinois U.S. Sen. Tammy Duckworth; and Georgia governor-in-her-mind Stacey Abrams, to name a few – are no better. The Democratic Party is an assembly of Karens. That’s who it attracts. So it doesn’t matter which prospect Biden chooses. He gets a Karen.

    For those who would complain that our editorial is sexist, we counter that with, one, Biden limited himself when he promised to choose a female running mate, so there are no men to criticize, and, two, there are male Karens out there, they just don’t have a name yet. We suggest Barack.

  49. Mark A

    Nazca landing strips?
    Maybe used by these? I mean the originals this model was based on.
    Any ideas?

  50. calli

    That’s a very good cartoon, tfm.

  51. OldOzzie

    Zyconoclast
    #3461340, posted on May 23, 2020 at 12:06 am
    P0rn lovers of the world can rejoice.

    Researchers in Australia claim they have recorded the fastest ever internet data speed.
    A team from Monash, Swinburne and RMIT universities logged a data speed of 44.2 terabits per second (Tbps).
    At that speed, users could download more than 1,000 high-definition movies in less than a second.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-52769796

    They obviously have not worled for NBN

    Maximum NBN Speed over old Telstra HFC Cable 100/40 Mbps – Pure Crap

  52. thefrollickingmole

    Legalise Sedition
    #3461468, posted on May 23, 2020 at 8:03 am
    Taiwan is the good bit of China. It’s why I can’t stand the anti Chunk stuff here.

    Well they should have won the war then!

    The old man says we should be kissing the ass of the CCP, can you imagine what a powerhouse China would have been for the last 50+ years without the cold dead hand of Communism at its throat?

    Nearly 10% of its population in remote areas were literally cretins.

    Also I have to say this is one of the best interviews/life stories you will hear.
    https://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/conversations/conversations-cres-eastman-rpt/8219208

    Professor Creswell (Cres) Eastman has led projects to abolish Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) throughout the developing world.

    Children born to mothers deficient in iodine can suffer a range of defects including mental retardation, deafness, and speech and physical impairments.

    Over the past decades, Cres and his teams have been effective in Malaysia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia, China and Tibet.

    His transformative work with populations in remote areas of China led him to be dubbed ‘the man who saved a million brains’.

    During his first visits to Tibet, Cres discovered that 13 per cent of the population were born with cretinism as the result of iodine deficiency.

    And the Communist government of China didnt even know they had the problem.

  53. Roger

    covid-19 anxiety turns to covid-19 rage:

    COVID-19 may go down as history’s most devastating example of expert arrogance and media malfeasance. When the history of the pandemic is written, both of these items need to be highlighted. It should also shake our faith in trusting our future to the expert class. And this is exactly the class former President Barack Obama assured us will be running the country in a Joe Biden presidency.

    RTWT

  54. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    China could have been a modern democracy and fully capitalist.

    instead a qtr of a billion chinese decided to act brain washed and follow a few thousand communist into the abyss

  55. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Biden, guided by the identity politics of his party, has promised that his choice for running mate will be a woman.

    may the best smelling hair win

  56. OldOzzie

    Legalise Sedition
    #3461445, posted on May 23, 2020 at 7:36 am

    I think it’s time to ban Robert Whittaker (Numbers) from this site.

    He is clearly trying to do as Calli asserts.

    For too long this deranged mental patient and military impostor ( “I was conscripted” – no you were not) had been given free reign to semi-anonymouusly promote his shit book no one wants to read and pollute us with bizarre fantasies that contradict each other.

    Along with that he’s clearly a Moby who puts Sinclair’s hobby and livelihood in jeopardy.

    Get the fuck outta here you bitter old poseur.

    +1

  57. calli

    The drunken sailors at Seven ask the burning question:

    “What will happen now to the government’s extra cash?“

    Listen up, dumbdumbs. There is no “extra cash”. There was never any “cash” in the first place.

    All it means is that our grandchildren have a tiny bit less to pay back.

    Our disgraced and debased media is the most toxic thing to come out of this so called crisis. And the blonde bimbo media is the worst.

  58. OldOzzie

    The Railroading of Michael Flynn

    How it happened and why it matters
    by Eli Lake

  59. Cassie of Sydney

    ““What will happen now to the government’s extra cash?“”

    They really think that money grows on trees.

  60. Maj

    The good religious news (because of President Trump):

    Donald Trump: ‘I Want to Get Our Churches Open’

    President Donald Trump expressed his interest at the White House on Thursday in getting more churches reopened despite the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

    He blamed Democrat governors for keeping churches closed.

    “The churches are not being treated with respect by a lot of the Democrat governors,” Trump commented to reporters as he left the White House for a trip to Michigan on Thursday afternoon. “I want to get our churches open, and we’re going to take a very strong position on that very soon,” he added.

    When reporters asked him if he would include mosques in his effort, he said he would.

    Recent reports revealed that the White House disputed proposed Centers for Disease Control guidelines prepared for the reopening of churches, delaying their release.

    A Trump administration official told CNBC that the White House wanted a more federal approach to the guidelines.

    The White House reaffirmed the president’s interest in getting churches reopened.

    “Not only is it good for the community; it’s their right under the Constitution to worship freely without government intrusion,” White House deputy press secretary Judd Deere said to CNBC. “The Trump Administration will always protect that right and continue to partner with states to ensure congregations are properly protected as restrictions are responsibly eased.”

    And the bad:

    Faith-Based Groups Announce Divestment from Fossil Fuels

    Forty-two progressive faith-based institutions from 14 countries announced are divesting from the fossil fuel industry, the largest ever such joint announcement from religious groups.

    Vatican News reported the religious institutions abandoning fossil fuels hail from “the Catholic, Anglican, Methodist, United Reformed, Baptist, Quaker and Buddhist traditions.”

    The effort has been coordinated by the UK-based Operation Noah as part of its Bright Now campaign. Operation Noah was joined by the Global Catholic Climate Movement, the World Council of Churches, Green Anglicans, and GreenFaith in making the announcement.

    Vatican News went on to cite the director of the Justice, Peace, and Integrity of Creation Commission for the Catholic Archdiocese of Semarang, in Indonesia, who connected the coronavirus pandemic to climate change as part of the same ecological death spiral.

    “In this COVID-19 pandemic, it is the exact time not only to reflect, but to act,” he said. “We have to stop our ecological spiral of death. We have to revive our ecological hope, in massive repentance of humankind, by taking the pathway to more sustainable living.”

    According to Operation Noah, this week’s announcement was timed to coincide with government investment in a global economic recovery, in an attempt to sway leaders “to think long term and focus on a recovery that is low-carbon and just.”

    “Fossil fuels do not have a place in the long-term health of humanity,” said Mark Campanale, Founder and Executive Chair of Carbon Tracker. “Faith institutions’ commitment to create a better world is leadership that governments should follow.”

    Operation Noah also cited the former Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, who urged humanity to reduce its “lethal dependence on fossil fuels.”

    “The current health crisis has highlighted as never before the need for coherent international action in the face of global threat,” the archbishop said. “Can we learn the lesson and apply it to the global threat of climate change?”

    For her part, Reba Elliott from the Global Catholic Climate Movement said that climate change brings with it a “higher risk of respiratory disease and hunger” and divesting from fossil fuels will benefit the poor.

    The group’s executive director, Tomás Insua, went further still, insisting that every dollar invested in fossil fuel companies “is a vote for suffering.”

    James Buchanan, the Bright Now campaign manager at Operation Noah, said it is “unethical to invest in fossil fuel companies” during the present “climate emergency.”

    One of the groups involved in the divestment is the Jesuit order in Britain, which already announced in February they would be dumping fossil fuel stocks from their $517,500,000 investment portfolio because of the fuel companies’ complicity in the “climate crisis.”

    “Our trustees took the decision to completely divest from oil, gas and coal-producing companies because they felt these companies were not making enough progress towards better solutions,” said Jesuit Brother Stephen Power, the order’s British Province Treasurer.

    Last week the Vatican announced a special “anniversary year” to commemorate Pope Francis’s 2015 encyclical letter on the environment, Laudato Sì.

    The pope’s “watershed” encyclical “called the world’s attention to the increasingly precarious state of our common home,” declared a press release from the Vatican’s department of integral human development.

    “Five years on the encyclical appears ever more relevant,” it stated. “The multiple cracks in the planet that we inhabit, from the melting ice caps in the Arctic to the raging wildfires in the Amazon, from extreme weather patterns around the world to unprecedented levels of loss of biodiversity that sustain the very fabric of life, are too evident and detrimental to be ignored any more.”

    The message of Laudato Sì is “just as prophetic today as it was in 2015,” the communiqué declared, especially as nations struggle to deal with the global coronavirus pandemic.

  61. OldOzzie

    calli
    #3461529, posted on May 23, 2020 at 8:50 am
    The drunken sailors at Seven ask the burning question:

    “What will happen now to the government’s extra cash?“

    Listen up, dumbdumbs. There is no “extra cash”. There was never any “cash” in the first place.

    All it means is that our grandchildren have a tiny bit less to pay back.

    Our disgraced and debased media is the most toxic thing to come out of this so called crisis. And the blonde bimbo media is the worst.

    Calli,

    said the same to my wife last night watching 6pm Ch 7 news and Albasleezy waffling on about spending the extra cash – Dumb as Numbers and Dog Shit

    Listen up, dumbdumbs. There is no “extra cash”. There was never any “cash” in the first place.

    All it means is that our grandchildren have a tiny bit less to pay back

    +1

  62. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Snub of war hero Teddy Sheean reignites furious battle for Victoria Cross

    Matthew Denholm
    TASMANIA CORRESPONDENT
    @MatthewRDenholm
    10:00PM May 22, 2020
    73 Comments

    They were sitting ducks. On the horizon, the ship’s lookouts spotted five Japanese bombers; the forerunner of a larger aerial force that would almost literally blow their small, unprotected vessel out of the water.

    Within two hours, HMAS Armidale, a minesweeper known as a corvette, was under attack; the Zero fighters arrived first, swooping in low and strafing the ship’s deck with machinegun fire.

    Then came the torpedo bombers, from all directions. “Two torpedoes struck us and there was a near-miss from a bomb that caused a great explosion,” recalls Victor “Ray” ­Leonard, then a 19-year-old ordinary seaman.

    “The Armidale perceptibly ­lifted, it seemed like a yard in the air, before coming down. Immediately, we began to take on water … all our guns were firing as fast as they could, until the order was given by the captain to abandon ship. Everyone capable of abandoning ship did so, except one man: Teddy Sheean.”

    Sheean, an 18-year-old labourer’s son from rural northwest Tasmania, not long at sea, seeing his mates in the water being strafed with gunfire, suddenly turned away from the lifeboat and ­headed back to his gun post.

    His action in firing on the Japanese, even as he and the ship sank below the surface of the Timor Sea, is one of the greatest acts of bravery and selfless sacrifice seen in warfare. While mentioned in dispatches, he was overlooked for a posthumous VC in a decision that continues to outrage his many admirers to this day.

    This week, a letter leaked to The Australian saw the long campaign for full recognition of Sheean’s outstanding gallantry explode into fresh controversy, with claims of ministers misleading parliament, cover-ups and bloody-minded bastardry by the top brass. Leonard, now aged 96, is the last man alive who witnessed that horrific afternoon of December 1, 1942. Of the 149 aboard the Armidale, only 49 survived and all but Leonard have gone since.

    Age may have since wearied his body, but not his mind. “I have a clear recollection of almost everything that occurred that day,” Leonard explains. His recollections — key to a recent tribunal recommendation Sheean finally receive a VC — are formed from his own observations, and the ­accounts of mates as they waited in the sea for rescue.

    “Sheean went as if to abandon ship on the port side, which was the sinking side, but when he got to the gunwale ahead of him he saw many of our crew struggling in the water, as the machinegunning by the Zeros continued,” ­Leonard recalls.

    “He turned around and made his way back to his gun, the aft Oerlikon (anti-aircraft gun) and he managed to get himself into position. He had to scramble there because of the ship sloping sharply.”

    Sheean was wounded in the ­effort. His job had been as gun loader; not gunner, but he did not hesitate. “He strapped himself into position and commenced to fire,” Leonard explains. According to multiple witnesses, Sheean shot down at least one enemy aircraft and possibly two. He was still shooting as he and the ship disappeared beneath the waves.

    As they gathered above the watery grave of their lost ship, survivors could talk of only one thing. “He must have known that he would go down with the ship in a matter of minutes,” Leonard says. “It was a moment of extreme heroism and gallantry. It must have saved lives. It was unbelievable. We talked about it all of the rest of that day and night and during the rescue that followed; how amazed we were that any person could be so brave.”

    Sheean was mentioned in dispatches, but overlooked by the Admiralty for a Victoria Cross. An epic campaign has followed, to rectify what his shipmates, family and some in the naval community see as a glaring oversight.

    A broader 2013 Valour Inquiry failed to recommend a VC for Sheean, while a 2018 request to the Chief of Navy specific to Sheean, also failed. A review of this last decision was then made to the Defence Honours and Awards Appeal Tribunal, by Tasmanian Liberal Veterans Affairs Minister Guy Barnett.

    The four-member, quasi-­judicial body gathered written ­accounts from survivors penned over the years, as well as a fresh account from Leonard, and held public hearings.

    In July last year, it finally promised justice for Sheean, highlighting a string of errors relied on by the military stretching back to 1943, when the Admiralty couldn’t even spell his name correctly.

    The tribunal found Sheean’s actions exceeded those of “strikingly similar” British VC cases, and unanimously recommended to the Minister for Defence Personnel, Darren Chester, that Sheean be posthumously awarded the VC. It recommended the ­citation read: “He sacrificed his life trying to save his shipmates and despite his wounds, he continued firing the gun until the ship sank and took him to his death. His pre-eminent act of valour and most conspicuous gallantry saved lives. His heroism became a standard to which the modern men and women of the Navy aspire.”

    The tribunal said the facts were accepted by all parties, including Defence. According to tribunal chairman Mark Sullivan, Chester advised he was “comfortable with the recommendations and … would be communicating with senior ministers” including Defence Minister Linda Reynolds and the Prime Minister. Then the trouble started. Chester was rolled, the tribunal report buried. It was only last week, thanks to a manoeuvre in the Senate by Tasmanian independent Jacqui Lambie, that Reynolds was forced to declare her hand.

    She told the Senate the VC would not be awarded. “The 2019 review by the tribunal did not present any new evidence that might support reconsideration of the Valour Inquiry’s recommendation,” Reynolds told the Senate. “That is also my view and the view of Defence. It is a very difficult ­decision, but I ­believe in the circumstance, the right decision.” It was too much for Sullivan, who felt obliged to write to Reynolds, in a letter exposed by The Australian, to claim the minister was plain wrong.

    The tribunal’s VC recommendation, he said, was based on its “full merits-based review”; not a review of the 2013 Valour Inquiry. Besides, there was “new evidence”.

    Sullivan said this included that Sheehan had reached the relative safety of a lifeboat before taking the extraordinary decision to return to his gun, differing from the Admiralty version that Sheean simply remained at his post.

    Other new evidence included Sheean telling a shipmate he was doing so to save his comrades being machinegunned, and that he was not wounded until after he decided to return to the gun.

    Reynolds subsequently corrected the record about the 2013 inquiry but otherwise stuck to her own guns, releasing a Defence statement to back it up. This read: “Defence’s view on the 2019 review … is that it presented no compelling new evidence nor any evidence of manifest injustice.”

    Scott Morrison said Australia would “remain eternally grateful” for Sheean’s “service, dedication and sacrifice”, but he believed the 2013 Valour Inquiry, which did not back a VC, was “more comprehensive” than the 2019 review. “Like previous governments, we have not taken this decision lightly and appreciate it would also be popular to take the contrary view. I have taken advice from Australia’s military chiefs past and present in making this decision.”

  63. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Faith-Based Groups Announce Divestment from Fossil Fuelsreality

    finxingly

  64. calli

    They must know it is all borrowed.

    This is just toxic class and race baiting – JobKeeper payouts to immigrant workers being pushed. Why not just buy them a ticket home so they can be with their families until it all blows over? That would be effective charity.

    Apparently repatriation during a crisis (confected or otherwise) is waaaaycist or something.

  65. Nick

    It must be one of the silliest beat-ups in the entire Covid media fiasco.

    It’s interesting to see the pack go after the Minister, when the civil service doesn’t get a mention.

  66. OldOzzie

    Communist Chairman “Red Dan” strikes again in Victoriastan

    Climb-ban bureaucrats in Victoria keen to extend their reach

    EXCLUSIVE JOHN FERGUSON ASSOCIATE EDITOR

    The late autumn Wimmera sun bouncing off Mount Arapiles acts as an illusion for Australia’s rock-climbing community.

    Lost in the sharp light is the gloomy recognition among many that the Victorian government is in the advanced stages of killing off a once-thriving industry in a battle over access, cultural heritage and the environment.

    As the world has been focused on the pandemic, Parks Victoria has been quietly accelerating its curbs on climbing in the heartland of the pursuit in Australia.

    Australian Climbing Association Victoria president Mike Tomkins is blunt about climbing’s future under the Andrews government.

    “Rock climbing in Victoria is on its last legs because we have been afraid to stand up for our ­activity in the face of cultural sensitivities,’’ Tomkins tells The Weekend Australian.

    Acclaimed climbing photographer Simon Carter agrees, calling for an independent investigation into the destruction of the sport.

    “There needs to be an inquiry into Parks Victoria’s management of the entire situation,’’ he says.

    Well over a year after the government imposed climbing bans over hundreds of square kilometres due to cultural heritage concerns in the nearby Grampians, bureaucrats have accelerated the restrictions.

    The Grampians was the initial target but now the attention has turned about 50km northwest to Mount Arapiles.

    First came the shutting down of a training crag at Mount Arapiles and during the next two months cultural heritage teams will be poring over the mountain.

    There will be four assessments conducted on registered Arapiles rock art sites but the areas are being kept secret.

    For Tomkins and other climbers there is an inevitability about shutting down climbing to such an extent the industry will ­become unviable for towns like Natimuk, near Arapiles. “These bureaucrats are out of control. It is no exaggeration to say that all who love the parks of Australia should be gravely concerned at the precedent that this sets.’’

    Adding to the angst is the fact that Parks Victoria also seems to be closing in on the climbing ­location called Bundaleer in the Grampians, which is considered in the top five climbing locations in the national park.

    Bundaleer has for years been promoted by Parks Victoria as a prime climbing site, but now the organisation is telling the sector to steer clear of part of the area, which is culturally sensitive.

    If climbing is banned at all or part of Bundaleer, which seems quite possible, it will be another blow to arguably Australia’s most important adventure industry.

    Parks Victoria chief executive Matthew Jackson insists he is alive to the importance of climbing. “We’re keenly aware of the importance of rock climbing to many people, and we’re working to keep communities, tour operators and climbing groups updated with information about Mount Arapiles and the Grampians,” he said.

    “As recently communicated to community, Parks Victoria and Barengi Gadjin Land Council will this month assess a number of rock art sites previously identified at Mount Arapiles-Tooan State Park and which are already on the Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Register.’’

    BGLC did not comment.

    Undermining Parks Victoria’s position have been a series of gaffes, falsely linking climbers to damage they didn’t commit and vastly overstating the impact of environmental damage at eight Grampians National Park sites.

    Climbers accept there are practices that need to be improved and, in some locations, greater effort taken to protect the environment.

    Ashlee Hendy, a climber for 20 years, says climbers are misunderstood by the government and some traditional owners.

    Climbers, she says, live for the environment. “They respect it and care for it,’’ she says. “To see the wall that’s been built (around climbing) is really disappointing.’’

  67. Maj

    What a leader!

    Donald Trump: ‘We Are Not Closing the Country’ if Hit by Second Wave of Coronavirus

    President Donald Trump said Thursday in Michigan that he would not close the country if it was hit by a second wave of the coronavirus.

    “We are going to put out the fires. We’re not going to close the country,” Trump said. “We can put out the fires. Whether it is an ember or a flame, we are going to put it out. But we are not closing our country.”

    The president spoke during a tour of a Ford factory that was manufacturing ventilators, as he continues pushing for the country to reopen after the coronavirus-fueled shutdowns.

    “We did the right thing, but now it is time to open it up,” he said. “A never-ending lockdown would invite a public health calamity. To protect the health of our people, we must have a functioning economy.”

    Earlier in the day, Trump said that some Democrat governors were not reopening their states fast enough.

    “You have a lot of, unfortunately in this case, Democrat governors, I think they think it’s great politics to keep it closed, but what are they doing, they’re hurting themselves, I don’t think it is good politics … they’re hurting themselves, they’re hurting their state, and it’s not good,” Trump said, and added, “You’ll break the country if you don’t.”

  68. OldOzzie

    Apologies to Cats for insulting Dog Shit

  69. OldOzzie

    Coronavirus: Jobshocker’s $60bn gaffe offers recovery windfall

    GEOFF CHAMBERS
    FEDERAL POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT

    A $60bn accounting error in Scott Morrison’s historic JobKeeper scheme has handed the government a shock budget windfall but reignited the campaign for generous wage subsidies to be extended to visa-holders, universities and more casual workers.

    In a joint statement on Friday afternoon, Treasury and the Australian Taxation Office revealed a “reporting error” had revised their estimated cost of the JobKeeper scheme down from $130bn to about $70bn.

    The development gives the government a $60bn boost to the budget bottom line that can be ­deployed to fight the impact of COVID-19 in other parts of the economy or to avoid adding to the nation’s debt.

    A day after Treasury officials told a COVID-19 parliamentary inquiry that 6.3 million Australians were enrolled to receive the $1500-a-fortnight JobKeeper payment, that number was revised to about 3.5 million workers.

    Labor said there had “not been in more recent memory a more ­serious error made in the budget”.

    Josh Frydenberg came under immediate pressure from the ­opposition, business groups, ­unions and higher education to use the extra $60bn to support foreign workers, casuals, university staff and employees working for foreign companies. The Treasurer warned the JobKeeper error was not an “invitation to go and spend more money”.

    “All the money that the government is spending during the corona­virus period is borrowed money. There is no money tree,” Mr Frydenberg said.

    Pushing back against Anthony Albanese’s call to expand JobKeeper, the Treasurer said it was “welcome news that the impact on the public purse from the program will not be as great as initially ­estimated”.

    “The reality is there was an unintentional error by a thousand businesses and it’s pretty shameful that the Labor Party is seeking now to be politically opportunistic at the expense of Treasury and the ATO,” he said.

    Treasury modelling had predicted JobKeeper would likely be deployed to support about 6.5 million workers and this appeared to have been borne out by ATO forms filled out by employers.

    But the ATO and Treasury informed the government late on Thursday of a “reporting error in estimates of the number of ­employees likely to access the JobKeeper program”.

    The Weekend Australian understands Treasury secretary Steven Kennedy also ­informed opposition Treasury spokesman Jim Chalmers of the error.

    “The enrolment forms completed by 910,055 businesses who have self-assessed as eligible under the scheme had indicated that this program would cover around 6.5 million eligible employees,” the Treasury-ATO statement said.

    “The ATO’s review of these forms has found that around 1000 of those businesses appear to have made significant errors when reporting the estimate of eligible employees on their enrolment form.

    “The most common error was that instead of reporting the ­number of employees they expected to be eligible, they reported the amount of assistance they ­expected to receive. For example, over 500 businesses with ‘one’ eligible employee reported a figure of ‘1500’ (which is the amount of JobKeeper payment they would expect to receive for each fortnight for that employee).”

    The revisions mean the JobKeeper and JobSeeker payments will support about 5.1 million Australians instead of the previously estimated 7.9 million out of a workforce of about 13 million.

    Universities Australia chief executive Catriona Jackson said the government should reconsider its decision to exclude higher education from JobKeeper.

    “As we have said in recent weeks, without greater support universities face the loss of 21,000 jobs in the next six months and a significant reduction in the essential research undertaken on our campuses,” Ms Jackson said.

    “We were disappointed that the government changed the regulations on a number of occasions to effectively exclude universities. We call on them to reconsider.”

    ACTU secretary Sally McManus said the government should extend JobKeeper to support temporary visa holders, casuals and higher education workers.

    “The government committed $130bn to help protect the jobs of six million workers. Now we learn it will only help 3.5 million,” Ms McManus said.

    “The government has opposed extending the package to casual workers, those on temporary work visas, workers in higher education, Australian workers whose company is owned by a foreign government, and those in our arts, culture and entertainment communities. Covering these workers would ­account for almost three million working people. Workers need this support extended … there are no more excuses.”

    Australian Industry Group chief executive Innes Willox said the JobKeeper accounting error was on “the right side of the ledger”. “It’s unfortunate that the mistake has been made. But it’s on the right side of the ledger, rather than the wrong side of the ledger, so there’s more money that the government potentially has to spend or less debt that it has to pay off,” Mr Willox said.

    The reporting error came to light following analysis by Treasury and the ATO assessing the amounts being paid out under the scheme and “reconciling these with the estimates provided by ­enrolled businesses of the likely number of eligible employees”.

    “It was not picked up by the ATO earlier as their primary focus in the first fortnight of JobKeeper payments was on ensuring that JobKeeper payments were paid promptly to those eligible for them, and not paid to those who were ineligible,” the joint statement said. “Importantly this ­reporting error has no consequences for JobKeeper payments that have already been made to eligible businesses.”

    Treasury said it remained the case that, without JobKeeper, unemployment would have been about five percentage points higher. “Treasury continues to expect the unemployment rate to reach around 10 per cent,” it said.

    Mr Albanese said the JobKeeper reporting error “blows any previous mistake when it comes to economic figures in Australian history right out of the water”.

    “This is a mistake you could’ve seen from space,” he said.

    The Opposition Leader said the government had said “its program was fully subscribed and that the $130bn had all been allocated”.

  70. calli

    “This is a mistake you could’ve seen from space,” he said.

    What? Like the mistake of walking out of a massage parlour in broad daylight? That type of mistake?

    Back in your box you sleazy beast.

  71. Nick

    The government has opposed extending the package to casual workers, those on temporary work visas, workers in higher education, Australian workers whose company is owned by a foreign government, and those in our arts, culture and entertainment communities. Covering these workers would ­account for almost three million working people. Workers need this support extended … there are no more excuses.”

    What a hasty cobbled sham of those who aren’t worthy of $60bn dollars worth of debt. She/he left out International students though.

  72. Ed Case

    According to Sal, employers had to bear the cost of the first 8 weeks of JobKeeper, then the Government reimbursed them and continue fortnightly payments until 30/9/2020.
    Those dopes who put down 1500 employees woulda got a first cheque of $9 million, then $2,250,000
    fortnightly after that another 9 times.

  73. OldOzzie

    Coronavirus: Jobshocker’s $60bn gaffe offers recovery windfall

    From the Comments

    fred
    14 MINUTES AGO
    Better the fault was to the benefit of us all in OZ 🇦🇺

    Manesh
    15 MINUTES AGO
    ok. let me get this clear.
    It was an Unprecedented time, the government, ATO and Treasury have to make a decision on how to make it a soft landing on economic crash due to job losses.

    They over estimate the number who would get access to JobKeeper.

    Now we have the actual numbers of and it is far less than originally thought. Which is good yeah? and that also indicate the how good the government manage the crisis situation.

    Now we saved $60 Billion. How good is that? Lucky we don’t hasve a Labor governemnt, otherwise, this is other way round lol

    Julie
    12 MINUTES AGO
    If you can see it from outer space Albo, why didn’t you tell us all 2 months ago. Such rubbish.

    Ken G
    19 MINUTES AGO
    Treasury and the ATO. Another group of ‘experts’ exposed by the COVID crisis.

    Michael
    16 MINUTES AGO
    A bit like spending the bread money on a winning lotto ticket. The Morrison government under promised and over delivered watch the economy bounce now, and how can we ever forget those previous shameful Labor budgets which did the opposite – year after painful year.

    Josh should roll out those terrible Labor numbers as they carry on about the glorious error.

  74. shatterzzz

    Almost 23,000 Australians have died since lockdowns began in late March.
    TERRIFYING: 101 have died from or with COVID-19.

  75. calli

    If that appears “judgemental” it’s a cue from the “no dancing” rule in pubs.

    Embrace the New Puritanism.

  76. thefrollickingmole

    Grain of salt and one swallow not making a spring, but this article seems to back what a lot of people here were worried about.
    Also Numberwang heres your daily dose of dead Americans to COOOOMMM!!! to.

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/california-doctors-say-theyve-seen-more-deaths-from-suicide-than-coronavirus-since-lockdowns
    Doctors in Northern California say they have seen more deaths from suicide than they’ve seen from the coronavirus during the pandemic.

    “The numbers are unprecedented,” Dr. Michael deBoisblanc of John Muir Medical Center in Walnut Creek, California, told ABC 7 News about the increase of deaths by suicide, adding that he’s seen a “year’s worth of suicides” in the last four weeks alone.

    DeBoisblanc said he believes it’s time for California officials to end the stay-at-home order and let people back out into their communities.

    “Personally, I think it’s time,” he said. “I think, originally, this was put in place to flatten the curve and to make sure hospitals have the resources to take care of COVID patients. We have the current resources to do that, and our other community health is suffering.”

    Kacey Hansen, a trauma center nurse at John Muir Medical Center for more than 30 years, says she’s worried not only about the increased suicide attempts but also about the hospital’s ability to save as many patients as usual.

    “What I have seen recently, I have never seen before,” Hansen said. “I have never seen so much intentional injury.”

  77. OldOzzie

    Mini Electric review: Here’s why I won’t buy electric

    JEREMY CLARKSON
    COLUMNIST

    I wish to God I had a truly great car to test, because to bomb about now on the quiet roads would be bliss. I haven’t, though. As I’ve explained, I’m stuck with the last cars to be delivered before the lockdown. Among them is an electric version of the Mini Cooper S.

    First things first: it’s bloody cheap for an electric car, and you get a lot of tech. It has the same “hybrid synchronous” motor as BMW fits to the i3. This means – pay attention – that within the rotor design you get the effect of permanent magnets combined with something called “reluctance”. This cuts down the need for rare-earth neodymium, which means the rotor can spin faster. I can see why James May likes electric cars so much. To him this kind of talk is like erotica.

    What normal people care about, though, is the oomph, and that’s not bad. Even though it’s very heavy, this Mini hits 100 km/h in 7.3 seconds. It actually feels faster than its petrol brother. But it isn’t. Not quite.

    And I must now put the needle back on the same old record and explain, once again, why I shall never buy an electric car. Yes, when you put your foot down at low speed there is instant and dramatic thrust. But before your passenger has time to say “wow”, it’s over. In this respect the power delivery from an electric motor is like what you get from a diesel. There’s one big lump, and then it’s gone. I much prefer the seamlessness of petrol.

    Then there’s the issue of slowing down. In a proper car you can coast. In an electric car you can’t, because the act of slowing down is used to top up the batteries. It’s called regenerative braking and it makes my nose swell up with rage. In the Mini you take your foot off the throttle and it’s as if you’ve jammed the bloody brakes on. This means gentle driving is tricky. It also means that, much to the surprise of other drivers, you shudder to a halt well short of traffic lights and junctions.

    But it’s not this, or the quality of the power delivery, that causes me to shy away; it’s the noise. All you can hear in an electric car is the tyres. And, frankly, I’d rather listen to the bubbling stomach juices of the lion that’s just eaten me. My Alfa GTV6 is a musical instrument; the noises it makes cause the hair on the back of my neck to rise. No electric car will ever do that.

    I appreciate that I’m speaking to only a very few people. Most will be ignoring the hairs on the back of my neck and saying, “Yes, but the Mini costs only 4c a kilometre to run.” This is undoubtedly true. The people at Mini also say you’ll get a range of 233km before you need to recharge. Two things on that. One, in normal running you will not get anything like 233km before you’ll need to find a plug socket and sit about for 12 hours while the damn thing comes back to life. And, two, rival electric cars from Peugeot and Renault can go further than 233km. Quite a lot further.

    There are other issues, too. The proper Mini is fairly cramped for passengers in the back, but with the batteries under the back seat there’s even less room in the electric version; also, the boot is tiny.

    Further forward, things are much better, because it’s familiar Mini territory. Like the last version I drove, the electric car has a dash that changes colour to tell you things. I don’t know what those things are, but it looks cool. I like the head-up display too, even though it gives you exactly the same information as you get on the instrument binnacle, which is located about an inch away from it. The car’s ride isn’t brilliant, though. And that’s another reason I’d buy the petrol-powered version instead.

    Of course, you may be sold on the idea of an electric car – and don’t be ashamed of that, because you’re not alone. Plenty of others like sitting about waiting for the batteries to charge and driving along in a state of permanent panic that they’re going flat again.

    Mini Electric

    Motor: 32.6kWh lithium-ion battery (135kW / 270Nm)

    Range: 233km on a full charge

    Price: From $54,800; due in Australia in August

    Rating: ★★★½

  78. Geriatric Mayfly

    Almost 23,000 Australians have died since lockdowns began in late March.
    TERRIFYING: 101 have died from or with COVID-19.

    Could you pease make it less brutal and terrifying, and in future inform that people have ‘passed’ rather than died.

  79. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    Climbers accept there are practices that need to be improved and, in some locations, greater effort taken to protect the environment.

    raise the cities! bring back the jungle!

  80. Roger

    Almost 23,000 Australians have died since lockdowns began in late March.

    Will any curious journalist inquire into the statistics to determine how many of the 23 000 deaths are attributable to the lockdown?

  81. Maj

    Vote Dem, people die:

    Fox News meteorologist blames NY governor for her parents-in-law dying of COVID-19 in nursing home and blasts Cuomo brothers for their ‘pathetic’ CNN interview as outrage over it mounts

    A Fox News senior meteorologist who lost parents-in-law to the coronavirus blames New York Governor Andrew Cuomo for their deaths and was outraged to see him laugh it up with his younger brother, Chris, on CNN earlier this week.

    Janice Dean told Fox News on Thursday that she felt compelled to speak out after the governor appeared on CNN, where Chris Cuomo teased his older sibling for having a large nose.

    During Wednesday’s episode of Cuomo Prime Time the governor recounted how he was tested for coronavirus on live TV during his daily press briefing on Sunday, leading his brother to joke he had a big nose and required a baseball bat-sized nasal swab for a test.

    But not all viewers were laughing over the brotherly banter, particularly after it was revealed that a New York State directive requiring nursing homes to accept COVID-19 patients discharged from the hospital led to outbreaks and thousands of deaths.

    Many also found the segment inappropriate given the fact that New York State has by far the highest number of COVID-19 cases and deaths in the United States.

    “Is it true… this was the actual swab that was being used to fit up that double barreled shotgun that you have mounted on the front of your pretty face?”

    [email protected] and his brother NY Gov. Andrew Cuomo share a light a moment over the governor’s televised coronavirus test. pic.twitter.com/ETcnPkTjqV
    — Cuomo Prime Time (@CuomoPrimeTime) May 21, 2020

    As of Friday afternoon, there are a confirmed 358,154 cases of COVID-19 across the state. The death toll has reached nearly 23,192.

    Dean, a Fox News meteorologist, appeared on Carlson’s prime time show on Thursday and blasted the governor after both of her parents-in-law died at a nursing home in New York State.

    Dean said that her mother- and father-in-law, Michael and Dolores Newman, both died of COVID-19 after they were exposed to the virus in nursing homes.

    Her father-in-law, Michael, an Air Force veteran and former New York City firefighter, was placed in a nursing home after it became apparent he was suffering from dementia.

    Dean said that she and her husband were notified a week before Michael’s death that the nursing home was moving him to another floor.

    ‘I believe that floor was used for recovering COVID patients,’ Dean said. ‘I can’t prove that. We can’t get any confirmation on any of this.’

    Dean said her husband was notified that his father died just three hours after he was told that he wasn’t feeling well. She said the death certificate listed COVID-19 as cause of death.

    The meteorologist said her mother-in-law, Dolores Newman, was rushed to the hospital two weeks later and died of COVID-19.

    The Newmans were married for 59 years.

  82. Ed Case

    ACTU secretary Sally McManus said the government should extend JobKeeper to support temporary visa holders, casuals and higher education workers.

    Casuals can go on the dole, they’re better off financially anyway.
    Jobkeeper is limited to people on the books for at least 12 months.
    Visa holders can head home, and Higher Ed can go on the dole like everyone else.

  83. calli

    Roger, London to a brick there will be a rise in self harm and suicide. And then there’s people awaiting surgery who have succumbed.

    The fallout from this nonsense will be incalculable.

  84. Maj

    Donald Trump lashes out at Fox News AGAIN demanding network ‘fire their fake pollster’ after poll showing him losing by EIGHT POINTS to Joe Biden

    President Donald Trump teed off on Fox News for the second day in a row Friday, this time going after the network’s polling unit after a survey showed him losing the race to Joe Biden by 8 percentage points.

    Trump ripped the network and looked back fondly at its early days, saying the late executive Roger Ailes is ‘looking down’ watching.

    Biden has led Trump in the last eight publicly released head-to-head matchups against Trump as unemployment spiked and U.S. coronavirus deaths surpassed 90,000, although by an average of 5.5 points in the RealClearPolitics average.

    CNBC had Biden leading Trump 48 to 45, and CNN had Biden leading 51 to 46 back on May 10 in their own polls.

    ‘Why doesn’t @FoxNews put up the CNBC POLL or the (believe it or not!) @CNN Poll? Hope Roger A is looking down and watching what has happened to this once beautiful creation!’ Trump tweeted Friday.

    In a second tweet, he demanded: ‘@FoxNews should fire their Fake Pollster. Never had a good Fox Poll!’ It included a screen shot of a Fox broadcast alert that Hillary Clinton led Trump by 10 percentage points. Clinton was the clear poll leader in 2016, and though she got 3 million more votes than Trump, he beat her in the Electoral College by 306 to 232 electoral votes.

  85. Nick

    Boris Johnson has been forced to cave into to Conservative backbench rebels opposed to the presence of Huawei in 5G networks and has drawn up plans to reduce the Chinese company’s involvement to zero by 2023.

  86. Googoomuck

    @calli #3461499, posted on May 23, 2020 at 8:20 am

    “It must be one of the silliest beat-ups in the entire Covid media fiasco.”

    +1

    Silly me, I thought it was some sort of disaster until the story came on. I thought there would be be calls from the usual suspects to extend the scheme, since they expected spending the money anyway.

    That seems to be the mindset – spend it or you will lose it. Our local park, three kilometres from the nearest railway line, was beautified recently using funds from the rail crossing project. Note, the local crossing was completed several years ago, well before the current building push. They had the cheek to put up a sign telling us. WTF? Any money saved should have gone back into the project for other crossings. In Victoriastan, of course. However, I digress, lol.

  87. Roger

    Roger, London to a brick there will be a rise in self harm and suicide.

    Of course, calli, but my real point was the lack of interest of our media in that aspect of the lockdown…to date, anyway – perhaps the stories will come out when the ‘crisis’ passes.

    See the piece I linked to earlier about the arrogance of the experts and the malfeasance of the media in the American context.

  88. Roger

    ACTU secretary Sally McManus said the government should extend JobKeeper to support temporary visa holders…

    Welfare for non-citizens!

    They either go home or apply for support from their own nation’s embassy.

  89. Infidel Tiger King

    Boris Johnson has been forced to cave into to Conservative backbench rebels opposed to the presence of Huawei in 5G networks and has drawn up plans to reduce the Chinese company’s involvement to zero by 2023.

    Great stuff.

    China is number 1 bitch.

  90. min

    Peking Duck Dan sums it up for ducking the China question is what he is doing in not answering questions about the Belt and Road deal . Noted that Craig Kelly calls it the Belt and Rope as the rope is to strangle the borrower .

  91. Bruce of Newcastle

    Mini Electric review: Here’s why I won’t buy electric

    He and most Europeans.

    EU crisis as carmakers set to desert Europe – France warns ‘Renault could disappear’ (22 May)

    French finance minister Bruno Le Maire, who is considering a £4.5billion (€5bn) loan for Renault to help it through the crisis, warned on Friday the company’s future was at stake. … Le Maire said Renault’s French plant in Flins mustn’t close and the company should be able to keep as many jobs as possible in France, but also said it needed to adapt and be competitive.

    Renault declined to comment on Le Maire’s remarks.

    The Flins factory, northwest of Paris, is where Renault makes its electric Zoe models and the Micra car for Nissan. It employed around 2,640 people at the end of 2018, according to Renault’s website.

    The EU persists in forcing car companies to be green despite few people wanting to buy green cars. So the car companies are leaving for less-green pastures.

    Meanwhile in the US…

    Rise of S.U.V.s: Leaving Cars in Their Dust, With No Signs of Slowing – ‘S.U.V.s made up 47.4% of U.S. sales in 2019 with sedans at 22.1%’ (22 May)

    Good luck greenies in weaning Americans off their SUVs. And no, electric SUVs won’t do it kids.

  92. Ed Case

    David Rowe’s daily Trump derangement — with a bonus Hanson derangement + Dutton derangement .
    Perhaps poor old Rowe is worried Scotty is about to go under the bus?

  93. When the history of the pandemic is written, both of these items need to be highlighted. It should also shake our faith in trusting our future to the expert class.

    Experts worldwide have been giving remarkably consistent advice to the politicians since the pandemic began.
    What does differ is how those politicians have interpreted that advice, and how compliant the population has been in accepting it. This partly explains why countries like Australia and Japan have mortality rates from the virus of 4 and 6 per million population, and countries such as the USA and Brazil have 295 and 99 respectively.
    There’s some interesting correlations.
    Countries where the restrictions have not become a political issue, generally have done better than those where it has. It’s multi-factorial, but populations exhibiting discipline and common sense (Singapore and South Korea) have also done well.

  94. Those dopes stressed business operators, who put down 1500 employees woulda got a first cheque of $9 million, then $2,250,000
    fortnightly after that another 9 times.

    Er.. not quite.
    Each eligible employee must also apply for the JobKeeper.
    They do this by filling out and signing an application form.

    To be paid for an employee, a business first has to submit the individual application form for that participating employee.

  95. Old School Conservative

    Legalise Sedition
    #3461445, posted on May 23, 2020 at 7:36 am
    I think it’s time to ban Robert Whittaker (Numbers) from this site.

    I totally agree and declare self interest in that position.
    Once Whittaker’s slurs about Alan Jones gain momentum the forces conspiring to shut down the Cat would have much more ammunition.
    Whittaker is providing proof positive that the Cat allows defamatory views.
    If the Cat is banned, my last known free speech site will be gone.
    I’m sure the destruction of Catallaxy Files has wider ramifications than just my loss of freedom of speech.

    As Whittaker well knows. He certainly shows a conspicuous lack of courage in allowing the same comments on his own blog.

  96. Knuckle Dragger

    I’ve found it.

    I’ve finally found definitive proof of what the North noggies thought of people like Liability Bob.

    ‘Yet even the communists were bemused by the excesses of the… anti-war movement.

    ‘…Activist Tom Hayden, who later married Jane Fonda, visited Hanoi and became its passionate advocate. One of the few comic moments in [POW] Doug Ramsey’s jungle captivity took place when Hayden’s name was mentioned during an interrogation. The prisoner asked his captors their opinion of him.

    ‘A cadre replied coldly, “We admire his ideology, but despise him as a person. How can you respect a man who betrays his own country?”‘

    – Sir Max Hastings; Vietnam: An Epic History of a Tragic War; p.330

  97. rickw

    President Donald Trump said Thursday in Michigan that he would not close the country if it was hit by a second wave of the coronavirus.

    Australia’s political mong’s are sure to do the exact opposite of this.

  98. calli

    Sal, they also have to pay up front, so for smaller, not-so-financial entities they are out of pocket until the taxpayers’ money arrives. A real cashflow headache for some.

  99. Knuckle Dragger

    Liability Bob and Helen Keller were and are quite similar in their respective outlooks, so it’s really not surprising that he’s a fan of hers.

    They both shared a vision of the future…. wait, wait.

    Avid readers, they…… hang on.

    Both were willing to walk the extra mile to achieve their….. geez. Wait.

    Having heard cries for help from likeminded souls, they………

  100. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    But not all viewers were laughing over the brotherly banter, particularly after it was revealed that a New York State directive requiring nursing homes to accept COVID-19 patients discharged from the hospital led to outbreaks and thousands of deaths.

    like nazis, the left love killing off the elderly

  101. thefrollickingmole

    Experts worldwide have been giving remarkably consistent advice to the politicians since the pandemic began.

    This is either a lie or this man inhabits a bubble.

    A few.

    Only people showing symptoms (temp etc) can spread the virus.
    Masks dont help lower transmission rates.
    It is easily transmitted on/from surfaces.

    Theres a quick 3 off the top of my head, all of these have either changed or still in flux depending on what authority you listen to.

    Still, its fairly obvious you are busy COOOMMMING!!! to the dead Americans as usual.
    such as the USA and Brazil have 295 and 99 respectively.

  102. rickw

    “Rock climbing in Victoria is on its last legs because we have been afraid to stand up for our ­activity in the face of cultural sensitivities,’’ Tomkins tells The Weekend Australian.

    We’re All Gun Owners Now!

    There’s no pursuit of Free People that Australian Government isn’t intent on wrecking.

    For da safety, for da security, for da sensitivity is their license to stuff everything.

    If you think they’ll leave your sport, hobby or pastime alone, it’s just because they haven’t got to you yet.

  103. mh

    Those dopes who put down 1500 employees woulda got a first cheque of $9 million, then $2,250,000

    Ed Case,
    Employers have to identify each of the eligible employees and which fortnight the employer is claiming for.
    This is done via STP and before any Jobkeeper payments are made to the employer.

  104. Farmer Gez

    OldOzzie
    #3461556, posted on May 23, 2020 at 9:12 am
    Coronavirus: Jobshocker’s $60bn gaffe offers recovery windfall

    Seriously, that headline was written?
    God help us!

  105. Sal, they also have to pay up front, so for smaller, not-so-financial entities they are out of pocket until the taxpayers’ money arrives. A real cashflow headache for some.

    That was the real fun part.
    Especially as the JobKeeper wasn’t announced until a couple of weeks after we’d sacked everybody.
    Then the rules on it changed several times, including at least twice during the weekend before the Monday when I applied for it.

  106. Geriatric Mayfly

    ‘Mayday’ in Pakistan. No wind beneath the wings, with Allah not tuned in on right wavelength. 40 victims so far.

  107. zyconoclast

    Sound familiar?

    Net migration to the UK from countries outside the European Union has risen to its highest level for 45 years, the Office for National Statistics says.

    Figures show an estimated 282,000 more non-EU citizens came to the UK than left in 2019, the highest since the information was first gathered in 1975.

    The ONS says a rise in students from China and India has driven this.

    In contrast, the number of people arriving from EU countries for work has “steadily fallen”.

  108. Knuckle Dragger

    It’s really not surprising that Chairman Dan and his Komintern still stalk the halls of power in Vicco.

    100,000 separate C19 snitches in a 24-hour period.

    Shameful.

  109. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    I think it’s time to ban Robert Whittaker (Numbers) from this site.

    Mr Whitlessker contributes nothing other than hurling insults and reliving his vietnam era derangement.

    You would be doing him a favour by forcing him to live out his few remaining years back with his own kin and friends. Now we get he probably has no friends but its an opportunity to make some, which he is never going to do here.

    +1 eviction off the island

  110. thefrollickingmole

    Literally 2 days ago…

    Last Updated:
    May 21, 2020 – 10:20pm

    CDC: Coronavirus ‘does not spread easily’ except for close contact with infected patients
    Fears have abounded over whether the virus is easily transmittable through groceries, packages

    On its website, the CDC says that coronavirus is “thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.” Yet “the virus does not spread easily in other ways.”

    “It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes,” the CDC also states on its site. “This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads, but we are still learning more about this virus.

    But flogbag states “Experts worldwide have been giving remarkably consistent advice to the politicians since the pandemic began.”

    Who to believe, a meandering monomaniacal misanthrope or the CDC….

  111. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    ‘Yet even the communists were bemused by the excesses of the… anti-war movement.

    One Bui Tin, who served on the general staff of the North Vietnamese Army, and later immigrated to Paris, after becoming disillusioned with Vietnamese Communism, saw the American anti-war movement as being essential to North Vietnamese strategy.

  112. calli

    And now Seven bimbos wax lyrical about how wonderful it is to see “experts” being given more public roles in telling us what to do with our lives.

    We didn’t know who they were before, but now we see them!, they gurgle excitedly. So much better than those tired old politicians. (They then show a photo of perfectly groomed, young-ish Stethoscope Man, noted for his wish for longer spells at the hairdresser because his hair couldn’t be done in 30 minutes).

    Dumbdumbs, we didn’t vote for these people. They are completely unaccountable. Yet you are delighted in their power to change our society on a whim or a hunch or worse.

    These people are desperate for tyranny. They can almost taste it. And it tastes good.

  113. stackja

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #3461623, posted on May 23, 2020 at 10:00 am

    CND helped USSR.

  114. Knuckle Dragger

    No.

    Leave the proven liar, demonstrated fraud and unmistakable coward here.

    Yes his presence is insulting. Yes he has plumbed new depths in previously unheard-of self-hatred after failing to stand up for his principles, exercising his freedom of choice and putting his junior spack teaching career on hold for 24 months 50 years ago.

    Yes, he is hugely and unintentionally funny.

    But he is also a marker of what we can expect as a society if the professional apologist sniveller class is not stamped out, set on fire and thrown into the ocean, and so must stay as a warning to the future. Humbly.

  115. zyconoclast

    Thai King Rama X’s son lives a life of ‘loneliness and rejection’ in German villa while his father spends lockdown with harem of 20 army ‘sex soldiers’ in nearby hotel
    -Prince Dipangkorn, 15, reportedly lives a life of loneliness in Alpine villa
    -His father is self-isolating in luxury hotel 40 miles away in Hotel Sonnenbichl
    -His entourage has booked out the whole fourth floor with staff locked out

  116. Ed Case

    Has Alan Jones ever claimed to have been defamed?
    I doubt it, tho Concern Trolling is always popular.

  117. Infidel Tiger King

    Dave Portnoy
    @stoolpresidente
    Emergency Press Conference – Now Dr Fauchi Says Staying Closed For Too Long Could Cause “Irreparable Damage”

    https://mobile.twitter.com/stoolpresidente/status/1263892989988012032

    Fauci has lost it.

  118. Roger

    Experts worldwide have been giving remarkably consistent advice to the politicians since the pandemic began.

    Mmm…have they now?

  119. Bruce of Newcastle

    One Bui Tin, who served on the general staff of the North Vietnamese Army, and later immigrated to Paris, after becoming disillusioned with Vietnamese Communism, saw the American anti-war movement as being essential to North Vietnamese strategy.

    Hence Xi’s current disinformation campaign.
    The Left falls for this stuff every time.

  120. calli

    Thar she blows!

    I’ll roll out the plastic sheeting. Flensing is so very messy.

  121. OldOzzie

    DNI Ric Grenell Declassifying Flynn-Kislyak Transcripts: “The IC doesn’t have all the transcripts/summaries….it wasn’t our product”…

    Acting Director of National Intelligence Richard “Ric” Grenell announced today he is in the process of declassifying the transcripts of the calls between Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak and former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn.

    Within a twitter response by Grenell, part of the riddle behind the transcripts gets a little more clarity: “The IC doesn’t have all the transcripts/summaries…. it wasn’t our product.

    The implication here is the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) did not generate one of the transcripts; that evolved into an FBI equity, and was later used in their case against Lt. General Michael Flynn. The December 29, 2016, intercept was not exclusive to the U.S. intelligence apparatus, and the call summary became proprietary to the FBI; the agency exploiting the underlying content.

    This makes sense and explains how the FBI was able to manipulate the framework of the call and keep the remaining U.S. intelligence system away from their internal plan.

    There was more than one phone call and conversation between Flynn and Kislyak. Some immediately after the election and in/around mid-December 2016. Reports of those contacts and communications WERE in the U.S. IC network and those reports led to unmasking requests. However, the specific December 29th communication was not an exclusive intercept of the U.S. intelligence community and therefore easier for the FBI to shape.

    Continue reading →

  122. Nice one Ed.

    “Cdl. Dr. Geo. Pell never claimed to be defamed…”

    Ahoy Captain! We can feed the tongue to Old Tom, right?

  123. Top Ender

    Scott Morrison said Australia would “remain eternally grateful” for Sheean’s “service, dedication and sacrifice”, but he believed the 2013 Valour Inquiry, which did not back a VC, was “more comprehensive” than the 2019 review. “Like previous governments, we have not taken this decision lightly and appreciate it would also be popular to take the contrary view. I have taken advice from Australia’s military chiefs past and present in making this decision.”

    Wonder how many were Navy?

  124. Boambee John

    Roger
    #3461576, posted on May 23, 2020 at 9:30 am
    ACTU secretary Sally McManus said the government should extend JobKeeper to support temporary visa holders…

    Welfare for non-citizens!

    Hate to depress you, but non-citizen permanent residents are already eligible.

  125. rickw

    And now Seven bimbos wax lyrical about how wonderful it is to see “experts” being given more public roles in telling us what to do with our lives.

    These are exactly the same people who applauded the experts of the eugenics movement in 1930’s Germany.

  126. calli

    This can also help us spot when particular types of expertise might be missing. For instance, some of disease models don’t consider how age and behaviour might affect predictions. This underlines why it’s so important not to limit the range of voices in policy making, as doing so can ultimately undermine the legitimacy of the decision.

    Mmmmaybe. Trouble is, the loudest voice usually wins, regardless of how many voices there are. More is not necessarily better, just more.

    I’d be more interested in the quality of the advice.

  127. Ed Case

    One Bui Tin, who served on the general staff of the North Vietnamese Army, …, saw the American anti-war movement as being essential to North Vietnamese strategy.

    It’s in the history books.
    The NVA lost every battle, Tet failed, yet the war was won on the campuses.

  128. rickw

    I have taken advice from Australia’s military chiefs past and present in making this decision.

    He took the advice of a bunch of tranny’s and lesbians?

  129. Boambee John

    Experts worldwide have been giving remarkably consistent advice to the politicians since the pandemic began.

    The bin chicken assumes that “consistent” advice is always valuable.

    Bad news, it is possibly to be consistently wrong. For proof, the bin chicken should look in its mirror.

  130. Why have experts when we have a Bunyip Aristocracy consisting of 100 or so political dynasties and the nation’s best paid lawyers?

    Sortition and ostracism would deliver us from these wannabe Napoleons.

  131. Botswana O'Hooligan

    For rickw DC-3’s C-47’s et al. Everything happened in a “3” at 81 knots for that was V1, V2 and just about everything else on takeoff at 26,200 lbs AUW. They didn’t meet the second segment of climb criteria so our DCA called them “developmental aeroplanes” to get around that one. If you are interested it goes like this for twin engine aeroplanes above 5700 kgs AUW:- gear retraction to 35 feet the climb gradient must be positive, from the gear retracted to 400 AGL feet the climb gradient must be 2.4% gross or 1.6% nett and at 400 feet AGL (above ground level) in level flight to accelerate to climb speed the rate available had to be 1.2% gross, 0.4% nett and then the climb to 1500 feet had to be likewise. The “3” didn’t meet any of that criteria. They either had P&W R-1830 or Wright R-1820 engines and in the case of an 1820 engine when it stopped throwing oil everywhere it was usually going to blow up. Some C-47’s were shipped and you can tell one of them by the ring of bolts around the fuselage behind the rear bulkhead for they separated the tail section. Ones for glider towing had a blunt end to the tail where the tow hook bizzo would have been. They burnt 80 gallons an hour on two engines and 110 on one engine so that’s where critical points and points of no return enter the equation. They were a nice old lady and anyone who ever flew one has fond memories of them and I remembered the above from 40 years ago when I last flew one. Another and as yet unproven fact about them is that old DC3 captains never go to hell and enjoy as much free cold beer as they want for eternity in paradise so I will check that out when I check out in due course.

  132. OldOzzie

    2020 Election: No Comparison as to Who Is Tough on China

    American elections always come down to a choice between competing candidates and policies. Campaigns ask if voters want lower taxes or higher taxes, more jobs or more welfare, and a strong defense or a weak defense. This November, voters will also choose between a president with a strong record of standing up against China – President Donald Trump — or a candidate with a history of being weak and feeble against China, Joe Biden.

    In this area the correct choice is crystal clear.

    President Trump has long fought for American jobs and against China. President Trump confronted China about its unfair trade practices and negotiated Phase One of a trade deal that enormously benefits American workers and farmers. He is fighting to bring back American manufacturing jobs, both prior to the pandemic and as we emerge. The president also correctly recognized the threat posed by COVID-19 and halted travel from China. Dr. Anthony Fauci and Dr. Deborah Birx praised him for strong, early leadership that they credited with saving lives.

    In comparison, Joe Biden’s record on China is so weak he makes Neville Chamberlain look tough.

    . In 2000, Biden downplayed China posing a threat to the U.S. economy and manufacturing, ignorantly comparing China’s economy to that of the Netherlands.

    . Biden was a champion of China’s entry into the World Trade Organization, which contributed to the loss of 60,000 American factories.

    . Last year, Biden said China was “not competition for us.”

    . Joe Biden served as the top cheerleader for the horrible Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which labor unions correctly opposed because it would have further harmed U.S. manufacturing to the benefit of the Chinese.

    . Let us also remember that only days after returning from China on Air Force Two with his father, Hunter Biden received a $1.5 billion investment in a private equity firm from a Chinese bank controlled by its communist government.

    . And, who could forget that while President Trump was halting travel from China due to the virus, Joe Biden called it “xenophobic” and “racist.”

    It’s no wonder that former Obama Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, a colleague of Biden in the White House, wrote that Biden has “been wrong on nearly every major foreign policy and national security issue over the past four decades.”

  133. thefrollickingmole

    calli

    Ill get the rendering pots stoked.
    https://youtu.be/uD5sPgV61bw

  134. Roger

    Hate to depress you, but non-citizen permanent residents are already eligible.

    Friedman’s dictum about welfare and open borders was in my mind.

  135. Roger

    It’s no wonder that former Obama Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, a colleague of Biden in the White House, wrote that Biden has “been wrong on nearly every major foreign policy and national security issue over the past four decades.”

    He’s in good company.

  136. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘These people are desperate for tyranny. They can almost taste it. And it tastes good.’

    Outstanding, calli. They imagine themselves to be immortalised in their inner circle of equally nondescript doctorate students at the local hidden-away-from-the-scummy-public rooftop ristorantes. The reality is that twelve months from now no-one will remember any of them as anything other than faceless nobodies who unnecessarily made their lives harder.

    Exhibit A: ‘Panic Buy Now’ Sutton in Vic, who didn’t personally like golf so made it illegal but allowed surfing.

    Exhibit B: Whatsisname in South Australia, who allowed restaurants and bars that served food to open with ummm, let’s see, regardless of venue space, let’s go with…. 10 people inside. As long as the punters gratefully ordered a feed with a beer.

    Except that, like everywhere else, there’s about 40 different types of liquor licences dependent on several thousand conditions and what SORT of joint you’re running. On hearing the joyous news, restaurants and bars ordered stock, organised staff, advertised their opening and accepted reservations.

    Until the afternoon before the appointed time, when it was discovered that because of the differing liquor licences about half of the businesses that had spent money trying to start up again wouldn’t be able to.

    So in the face of open rebellion, Whatsisname decided to…… say fuck it, and let them all open. Under said conditions.

    Nothing whatsoever to do with C19, epidemiology in general or public safety.

    Everything to do with wielding power they don’t understand, like putting a ten year old boy in charge of a mining tipper.

  137. Dr Faustus

    In Offer They Can’t Refuse news:

    Miners confident on China coal demand as import threat looms

    Zhao Lijian, a spokesman for China’s Foreign Ministry, said China always adhered to “mutual respect and equal-footed treatment” while developing friendly relations with other countries.

    “We hope Australia will work with us to create favourable conditions for practical cooperation with actions that are conducive to bilateral relations and mutual trust,” he said.

    Translation: Shut fuck up about COVID and Hong Kong, get fuck out of way of Chinese ownership of Australian assets, and let Chicom FIFO workers to run China First projects with no tax.

    How inscrutable is this? Even moron like Fitzgibbon understand.

  138. mh

    They also do democracy better than us.

    I like their Parliament

  139. Mater

    From his own blog:

    Unknown‬ said…
    A great speech, will be up there for some time. And yet where are you? have you abandoned Cat or have you been “erased’ in the classic Stalinist tradition?
    7 November 2014 at 14:00

    ‪1735099‬ said…
    I posted on the Cat to foster outrage, get noticed and sell my book.
    Mission accomplished!

    He is not here to put a case, to convince, or to be convinced.
    Destroy his credibility, with his own hypocrisy and lies, at every opportunity.

  140. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The NVA lost every battle, Tet failed, yet the war was won on the campuses.

    “The Vietnamese seek only “freedom and independence” which the United States wants to prevent them from having.” Jane Fonda.

  141. Geriatric Mayfly

    windy.com satellite pic this morning shows cloud being drawn from that Indian Ocean disturbance right across the north and down onto Sydney’s doorstep. A graphic illustration of circulatory systems and Coriolis busy as always.

  142. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    “The Vietnamese seek only “freedom and independence” which the United States wants to prevent them from having.” Jane Fonda.

    hasnt dated well has it jane? jane should have stuck to 3rd rate sci fi flicks with her pegs and tit on display.

    a warning message to emrat who think anyone gives a toss about her political views over her pout and tight butt. if only she could have been a nobody, the shame…

  143. Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)

    They also do democracy better than us.

    generations of soy has turned the chicoms into tepid girlie men with tiny pee pees

  144. Rockdoctor

    Even moron like Fitzgibbon understand.

    Fitzgibbon isn’t the sharpest tool in the shed and doesn’t. He was openly groomed by the Chinese when Defence Minister so I would rate anything from his mouth as credible as something from Dastyari or Carr on this subject.

  145. thefrollickingmole

    Anyone wanting what looks like an entertaining read on actual oldde time whaling might like this book.
    https://www.gutenberg.org/files/1356/1356-h/1356-h.htm

    …where some form of agreement was read out to us. Sailors are naturally and usually careless about the nature of the “articles” they sign, their chief anxiety being to get to sea, and under somebody’s charge. But had I been ever so anxious to know what I was going to sign this time, I could not, for the language might as well have been Chinese for all I understood of it. However, I signed and passed on, engaged to go I knew not where, in some ship I did not know even the name of, in which I was to receive I did not know how much, or how little, for my labour, nor how long I was going to be away. “What a young fool!” I hear somebody say. I quite agree, but there were a good many more in that ship, as in most ships that I have ever sailed in.
    ….
    On board ship, especially American ships, the first requisite for a sailor who wants to be treated properly is to “show willing,” any suspicion of slackness being noted immediately, and the backward one marked accordingly. I had hardly reached the deck when I was confronted by a negro, the biggest I ever saw in, my life. He looked me up and down for a moment, then opening his ebony features in a wide smile, he said, “Great snakes! why, here’s a sailor man for sure! Guess thet’s so, ain’t it, Johnny?” I said “yes” very curtly, for I hardly liked his patronizing air; but he snapped me up short with “yes, SIR, when yew speak to me, yew blank lime-juicer. I’se de fourf mate ob dis yar ship, en my name’s Mistah Jones, ‘n yew, jest freeze on to dat ar, ef yew want ter lib long’n die happy. See, sonny.” I SAW, and answered promptly, “I beg your pardon, sir, I didn’t know.” “Ob cawse yew didn’t know, dat’s all right, little Britisher; naow jest skip aloft ‘n loose dat fore-taupsle.” “Aye, aye, sir,” I answered cheerily, springing at once into the fore-rigging and up the ratlines like a monkey, but not too fast to hear him chuckle, “Dat’s a smart kiddy, I bet.” I had the big sail loose in double quick time, and sung out “All gone, the fore-taupsle,” before any of the other sails were adrift. “Loose the to-gantsle and staysles” came up from below in a voice like thunder, and I bounded up higher to my task. On deck I could see a crowd at the windlass heaving up anchor. I said to myself, “They don’t waste any time getting this packet away.” Evidently they were not anxious to test any of the crew’s swimming powers. They were wise, for had she remained at anchor that night I verily believe some of the poor wretches would have tried to escape.

  146. OldOzzie

    Mini Electric review: Here’s why I won’t buy electric

    The cost to climate of an electric car is much more than 4c per km. Several reputable studies have convincingly shown than an electric car needs to do around 100,000+ kilometres before it starts saving on carbon emissions. The reason is that a lot of CO2 was emitted in its production, especially manufacture of its batteries.

    BTW, after one has clocked 100,000 km time has come to replace the batteries – so there is no saving of the environment, just a feel good effect of having thought that one was saving the environment!

    Perhaps this realisation is best explained by philosopher, A Schopenhauer, who said: “All truth passes three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as self-evident”.

  147. mh

    a warning message to emrat who think anyone gives a toss about her political views over her pout and tight butt.

    Check out this latest pic

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CAdRxQLB5PF/?utm_source=ig_embed

  148. Dr Faustus

    Coronavirus: Clive Palmer ‘to launch High Court challenge’ to WA border closure after being denied entry

    Mr Palmer wanted to visit WA for meetings with businesspeople, Senator Mathias Cormann and potential 2021 state election candidates for his United Australia Party but was knocked back.

    Not sure what WA has done to deserve this visitation.
    Must be pretty bad.

  149. Bruce of Newcastle

    “The Vietnamese seek only “freedom and independence” which the United States wants to prevent them from having.” Jane Fonda.

    She’s too busy saving the world from globular worming and Trump666 to worry about Vietnamese people these days.

    ‘Artists For Amazonia’ Livestream Benefit Features Jane Fonda, Morgan Freeman, Carlos Santana (23 May)

    Maybe she can ride an antiaircraft gun in the Amazonian jungle too.

  150. dopey

    Terry McCrann, The Australian. A new record, surely.
    ” She was thorough, beautifully, utterly inadvertently and completely unknowingly right…”

  151. Old School Conservative

    Frollicking – that was a barrel of laughs for the full length of the video.
    Thanks for posting.

  152. Top Ender

    There really seems to be some sort of bias against the Navy in Victoria Crosses: Consider:

    – Hec Waller, who commanded HMAS Perth until it went down fighting. USS Houston nearby, also sunk in the same battle, saw its commander awarded the USA’s highest award, the Medal of Honor. Waller was given a Mention in Despatches, a badge, not a medal, and not even a bravery award.

    – Robert Rankin, commander of HMAS Yarra, the sole escort of a small convoy, who turned and faced his ship against overwhelming Japanese odds. Nothing at all was given to any of the ship’s company. On the other side of the world Fogarty Fegen of the RN was given a VC for his sole naval defence of a convoy;

    – “Buck” Taylor, gunner on the Yarra, did the same as Sheean – manning his gun to the end, even after “Abandon Ship” had been ordered.

    Navy recommendations for honours in WWII were processed in London by the Admiralty. RAAF and Army were processed here.

    And the above examples have been examined by inquiries, but because there was no deliberate disobeying of administrative processes – just incompetence – they were not remedied.

    Talk about discrimination against the Navy!

  153. Infidel Tiger King

    Not sure what WA has done to deserve this visitation.
    Must be pretty bad.

    Palmer is a hero.

    He has put the Chicoms over a barrel and now abuses them for his own pleasure.

    If only all our billionaires were so.

  154. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Maybe she can ride an antiaircraft gun in the Amazonian jungle too.

    “The Vietnamese people were peasants, living a peaceful, bucolic life before the Americans came to destroy Vietnam.” Jane Fonda.

  155. Free Radical

    Welfare for non-citizens!

    No. It would be job support for taxpayers. In a casualised workforce economy everyone employed at 1 March 2020 should be paid Jobkeeper. The 12 months continuous employment rider is an unjust a cost saving attempt that made no sense in March and makes even less sense now. Seems Friedeggburger is still trying to be Scrooge, can’t get over his now disappeared balanced budget.

    Anyway, the $60B mistake by Treasury and the ATO was made 6 weeks before any tick box errors by form filling employers. Joshie made a big deal announcing the $130B rescue package and should use the surprise $60B to support the taxpayers who he deliberately left out back then.

  156. Bruce of Newcastle

    windy.com satellite pic this morning shows cloud being drawn from that Indian Ocean disturbance right across the north and down onto Sydney’s doorstep.

    The BoM model suggests it’s going to combine with a big loop in the jet stream and smack into Perth on Sunday night. Stay safe westie Cats.

  157. Delta A

    windy.com

    Excellent site, Mayfly. Thank you.

  158. Knuckle Dragger

    The ‘aspiring rapper’ concept has evolved through ‘aspiring footballer’ to ‘aspiring athlete’ (the Hun):

    ‘A man is lucky to be alive after a teen intruder allegedly stabbed him repeatedly during a terrifying house burglary in Melbourne’s inner east. The boy, who was 14 at the time of the incident, fronted a Children’s Court on May 20 seeking bail.

    ‘The boy, a promising athlete, faces charges including attempted aggravated burglary, intentionally cause serious injury, threat to kill and unlawful assault.

    ‘Sen-Constable Crocket told the court the boy was a promising athlete who knocked back scholarships to elite schools so he could continue to hang around with his delinquent mates. Leading Senior Constable Melissa Sambrooks told the court the boy was well-known to police and his latest charges represented a frightening escalation in offending.

    ‘She also told the court the boy was on seven counts of bail at the time of the alleged offence.’

    Sounds like a nice kid. Misunderstood, probably. Evidently one of the scholarships lined up was to the AIS, specialising in the 2000m Run Away From My Dealer Who I Just Ripped Off.

  159. Bruce of Newcastle

    Miners confident on China coal demand as import threat looms

    They are probably right to be.

    China To Boost Oil & Gas Exploration, As EU Prepares To Commit Suicide (22 May)

    BEIJING, May 22 (Reuters) – China said on Friday it will bolster the capacity of the country’s energy reserves and offer lower gas and electricity charges to key industries, as it looks to ensure energy supply and offset the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

    In energy announcements on the first day of the parliament, known as the National People’s Congress (NPC), authorities also pledged to boost the country’s oil and gas network and continue to support exploration for unconventional gas reserves.

    The bolded bit means coal. Lots and lots of yummy thermal coal. Sucked in, greenies.

  160. EvilElvis

    Sal, they also have to pay up front, so for smaller, not-so-financial entities they are out of pocket until the taxpayers’ money arrives. A real cashflow headache for some.

    So burn down cash reserves, pay it personally or go into debt to pay for a reimbursement that still has a work component to administer.

    People also don’t realise that the customer base has been obliterated for many businesses so there is little income to maintain Jobkeeper wages that have the potential to be greater than a normal working weeks wage for many employees.

  161. Tom

    Could you pease make it less brutal and terrifying, and in future inform that people have ‘passed’ rather than died.

    Nothing better expresses the pansification of Australin society than the news media’s absolute refusal — as a matter of policy — to call death death.

    About 20 years ago, some unelected Karen decided it was too upsetting to call death death. Calling death a passing is now enforced as if the revenue from Dickhead Dan’s speed cameras depends on it.

  162. Dr Faustus

    He has put the Chicoms over a barrel and now abuses them for his own pleasure.
    If only all our billionaires were so.

    Situational.
    First glimpse of an opening Chicom wallet and Aussie Crive would join the Kowtow chorus.

  163. Kev

    What happens to weapons after war – enough to make collectors cry.

  164. Rockdoctor

    Not sure what WA has done to deserve this visitation.
    Must be pretty bad.

    Too bad he doesn’t own a TV station, would get all the exemptions he wants…

  165. I posted on the Cat to foster outrage, get noticed and sell my book.
    Mission accomplished

    Please people, boycott this idiot and make his line fail to prosper.

    Should we unleash the Juice on this fool for his anti-cementitism?

    Racism just isn’t acceptable in this day of age.

  166. Old School Conservative

    Kev, what happens to the ordinance?

  167. calli

    The windy.com site is showing a magnificent ECL just off theNSW coast. Whirling away like a Van Gogh painting. I always check it before going for my long walk as it’s a bit more accurate than the radar. Picks up a lot of other interesting stuff, too. Like the amount of heavy industrial activity in China.

    No wonder they don’t want iron or coal. Nothing much seems to be happening.

  168. Ed Case

    People also don’t realise that the customer base has been obliterated for many businesses so there is little income to maintain Jobkeeper wages that have the potential to be greater than a normal working weeks wage for many employees.

    No.
    JobKeeper subsidises wages $750/week, so that can never happen.
    If an employer still can’t afford to pay wages when the Feds are picking up the first $750 and there’s no customer base, then it’s all over, isn’t it?

  169. OldOzzie

    Carnage when money-go-round stops – Weekend Australian

    Shortsighted leaders have driven the nation to the brink of an economic abyss. Australians will soon be more afraid of poverty than the virus.

    By STEVE WATERSON

    Shortly after World War II, British writer and theologian CS Lewis examined what he called “moral busybodies” in one of his essays on ethics. “Of all tyrannies,” he said, “a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive.”

    Tyranny is a strong word; but not too strong, I think, to be applied to what we’re experiencing now: incompetent politicians exercising powers they have no idea how to control, in response to the coronavirus. Let’s not question their intentions, even though the signs of mission creep abound, and the voices of reason are drowned out by the sound of goalposts being dragged into new, contorted positions.

    We were told, were we not, that by flattening the curve of infections we would buy enough time to prepare for the coming onslaught. We would take cover from the virus, ramp up our health facilities and, thus prepared, stand behind our ranks of ventilators and face it gallantly.

    The problem is, we have been forbidden to break cover. We have not confronted the virus, treated our casualties and bravely returned to the barricades. We have hidden from it. There is no curve left to flatten. But the virus is still out there, and we will have to deal with it one day.

    The mantra parroted by our federal leaders, premiers and the medical bureaucrats they hide behind is that they will do nothing that threatens their citizens’ health. That sounds like a noble principle, but they’re solving the wrong problem. We are no longer facing a health crisis: we are facing economic carnage.

    Our leaders are stunned into idiotic paralysis. NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian was looking a shoo-in for best on ground when she said this week, “More than 220,000 jobs lost in April is beyond our wildest expectations in terms of what could have happened.” Really? You find catastrophic modelling that says tens of thousands of people are going to die entirely believable, but those jobless figures astonish you?

    Queensland’s Annastacia Palaszczuk came with a late grab at the title with her (or is it her chief health officer’s?) ruling that despite having next to no infections she would not be opening her state until September. The CHO then quantified the conditions needed to satisfy her: two consecutive 14-day incubation periods without community transmission in Victoria and NSW. So no one’s going to the Sunshine State ever again.

    The defiant stupidity is beyond parody, and beyond comical. It’s costing Queensland $50m a day in lost tourism revenue. The state relies hugely on domestic visitors during the winter, with a plethora of small businesses running cafes, restaurants, tours, accommodation, transport and so on. They used to employ many thousands of mainly young people, but not now. If the border does not reopen immediately, neither will many of those businesses. By September the opportunity to recover will be lost. And there are no international tourists on the horizon.

    So far, the pain is dulled by unsustainable federal handouts, ludicrously applied. I haven’t come across anyone who has had the virus, but I know a half-dozen uni students who have seen their $200 Saturday jobs turned into a $750 bonanza, without the nuisance of having to go to work. A friend in Sydney’s Bondi lives next door to a household of cheerful bludging surfers who are bewildered but joyful at the doubling of their dole payments.

    Their joy won’t last. When the financial props are removed, millions of Australians will fall into a largely avoidable misery. They will soon be more afraid of poverty than the virus. At some point their debts will be called in; their overdue rent demanded; their missed payments see cars and white goods repossessed. I hope the banks and landlords are merciful, but history doesn’t suggest so.

    When we reach the end of this economic disaster, let’s not forget it was man-made. In 1957, for example, the Asian flu claimed some 120,000 American lives, from a population half its current size. But the US didn’t close down business, schools or travel, destroy the economy or shatter society. Those now rather creepily celebrating an apparent rise in Sweden’s fatalities might consider that this is likely to be a marathon. We may only be kicking the reckoning down the road, where a broken nation and shell-shocked officials will be ill-equipped to deal with it.

    It’s career suicide for a politician to admit they’ve made a mistake. They are conditioned from their first appearance before the selection committee to show nothing but confidence and to double down if challenged. The media bears much of the blame for this unhealthy instinct; its reporters pounce on any slip of the tongue, any sign of weakness, indecision, self-doubt, memory lapse — any of the things that mark us as human beings.

    We are seeing the conseq­uences now, with politicians whose laser focus on factional fighting, speaking in platitudes and slithering up the greasy pole has left them disconnected from reality. We’ve tolerated the lesser, state-level mediocrities because they were only supposed to look after the boring bits. They were neither equipped nor expected to make proper, grown-up decisions about people’s lives. Now they’re terrified, and so are we, but for different reasons.

    Perhaps we can offer them a face-saving deal: end the lockdown while there’s something left to salvage, promise never to do anything so foolish ever again, and we will pretend to accept that their brilliant agility saved the lives of hundreds of thousands of Australians. And when the virus resurfaces, let’s pretend it’s just another bad flu and take the simple precautions we have always taken, without committing economic suicide.

    Naturally, this stance will be characterised as prioritising money over lives. But it’s not. A healthy economy is necessary for life. The equation now is lives versus lives: the broken lives of people left destitute, with the attendant physical and mental health debris, versus the lives of those who will succumb to the virus. It becomes clearer, as the death toll mounts around the world, which people we most need to protect, and we should divert some of the billions we are giving away to do so.

    Others who remain fearful should be urged to protect themselves; their caution should be respected, their absence from society encouraged and supported financially. Let them hide forever if they want: the government, via employment or welfare, is funding 9.5 million — roughly 72 per cent — of our 13.2 million workforce; a few more on the payroll won’t make any difference.

    But those who so desire, especially the 28 per cent who pay for all this, should be allowed to return to normal, accepting the virus as just one of the multitude of risks life entails. No one will make the vulnerable mingle with the daredevils. No one will burst into their homes and lick them. Decide what level of risk you are comfortable with and live by it. I don’t go skydiving or rock-climbing; you don’t go to the pub or lie on the beach.

    Instead, we are living by a policy whose costs are still unknown. Already the British government has estimated their lockdown has caused 12,000 excess deaths, through suspension of cancer and other disease screening, delays to surgery and other procedures, and the catastrophist media-fuelled hysteria that has made people too scared to visit hospitals. I haven’t seen such figures for Australia, but I’d have a substantial bet they’re higher than our 100 virus deaths.

    A final thought for those who insist this downturn is the price we must pay to save the sick and elderly: others will pay too. A UN report, released last month, says after decades of lifting living standards in the world’s poorer countries, in a matter of months tens of millions will tumble back into extreme poverty. By year’s end more than a quarter of a billion worldwide will be close to starving.

    There will be old people among them, but for anyone who saw the famines in Ethiopia, what haunts them still are the images of tiny, uncomprehending victims. Get ready to see them again. According to the UN, “hardship experienced by families as a result of the global economic downturn could result in hundreds of thousands of additional child deaths in 2020, reversing the last two to three years of progress in reducing infant mortality within a single year”.

    There is no stopping this madness without some concerted effort by the public to make our leaders wake up to their errors, but I despair at our timid acquiescence to their witless rulings. Even in Spain, Germany and the US, some of the worst-affected countries, there have been protests in the streets. Here, rather than rage against the erosion of our liberties, the battery chickens send out hilarious memes about living under lockdown: “Hey, sleeping on the couch tonight to cut down on the morning commute!” “Now I know why dogs get so excited to go for walks!” Terrific, here’s a LOL and a smiley face for you.

    We opened with Lewis, so let’s end with him. “Those who torment us for our own good,” he wrote, “will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.”

    I fear our leaders believe in their hearts that their paternalistic actions are in our best interests. Sadly, a righteous conscience is no substitute for dispassionate reason when it comes to protecting the country. Maybe we should all have a quiet think about what we’re doing.

    STEVE WATERSONCOMMERCIAL EDITOR
    Steve Waterson is commercial editor of The Australian. He studied Spanish and French at Oxford University, where he obtained a BA (Hons) and MA, before beginning his journalism career.

  170. calli

    OSC, such questions are of no materiel importance whatsoever. 😀

  171. Old School Conservative

    OK Bob, challenge accepted.
    I’ll head off to your web site now and post verbatim what you wrote about Alan Jones.

  172. Should we unleash the Juice on this fool for his anti-cementitism?

    There are some here who can’t tell the difference between anti-semitism and the state of Israel.

    Joowish groups consistently disagree on a range of specific public policy issues, with more religiously observant Joows saying, for example, that Israel should shut down public transport on the Sabbath (as it mostly does); secular Joows almost universally say public transport should remain running. Joows of varying levels of religious observance also take starkly different positions on some key aspects of the Joowish state. For instance, in a hypothetical conflict between democratic principles and Joowish law (halakha), ultra-Orthodox Joows overwhelmingly say Joowish law should take precedence (89%), while an equally large share of secular Joows say democratic ideals should take priority.

  173. Kev

    Kev, what happens to the ordinance?Get’s rewritten maybe but to be sure we should ask Numbers.

  174. JC

    Coronavirus: Clive Palmer ‘to launch High Court challenge’ to WA border closure after being denied entry

    He’s back in court? This dude must have 1/2 dozen court cases running at any one time.

  175. What happens to weapons after war – enough to make collectors cry.

    What happens to many soldiers after war – enough to make anyone cry.

  176. Old School Conservative

    Done, Bob.

  177. EvilElvis

    No.
    JobKeeper subsidises wages $750/week, so that can never happen.
    If an employer still can’t afford to pay wages when the Feds are picking up the first $750 and there’s no customer base, then it’s all over, isn’t it?

    Ed, read the first bit of my quoted post. Jobkeeper is a reimbursement. The business needs to find the money first to pay wages to then be eligible to get the Jobkeeper reimbursement later.

    You seem to be getting tangled up in this Jobkeeper thing. What’s the main issue here? You’ve been banging on for ages about it.

  178. Tel

    The boy, a promising athlete, faces charges including attempted aggravated burglary, intentionally cause serious injury, threat to kill and unlawful assault.

    If I recall correctly … the door kick, stab, grab and run has been listed to become an Olympic sport when Chicago hosts the games in 2028. Most cities will have competitive teams by then … might bring back the viewers. One of the few activities completely unaffected by social distancing laws.

  179. thefrollickingmole

    Kev

    Lot of stuff getting a second run in Syria.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_military_equipment_used_by_Syrian_opposition_forces

    StG 44[20][21][22] Sturmgewehr 44.jpg 7.92×33mm Kurz Assault rifle Nazi Germany Nazi Germany On 8 August 2012, the FSA captured around 5,000 from a Syrian Arab Army storage container.

  180. Bruce of Newcastle

    There are some here who can’t tell the difference between anti-semitism and the state of Israel.

    Which every Lefty unconvincingly trots out whenever they get pinged for antisemitism.
    JPost isn’t especially righty but I like their outing of such craven behaviour every day.

  181. OldOzzie

    Old School Conservative
    #3461713, posted on May 23, 2020 at 11:17 am
    OK Bob, challenge accepted.
    I’ll head off to your web site now and post verbatim what you wrote about Alan Jones.

    OSC,

    make sure you send a copy to Alan Jones

    Alan Jones considering legal action over SMH accusations of encouraging ‘racism and sexual violence’

    LEO SHANAHAN
    MEDIA EDITOR

    Alan Jones is understood to be considering legal action against Nine stablemate The Sydney Morning Herald who ran a blistering editorial against the departing broadcaster, including accusing him of encouraging “racism and sexual violence”.

    The SMH devoted its Friday editorial to the long-serving broadcaster for 2GB, now owned by Nine Radio, following a finding by the broadcasting watchdog ACMA that Jones breached decency standards in comments made about New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern in August last year.

    On Thursday, Jones was forced to issue an on-air correction following the finding after he suggested Scott Morrison should “shove a sock” down the throat of the New Zealand Prime Minister and be “tough with a few backhanders”.

    The Australian Communications and Media Authority found Jones had used “violent metaphors” to encourage “aggressive silencing” of the New Zealand Prime Minister.

    However the SMH went one step further in its farewell to Jones, claiming “his encouragement of racism and sexual violence should be unacceptable to all sides of politics”.

    The SMH online later removed the reference to “sexual violence” and published a correction.

    “A previous version of this story referred to encouragement of sexual violence. This was intended to refer to ‘violence against women’, examples of which were stated in the story. There is no suggestion that Alan Jones encouraged violence in a sexual context,” the correction read.

    The SMH editorial also accused Jones of “bullying” and “a hysterical, polarising “shock jock” style designed to humiliate”.

    “This undermined the sense of civility that is crucial for reasonable debate and put Jones above our elected representatives.

    “Now that he has left his radio pulpit, a show that has had a record 226 consecutive ratings wins, Australian politicians should reflect on how – and why – they tolerated Jones for so long.”

    Jones is understood to be furious at the comments and threatened legal action against the Sydney Morning Herald, after the offending line was published in all print editions.

    There are some at Nine Radio also angry at the comments, that are felt to “undermine” the work of boss Tom Malone, who diplomatically negotiated the departure of Jones and paid out the remaining year on the broadcaster’s $4m-a-year contract.

    A spokesman for Nine declined to comment on the editorial.

    Jones will also remain on the Nine-owned 2GB until the end of the month.

    The top-rating broadcaster announced his retirement from radio on air last week radio blaming ill-health, but will continue broadcasting on Sky News.

    Jones also has a rugby union column in The Australian.

    The Australian understands Nine Radio had been informed in mid-March of the final breach findings, just six weeks before Jones’s decision to retire.

    Nine has declined to comment, but sources close to Jones were adamant it did not contribute to his departure.

    As The Australian revealed last week, Jones met with Nine Radio boss Tom Malone on May 1 at Jones’s Southern Highlands property, at which it was decided Jones would step down.

    Both Nine and Jones have maintained that the 79-year-old decided to leave due to ill-health.

  182. Good morning all.
    Judging by the front page of the Hun, it would seem that only Richmond have black fellas playing. Yet another story about Dreamtime etc.
    In more serious news, Jack Steven and his ex squeeze have been interviewed by the rozzers over his curious stabbing. A couple of paragraphs from the Hun:

    ‘Detectives are still working to establish an exact timeline, but believe he was stabbed in the Brighton area last Saturday night.
    His ex squeeze, Indiana Beresford, who lives in their former home in Brighton East, has been spoken to by detectives. The Herald Sun is not suggesting she stabbed Steven, simply that she was interviewed in relation to the incident.
    It is understood Steven has been extremely distressed by the incident and the widespread speculation over who stabbed him and why.’

    Consider the man lost to football. His mental health battles have consumed him and now shacked up with another lady by the name of Marley Gordon, who incidentally was with GWS Giant Toby Greene. Almost like a Days Of Our Lives storyline. Unusual names included.

  183. Gab

    There are some here who can’t tell the difference between anti-semitism and the state of Israel.

    What a load of cowardly baloney. Typical.

  184. EvilElvis

    but believe he was stabbed in the Brighton area last Saturday night.

    Help me out, Black Ball. Is the ‘Brighton area’ near the ‘nether regions’?

  185. Fisky

    Iain Duncan Smith MP
    @MPIainDS
    · 4h
    The Prime Minister has instructed officials to draw up plans that would see China’s involvement in the UK’s #5G network reduced to zero. Boris Johnson to reduce #Huawei role in Britain’s 5G network in the wake of coronavirus outbreak https://telegraph.co.uk/politics/2020/

  186. OldOzzie

    Steve trickler
    #3461723, posted on May 23, 2020 at 11:22 am
    Well done.

    Trump’s New Press Sec. Lists Questions The Press Needs to Ask Obama, Then Walks Out

    Steve

    That is one Smart, Effective Lady – Trump has a Gem in his Press Secretary

  187. Hate to depress you, but non-citizen permanent residents are already eligible.

    70% of the eligible employees on JobKeeper through me are non-citizens.
    It was the non-citizens who dragged me into it.
    The Aussies were full of stuff like: “Put me on holidays, I’ll still come in & do a full week of work, tell me how I can help, I’ll do anything, we gotta keep this ship floating”
    Meantime the non-citizens were emailing me with thinly-veiled threats & worse.

  188. Steve Trickler ‘well done’ needs to be delivered a la Tommy Lee Jones in Under Siege when old mate gets the systems back on track. What a star she is.

  189. Old School Conservative

    ‘Detectives are still working to establish an exact timeline, but believe he was stabbed in the Brighton area last Saturday night.

    Does that hurt more than being stabbed, say, in the neck?

  190. Yes I was pondering that same question EvilElvis 😂

  191. Knuckle Dragger

    Good point re the Tiges BB.

    The AFL must be beside themselves. If they actually do get started they’ll have to have shared signature rounds. A combination Dreamtime and Dress Like A Girl Round should be a belter.

  192. Eddystone

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #3461348, posted on May 23, 2020 at 12:25 am
    When I was a kid a granny from across the road gave my brother and I her husband’s bandolier and belt. He’d been a light horseman.

    I got an ammunition pouch from a Light Horse bandolier in a showbag from the Adelaide show when I was a kid in the early 60’s. Why it was in there, I have no idea.

    I’ve still got it, a leather ammo pouch that holds two clips of .303, stamped “Holden & Frost 1916”

  193. Sinclair Davidson

    Gentlepeople – I have gone through the thread and deleted a few comments.

    I have noticed over the years that Australians have a rather nasty tendency to accuse people they don’t like of sexually perverted criminal behaviour. To be clear – I don’t just dislike that behaviour, I HATE it. I don’t want to see it at the Cat. So the next time you want to post a comment about a person being a sexual deviant just don’t do it. The next time you want to a post a news story about people being sexual deviants just don’t do it. If you have an interest in sexual deviance go and blog about it at Opinion Dominion.

    Now we have very few rules here at the Cat. I like to think of that as being a feature. Please observe the rules that we do have.

  194. Cassie of Sydney

    “There are some here who can’t tell the difference between anti-semitism and the state of Israel.”

    There is no difference…he has just confirmed his anti-Semitism with the above post. Keep going racist.

  195. People also don’t realise that the customer base has been obliterated for many businesses so there is little income to maintain Jobkeeper wages that have the potential to be greater than a normal working weeks wage for many employees.

    No.
    JobKeeper subsidises wages $750/week, so that can never happen.
    If an employer still can’t afford to pay wages when the Feds are picking up the first $750 and there’s no customer base, then it’s all over, isn’t it?

    Elvis is correct.
    The JobKeeper payment is a flat $750 per week.

    If the employee was earning $100 per week for 4 hours;
    They get $750 per week.
    (& legally cannot be worked more than 4 hours per week in return)

    Keep in mind the employer had to pay the $750 per week for several weeks, & thanks to STP could not wait until the JobKeeper payments arrived & back pay it.

    Teenage girls living with parents, who did a bit of after-school work, were suddenly winning $750 a week, no work to do, & their employer was having to pull $750 per week out of thin air to fund it.

  196. stackja

    Follow the Leader
    Patrick Carlyon

    Certain that inaction would costs lives, Premier Daniel Andrews made the decisive leap to lock Victoria down. It’s a move he is adamant helped us avoid the catastrophic scenes witnessed overseas

    ANDREWS says he has drawn on reserves of energy that replenish him in stressed times, though he adds that the likes of bushfires or election campaigns have not demanded such prolonged dedication.

    He has been unfazed by Opposition taunts and the label of “Dictator Dan” by Kew MP Tim Smith. Nor will he be drawn on the ill-advised tweet about Captain James Cook by Victoria’s deputy chief health officer Dr Annaliese Van Diemen, except to say that she is on a team that has saved thousands of lives.

    He sounds pleased there has been less politics in the past two months than in the past 25 years. He doesn’t have time to focus on things, issues or people who are “fundamentally irrelevant”.

    There are learnings from every crisis, he says. The advent of the National Cabinet looms as one of the more significant of this one.

    ‘My view would be that COAG is basically finished, or should be,” he says.

    Andrews says the National Cabinet has made urgent decisions without ill-will or argument and retaining it presents an opportunity for fast decisions on fundamental reforms. “It is the PM’s call on whether there is a National Cabinet going forward but I had nearly an hour on the phone with him on Tuesday night talking about all sorts of national reform ideas opportunities …” he says. “While it’s for the PM to make announcements, I certainly don’t want to go back to the days of COAG where we all go up to Canberra or Sydney or wherever it is, we have a pretty turgid meeting where we don’t decide much, then we all line up and do a press conference where we at best are polite about each other, and at worst it’s a conflict model that doesn’t really work.” Andrews is usually a keen player at Kingston Heath Golf Club on Sundays. He acknowledges the unpopularity of his government’s golf ban, but he isn’t about to take advantage of its lifting. From helping small business, to tackling the inevitable unemployment surges, he doesn’t have time. “The least I can do is be focused on them rather than playing golf.”

    [email protected]

  197. Kev

    What happens to many soldiers after war – enough to make anyone cry.

    You’re enough to make anyone cry. Lighten up mate – try and amuse us or link to something positive or interesting. I know you post here to foster outrage but seriously, if you took my advice you might find people would stop attacking you. You might like the feeling even if it was a never-before-experienced sensation.

  198. Cassie of Sydney

    Sinclair Davidson
    #3461742, posted on May 23, 2020 at 11:38 am”

    Understand Sinc.

  199. Dr Faustus

    OldOzzie at 11:16 am

    Shortsighted leaders have driven the nation to the brink of an economic abyss. Australians will soon be more afraid of poverty than the virus.

    When the financial props are removed, millions of Australians will fall into a largely avoidable misery. They will soon be more afraid of poverty than the virus. At some point their debts will be called in; their overdue rent demanded; their missed payments see cars and white goods repossessed. I hope the banks and landlords are merciful, but history doesn’t suggest so.

    Recovery from the mess at the bottom of the abyss is far too complicated for government (or anyone else) to plan for. The best government can do is to keep getting the fuck out of the way.

    It won’t.

  200. EvilElvis #3461722, posted on May 23, 2020 at 11:21 am
    [Ed Case] You seem to be getting tangled up in this Jobkeeper thing. What’s the main issue here? You’ve been banging on for ages about it.

    Elvis, you’re not wrong.
    Ed (apparently Grigory the PITA) has been banging on non-stop, & always erringly (or deliberately) coming out with industrial-strength wrongology on the topic.
    This cannot be by chance.

  201. EvilElvis

    If you have an interest in sexual deviance go and blog about it at Opinion Dominion.

    Is this not Opinion Dominion?

    Shit. The same thing happened to me at MamaMia.

  202. Cassie of Sydney

    “Gab
    #3461730, posted on May 23, 2020 at 11:29 am
    There are some here who can’t tell the difference between anti-semitism and the state of Israel.

    What a load of cowardly baloney. Typical.”

    Well said…they hide their anti-Semitism behind Israel bashing.

  203. woolfe

    All 10 of my wife’s clients have already received job keeper that was applied for. One is waiting on their cash boost but probably because they were way behind on their tax payments.

  204. mh

    Recovery from the mess at the bottom of the abyss is far too complicated for government (or anyone else) to plan for. The best government can do is to keep getting the fuck out of the way.

    It won’t.

    Neither will the RBA.

  205. Sinclair Davidson

    Theoretically there is a distinction between anti-Zionism and antisemitism. In practice the correlation is so high that I tend to find no need to worry about the distinction.

    So I have sympathy for the argument that Zionism is blasphemy because the State of Israel can only be established when the messiah comes. Everybody else is just a racist until proven otherwise.

  206. And in further sporting news:

    ‘Anthony Mundine tells Page 13 he is busy planning a comeback at age 45 with a bout against Michael Zerafa in Bendigo.
    Last year’s Battle Of Bendigo saw Zerafa, 28, beat Jeff Horn and now a match against another former world champion in Mundine is in the offing.
    Mundine said Zerafa’s constant “smack talk” has stirred the beast within (a few zeros added by top boxing promotor Brian Amatruda could have also helped sweeten the pot).
    “This cat Zerafa’s been talking a lot of smack” Mundine said on his way to Dubbo to launch indigenous roadside barrier art.
    “I was a very good smack talker back in the day, but he has been disrespecting me.
    “Even at my age, I will prove that you have to earn my respect and I truly believe I am good enough to beat him.
    “I know what I am made of. If I am right on that night, then say night-night Zerafa.”

    Yes, the last refuge of all champions. Laughable. I would have loved to see him in America but his comments about 9/11 saw him delegated to could’ve been status.

  207. mh

    Sal, SMEs should have received Cash Flow Boost payments.

    This should help with the upfront payments for wages.

  208. “This cat Zerafa’s been talking a lot of smack” Mundine said on his way to Dubbo to launch indigenous roadside barrier art.

    My favourite piece of Aboriginal art is “Mundine on Canvas”

  209. My gentle friends. Not my gentile friends.

    Seriously I need some advice.

    What do you do when a friend goes mad watching Michael E Jones videos and rants about Orenthal James non-stop?

    He’s getting worse.

  210. Cassie of Sydney

    “So I have sympathy for the argument that Zionism is blasphemy because the State of Israel can only be established when the messiah comes. Everybody else is just a racist until proven otherwise.”

    Well said Sinc….now there are anti-Zionist Jooooish sects..such as Neturei Karta….who maintain this…but in the meantime they are still happy to live in Israel and take the Zionist government’s benefits. Mea Shearim is a suburb in Jerusalem of such sects. But this anti-Zionism is completely unrelated to the anti-Zionism of the left..which is just a convenient masquerade for their Joooo hatred.

  211. Ed Case

    Ed, read the first bit of my quoted post. Jobkeeper is a reimbursement. The business needs to find the money first to pay wages to then be eligible to get the Jobkeeper reimbursement later.

    Sure.
    Once you’ve been reimbursed, you’ve paid nothing and you’ve gained the value of the labour performed.

    You seem to be getting tangled up in this Jobkeeper thing. What’s the main issue here? You’ve been banging on for ages about it.

    Where’s this tangling you speak of?
    My initial and only misunderstanding was how it was to be administered.
    Since Sal pointed out that error, i’m amazed that any employee was stupid enough to sign up

  212. Sal, SMEs should have received Cash Flow Boost payments.

    mh, are you Grigory also?
    Where the heck do you get this bullshit from?
    The, haha.. “Cash Boost” is not a payment to the business.
    It is a discount on the April, May, June BAS payments to the ATO.

    Wanta have a guess at what the discount is on zero income?

  213. Cassie of Sydney

    “Free Radical
    #3461757, posted on May 23, 2020 at 11:51 am
    Can’t help herself. Another one to delete Sinc.

    Is Grigs now the Cat censor…..or is he just stalking me? We know he has a bit of form with that.

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