Open Forum: May 23, 2020

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2,127 Responses to Open Forum: May 23, 2020

  1. cohenite

    Bodyguard, the Netflix thriller is not a bad series, but is stupidly woke: all the RoP terrorists are called Asians; no wonder the chunks have rounded all the RoP into camps.

  2. mh

    They want to build a mega m0squ3 in London and this is best objection they can come up with?

    Churchill would have something to say

    “How dreadful are the curses which Moh ammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy. The effects are apparent in many countries. Improvident habits, slovenly systems of agriculture, sluggish methods of commerce, and insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live. A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement; the next of its dignity and sanctity. The fact that in Moh ammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property – either as a child, a wife, or a concubine – must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Is lam has ceased to be a great power among men. Thousands become the brave and loyal soldiers of the faith: all know how to die but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Moh ammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith. It has already spread throughout Central Africa, raising fearless warriors at every step; and were it not that Christianity is sheltered in the strong arms of science, the science against which it had vainly struggled, the civilisation of modern Europe might fall, as fell the civilisation of ancient Rome.”
    ― Winston Churchill, The River War

  3. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    It was Attlee who finished off the war & oversaw the aftermath.

    Clement Attlee had been an infantry officer at Gallipoli – one of the last men “off the beach” at the evacuation, and Churchill held him in high regard as a result.

  4. Bar Beach Swimmer

    At the end of Darkest Hour is a postscript. Churchill loses the 1946 general election 9(?) months after the end of the war

    SSDM,
    That is my mistake – I plead that it came up quickly on the screen and I was typing on my phone. I thought it said 9 months, hence the question mark, so, deduced that because the war in Europe ended in May the general election must have been 1946. 🙏😊

  5. jupes

    Oh dear. Here is the ABC shilling for Isl*m. (can’t link because of banned words)

    “When a woman covers it becomes about people getting to know her for who she is, not the way she looks.

    Sure love.

    You idiot.

  6. jupes

    Bodyguard, the Netflix thriller is not a bad series, but is stupidly woke:

    Therefore it is a bad series.

    Unwatchable.

  7. Clement Attlee had been an infantry officer at Gallipoli – one of the last men “off the beach” at the evacuation, and Churchill held him in high regard as a result.

    Eden’s WWI record was exemplary (including promotion in the field to adjutant of his unit -while still a teenager). Churchill worked closely with Eden all through WWII.
    S’pose Churchill knew exactly what he was dealing with.

    IIRC Attlee believed Churchill was a brilliant leader & excellent at strategy. This cannot have done any harm to the mutual high regard.

  8. Jamie Lee Curtis must rate a mention

  9. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Oh dear. Here is the ABC shilling for Isl*m. (can’t link because of banned words)

    “When a woman covers it becomes about people getting to know her for who she is, not the way she looks.

    It was explained to me, in Dubai, that “it is necessary for women to cover themselves such, so that good men are not led astray from the study of the true faith, by thoughts of lust.’

  10. Bodyguard, the Netflix thriller is not a bad series, but is stupidly woke:

    Therefore it is a bad series.
    Unwatchable.

    It’s actually edge-of-the-seat all the way.
    Woke as, yeah. Defy you to watch just one episode.
    (Thought it was on Seven or one of the commercial channels)

  11. Rex Mango

    Nicole Scherzinger, not really Hollywood but close, in the running for great junk in the trunk:

  12. Seven Media is possibly more woke than the ABC.

    In my Goolag newsfeed today there was a “Jacobin” article about how our compulsory super system “reinforces inequality” and that the unions should have more control of industry super funds.

  13. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Attlee believed Churchill was a brilliant leader & excellent at strategy.’

    Churchill fucked up the Dardanelles campaign completely. If Attlee was personally wearing the consequences in the field of Churchill’s London-based incompetence and had 25 years to find out about it, I’m not sure what that says about either of them.

  14. Davey Boy

    ABC must have overlooked this

    “If you take out uncovered meat and place it outside … without cover, and the cats come to eat it … whose fault is it, the cats’ or the uncovered meat’s? The uncovered meat is the problem. If she was in her room, in her home, in her hijab, no problem would have occurred.”

    h/t Sheik Taj Aldin al-Hilali

  15. JC

    Clement Attlee had been an infantry officer at Gallipoli – one of the last men “off the beach” at the evacuation, and Churchill held him in high regard as a result.

    Wonderful. Bread. of all things wasn’t rationed during the war in Britain. It became rationed after the war by the Labor government. But hey, Churchill held him in high regard.

  16. Knuckle Dragger

    Not Nicole, no.

    Not Curtis, Diaz, Hawn, Whatsername from last night.

    Margot Robbie.

    Who, if you watched the movie clearly, is clearly in love with me.

  17. mh

    jupes
    #3462389, posted on May 23, 2020 at 11:05 pm
    Bodyguard, the Netflix thriller is not a bad series, but is stupidly woke:

    Therefore it is a bad series.

    Unwatchable.

    I saw some of that. The elite anti terror squad taking out the suicide bomber were all female.
    Had a touch of The Worm That Turned.

  18. Bruce in WA

    Best arse (ass). Yep, I’ll stand by my pick.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9yr7Xio4Eg

    Margot Robbie? Get back to me when she’s had a full meal.

    Cameron Diaz? She has an ass??? Goes with her tiny tits.

    (Yes, I know for us it’s arse. But that kills the search engines.)

  19. jupes

    Woke as, yeah. Defy you to watch just one episode.

    No. If it’s woke, I won’t can’t watch it.

    Sure, it limits the amount of modern films and series I can watch, but I can live with that.

  20. jupes

    The elite anti terror squad taking out the suicide bomber were all female.

    Like I said. Unwatchable.

  21. Rex Mango

    In my research for Hollywood’s best arse came across this, bit long but final scene conclusive where she stabs her lover to death:

  22. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From Des Deskperson at 4:39 pm:

    “…
    A fair point, Mick.

    What you have drawn attention to – and why intrigues me – is the size of the ACMA – 450 employees at 31 December 2019.

    By contrast, two APS agencies that I picked out at random and which have a broadly similar regulatory and audit function have considerably smaller staffs. The Fair Work Commission – whose duties are by all appearances much more important and intensive than the ACMA’s – had only 304 staff. The Australian National Audit Office – responsible for in accurate, evidence based in-depth audits of the financial probity and the performance effectiveness of Commonwealth agencies – had only 338.

    Maybe I’m missing somethings but the ACMA seems, prima facie, somewhat feather-bedded.”

    Perhaps ACMA’s sponsors were well placed during its creation to craft this as reward for the Australian Broadcasting Authority delivering a win for government control of the media (as I recall it) in the cash for comment inquiry conducted by its Chairman David Flint, during its final years. This is merely a guess on my part – the media / government issues did not attract much of my attention back then.

    I appreciate your responses and the discussion Des.

    From johanna at 5:37 pm:

    “…

    Mick, I knew several of the senior management there from my days in the Comms Department, where many of them come from. I can confidently say that none of them has any experience of the world outside the bureaucracy, and the Canberra bureaucracy at that.

    What’s more, they are funded by an industry levy and therefore have absolutely no fear of ever having their budget properly scrutinised, let alone cut. Industry is too scared to take them on.

    They are completely process oriented, and weave their way through the maze of legislation, regulations, and industry codes that bedevil the communications sector. 90% of it could be scrapped tomorrow, and nobody would notice, except for a few noisy and well placed lobbyists and SJWs.

    No Minister has had the guts to do anything about them, and the prospects for the future are not great.”

    The damn things are set up to satisfy some zealot’s urges Johanna, or some momentary political imperative, then their reason for existence diminishes and dies yet they continue to live, serving no good purpose. There needs to be a sunset clause or a mandatory objective examination of worth after ten or fifteen years, with the presumption that they should be disbanded. There would be hundreds of these turn outs across the Federal and State governments, and thousands employed doing nothing of value.

    Much more importantly … I have just enjoyed West Side Story on SBS and the excellence of people such as George Chakiris, Rita Moreno and Russ Tamblyn who could both act and dance beautifully. A welcome bonus for this week. 😁

  23. Churchill fucked up the Dardanelles campaign completely. If Attlee was personally wearing the consequences in the field of Churchill’s London-based incompetence

    Attlee believed the Dardanelles campaign was a brilliant idea.
    Incidentally, he was one of the last men off the beach there.
    The bloke was wounded, not lightly, a few times during the war.
    In contrast to Eden-the-teenage-staff-officer, Attlee was near too old for war service.

  24. jupes #3462389, posted on May 23, 2020 at 11:05 pm
    Bodyguard, the Netflix thriller is not a bad series, but is stupidly woke:
    Therefore it is a bad series.
    Unwatchable.

    I saw some of that. The elite anti terror squad taking out the suicide bomber were all female.
    Had a touch of The Worm That Turned.

    I don’t even notice shit like that.
    Then again, I watched western movies when I was a kid.
    Anyone who blows a gasket at unrealistic bullshit in movies is only ever going to get about 5 minutes into any western movie.

  25. Rex Mango

    Just watching end of Valkyrie & not a bad movie, but ruined by Hollywood putting their stars in charge. Am sure the Germs weren’t happy about losing, but having Hollywood make up this sort of history must be galling. An unknown actor would’ve been better cast than Tom Cruise.

  26. K2

    There was a show on ABC a couple of years ago called Pine Gap. About the American spy base out near Alice Springs.

    Anyway I started to watch the first episode. The head controller of the spies was an African American, but then a bit later it turned out that the real head controller of the spies lurked in a dark office upstairs, and was also an African American. I changed channels at that point and never watched it again.

    Go woke. Go broke.

  27. I don’t even notice shit like that.
    Then again, I watched western movies when I was a kid.
    Anyone who blows a gasket at unrealistic bullshit in movies is only ever going to get about 5 minutes into any western movie.

    Whatever happened to Gary Cooper?

    You know, the strong, silent type?

  28. Pine Gap is possibly the worst thing made on Australian TV and we have some terrible, awful televisual crap.

  29. Steve trickler

    Maureen McGovern.



  30. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Churchill fucked up the Dardanelles campaign completely

    Asquith, Kitchener and Fisher bore most of the responsibility for that fuckup.

  31. Pine Gap was boring as batshit.
    Dull predictable plot means a movie/series cannot be saved.

  32. Rex Mango

    K2, you should’ve seen Darkest Hour earlier, literally. May 1940 & London was full of West Indians.

  33. Said it before Salvatore, 3.10 To Yuma is one of the great fillums. I rate a classic as any time it’s on, you watch. Certainly true in this case

  34. Rex Mango

    Churchill didn’t fuck up the Dardanelles. It was a legit military gamble that saved thousands of Australian lives, as our troops went to a backwater without artillery for 9 months prior the Western Front.

  35. K2

    Thanks Rex. I’m glad I missed it.

  36. Said it before Salvatore, 3.10 To Yuma is one of the great fillums. I rate a classic as any time it’s on, you watch. Certainly true in this case

    The original or the remake with Rusty?

  37. Rex Mango

    Not wanting to waste lockdown & in the mood for self improvement, today I visited the bottle shop & bought three different bottles of whisky for $160. Tonight tasting them together I can honestly say there is absolutely no difference whatsoever.

  38. K2

    Blue Label Johnnie Walker is flash piss apparently. My mate drank 9/10ths of a bottle in a pub in central Adelaide one arvo. Dumb young barmaid was selling it at standard rate etc. I only drink beer.

  39. max

    Kentucky Rain – the best period for Elvis. Around 1970.

  40. Rex Mango

    max, Elvis wall of sound in a recording session January 69 where he got the best session muso’s etc to lay down his best tracks.

  41. Arky

    Jamie Lee Curtis must rate a mention

    ..
    Yep. Good looking for a bloke.

  42. Rex Mango

    Col Tom Parker was out the way:

  43. Arky

    This is the one you want Rex:
    ..


  44. Rex Mango

    The Elvis wall of sound high point:

  45. Rex Mango

    Arky, those cars were re-badged American cars, The XA was an experiment & the XB was the apotheosis of Australian motor cars.

  46. Arky

    XB has the Cleveland big block.
    The 1967 XR has the lovely Windsor small block in 289 ci.

  47. Arky

    With the heads off you could lift the Windsor block out of the engine bay by hand.

  48. Rex Mango

    351 Cleveland makes 351 Windsor a very sorry dance fellow.

  49. Rex Mango

    Great footage here, this bloke is perhaps driving a 351, who knows:

  50. MemoryFault

    Thanks Tom.
    Maybe a laugh will bring back the sunshine of my smile.
    But I doubt it.

  51. calli

    I can’t believe you guys had a two page discussion on women’s backsides and C.L. missed it.

    Cruel and unusual.

  52. miltonf

    Latho nails it again..

    Murdoch’s Paul Kelly using Kevin Rudd to say post-pandemic, the world won’t have any super-powers, no China, no USA.
    Do people really get paid to write this drivel?

    Tired old turds.

  53. calli

    Perfect

    Chuckle.

    Thanks Tom. A good crop. I did like the ‘snap‘shot of Venice too.

  54. miltonf

    With all the focus on Joe Bidet he almost makes Clinton look like a model of propriety.

  55. miltonf

    The Chinese Communist Party has threatened that American politicians seeking to hold China accountable for the coronavirus pandemic will face “severe consequences,” including targeted economic sanctions. PJ Media

    Evil people.

  56. Brazil is providing a stark example of the outcome of politicising the pandemic.

    When the President sacked his health minister in April, he said: “Mandetta’s vision was that of health, of life. Mine is more than life, it includes the economy, jobs.”

    One highly respected British medical journal, The Lancet, called Bolsonaro the “biggest threat” to public health in Brazil.

    In April, when the coronavirus death toll surpassed 5,000, the President told the press:

    “So what? I mourn, but what do you want me to do about it?”

    Now, more than 1,000 people are dying every day.

    Brazil is now the sixth country to register more than 20,000 deaths.

    And experts say the peak of the outbreak is still weeks away.

  57. Ah yes, the *respected* Lancet.

    The Lancet is where the Wakefield paper (“MMR vaccine causes autism”) was published.

    They even said he was a good boy and he did nothing wrong.

    Yes, that *respected* Lancet.

  58. Twostix

    The contact tracing app you’ve installed, it’s a snitch and this is its purpose:

    Matt Hancock says ‘healthy’ people without coronavirus symptoms must also isolate if tracked

    under the new system, self-isolating if you’ve been in close contact with someone who tests positive

    . Under the new system, they could get a phone call from an official ordering them to isolate.

    Imagine having obediently installed the government surveillance app thinking it was for your own good.

    LOL.

  59. The Ministry of Love does not take kindly to being cheated on.

  60. calli

    Why would you need to “self-isolate” if you test negative? Are asymptomatic “carriers” testing negative?

  61. calli

    In other news, apparently I’m not “allowed” to watch my grandson play rugby. And only one of his parents is “allowed” to attend.

    Or…you are “allowed” to watch from the car. Because all sportsgrounds have handy carparks set up On the sideline just like drive-ins.

  62. Herodotus

    Lancet retailing tainted studies on hydroxychloroquine? Surely not! It’s such a respected journal. (Cough)
    Jo Nova has this topic sorted.
    Link

  63. Bruce of Newcastle

    Ah yes, the *respected* Lancet.

    Lancet has gone full-on hysterical climate bedwetting and politically far-left over the last decade. It’s sad to see a previously superior outlet destroy itself in this way.

    Lancet Editor’s Backing For Extinction Rebellion (28 Mar)

  64. Herodotus

    Spot the bias in this part of a report in The Australian about local efforts to find solutions. The Doherty Institute is a very advanced group who have sequenced the viral genome well before most others.
    But the reporter couldn’t help but say this later in the piece:

    “Other fronts include a trial led by the institute involving 2500 people in more than 80 hospitals in Australia and New Zealand (called the ASCOT trial) to assess the effectiveness of two antiviral drugs, lopinavir/ritonavir (used to treat HIV) and hydroxychloroquine, the antimalarial drug touted by Donald Trump and Clive Palmer.”

  65. Bruce of Newcastle

    Lancet is a perfect example of Iowahawk’s classic description of how it’s done:

    1. Identify a respected institution.
    2. kill it.
    3. gut it.
    4. wear its carcass as a skin suit, while demanding respect.
    #lefties

    And here is the ABC and Numbers doing the ‘demanding respect’ bit.

  66. rickw

    Now, more than 1,000 people are dying every day.

    Brazil has a population of 209 million. The death rate is tiny.

  67. Cactus

    Rex.Mango at 1224. Did all 3 come from speyside in scotland. They can all taste very similar…

  68. pete m

    Downer wets his pants a little more.

    What a stupid prick to go along with Obama’s illegal surveillance setup.

    His cv should be forever marked DICKHEAD.

  69. johanna #3462042, posted on May 23, 2020 at 5:37 pm

    Ah! My pain explained!

  70. rickw

    Daily dose of Vietnam!

  71. Bruce of Newcastle

    Downer wets his pants a little more.

    G. Gordon Liddy was sentenced to 20 years.
    Downer may not get quite that long.
    But, then again, he might.

  72. Cassie of Sydney

    “pete m
    #3462519, posted on May 24, 2020 at 8:20 am
    Downer wets his pants a little more.

    What a stupid prick to go along with Obama’s illegal surveillance setup.

    His cv should be forever marked DICKHEAD.”

    I have always marked him as a DICKHEAD. And despite the fact that I can’t stand that independent and very vacuous Sharkie in Mayo…I was happy that Downer’s daughter didn’t win the seat of Mayo last year.

  73. Roger

    Downer wets his pants a little more.

    Schadenfreude should normally be eschewed by the morally sound person but in this instance I think a little indulgence might be warranted.

  74. From The Daily Mail

    World Health Organisation fails to mention its ‘goodwill ambassador’ Peng Liyuan is the wife of China’s President… saying only on its website that she’s a singing star, amid concerns over WHO’S handling of the coronavirus pandemic

  75. P

    Remedy for a double standard in NSW law

    Bill would make NSW anti-discrimination law consistent

    Without very much fanfare, a very significant bill was tabled in the NSW Parliament last week. The Anti-Discrimination Amendment (Religious Freedoms and Equality) Bill 2020 was introduced by Mark Latham MLC and, if passed, offers the most meaningful protections to people of faith in this state in recent memory.

  76. Crossie

    Journalists still beating up Frydenberg for not going to spend $60 billion is getting more than tedious. Are they aware how stupid they sound and look by persecuting a guy for not putting the country into more debt? And why hasn’t anybody pointed it out to them?

  77. Roger

    World Health Organisation fails to mention its ‘goodwill ambassador’ Peng Liyuan is the wife of China’s President…

    First Robert Mugabe, now Xi’s wife…what on earth convinces Dr Tedros to make these odd appointments?

    (rhetorical question)

  78. areff #3462151, posted on May 23, 2020 at 7:57 pm

    Seriously, the supply chains from China are suffering. I’ve been trying to get a replacement keyboard for six weeks.

    There’s only one solution. I still use an IBM Model M from 1987. Finding an original one may be problematic but IBM sold the design to another company that still makes them. Buy one and it should be the last keyboard you ever need. A search for ‘Model M keyboard’ shall find them.

  79. rickw

    Bill would make NSW anti-discrimination law consistent

    Consistent anti-discrimination law is an oxymoron.

  80. So if we donate to WHO, we’re kicking up to President Xi?

    Fuck this shit.

    You absolutely have a moral obligation to minimise your taxes.

  81. Goolag now deleting undesirable files off Goolag drives.

    Do evil.

  82. mh

    I see Kingaroy got down to 0.0 C this morning

  83. Cassie of Sydney

    “First Robert Mugabe, now Xi’s wife…what on earth convinces Dr Tedros to make these odd appointments?

    (rhetorical question)”

    Indeed. But I wouldn’t use the word “odd”…corrupt is a better word.

  84. Roger

    Indeed. But I wouldn’t use the word “odd”…corrupt is a better word.

    Used with irony, c.

  85. Cassie of Sydney

    “rickw
    #3462544, posted on May 24, 2020 at 8:53 am
    Bill would make NSW anti-discrimination law consistent

    Consistent anti-discrimination law is an oxymoron.”

    Agree….but we need to thank Mark Latham who has been the only one to stick his neck out to try and do something to amend this very discriminatory “anti-discrimination” legislation here in NSW….used and abused by a venal homosexual crank to attack Christians….and in particular one Christian..meanwhile the NSW Libs and Nats have done nothing…NOTHING.

  86. Crossie

    Seriously, the supply chains from China are suffering. I’ve been trying to get a replacement keyboard for six weeks.

    I have heard that in other stores recently, very little new stock has been arriving.

  87. johanna

    Just catching up on last night.

    Arky, brilliant clip of Motorhead doing ‘Heroes’ at 10.09pm. Awesome.

    One of my greatest regrets is that I never saw them live. 🙁

  88. Crossie

    meanwhile the NSW Libs and Nats have done nothing…NOTHING.

    Oh yes they have, they have actually worked against Christians with the abortion law as a recent example.

    They all need to be unelected. How much worse could it get with five or six minor parties forming a government particularly in view of the coronavirus debacle? A legislative and other political paralysis would be a plus.

  89. Snoopy

    First Robert Mugabe, now Xi’s wife…what on earth convinces Dr Tedros to make these odd appointments?

    Well in Mugabe’s case it was almost certainly a reward for providing asylum to Ethiopia’s ex-President, the mass murdering communist Mengistu who remains living comfortably and unbothered by the International Criminal Court in Harare.

  90. Israel was right.

    Targeted assassination.

  91. min

    Thank goodness Greg Sheridan is on Insiders telling them it was the stupid bureaucrats that caused the problems. Mark Riley confesses he has no maths past primary school but it is still Josh’s fault because he is the minister. If that is so Josh better go through the bureaucrats with a dose of salts.

  92. Bruce of Newcastle

    Israel was right.
    Targeted assassination.

    I wouldn’t go that far myself.
    But stopping their welfare might be a good start.

    Five Alleged Rwandan Genocide Perpetrators Live Openly in Britain, Four on State Welfare (23 May)

  93. thefrollickingmole

    First Robert Mugabe, now Xi’s wife…what on earth convinces Dr Tedros to make these odd appointments?

  94. mh

    Treasurer Josh has just appeared on Luke Grant’s 2gb show clearing up the Jobkeeper manufactured hysteria.

    A very sound performance.

  95. H B Bear

    Mark Riley confesses he has no maths past primary school but it is still Josh’s fault …

    Shit Happens is more stupid than I thought.

  96. Cassie of Sydney

    “Legalise Sedition
    #3462575, posted on May 24, 2020 at 9:15 am
    Israel was right.

    Targeted assassination.”

    Agree.

  97. Knuckle Dragger

    17 degrees this morning when I surfaced, still under the sway of Margot Robbie from Suicide Squad.

    Initially I thought the ink in my pen had frozen as I tried to make notes about something whilst out back on the patio where I live, clad in two layers of clothing to ensure my survival.

    The actual state of affairs was that the pen had run out of ink.

    Bit of an anticlimax, really.

  98. calli

    How can we help, Mark?

    😄

  99. Knuckle Dragger

    Rarely do I comment on US politics – aside from occasionally reflecting on the achievements of 45 in smashing up The Machine, but I noted the Florida Governor (deSantis?) on the teev this morning repeatedly punching Cuomo and the MSM squarely in the nuts.

    A bit ‘me, me me, I,I’ but otherwise a solid performance. Has a lot of potential, and I think he’ll make it through to the semi-final in Brisbane.

  100. Cassie of Sydney

    “Mark Riley confesses he has no maths past primary school but it is still Josh’s fault …”

    It wasn’t just maths…..Mark Riley learnt nothing else past primary school.

  101. OldOzzie

    We’re All in this Together. except for China and it’s Labor Fan Club

    Federal Labor must stop pandering to China

    Piers Akerman, The Sunday Telegraph
    May 23, 2020 11:00pm
    Subscriber only

    The Wuhan virus has exposed an unprecedented combination of ignorance, fantasy and pure ­opportunism in left-wing politics — and an unprecedented use of the word unprecedented.

    Ignorance has abounded since the Chinese virus first slithered into Australia with returning travellers, notably among those who had been on what was to be the cruise of their lives aboard the Ruby Princess.

    Such was the level of ignorance that the very health officials charged with ensuring that our nation is safe from pandemics not only permitted infected passengers to disembark from the floating viral petri dish, but they all but ushered them onto aircraft bound for every state and territory and destinations abroad.

    Then, basing their decision-making on epidemiological modelling which had zero basis in actuality, our pro­vincial politicians surrendered their authority to regiments of unelected petty officials who insisted they ­impose draconian economy crippling lockdown measures.

    Still attempting to follow Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews, the fool who signed up to loading Victorian taxpayers with a massive debt to Beijing’s signature Belt and Road Initiative, federal Labor has not yet acknowledged the monstrous bullying the Chinese have been engaging in since the virus emerged from either a bowl of bat soup or Wuhan’s biological research centre.

    Opposition agriculture spokesman Joel Fitzgibbon, notionally one of the saner Labor frontbenchers, showed he is just as much a patsy for the Big Panda as is Andrews when he ­attacked the federal Government’s call for an internationally-supported inquiry into the origins of the ­coronavirus pandemic.

    Here is ­Fitzgibbon, leading the charge on “our” ABC: “So what was the interest the Prime Minister was pursuing? Running out there, in front of the pack, not knowing what model he was ­talking about, without consulting anyone … How did that help Australia?”

    Globally, Australia was reaping the benefits of being one of the first to seek answers about the coronavirus; ­answers that hopefully will help ­prevent future outbreaks of highly ­infectious viral epidemics.

    Contrary to the views espoused by Fitzgibbon and others in the Labor Party, more than 130 nations meeting virtually for the 73rd conference of the World Health Assembly on Tuesday supported Australia’s call for an ­independent inquiry — with China’s President Xi joining the consensus at the 11th hour.

    Just as former Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott was praised for leading the call for a thorough investigation into the shooting down of the Malaysian Airline’s flight MH17 — and last Wednesday Igor Girkin, a Russian who is in charge of pro-­Russian separatists, admitted feeling “moral responsibility for the deaths of the 298 people in the attack — so Prime Minister Morrison has won international acknowledgment for leading the call for the coronavirus ­inquiry. Labor doesn’t give up though.

    Its support for totalitarian regimes — covering their naked Communist or Socialist underpinnings with the fig leaf of claims of working for the people — is as obvious as its leaders’ desire to impose controls on our population.

    In Victoria, Red Dan Andrews permitted a meatworks to continue infecting workers under cover of privacy issues until it became the same sort of viral hotspot as the Ruby Princess.

    In NSW, Opposition leader Jodi McKay called on the Berejiklian government to give local government officials greater authority to enforce social distancing guidelines — essentially giving the local dog catchers and ­rangers more power to push citizens around.

    But the clearest indication of Labor’s unfitness to govern was its ­response to the $60 billion reporting error by businesses to the JobKeeper program.

    Following that revelation, Labor called for this money to be spent rather than celebrating the saving. The Chinese virus has slammed Australia with an — here we go — ­unprecedented lifetime debt and this JobKeeper error has provided a degree of respite.

    Rather than grabbing the opportunity to wind back some of the horrendous cost of the virus, Labor wants to punish the workers even more and rub in the fact that they are going to carry a huge debt by making that debt even greater.

    The Chinese want to punish our honesty with trade restrictions, Labor wants to punish us with more debt.

    So much for the claim that we’re all in this together.

  102. MiltonF:

    The Chinese Communist Party has threatened that American politicians seeking to hold China accountable for the coronavirus pandemic will face “severe consequences,” including targeted economic sanctions. PJ Media

    The stupid bastards are doubling down/always escalate/paint themselves into a corner, and hasn’t that worked a treat before?
    They’re going to ‘save face’ all the way to WW3.
    “If you know your enemy as well as you know yourself…”
    That works great, Sun Tzu, old son, but what if you are deluded about your own capabilities?

  103. OldOzzie

    Does this describe Politics in Australia?

    The Key Reason DC Hates President Trump – It’s a Big Club, and He Ain’t in It…

    Something 99% of American voters do not understand. Congress doesn’t actually write legislation. The last item of legislation written by congress was sometime around the mid 1990’s. Modern legislation is sub-contracted to a segment of operations in DC known as K-Street. That’s where the lobbyists reside.

    Lobbyists write the laws; congress sells the laws; lobbyists then pay congress commissions for passing their laws. That’s the modern legislative business in DC.

    CTH often describes the system with the phrase: “There are Trillions at Stake.” The process of creating legislation is behind that phrase. DC politics is not quite based on the ideas that frame most voter’s reference points.

    With people taking notice of DC politics for the first time; and with people not as familiar with the purpose of DC politics; perhaps it is valuable to provide clarity.

    Most people think when they vote for a federal politician -a House or Senate representative- they are voting for a person who will go to Washington DC and write or enact legislation. This is the old-fashioned “schoolhouse rock” perspective based on decades past. There is not a single person in congress writing legislation or laws.

    In modern politics not a single member of the House of Representatives or Senator writes a law, or puts pen to paper to write out a legislative construct. This simply doesn’t happen.

    Over the past several decades a system of constructing legislation has taken over Washington DC that more resembles a business operation than a legislative body. Here’s how it works right now.

  104. Ed Case

    China also wouldn’t be happy about our choice of Diesel Electric Submarines.
    From the limited amount i’ve read, the D/E’s will be invisible to detection in coastal waters, like, erm,
    all of Australian waters, whereas Nuclear Subs stand out like dogs balls away from Blue Water.

  105. Cassie of Sydney

    “min
    #3462581, posted on May 24, 2020 at 9:23 am
    Thank goodness Greg Sheridan is on Insiders telling them it was the stupid bureaucrats that caused the problems.”

    Nice to know Insiders has invited Sheridan back..particularly after his 55 second spray about their ABC and Pell a few weeks ago which caused the luvvies to freak out…because you know…you can’t have anyone on their ABC that questions the progressive far-left orthodoxy of the place.

  106. Farmer Gez

    Brazil COVID deaths per mill 104
    Murder rate p/m 300

  107. custard

    Greg Sheridan has destroyed the couch this morning on Insiders.

  108. whereas Nuclear Subs stand out like dogs balls away from Blue Water

    Erm, what?

  109. dover_beach

    Greg has made Annabelle go mad.

  110. H B Bear

    Gargoglery QCMD nuclear sub expert

    How lucky are we to have the benefit of his genius?

  111. Cassie of Sydney

    “Bruce of Newcastle
    #3462583, posted on May 24, 2020 at 9:31 am
    Israel was right.
    Targeted assassination.

    I wouldn’t go that far myself.
    But stopping their welfare might be a good start.

    Five Alleged Rwandan Genocide Perpetrators Live Openly in Britain, Four on State Welfare (23 May)”

    Why not.? The fact that there are five Rwandan genocide perpetrators living in comfort in the UK…on welfare…..shows that there is a complete lack of will to pursue justice anymore in the west. Even Golda Meir knew that back in 1972….as she said then…since the world won’t pursue and bring to justice the Munich murderers…Israel must…by any means necessary.

  112. MemoryFault

    whereas Nuclear Subs stand out like dogs balls away from Blue Water
    Erm, what?

    Goes in the same file as Sissy Pyne’s claim about warm water/ cold water subs, Dot.

  113. *I heard from a bloke who actually went to ADFA that nuke subs don’t have convection cooling, cannot turn their pumps off, cannot be turned off, don’t mix waste warm water with ambient water and water does not absorb IR light”…”what we need is short range subs incapable of strategic interdiction and also unable of carrying long range cruise missiles with large conventional warheads or tactical nukes. That’ll really piss off Chi-nah…”

    Ed.

    Explain how you’re not a China shill.

    GO!!!

  114. Cassie of Sydney

    “custard
    #3462603, posted on May 24, 2020 at 9:55 am
    Greg Sheridan has destroyed the couch this morning on Insiders.

    Good to know…I admire your stoicism in watching it.

  115. OldOzzie

    Emissions debate goes from inane to ridiculous

    TERRY MCCRANN

    I give it to Business Council of Australia CEO Jennifer Westacott over Angus Taylor, the Minister for “Energy and Emissions Reduction” — four words, by the by, that capture everything that is so hopelessly and destructively wrong about government in general in the 21st century and this Morrison government more and very specifically.

    Westacott did manage to nose Taylor out in mouthing the most mindless pap per page — she packed an impressive lot into a single page whereas his was spread out over 74 pages in his “Technology Investment Road Map Discussion Paper”.

    Westacott was commenting on Taylor’s paper on behalf of the business council, the curdled cream of the Australian business community; so, true, she was essentially only developing his inanity theme.

    “All Australians want action on climate change,” Westacott asserted. Actually, no, Jennifer: not all Australians are so mindlessly stupid as you claim. All Australians do not want to take utterly futile and indeed actively stupid action that would be — indeed, already is — all pain and zero gain.

    She followed with a sentence that managed to fit more idiocy in so relatively few words than I would have thought possible.

    “By not picking winners and remaining technology neutral, the road map is firmly focused on achieving a critical end goal, a more carbon efficient economy, while ensuring that new jobs, industries and opportunities are created to keep Australia competitive.”

    “By not picking winners and remaining technology neutral”: are you kidding? The entire, albeit chaotically ramshackle, policy is exactly about picking “winners” and not remaining technology neutral.

    It’s all-about closing down our existing highly efficient coal-fired power generation while eliminating any chance of it being progressively replaced by next generation coal-fired generation (or nuclear, which if properly done could be a close second best); to say nothing of destroying energy-intensive value-adding industries reliant on cheap power like aluminium smelting.

    While at the same time it deliberately seeks to force-feed the use of otherwise useless wind and solar generation, backed up by some form of inefficient and almost as useless “battery”, whether Tesla-style, “big battery” Snowy 2, or gas-fired stations which would spend most of their time lying highly inefficiently idle.

    She was though, beautifully, utterly inadvertently and completely unknowingly right about the policy not “picking winners”; no, it is precisely about picking losers: hence my quotation marks around the word in the earlier sentence.

    “A more carbon efficient economy”: out in the real world as opposed to the jargon of public sector and business bureaucrats, what the hell does that mean?

    I, and I would suggest most rational persons, would want carbon to be used efficiently like any other resource in the economy, like indeed it is already in a coal-fired power station.

    Crystal clear

    One thing is crystal clear, whether or not we get Westacott’s “carbon efficient economy” fantasy unicorn, we will most certainly get a dramatically and permanently less efficient economy in the good, old-fashioned — both normal English and economic — meanings of the word, if we persist in this mad, bad and dangerous embrace of destroying our energy infrastructure.

    “Ensuring that new jobs, industries and opportunities are created to keep Australia competitive”; again, are you kidding?

    The entire basis of our economy, of any economy — indeed of the entire progress of civilisation through especially the past two to three centuries — and so to “jobs, industries and opportunities” is access to power that is cheap, power that is reliable and power that is plentiful.

    Westacott showed she well less than half got that and well more than half didn’t, with her metric of: “affordable, reliable and secure”. No plentiful, affordable not cheap, and there is no way, no way, the energy generation chaos that would ensue from the Taylor-Westacott future would deliver reliable and secure.

    Our friends — for some, “friends” — in the Middle Kingdom know all this only too well. That is why China is embracing more and more, and more efficient, coal-fired power and happily selling us wind turbines and solar panels.

    For them, it’s a no-brainer two-fer — they get both more efficient and richer, while enabling us to destroy jobs and industry and impoverish ourselves.

    I could go on with virtually every paragraph of the Westacott statement.

    The so-called “Climate Solutions Fund” has to be expanded. Why? This is all supposed to be the most efficient, the cheapest, the form of generation that will, well, generate the greatest returns.

    Technology-focused strategies

    Why then does it need government money? On top of the quite literally tens of billions of dollars of both taxpayer and electricity consumer money that has been pumped into useless wind and solar (and now the Snowy 2 big battery, Malcolm Turnbull’s “answer” to Kevin Rudd’s multi-billion-dollar NBN waster)?

    “Other technology-focused strategies including on hydrogen, electric vehicles and grid reliability …”

    Again, why? We are continually told that all these wonderful things are the cheapest and most efficient; the very future available to unfold before our eyes; so why then do investors need to be led to and then subsidised into them?

    And I just love that term “grid reliability”. That’s the money you have to spend to ensure we do actually get electricity when the wind don’t blow and the sun don’t shine; with those quirky buggers, wind and sun, choosing to (not) do so when they decide rather than when it would suit us.

    Like what happened in Britain earlier this month. At times Britain can get more than 10,000MW from wind when the wind does, you know, blow. For two whole days it didn’t; for two whole days Britain was getting just 300MW or so from wind — effectively zero.

    So where did it get its electricity from? About 45 per cent came from a carbon-emitting, cough, cough, fossil fuel called gas; around 25 per cent from, cough, cough, nuclear; another 10 per cent or so from burning wood and pumping CO2, and 15 per cent from the extension cords to Europe.

    Please Jennifer, who will we plug our extension cord into, when we’ve closed the coal-fired generators?

  116. Mark A

    Ed Case
    #3462598, posted on May 24, 2020 at 9:51 am

    China also wouldn’t be happy about our choice of Diesel Electric Submarines.
    From the limited amount i’ve read, the D/E’s will be invisible to detection in coastal waters, like, erm,
    all of Australian waters, whereas Nuclear Subs stand out like dogs balls away from Blue Water.

    I don’t think you thought this one through.
    Unless you have a very compelling reason to say so.

  117. mh

    custard
    #3462603, posted on May 24, 2020 at 9:55 am
    Greg Sheridan has destroyed the couch this morning on Insiders.

    Set fire to it? 🔥

  118. Ah yes and nuclear powered subs don’t have any batteries in them at all.

  119. stackja

    Health Minister Brad Hazzard warns social distancing fact of life
    Australians may have to get used to social distancing being a fact of life, NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard says as he shares his fears in an exclusive interview with The Sunday Telegraph that an effective COVID-19 vaccine may never be found.

    Linda Silmalis, Chief Reporter, The Sunday Telegraph
    Subscriber only
    |
    May 24, 2020 6:00am

    ….

    This means while packed pub nights are obviously gone “for now”, there may always be a need for social distancing, which he concedes would forever change our “matey” way of life.

    “Unless there is a vaccine or cure — a vaccine for prevention, a cure for once you’ve got it — this virus will be with us for a long while,” he said.

    “I hope they come back, but it’s going to depend very much on the vaccine.”

    Flu viruses been with us for a long while.

  120. Ed Case

    Here’s the reason Defence chose Diesel Electric over Nuclear. Stealth.
    Not popular with China, that’s why their stooges in the Australian media are all over it like psoriasis.
    https://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/could-sink-the-us-navy-lethal-stealth-submarines-15034

  121. “Unless there is a vaccine or cure — a vaccine for prevention, a cure for once you’ve got it — this virus will be with us for a long while,” he said.

    Fuck off Brad.

    Go back to conveyancing and disputing traffic fines, you were pathetic as AG.

  122. Tom

    US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo live on Sky Outsiders giving Dickhead Dan’s Victorian state government both barrels for signing up to the Chinese Communist Party’s Belt and Road quid pro quo.

  123. Bruce of Newcastle

    Anyone want a fashion accessory?

    All shook CUP: Elvis Presley’s rhinestone studded jockstrap bearing his initials goes up for sale for £30,000 (23 May, via BCF)

    A man who certainly had big stones in his underdacks.

  124. Ed Case
    #3462627, posted on May 24, 2020 at 10:14 am
    Here’s the reason Defence chose Diesel Electric over Nuclear. Stealth.

    It’s horseshit and scientifically illiterate.

  125. mh

    Tom
    #3462629, posted on May 24, 2020 at 10:15 am
    US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo live on Sky Outsiders giving Dickhead Dan’s Victorian state government both barrels for signing up to the Chinese Communist Party’s Belt and Road quid pro quo.

    Is Pompeo giving a presser or being interviewed?

  126. Tom

    mh, one-on-one interview by Mike Pompeo with Rowan Dean.

  127. H B Bear

    Bruce – I could see JC bidding for those, although they might be a bit hard for his Mum to iron.

  128. Steve trickler

    Check this out.



  129. mh

    mh, one-on-one interview by Mike Pompeo with Rowan Dean.

    Wow. Great scoop for the Outsiders team.

  130. Kangaroo Court idiot is now accusing judges of receiving bribes because he has a monomaniacal, autistic obsession about Capilano honey having sugar added to it.

    Who cares, it’s all various kinds of sugar, just get some organic crap instead if you think it matters.

    This guy is our Lionel Hutz.

    Let’s see his suit vs Big Fisheries over their “crab stick” scam.

    It’s just beef offal flavoured with prawn offal. Who knew?! What a scandal!

  131. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘Australians may have to get used to social distancing being a fact of life, NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard says’

    Clearly believing the Ruby Princess disaster has been long forgotten by the hoi-polloi amid giddy celebrations of potentially having a beer in public at some point before Christmas, Hazzard’s now prepping the plebs to work against the human being’s hardwired instinct for physical contact and being a pack animal.

    No single person could be this stupid. It has to be a committee of non-social-distancing PR flunkies that came up with that combination of fear-mongering and gentle ‘Government will save you’ soothing narrative.

    We’ll all be okay, as long as we are guided into the ossuary by the cold, dead hand of government.

  132. Rex Anger

    @ Ed Case- The reason Diesel-electric subs (and AIS-equipped boats) are so quiet relative to nukes, is that their sound profiles are different. The US and Russian and Chinese, etc. navies adaopted nukes so thoroughly and rapidly in tbe late 50s thru 70s, that they all learned to listen near-exclusively to ewch others’ vessels.

    A nuclear submarine is a steam-powered vessel like the surface ships of old, just the ‘fire’ works a little differently to produce the steam for the turbines, etc. You are listening for characteristic noises produced by steam plant and turbines, as well as propeller noise.

    When most all of the subs you chase are nuclear, you optimise your sensors, technology and software to listen for that. The most effective counter-strategy is then to adapt your ships to be sneakier. This is why several classes of late-Cold War Soviet boats had electric ‘creep motors’ for small positional adjustments and moving very slowly at 1-2kt when the captai felt he needed to really minimise his sound profile.

    That the US navy had an appreciable technical edge in detection gear and hydrodynamic design just means that the Soviets’ solutions were overshadowed by age, poor design and lack of build quality.

    Their DE boats were known to be very hard to detect also.

    I might argue that DE quietness would only be a tactical advantage for a limited time, until the enemy’s detection methods and tactics improved. Then you are back to using your environment, decoys and innate sneakiness and initiative to attain your advantages. Same as for armoured warfare in these days of guided missiles and airpower, and manmed fighters against UAVs and ever more sophisticated integrated air defence systems, where the human operator is really just there to turn the radars on and off, and decode which contacts are.actually.spurious.

  133. Geriatric Mayfly

    Dickhead Dan’s Victorian state government both barrels for signing up to the Chinese Communist Party’s Belt and Road quid pro quo.

    Recall those big goofy ears flapping when he uttered his finest line, “We hear you.” They also seem to be able to pick up even the weakest signals coming out of China, all those thousands of kms away.

  134. Nick

    This means while packed pub nights are obviously gone “for now”, there may always be a need for social distancing, which he concedes would forever change our “matey” way of life.

    It’s interesting to see what is haram and what isn’t to these guys.
    Poker machines, tick. Presumably it relates to tax and donations, cough.
    Ramadan/Iftar dinners, no problem.
    ‘Matey’ things? Nah, this comes under the heading of things bogans and people who aren’t active on twitter, like.

  135. Geriatric Mayfly

    Let’s see his suit vs Big Fisheries over their “crab stick” scam.
    It’s just beef offal flavoured with prawn offal. Who knew?! What a scandal!

    Someone told me it is actually coloured tripe. Projectile vomit imminent.

  136. Cassie of Sydney

    “Go back to conveyancing and disputing traffic fines, you were pathetic as AG.”

    That’s putting it mildly…but now NSW is even more fortunate…it has little Green man Mark Speakman as AG…..NSW has a conga line of useless parisitic failed AG’s

  137. MemoryFault

    Here’s the reason Defence chose Diesel Electric over Nuclear. Stealth.

    No, Ed. The reason was treason.
    That department has been sabotaging Australia’s defence efforts since pre WWII.

    The sole advantage of some D/E subs is that they are generally a lot smaller than nuclear subs, and thus have less of a detectable “footprint” (2,000 to 3,000 tonnes displacement). However, the Shortfin Barracuda D/E sub we are allegedly buying off the French, has the same displacement as the Yank Virginia Class nuclear attack sub – around 8,000 tonnes, so there is no “advantage whatsoever.

  138. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘It’s interesting to see what is haram and what isn’t to these guys.’

    RoPer weddings, 50+ guests photographed all a-huggy with a giant middle finger just because – tick.

    Skip funerals, eleven present – bzzzt.

    My concept to save the AFL Grand Final involves converting the MCG to a Colesworths, thus removing the cap on public entry numbers.

  139. Rex Anger

    Furthermore, the Virginia has been designed and optimised for brown-water (i.e. shallow water) ops.

    You don’t send out SEALS and SASR operators from miles out to sea. You need.to sneak in close. Ditto when sticking an EW mast up to.listen to radio traffic or assess radar.returns, or tap undersea cables.

    Submarines do not just hunt and kill surface ships and submarines. They are about as.sneaky and.offensive a weapon you can get, without surfacing next to an enemy sticking your fingers up the captain’s nose and insulting his mother.

    In this era of pervasive satellite and aerial coverage, having to come close to the surface periodically to run a diesel engine and recharge batteries is extremely dangerous. Depth is life for a submariner.

  140. Ed Case

    I might argue that DE quietness would only be a tactical advantage for a limited time, until the enemy’s detection methods and tactics improved. Then you are back to using your environment, decoys and innate sneakiness and initiative to attain your advantages.

    Okay.
    Diesel Electric Subs are the ducks nuts for defending Australia.

  141. stackja

    When children were allowed to have fun, Empire Day 24 May.

  142. Okay.
    Diesel Electric Subs are the ducks nuts for defending Australia.

    You are many magnitudes dumber than monty.

  143. Ed Case

    You don’t send out SEALS and SASR operators from miles out to sea. You need.to sneak in close.

    Close to what?
    The subs are for defending Australia by sinking hostile shipping, not protecting the autonomy of feminists in the Kurile Islands.

  144. Rex Anger

    Not necessarily, Ed.

    The average transit speed of subs like Collins is slower than for even the older.Los Angeles boats and their Eastern or Euro equivalents.

    Nukes.can dash at up to 30+ kts if needed, and being noticed is less critical than etting into place. And that can be sustained indefinitely.

    The Collins needs to snort regularly as its.power runs down. That requires slower cruise speeds to prevent wrecking the snorkel, and exposes it to easier interdiction.

    While HMAS Stirling present easier.access to any location the RAN may conceivably operate in, therenis still a long way to go to reach any operational area. Scrambling a DE sub to a contact in the Great Southern Ocean or off Indonesia will still require a longer response time than if it were an LA, Virginia, Astute, etc.

    I do concede that building a robust Nuclear Propulsion branch of the Navy would be time-consuming and expensive. And politically very poisonous in the very leftist Overton window of our time. Also, the standards the US adopted are exceedingly high for its nuclear engineers. But you.would want your very best and brigjtest running a reactor.under.those conditions.

  145. cohenite

    Here’s the reason Defence chose Diesel Electric over Nuclear. Stealth.
    Not popular with China, that’s why their stooges in the Australian media are all over it like psoriasis.
    https://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/could-sink-the-us-navy-lethal-stealth-submarines-15034

    Bullshit. MF and Rex put forward some technical reasons. To those you can add the hideous political reasons of saving Chrissy poof’s seat, which was achieved and he promptly resigned; then the anti-nuke sentiment for energy which has spilt over to the subs; no other country in the world is building non-nuke subs. Finally a good overview of the incompetence and ratbaggery of the ADF process from Andrew Davies:

    https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/the-aggregate-failure-of-australias-submarine-policy/?fbclid=IwAR20hcMY7-6Kb4LbpKcKa2dGQqgFGqP4zMvPrQXV3pmWoUTmLMsArbtwA28

    Davies mentions $50 billion; this figure is now $225 billion, including maintenance. This is the crowning glory of turdball’s legacy making him the undisputed worst ever Australian PM.

  146. Rex Anger

    From the same post you quoted, Ed.

    Submarines do not just hunt and kill surface ships and submarines. They are about as.sneaky and.offensive a weapon you can get, without surfacing next to an enemy sticking your fingers up the captain’s nose and insulting his mother.

    Intelligence gathering in times of ‘peace’ like these are some of the most vital.missions submarines undertake. In the Cold War, all Western nations performed such tasks with their boats. And I have little doubt the East did exactly the same. Maybe just not as well…

  147. Knuckle Dragger

    Weighing in*:

    For any submarine fleet to be effective it needs to have access to its supply lines.

    This is why our potential new diesel/electric fleet should be based in the Gulf of Mexico, as all our diesel is underground somewhere in Louisiana.

    *Navy joke

  148. The subs are for defending Australia by sinking hostile shipping, not protecting the autonomy of feminists in the Kurile Islands.

    Which is best served by blue water interdiction and directly attacking their home ports, not waiting for them in the Bass Strait.

    There are extensive shelf regions in the NW but it also comes in within 100 km of the shore around Sydney.

  149. Ed Case

    Thanks Rex.
    Their could be a compelling reason why Defence opted for D/E over off the shelf Nuclear from the U.S.
    though?
    And it wouldn’t have anything to do with Chris Pyne saving his seat?

  150. Boambee John

    dover_beach
    #3462608, posted on May 24, 2020 at 9:58 am
    Greg has made Annabelle go mad.

    Waddya mean “go”? Old Crazy Eyes (look at them some time) has been bonkers for years.

  151. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Intelligence gathering in times of ‘peace’ like these are some of the most vital.missions submarines undertake.

    I’m remembering an article on the “Australian” a few years ago, about the work the “O” class boats had done, monitoring the Soviet naval bases in Vietnam.

  152. Davies mentions $50 billion; this figure is now $225 billion, including maintenance. This is the crowning glory of turdball’s legacy making him the undisputed worst ever Australian PM.

    We could have bought 1500 F-22s for that price.

  153. thefrollickingmole

    The subs are for defending Australia by sinking hostile shipping, not protecting the autonomy of feminists in the Kurile Islands.

    Then we wind up the navy as a branch and invest completely into airstrips & aircraft & missiles.

  154. thefrollickingmole

    Encouraging signs??

    Bane masks become latest craze during coronavirus pandemic

    Now to set up the tribunals.

  155. Ed Case

    To those you can add the hideous political reasons of saving Chrissy poof’s seat, which was achieved and he promptly resigned

    In other words, the decision had nothing to do with saving his seat, since he was intending to retire anyway.

  156. Worst trolling ever.

    Pro China and pro Chrissie Payhne.

  157. twostix

    Health Minister Brad Hazzard warns social distancing fact of life
    Australians may have to get used to social distancing being a fact of life, NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard says as he shares his fears in an exclusive interview with The Sunday Telegraph that an effective COVID-19 vaccine may never be found.

    This is as big a social revolution, being cynically and ideologically driven by the New Class (aka bugman class) to bring a new order into our societies in which they micromanage our lives using Science(TM) and Statistics(tm) and Studies Say(tm) as any that have happened in the past.

  158. Knuckle Dragger

    ‘The subs are for defending Australia by sinking hostile shipping, not protecting the autonomy of feminists in the Kurile Islands.’

    There’s a reason battleships are extinct*. Their only remaining use is as a coastal bombardment platform, and even then only under complete and utter air superiority.

    Anyone that thinks a hostile navy can’t project its power from blue water is kidding themselves. By the time any of them get to the shelves it’s too late.

    *Sadly.

  159. Ed Case

    Davies mentions $50 billion; this figure is now $225 billion, including maintenance. This is the crowning glory of turdball’s legacy making him the undisputed worst ever Australian PM.

    Well, yeah, there will be costs to maintaining them, though those costs would be infinitesimal compared to the costs of not maintaining them.

  160. thefrollickingmole

    https://www.consultancy.com.au/news/892/christopher-pyne-joins-ey-australia-to-help-grow-defence-practice

    Christopher Pyne joins EY Australia to help grow Defence practice
    17 July 2019 Consultancy.com.au
    Big Four accounting and advisory firm EY appears to be developing its defence profile in Australia, to which end it has now made a high-profile appointment to its operations. Former Defence Minister of Australia Christopher Pyne now joins EY to help expand its defence services segment.

    Pyne resigned from his post in the Federal Parliament In May this year, and his appointment to EY lies under the radar of any conflict of interest regulations, given that EY doesn’t fit within the bracket of lobbying firms. As a result, despite Pyne’s positions in the Defence and Defence Industry ministries, he can now work in the Defence sector in a private capacity.

    Defence spending in Australia is rapidly on the rise. The country is set to invest more than $200 billion over the next ten years, $50 billion of which are earmarked for submarines and $35 billion for frigates. The private sector in Australia is now moving to capitalise on this scenario.

    EY is among these firms. The global professional services firm has been expanding in every domain across the Australian market, which includes substantial investments in the digital space. The firm’s revenues have been growing at nearly 10% in the country, and this latest foray into the defence sphere is likely to boost this growth.

    Pyne is also here to help lead conversations about what all states need to do to meet the challenges and opportunities this defence investment will bring,” he added.

    “The Australian government is engaged in the largest expansion of our military capability in our peacetime history – around $200 billion over 10 years out to 2026.”

    Pyne is familiar with the regulatory and strategic atmosphere in Australia’s defence policy, and will be in a strong position to advise the firm’s new venture. Speaking to the Australian Financial Review, Pyne said that he was, “looking forward to providing strategic advice to EY, as the firm looks to expand its footprint in the defence industry.”

    EY’s defence operations are based in South Australia under the supervision of Partner at the firm Mark Stewart. The firm’s work in the defence space also extends to Canberra. Stewart has expressed his satisfaction with Pyne’s arrival to help expand the scope and quality of these operations.

    “Right now the Australian government is engaged in the largest expansion of our military capability in our peacetime history – $200 billion over 10 years out to 2026 with an ambition to build Australian science, technology, engineering, innovation and industrial capability,” said Stewart.

    “EY sees a role in helping the industry aggregate but also develop their capability to win and execute on work either in their own right or with primes. Christopher Pyne is also here to help lead conversations about what all states need to do to meet the challenges and opportunities this defence investment will bring,” he added.

  161. Rex Anger

    I would think it something along these lines, Ed-

    1) Historical and technical familiarity. DE boats have been around since John Holland’s first efforts for the USN and RN from 1904 onwards. The tech has certainly got better, but the modern DE boat is not that different from its progenitor.

    2) Niche ability. We are a US ally with (finally) capable DE boats, and very good ones historically. If Russian ships from Vladivostock, PLA-N boats and any neighbour whom the US is eyeing up suspiciously are being nefarious, they are less lilely to suspect an RAN boat sneaking up off the coast to ‘listen in,’ or trail their missile boats or recording what their newest vessels sound like for adding to each others’ sonar software libraries. As I said before, if you have trained your people to listen for nuclear steam plants and turbines, an electric motor will be mich harder to listen for.

    3) Politics. And not just the whole Parliamentary bullshit. Service bureaucracies can be very upsettable when brash neecomers turn up. If you get the chance, research Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, the ‘father’ of the US nuclear navy. The man hated cliques, yet set.up one kf the most powerful and intractable (and damn good) service empires in the process of founding his reactor branch. And the standards he set are superb.

    However, he was reputably an utter.bastard. And he needed to be. In today’s very.politically correct world of mouthing the right pieties and appeasing the right people to attain Sraff rank, I fear that any of the good ones who do favour nuclear power and have the appropriate degree of mongrel might top out with a fleet and/or shore.command, then just check out and give up. To the detriment of all.

  162. twostix

    I can well assure you that this guy, has never in his life felt part of the Australia’s “mates” or pub culture.

    Instead he seethes with contempt at being an outsider to it.

    He was elected to NSW Legislative Assembly in 1991 and sat in the backbench during the Greiner and Fahey governments.[9]

    This is the one defining charateristic of the bugman class from Sydney, to New York, to Las Angeles, to London- they are not of the left or right, they share one thing: they’re weird outsiders to their cultures and people and feel contempt for our norms and ideas.

  163. mh

    Pompeo all over the Oz front page now.

    Presumably this is related to the Rowan Dean interview.

  164. NoFixedAddress

    A blast from the past

  165. MemoryFault

    The subs are for defending Australia by sinking hostile shipping

    No, Ed.
    The primary function of submarines for Australia at least, has been the long range monitoring and surveillance of enemy/ potential enemy shipping movement. Secondary functional requirement is the transport and placement of specialist defence personnel to land engagements. Actual sinking of shipping is a very distant third function.

  166. Knuckle Dragger

    Goodness me.

    ‘Well, yeah, there will be costs to maintaining them, though those costs would be infinitesimal compared to the costs of not maintaining them.’

    Trying to remember. Someone, some wannabe, used to repeatedly and publicly say there was a massive (unstated) cost involved in ruinables and going full climate change retardo – but whatever it cost would be dwarfed by the cost of not doing it.

    Oh yeah. Bill Shorten, just last year.

  167. Christopher Pyne joins EY Australia to help grow Defence practice
    17 July 2019 Consultancy.com.au
    Big Four accounting and advisory firm EY appears to be developing its defence profile in Australia, to which end it has now made a high-profile appointment to its operations. Former Defence Minister of Australia Christopher Pyne now joins EY to help expand its defence services segment

    Who would pay for this idiot’s advice?

    Its just legalised corruption and “access”.

  168. Tom

    Breaking:

    US Secretary of State Mike Pomoeo has threatened the United States will “simply disconnect” from Australia if Victoria’s Belt and Road agreement with China affects US telecommunications.

    Mr Pompeo has warned on Sunday that the Belt and Road agreement increases the Chinese communist regime’s ability to do “harm”, as Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews digs into the economic partnership.

    The US Secretary of State said he did not know of Victoria’s agreement but warned it could impact his nation’s Five Eyes partnership with Australia.

    “We will not take any risks to our telecommunications infrastructure, any risk to the national security elements of what we need to do with our Five Eyes partners,” he said.

    “I don’t know the nature of those projects precisely. To the extent they have an adverse impact on our ability to protect telecommunications from our private citizens, or security networks for our defence and intelligence communities – we simply disconnect, we will simply separate.

    “We are going to preserve trust in networks … we hope our friends and allies, especially our Five Eyes partners like Australia, do the same.”

    Rowan Dean, who interviewed Pompeo on Sky Outsiders, has better “news sense” than 90% of journalists. Superb “get”!

  169. EvilElvis

    Now, Ed. Tell us about the impact of Jobkeeper salaried submariners on air defense performance in an Antarctic setting.

    I’ll tip me hat, you’ve just segued beautifully into another self made whirlpool of frogshit circle work. As you were.

  170. Free Radical

    Treasurer Josh has just appeared on Luke Grant’s 2gb show clearing up the Jobkeeper manufactured hysteria.

    The only thing manufactured is the explanation from Joshie, Treasury and the ATO. I repeat:

    In a casualised workforce economy everyone employed at 1 March 2020 should be paid Jobkeeper. The 12 months continuous employment rider is an unjust cost saving attempt that made no sense in March and makes even less sense now. Seems Friedeggburger is still trying to be Scrooge, can’t get over his now disappeared balanced budget.

    The $60B mistake by Treasury and the ATO was made 6 weeks before any tick box errors by form filling employers. Joshie made a big deal announcing the $130B rescue package and should use the surprise $60B to support the taxpayers who he deliberately left out back then.

  171. twostix

    Witness the social misfit bugman class in action:

    In August 2019, Brad Hazzard came out in support of removing abortion as a criminal offence (after 119 years within the NSW Crimes Act 1900 section(s) 82–84)[21] via a bill he co-sponsored with 14 others of all different political parties and independents

    There is Liberal, there is Labor, there is left, there is right….and there is bugman.

    And this bugman describes his worst nightmare “packed pubs” full of prolish mates being social and having a good time together, something he will never experience being a perpetual atomised social outsider:

    This means while packed pub nights are obviously gone “for now”, there may always be a need for social distancing, which he concedes would forever change our “matey” way of life.

    Hmmhmmmm Misfit Brad is sad that people are going to have to be like him now.

  172. EvilElvis

    This is the one defining charateristic of the bugman class from Sydney, to New York, to Las Angeles, to London- they are not of the left or right, they share one thing: they’re weird outsiders to their cultures and people and feel contempt for our norms and ideas.

    Excellent, twostix.

  173. Knuckle Dragger

    stix:

    ‘“packed pubs” full of prolish mates being social’

    Bang on.

    People like Hazzard don’t have mates. They have leverage points.

  174. Here we go.

    False imprisonment.

    Given the police recruited Michaels, this is an absolute shitfight.

    https://www.firstcoastnews.com/article/news/crime/gbi-explains-why-roddy-bryan-faces-felony-murder-charges-in-ahmaud-arbery-shooting/77-34a8c79a-511d-410d-949b-80e57f66dda8

    Reynolds said if he believed Bryan was simply a witness, he never would’ve been arrested. Instead, it is the GBI’s belief that Bryan’s attempt to falsely imprison Arbery contributed to Arbery’s death, he said.

    In one of the warrants, it states that Bryan attempted to confine and detain Arbery multiple times using his vehicle.

    A second warrant for felony murder says that Bryan caused Arbery’s death based on his actions.

  175. twostix

    US Secretary of State Mike Pomoeo has threatened the United States will “simply disconnect” from Australia if Victoria’s Belt and Road agreement with China affects US telecommunications.

    I said a few weeks ago, if the US feel Australia’s political class are too compromised by Chinese influence and money, they’ll simply bypass them and tell the Australian people directly: make your choice for future – US or China.

    They know what the everyman will choose and the political class – who seem to be completely enthralled to China right now down to the obvious attempt at Chinifying our social society and attitudes had better be ready.

  176. Dr Faustus

    Like what happened in Britain earlier this month. At times Britain can get more than 10,000MW from wind when the wind does, you know, blow. For two whole days it didn’t; for two whole days Britain was getting just 300MW or so from wind — effectively zero.

    And a week before that, when the wind was a-blowin and all the windmills a-turnin, retail customers were being paid to turn on appliances to consume excess electricity and avoid overloading the distribution system.

    No control. What happens when you have to heavily overbuild to reach ‘ average’ output.

  177. thefrollickingmole

    A lot of people in politics are the products of weird families.
    Maolcolm with his mummy issues, Rudd with his dead dad, and endless others with freakish family circumstances.
    Lot of childless hermaphrodite type creatures as well as dynasties of ticks.

    And a huge number of them stupidly believe the crooked timber of humanity can be perfected by just passing one.more.law.

  178. MemoryFault

    In other words, the decision had nothing to do with saving his seat, since he was intending to retire anyway.

    Tell me Ed, were you born a total fvckwit or did your mother drop you on your head when you were young? The Liberals did it to save the seat, not the idiot who was occupying it at the time. As far as the Libs were concerned, they couldn’t give a stiff shyte which cretin had his arse on the seat, as long as it was a LIBERAL arse.

    Politics is strictly a numbers game. Don’t you even know that much?

  179. EvilElvis

    The only thing manufactured is the explanation from Joshie, Treasury and the ATO.

    If Jobseeker was left alone and Jobkeeper was just a top up from Centrelink to $750 a week for employees we’d be in a lot smaller debt hole and more people, including casuals in short tenure positions, would be still in some level of employment.

    I can understand the mentality of the bureacracy who implements this rubbish after reading some comments here. Low energy trolling. The sort that could probably power a zero sound submarine.

  180. Boambee John

    Seditious

    We could have bought 1500 F-22s for that price.

    But not crewed, fuelled, armed and maintained them. The (grossly excessive) $225 million for the French Tadpoles includes those through life costs (for their peacetime life).

  181. lotocoti

    I hope no one finds out NCS Harold E. Holt has been talking to Nucs in the too shallow for Nucs bits of WestPac for the past forty years.
    And the Eastern Indian Ocean*.
    *The opposite of fun was manually plotting XBT data for the EIO.

  182. Zatara

    Latest warmist scheme: Record ‘climate change’ as cause of death on death certificates

    Climate change should be recorded as a cause of death on death certificates in Australia because heat-related mortality is so vastly unreported, according to commentary published in The Lancet Planetary Health on Thursday. (snip)

    “Climate change is a killer, but we don’t acknowledge it on death certificates,” co-author Arnagretta Hunter, from the ANU Medical School, said.

    She said it was acknowledged that phenomena caused or exacerbated by climate change – such as drought, bushfires, floods and storms – had an impact on illness and death rates in Australia, but that there was no way to acknowledge these factors on death certificates.

    High taxation, ridiculously inflated energy prices, and numerous other by-products of socialism have impacts on illness and death rates as well. Plan on listing those on death certificates? I didn’t think so.

  183. rickw

    We could have bought 1500 F-22s for that price.

    Did the fighters have free trips to France and a fat job via the supplier at the end of them?

  184. twostix

    This means while packed pub nights are obviously gone “for now”, there may always be a need for social distancing, which he concedes would forever change our “matey” way of life.

    Packed pubs are “gone” so that 91 year olds locked away in aged care homes don’t get a bad cold from infected people who state governments deliberately send into their locked down aged care homes.

    Also coincidentally we’re going to be running our societies just like China now, first up: Wuhan style mass imprisonment, wear your masks and install your government app! Oh and here’s this social revolution that we’re going to enforce on you.

    No, no the complete and utter abolition of our last few traditions and cultural mores and China’s social and cultural mores being rammed down our throats in identical ways all over the western world all at once has nothing at all to do with Chinese influence, it’s a pure coincidence!

  185. Rex Anger

    @Locototi- Oh Noes! Shallow water submarine ops!

    The sneakiest submarine ops of them all… 😉

  186. Dr Faustus

    Fears for Hong Kong democracy as China ‘looks to setup local intelligence agency’

    China’s new national security legislation may be used to establish a domestic intelligence agency in Hong Kong similar to the colonial-era Special Branch, the territory’s former leader Leung Chun-ying says.

    Ironic, given that the HK Special Branch was established to counter the CCP and Mainland Chinese organised crime.

  187. rickw

    I said a few weeks ago, if the US feel Australia’s political class are too compromised by Chinese influence and money, they’ll simply bypass them and tell the Australian people directly: make your choice for future – US or China.

    Bloody easy decision. I hope the USA gets on with it. More States for the United States.

    Let’s end the failed Australian Nation experiment.

  188. mh

    The $60B mistake by Treasury and the ATO was made 6 weeks before any tick box errors by form filling employers. Joshie made a big deal announcing the $130B rescue package and should use the surprise $60B to support the taxpayers who he deliberately left out back then.

    Josh has cleared that up. The estimate from Treasury was when the projections of the corona spread was far greater, and the impact to the economy was expected to be far greater.
    The 130 billion was still expected to be the cost some weeks later as some employers had completed the initial Jobkeeper form incorrectly – example, where you indicate you have two eligible employees they were putting the fortnightly payment amount for the two employees, 3000. This resulted in a Jobkeeper cost estimate still remaining in the ball park of 130 billion.

    Josh states this 60 billion is not money that is now sitting in a treasury piggy bank, it’s 60 billion that doesn’t have to be found via International bond markets.

  189. Top Ender

    One interesting aspect of diesel submarines often overlooked is they need to refuel.

    That means going to a friendly port. Or a refuelling vessel, and the RAN doesn’t do that.

    So your sub is offline for ALL the time it takes to go to the port, refuel, and come back on station.

    Which a nuclear doesn’t do.

  190. Top Ender

    Article in Quadrant on Teddy Sheean and others denied VCs.

  191. Boambee John

    225 billion, not million.

    We wish!

  192. Bruce of Newcastle

    And a week before that, when the wind was a-blowin and all the windmills a-turnin, retail customers were being paid to turn on appliances to consume excess electricity and avoid overloading the distribution system.

    And again.

    UK wind farms could face weekend ‘switch-off’ (23 May)

    Expected low electricity demand in the UK over the upcoming Bank Holiday weekend because of Covid-19 could see several distributed-connected wind farm operators paid to cut output in order to manage the grid.

    “As with any actions we take to balance the electricity system, they’re carried out in economic order, with cheaper actions taken first, to ensure we operate the system as efficiently as possible for consumers.”

    National Grid ESO estimates that measures to balance the system this summer as a result of the Covid-19 impact on demand will cost about £500m more than the same period last year.

    So-called Balancing Services Use of System charges were £333.2m (€372m) from May to August 2019, with the forecast for this year at £826.3m.

    Wind energy is so crap that they have to pay the windies to turn the wretched things off, and then pay the grid to cope with the instability they cause. I just wish they’d get fined for each bird death the way that other industries are.

  193. Mark A

    Bit of trivia.

    Frosted Security Glass Can Be Defeated With What Common Item?

    Answer: Cellophane Tape

    Frosting glass by etching the surface with an acidic compound or sandblasting it is a common way to permanently increase the privacy and security offered by the glass. It would appear to be a completely irreversible process short of painstakingly polishing the glass until the etched layer had been completely removed, but there’s a neat little trick that allows you to look through security glass that is only etched on one side: you can press a piece of cellophane tape over it.

    This bit of office-supply wizardry works because the cellophane tape temporarily fills in the irregularities of the etched surface (you could also approximate the same effect, albeit in a much messier fashion, by smearing oil over the glass). The result isn’t as perfectly clear as a regular sheet of glass would be, but you can still easily look through it and identify what is on the other side.

  194. Dr Faustus

    Unintended consequences #347:

    Sydney son preparing for return to work. CBD highrise owners/operators/occupants are instructed to maintain strict social distancing – under penalty.

    His 40 floor office building is serviced by 8 x 16 person lifts. Now to be restricted to 8 x 2 person lifts to avoid instant COVID death.
    Chaos ensues.

  195. Zatara

    Top Ender

    Did you catch my post yesterday when I suggested that most if not all of the senior officers of the RAN in WWII were actually RN?

    That RAN personnel were therefor not in the old boy’s club?

    Any thoughts on that as a major impact on VC recommendations?

  196. Bruce of Newcastle

    There’s a reason battleships are extinct*. Their only remaining use is as a coastal bombardment platform, and even then only under complete and utter air superiority.

    To be fair KD they can also be used to make really great Hollywood movies!

  197. Tony Jones getting rightly ridiculed on the Sunday Footy Show over his attempts to kiss Rebecca Judd and ask her for a bbq.

  198. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    This one’s for military type Cats.

    “On 9th August 1945, the day that sectors of Nagasaki were leveled by the second nuclear bomb, and three days after the destruction of Hiroshima, the Japanese Government filed a formal protest through the Swiss Govenment, on the atomic bomb as “a new crime against the whole of humanity and civilization.”

    “Five Days in August” Michael D Gordin, Page 108.

  199. Knuckle Dragger

    BoN,

    Agreed, but the reputation of the battleship, however temporarily renewed was ruined when they let Cher near one.

  200. cohenite

    In other words, the decision had nothing to do with saving his seat, since he was intending to retire anyway.

    It had everything to do with saving Chrissy’s seat but Chrissy saw the writing on the wall and scampered.

    Well, yeah, there will be costs to maintaining them, though those costs would be infinitesimal compared to the costs of not maintaining them.

    Now you’re just plucking stuff out of your arse. Rather than argue the toss I’ll let Alistair Pope, sub expert and ex military rebut your current bloviations and any others you may generate: the sub project is so irrational as to be almost treasonous:

    https://quadrant.org.au/opinion/qed/2019/10/australias-looming-submarine-disaster/?fbclid=IwAR3GXDU4DdKLEELVcomhletL–DoxlLJrFwYEzVjtY_KiuE5wt0HjoAWC88

  201. Dr Faustus

    I just wish they’d get fined for each bird death the way that other industries are.

    Cunningly, the bulk of the UK’s wind generation is offshore – so the shredded seabirds just drop, uncounted, as burley into the waves below.

    The Green circle of life.

  202. Bruce of Newcastle

    Actually, on battleships, the entertaining novel Surface Action by David Drake makes a very good point. Which is that aircraft and missiles are inherently quite fragile. In that novel the battleships use extremely fast and deadly small-calibre rail guns for area defense. Which gives me an excuse to put up this story from today:

    US Navy laser weapon destroys aircraft mid-flight in groundbreaking military test – VIDEO (23 May)

    After the high-powered laser is fired, videos show a drone suddenly burning up mid-flight before completely vanishing.

    The test attack represents a first-of-its-kind at-sea test for the Navy’s laser weapon system.

    The laser itself is understood to be the Northrup Grumman-developed 150-kilowatt-class Laser Weapon System Demonstrator (LWSD).

    The US Army is also developing its own laser weapon, the Indirect Fires Protection Capability-High Energy Laser (IFPC-HEL), which is expected to range up 300 kilowatts and intercept rockets, artillery, and mortars.

    Director of the Office of Naval Research Guy Renard said:”For about the price of a gallon of diesel fuel per shot, we’re offering the Navy a high-precision defensive approach that will protect not only its sailors, but also its wallet.”

    It was only last year that they were considering a 60 kW system, now this report mentions an actual ship-borne test of a 150 kW laser, with news of a 300 kW laser in the works.

    Which makes area defense very interesting. A rapid fire lightspeed weapon would potentially enable Surface Action-style battleships. A battleship has an advantage that smaller vessels do not: you can put several big hairy nuclear reactors in one of them to power such defensive weapons.

  203. Top Ender

    Yes Zatara, but only 20 mins ago – we were out last night and have been watching Outsiders this morning.

    I think you make a fair point. It was only during WWII that an Aussie was allowed to command a large combined RN/RAN flotilla – from memory Farncomb or Collins. The latter had a famous victory with HMAS Sydney when he also had under his command four RN destroyers when they sank the Italian cruiser Bartolomeo Colleoni.

    I did explore these sort of areas in Honour Denied: Teddy Sheean, Tasmanian Hero. There probably was a fair degree of anti-RAN bias within the RN, but they were also pretty good and fair to our officers going there under training. I remember reading a few accounts where our blokes commented amongst themselves that a lot of RN officers had substantial private incomes. I think it was Collins who was rather aghast at how much he had to spend on his formal uniform to attend Buckingham Palace – officers had to buy their own, and their own sword – all very expensive.

    But several of our blokes had RN commands in WWII. Farncomb commanded an RN carrier during D-Day IIRR – HMS Attacker I think. Dechaineux had an RN destroyer under him during the Dunkirk operations.

    We were certainly discriminated against by the system of bravery awards – we could not recommend the nature of the award for example, whereas RN captains could. And also how is not “manifest injustice” that the RAN had to go through London, while RAAF and Army were processed in Canberra?

    Still, the motto of HMAS Sheean is “Fight On” and a lot of people certainly intend to do so.

  204. MemoryFault

    Agreed, but the reputation of the battleship, however temporarily renewed was ruined when they let Cher near one.

    Just for Knuckles.

  205. “On 9th August 1945, the day that sectors of Nagasaki were leveled by the second nuclear bomb, and three days after the destruction of Hiroshima, the Japanese Government filed a formal protest through the Swiss Govenment, on the atomic bomb as “a new crime against the whole of humanity and civilization.”

    How’s their form?
    Treating P.o.W.s abominably, massacring occupied populations, using occupied populations & P.o.W.s for live bayonet practice, for live target practice, for germ warfare tests, for chemical warfare tests, etc.

    & then bitching about someone they attacked without declaration, reciprocating to all the above by flying over on an air raid to drop a bomb?

  206. Bruce of Newcastle

    “Five Days in August”

    Started reading it last week, then took time out for two SF novels. 😀

  207. Dr Faustus

    COVID app downloads reach six million

    Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said the app is playing a significant role in Australia’s response to the pandemic and several countries have expressed interest in learning from its positive impacts.

    “Significant role”? Greg, enough of the humble-bragging.
    It’s fucking destroyed the Covid19 virus’s Australian foothold.

  208. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Treating P.o.W.s abominably, massacring occupied populations, using occupied populations & P.o.W.s for live bayonet practice, for live target practice, for germ warfare tests, for chemical warfare tests, etc.

    I did find it ironic, indeed.

  209. pete m

    Dr f, lifts have been excluded from safe distancing rules as short time in them

  210. Knuckle Dragger

    Ewwwwwww.

    the exact opposite of SS Margot Robbie.

  211. Roger

    I said a few weeks ago, if the US feel Australia’s political class are too compromised by Chinese influence and money, they’ll simply bypass them and tell the Australian people directly: make your choice for future – US or China.

    Mike Pompeo seemed to imply the US will cut Australia from Five Eyes if Victoria’s Belt & Road agreement is seen to compromise telecommunications.

  212. mh

    pete m
    #3462752, posted on May 24, 2020 at 12:09 pm
    Dr f, lifts have been excluded from safe distancing rules as short time in them

    My local Westfield has a public elevator with info inside stating 26 person capacity.

    On the outside Westfield have put a sign advising due to COVID-19 the lift is restricted to one person only.

  213. JC

    Mike Pompeo seemed to imply the US will cut Australia from Five Eyes if Victoria’s Belt & Road agreement is seen to compromise telecommunications.

    It’s all political theater with hunchback unable to achieve anything other than grandstanding. Every single dollar of direct investment into Australia has to pass through the Foreign Investment Review Board. The hunchback has zero say on direct investment as its all in the hands of the federal government.

  214. Roger

    On the outside Westfield have put a sign advising due to COVID-19 the lift is restricted to one person only.

    Do you suppose they consulted a panel of experts on that?

  215. Ed Case

    Tell me Ed, were you born a total fvckwit or did your mother drop you on your head when you were young?

    Haha, flashes of humor are an encouraging sign, tho you could easily be referencing your good self.

    The Liberals did it to save the seat, not the idiot who was occupying it at the time. As far as the Libs were concerned, they couldn’t give a stiff shyte which cretin had his arse on the seat, as long as it was a LIBERAL arse. Politics is strictly a numbers game. Don’t you even know that much?

    1. I do get that you don’t like the Liberal Party, tho your motivation is anyone’s guess.
    2. Pyne’s seat has shipbuilding facilities, and it’s always prudent to invest in shipbuilding skills, at least if you’re planning on still having a Country down the track.
    3. Liberal Party interests would be best served by a large influx of militant shipbuilding Unionists taking up residence in your marginal seat?
    Perhaps not.

  216. johanna

    The warmenistas are really getting desperate:

    Australian National University’s Dr Arnagretta Hunter is also part of the research team and said including climate data on death certificates would let policy makers and medical teams make better decisions.

    “As the climate changes and we expect to see more and more hot temperatures, we need to understand what the magnitude of that health effect might be,” she said.

    “What’s alarming is that this hasn’t been studied in great detail . . . but we actually don’t understand the magnitude of this relationship between heat and mortality.

    “We have made an extraordinary amount of policy decisions to save lives from coronavirus but the magnitude of the potential health risk from climate change is so much greater.”

    Touch of relevance deprivation syndrome there?

    They want death certificates to record the outside temperature and humidity – although which point in time should be chosen is not clear. If somebody dies in hospital after several weeks, of cancer, what temperature and humidity point do they choose? On what basis? What if they collapse at home with the aircon on full bore? It’s nonsense, scientifically.

    But if they do, the numbers will prove, as they always have, that it is cold that kills people, especially the elderly. Winter is when they drop off the twig most often.

    Just another reminder that the links between medicine and proper science are very tenuous.

  217. Roger

    It’s all political theater with hunchback unable to achieve anything other than grandstanding.

    And I expect there’ll be quite a bit of political theatre surrounding FIRB’s decisions on the matter.

  218. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Hardline feminist Clementine Ford is slammed for saying coronavirus ‘isn’t killing men fast enough’ in ‘repulsive’ Twitter rant – but blames the backlash on ‘male fragility’

    Clementine Ford said men aren’t dying fast enough from coronavirus pandemic
    Post was in response to gender disparities in parenting children during crisis
    She said the widespread backlash she received proves how ‘fragile’ men are

    Daily Wail “Frightbat?”

  219. MemoryFault

    I do get that you don’t like the Liberal Party, mainstream political parties.

    FIFY

    tho your motivation is anyone’s guess.

    See above. They are ALL thieving traitors.

  220. Bruce of Newcastle

    Ha, on battleships and Hollywood, I was checking the guide while having lunch just now. Wouldn’t you know it Under Siege starring BB-63* is on 9Go tonight.

    (Ok, most of it was actually filmed on BB-60, but a battleship is a battleship!)

  221. lotocoti

    There aren’t a lot of modern weapons which could crack an Iowa class battleship in final fit.
    On the other hand, there isn’t too much in a modern ship hard enough to detonate an incoming 16″ round.
    (That doesn’t mean a bunch of 16″ through and throughs wouldn’t be day ruining.)

  222. Roger

    They want death certificates to record the outside temperature and humidity –

    Er…isn’t that mistaking the weather for the climate?

    I hope she’s better at cardiology – for that is her actual profession – than climate science.

  223. Arky

    The US Army is also developing its own laser weapon, the Indirect Fires Protection Capability-High Energy Laser (IFPC-HEL), which is expected to range up 300 kilowatts and intercept rockets, artillery, and mortars.

    ..
    For sure it’s taken nearly 100 years, but finally we have death rays.
    Cool.

  224. Dr Faustus

    pete m
    #3462752, posted on May 24, 2020 at 12:09 pm
    Dr f, lifts have been excluded from safe distancing rules as short time in them

    Pete: I would have expected this too.

    But not so.
    It may be litigation risk management, but Sydney CBD building managers are certainly restricting lift access – and access in general.

  225. Clementine Ford said men aren’t dying fast enough from coronavirus pandemic
    Post was in response to gender disparities in parenting children during crisis
    She said the widespread backlash she received proves how ‘fragile’ men are

    That grotesque harpy has a husband and a son, and zero self awareness.

  226. cohenite

    Ha, on battleships and Hollywood, I was checking the guide while having lunch just now. Wouldn’t you know it Under Siege starring BB-63* is on 9Go tonight.

    Seagal’s best: some highlights:

  227. Arky

    Maybe now we have death rays we can also get some half decent robots:
    ..


  228. Arky

    They should add some clattering relays to the speech of Siri and the other online smart arses.

  229. Bruce of Newcastle

    Clementine Ford said men aren’t dying fast enough from coronavirus

    The data says the male/female death rate is already between 2:1 and 3:1.
    Maybe time for hubby to take out an AVO.
    Just saying.

  230. Zatara

    “On 9th August 1945, the day that sectors of Nagasaki were leveled by the second nuclear bomb, and three days after the destruction of Hiroshima, the Japanese Government filed a formal protest through the Swiss Govenment, on the atomic bomb as “a new crime against the whole of humanity and civilization.”

    Yet on 4 August 1945 (5 days before) the U.S. Army Air Force dropped 5 million leaflets over Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and 33 other Japanese cities warning that those cities would be attacked.

    Hiroshima leaflet

    TO THE JAPANESE PEOPLE:

    America asks that you take immediate heed of what we say on this leaflet.

    We are in possession of the most destructive explosive ever devised by man. A single one of our newly developed atomic bombs is actually the equivalent in explosive power to what 2000 of our giant B-29s can carry on a single mission. This awful fact is one for you to ponder and we solemnly assure you it is grimly accurate.

    We have just begun to use this weapon against your homeland. If you still have any doubt, make inquiry as to what happened to Hiroshima when just one atomic bomb fell on that city.

    Before using this bomb to destroy every resource of the military by which they are prolonging this useless war, we ask that you now petition the Emperor to end the war. Our president has outlined for you the thirteen consequences of an honorable surrender. We urge that you accept these consequences and begin the work of building a new, better and peace-loving Japan.

    You should take steps now to cease military resistance. Otherwise, we shall resolutely employ this bomb and all our other superior weapons to promptly and forcefully end the war.

    EVACUATE YOUR CITIES.

    Perhaps they should have paid more attention.

  231. cohenite

    Clem and roz should be locked in a room for a month; just to see what happens. As to which is the uglier I don’t know:

    clem

    roz

  232. mh

    Seagal: “I’m just a cook”

    lol

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