Tuesday Forum: May 26, 2020

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2,188 Responses to Tuesday Forum: May 26, 2020

  1. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    I feel sympathy for the bird watcher and for the dog.

    Here’s hoping the poor li’l mistreated pooch now finds a good home.

  2. thefrollickingmole

    No link because Ped**** work in link. But google the highlighted bits should take you to the full story, well worth a RTWT.

    Awful story here with some good reporting.
    Turd put himself in a position of authority then fairly deliberately targeted the poorest/most vulnerable kids from towns.
    NSW government secretly paid millions to victims of a teacher it admits was a

    Exclusive: At least 14 Indigenous men received out-of-court settlements after being abused by teacher, principal and school inspector Cletus O’Connor

    The New South Wales government has quietly paid out millions of dollars to more than a dozen former schoolchildren who it admits were abused by a p*****phile teacher who rose through the ranks of the state’s public school system over three decades while preying on young Indigenous boys.

    Since April 2018 lawyers from the state’s education department have signed out-of-court settlements with 14 men from across western NSW. The men, who are all Indigenous, are predominantly based in Dubbo.

    The department has never publicly disclosed the settlements, which in some cases included confidentiality clauses preventing disclosure of the value of the payouts. Nor has it acknowledged the existence of a serial p****dophile in the public school system, a step that might have encouraged others to come forward.
    ….;
    Accounts from victims obtained by Guardian Australia through interviews and unfiled court documents suggest the authority O’Connor gained from the role allowed the abuse to flourish.

    In the 70s and 80s school inspectors in NSW sometimes operated with little oversight. One former school inspector told the Guardian it was common to spend days on the road visiting distant parts of the state without contact with other department officials.

  3. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    producers promoted petroleum as environmentally responsible when they knew it was contributing to drought, wildfires, and sea level rise associated with global warming

    And:

    War is Peace
    Freedom is Slavery
    Ignorance is strength

    Big Sister Karen is watching you, prole.

  4. thefrollickingmole

    Interesting little side note on the blowing up of the first flogs cave.

    Its happened just as they are set to get a ruling on a land title case.
    Whats the odds of that?

    A suspicious person might almost suspect the area wasnt “flagged’ as significant to allow for just this sort of thing to happen.

  5. OldOzzie

    Re Beef and Lamb

    Covid-19 has brought some benefits – Restaurant suppliers are now going direct – not necessarily cheap but the Quality is superb

    Milly Hill Meat Order Online:

    Let Us Meat Your Needs With These Specials!
    Specials:
    Bone In Lamb Shoulder Roast Approx. 1.5Kg / Piece $32.90
    Wagyu Rump Steak Approx 300 Grams Each ( 4 Pieces Per Pack ) For $24.90
    Bacon Bones 500 Gram Packs ( Ideal for Soup ) $6.90
    Orders Over $200.00 Free Delivery, Under $200.00 Delivery Fee Will Be $28.00.

    and

    Vic’s Meats Direct

    who supply Qantas 1st Class – https://wine.qantas.com/p/Barbecue-Deluxe-%2B-Sangiovese/DSVICSBBQ6_V

  6. OldOzzie

    Andrews has put China above his party and his nation

    GREG SHERIDAN

    This week the federal Labor leader, Anthony Albanese, and his deputy, Richard Marles, explicitly repudiated Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews over his decision to sign up to China’s Belt and Road Initiative.

    In signing a BRI memorandum of understanding, Andrews contradicted and defied Australian foreign policy on a matter of geo-strategic importance. That is irresponsible and damages Australia’s national interests.

    Andrews contradicted federal ALP policy as well. This was more explicit when Bill Shorten was Labor leader because Shorten had decided to back bipartisan Aust­ralian policy.

    That policy is that while Australia welcomes Chinese investment in principle, it will not sign up to the BRI as a program. This is because­ the BRI is freighted with Chinese geostrategic ambition and has been highly problematic in many countries. Instead, Canberra’s view is that each Chinese investment proposal should be assesse­d individually on its merits.

    Andrews’s irresponsibility and his determination to act against the national interest and national policy should be a bigger issue. It is almost unprecedented.

    You can imagine how reluctant Albanese and Marles are to get into a policy fight with Victoria’s Labor government. But they and Labor’s foreign affairs spokeswoman Penny Wong deserve praise for the way they have stuck to Australia’s national interests in the spate of recent disputes betwee­n Canberra and Beijing.

    Albanese said in a radio interview that if he became PM he would not be signing up to the BRI and that he had never supported the Andrews government’s deal.

    Marles said in a press conference: “A future Labor government would not be signing a Belt and Road agreement with China. When it comes to Chinese investments in infrastructure projects, that’s a matter which we think should be taken on a case-by-case basis and we should proceed down that path with some caution.”

    The rebuke is clear and explicit.

    Previously, Labor frontbench senator Kimberley Kitching had, quite courageously, been the main Labor voice making the obvious case that Andrews was wrong in principle to back the BRI and set up a state foreign policy against Australia’s foreign policy. Kitching’s remarks were in support­ of what turned out to be the Albanese-Marles official federal­ Labor position. Albanese has stressed, for example, that Labor is “as one” with the Morrison government in calling for an independent inquiry into the outbreak of coronavirus.

    Victorian Treasurer Tim Pallas bizarrely argued that the federal government’s call — with which, remembe­r, Albanese is at one — “vilified” China. He blamed the Morrison government for the punitive tariffs and other restrictions Beijing has lately applied against us. Does Pallas also blame federal Labor? Andrews endorsed Pallas’s remarks.

    Labor agriculture spokesman Joel Fitzgibbon also contradicted Albanese, Marles and Wong by saying the Morrison government was responsible for the Chinese tariffs. All this shows that Labor is deeply divided and a bit all-at-sea on China, but Albanese, Wong and Marles have so far held it together pretty well at the leadership level.

    It is difficult for any opposition to offer bipartisan support to a government. Bipartisanism normally means the government wins. But both sides of polit­ics have mostly maintained a bi­part­isan position on national security.

    They do this for two reasons. One, they both genuinely value national security. And two, ­although it may not always be obviou­s, it is good politics. Mark Latham as opposition leader attacke­d George W. Bush at the height of Bush’s unpopularity. But he suffered in the polls because people thought Latham threatened our US alliance.

    A similar thing happened to Bill Hayden as opposition leader. Similarly, in government, Bob Hawke reacted furiously to KGB efforts to cultivate and compromise former senior Labor Party official­ David Combe. Hawke cut off all contact between Combe and members of the cabinet. In doing this, he convinced the whole of Australia, and international actors, that he and his government took national security seriously.

    Unusually, Hawke won votes on national security. Even if it is generally difficult for Labor to win on national security, it is nonetheless very easy for it to lose votes in enormous quantities on that issue. So Albanese, Marles and Wong, in great contrast to Andrew­s, have bolstered national security and helped keep Labor electable.

    Andrews seems to argue that the BRI has no national security element. If that is his argument, it is a remarkably ignorant one. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo added his voice this week in oppos­ition to Victoria’s BRI deal. ­He wrongly thought the deal could involve telecommunications and the US embassy had to clean up after his remarks. But his statement nonetheless underlines the fact that the BRI is a geostrat­egic issue.

    The BRI has been used to entrap­ Third World countries into unsustainable debts, which Beijing can then transform into brutal political­ leverage. Thus Beijing now owns a port in Sri Lanka. It also has a heavily fortified naval base in Djibouti.

    It has sometimes left Third World nations crippled with debt. The BRI has sometimes produced useless and shoddy infrastructure. It has sometimes involved the exclusive­ use of a Chinese workforce with no real technology transfer and little economic gain for the host country.

    We can be confident nothing like this will happen in Victoria, not because we can have confid­ence in the Andrews government, but because the federal government won’t let any such thing happen­. Any Chinese investment must be approved by the Foreign Investment Review Board. Any Chinese participation in infrastructure building will have to go through normal government procedures. Any Chinese workforce will need federal immigration approval­.

    It is possible that some Victorian firms may get a sliver of work with Chinese BRI projects in third countries.
    But if the price of getting that work is for the Victorian government to campaign against Australia in a geostrategic dispute, that is too high a price.

    The federal government and the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade are adamant that advance consultation by the Victor­ians with Canberra over this deal was minuscule and meaningless.

    Andrews has set himself up as making geostrategic foreign policy decisions against Canberra. He should now answer questions on Beijing’s actions in Hong Kong, its internment of a million Uighurs, its imprisonment of human rights lawyers, its smashing up of Christian churches, its actions in the South China Sea. If his answer is that these are matters for a federal government not a state government, then that should also have been his answer on the BRI.

  7. thefrollickingmole

    Possibly the worst bit of “justice” globally at the moment.

    Whole article presebnted in all its glory.

    This lady possesses the most magical vagina on earth.

    Sally Challen can inherit controlling husband’s estate, rules judge
    Challen, 66, won an appeal in 2019 over her conviction for murdering her husband

    A woman who won an appeal over her conviction for murdering her controlling husband can inherit his estate, a judge has ruled.

    Sally Challen, 66, was given a mandatory life sentence in 2011 after being convicted of murdering Richard Challen, 61, of Claygate, Surrey in August 2010.

    Appeal judges quashed her murder conviction in February last year and ordered a new trial. She was released in June following a preliminary hearing for the new trial at the Old Bailey after prosecutors accepted her plea to manslaughter.

    She was sentenced to nine years and four months for manslaughter, but released after the judge concluded she had already served her sentence.

    In a ruling on Wednesday, the judge Paul Matthews concluded that a rule barring people who kill from inheriting their victim’s estate should be waived in her case. His decision followed a high court hearing in Bristol earlier this month.

    Challen had been in a relationship with her former car dealer husband for about 40 years, since she was 15 and he was 22, and they had two sons, the judge heard. She had beaten him to death with a hammer, and claimed she had suffered years of controlling and humiliating abuse.

    Matthews said Challen had been a victim of coercive control and suffered psychiatric illness. “The deceased’s behaviour during their relationship and their marriage was by turns contemptuous, belittling, aggressive or violent,” he said.

    “His response to any suggestion that she would divorce him was that he would limit access to their children. He would ignore her complaints about his behaviour or insist that she was mistaken and that she had not seen what she said she had seen,” the ruling added.

    Challen had considered suicide after killing her husband and had left a note saying she could not live without him.

    “These facts are extraordinary, tragic, and, one would hope, rare,” the judge said.

    “They lasted 40 years and involved the combination of a submissive personality on which coercive control worked, a man prepared to use that coercive control, a lack of friends or other sources of assistance, an enormous dependency upon him by [Challen], and significant psychiatric illness.”

    He added her husband had “undoubtedly contributed significantly” to the circumstances in which he died, and said he considered without his “appalling behaviour over so many years” she would not have killed him.

    He left no will, and a major asset, the home they shared, had been jointly owned.

    Every case had to be decided on its merits, and not all victims of coercive control would necessarily be able to inherit, the judge said. “I emphasise that the facts of this terrible case are so extraordinary, with such a fatal combination of conditions and events, that I would not expect them easily to be replicated in any other,” he added.

    The ruling means that Challen, and not the couple’s sons, would inherit. A “major effect” of that would be that Challen would not have to pay inheritance tax.

    Challen’s guilty plea to manslaughter was accepted on the grounds of diminished responsibility after a psychiatric report concluded she was suffering from an “adjustment disorder”.

    The prospect of a retrial was seen as a key test of new laws on domestic abuse and coercive control introduced in 2015.

    The dead chap was unavailable for comment??

  8. OldOzzie

    Nathan Turner, ‘the life of the party’, is now nation’s youngest coronavirus death

    MICHAEL MCKENNA
    SENIOR REPORTER

    Hundreds of people in the central Queensland mining town of Blackwater will be tested for COVID-19 on Thursday following the death of 30-year-old Nathan Turner, Australia’s youngest victim­ of the coronavirus.

    The coalminer, who had been suffering seizures and was on worker’s compensation since Novembe­r, was found unconscious on Tuesday and tests conducted­ after his death found he was carrying the virus.

    Mr Turner had been showing symptoms of the virus for three weeks prior to his death, but was not tested. His fiancee, who works in the local bakery and is now sick, has tested negative.

    It emerged on Wednesday night that there is some uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 tests on Mr Turner. A test conducted about 9pm on Tuesday — several hours after his death — produced a positive reading for the virus, but a test three hours later came back negative.

    “The first test was conducted closer to his death and is more reliable and while the second test was negative, it was contaminated with blood and is treated as being technically invalid,’’ a government source told The Australian. “We do not know if he died because of the virus but Queensland Health believes he died with the virus.’’

    Queensland Health is investig­ating how Mr Turner was infected­, with no prior cases of COVID-19 in the Blackwater region­, where he had been since February.

    On Wednesday, authorities re-interviewed­ a nurse — who contracted COVID-19 earlier this month and continued working at a Rockhampton aged-care facility while feeling unwell — as a possible source of the infection.

    The nurse, who has not been identified, travelled the 167km from Rockhampton to Blackwater on May 10, four days before she was diagnosed with the virus.

    After her initial diagnosis, she told authorities of her visit to the mining town, with the revelation on Wednesday prompting community and state opposition questions as to why residents weren’t told and mass testing conducted.

    Sources told The Australian that the nurse, who had shown symptoms from May 5, had said in an interview with Queensland Health workers that she had had no contact with anyone in the community while in Blackwater.

    “She said she had driven to Blackwater to watch the sunrise and hadn’t gotten out of her car or had any contact with anyone,” a source said. “It’s a strange place to go to watch the sunrise.’’

    In a statement, Queensland Health defended its actions and said it now appeared Mr Turner had shown COVID-19 symptoms before the nurse visited the town. “Contact-tracing information provided to Queensland Health for the central Queensland case identified on May 14 was that the individual travelled to Blackwater in the second week of May but did not interact with other individuals there,’’ the statement said.

    “Information provided to Queensland Health about the case identified today indicated the man had respiratory symptoms since the first week of May.

    “At this time, no evidence has been provided to Queensland Health that links the two cases. But we will continue to assess all information relevant to any case.’’

    Friends of Mr Turner paid tribute to the coalminer on Wednesday night. “He was a larrikin and always the life of the party,” a friend told The Australian.

    “He was a funny, kind person who always had time for his mates.”

    Others posted messages on Mr Turner’s Facebook page after news of his death spread.

    “RIP mate, I am so shocked right now,” one friend said.

    “You were a top bloke and always knew how to make your friends smile. Fly high buddy and thoughts to your loved ones.”

    Mr Turner had been off work from the Jellinbah mine since November­ with a “complicated” medical condition, understood to relate to seizures and a separate respiratory condition.

    Queensland Health said his fiancee was in isolation but had not been admitted to hospital. She found him “unresponsive’’ in their home at 4.30pm on Tuesday after returning from work, and he could not be revived. The police and ambulance officers who attended the scene are also now in quarantine.

    A team of public health experts and additional contact-tracing resources have been deployed from Brisbane to Blackwater to track the possible source of the virus, with testing starting at Blackwater Hospital from late on Wednesday.

    A fever clinic also will be established at the Blackwater Rodeo Grounds on Thursday for the estimated 5000 people living in and around Blackwater, near Emerald.

    A post mortem will be carried out in the next few days to determine the cause of Mr Turner’s death and it has been referred to the coroner.

    If COVID-19 is confirmed as the cause of death, Mr Turner will be Australia’s youngest fatality from the virus. There have been 103 confirmed COVID-19 deaths across the country, including his.

    The previous youngest victim of the virus in Australia was a 42-year-old man from The Philippines who was a crew member of the Artania cruise ship.

    Photo with Article shows a Fairly Stout Young Man

  9. rickw

    Andrews’s irresponsibility and his determination to act against the national interest and national policy should be a bigger issue. It is almost unprecedented.

    This shit needs to end. Charge this fucker with Treason and remove him from office.

  10. Maj

    Mr Turner had been off work from the Jellinbah mine since November­ with a “complicated” medical condition, understood to relate to seizures and a separate respiratory condition.

    But his death is all the Rona’s fault, even if one of the tests came back negative.

  11. He who seeks equity must do equity.

    My clean hands are bloody and come with a claw hammer.

    This better go to the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom.

    There is no way this should be allowed to stand.

    Being a bad husband is not like being a violent husband.

    *He didn’t give me money, which was abusive, so I killed him – now I want the estate*

    You could have gotten a divorce.

  12. Infidel Tiger King

    “Life of the party”

    Alcoholic druggie.

  13. Johno

    I bought a milanese watch band from Melbourne on the 4/5/20, after 12 working days it still hadn’t arrived, so I asked for a refund, which I received. I then ordered a new one from Sydney,cheaper, and it arrived two days later. The one from Melbourne arrived yesterday, 23 days after it was posted. How does a small package get that lost in the mail system? It was posted in a letter.

  14. thefrollickingmole

    Its pretty amazing 2 cases on opposite sides of the world, UK and Australia where a man was beaten to death with hammers in their sleep and in both instances the law finds the ladies not responsible.
    Can you imagine the same “reasoning” being allowed if the perp was male?

    Over there with Challen, over here with the Sri Lankan doctor.
    https://www.news.com.au/national/western-australia/doctor-killed-husband-with-hammer-after-their-sex-with-teen/news-story/bfcfb557bf75a21eeb7473962f44eab3
    Dr Liyanage allegedly bludgeoned her husband to death with a hammer, fearing he would reveal they were having sex with a teenager.

    Prosecutors claim Dr Liyanage was fed up with her husband’s sexual demands, which included the couple having sex with other women, and was also concerned about the effect the couple’s relationship with the 17-year-old would have on her career.

    “It got to a stage that she was no longer prepared to put up with his behaviour,” prosecutor Nick Cogan said, the West Australian reported.

    But the accused woman’s defence argues she was a “trapped and battered woman”.

    Note to self, dont buy a hammer if i think my wife is grumpy with me.

  15. Stimpson J. Cat

    Now I know there are a lot of Atheists out there wondering how we can know for sure God exists.

    Well, the answer is very simple.

    Cyclists in the rain.

    Thank You Jesus Praise The Lord !!!

  16. EvilElvis

    How does a small package get that lost in the mail system?

    Don’t go there, Johno. Just don’t go there.

    #stillwaiting #we’reallinthistogether #workingharderthanever

  17. Free Radical

    I sold a van the other day to a golf pro
    My unorthodox swing is self taught. He thinks it’s great.

    Interesting club head placement. I see the Youtube category is Comedy.

  18. zyconoclast

    A Chinese national residing in New York has been arrested for allegedly trying to cheat the federal government and several banks in millions of dollars in loans intended to provide relief to small businesses during the CCP virus pandemic, the Justice Department said.

    Muge Ma, 36, who is also known as Hummer Mars, has been accused of attempting to claim over $20 million in government-back loans for two of his companies—New York International Capital LLC (NYIC) and Hurley Human Resources LLC (Hurley)—by falsely representing that the companies had hundreds of employees and paid millions of dollars in wages to those employees when Ma appears to be the only employee in his companies.

  19. Maj

    Don’t get married.

    Get married. Raise a family. The future depends on it.

  20. Infidel Tiger King

    Get married. Raise a family. The future depends on it.

    Exactly.

  21. OldOzzie

    New FBI document confirms the Trump campaign was investigated without justification

    Late last week the FBI document that started the Trump-Russia collusion fiasco was publicly released. It hasn’t received a lot of attention but it should, because not too long from now this document likely will be blown up and placed on an easel as Exhibit A in a federal courtroom.

    The prosecutor, U.S. Attorney John Durham, will rightly point out that the document that spawned three years of political misery fails to articulate a single justifiable reason for starting the “Crossfire Hurricane” investigation.

    Those of us who have speculated there was insufficient cause for beginning the investigation could not have imagined the actual opening document was this feeble. It is as if it were written by someone who had no experience as an FBI agent.

    Keep in mind the FBI cannot begin to investigate anyone, especially a U.S. citizen or entity, without first creating a document that lists the reasonably suspicious factors that would legally justify the investigation. That’s FBI 101, taught Day 1 at the FBI Academy at Quantico, Va.

  22. Snoopy

    OldOzzie
    #3466268, posted on May 28, 2020 at 9:13 am
    Andrews has put China above his party and his nation

    Not so fast Old Ozzie

    Victoria follows in the footsteps of the ‘Turnbull govt’s Belt and Road betrayal

  23. P

    Catholics petition for equal treatment
    May 28, 2020

    From the petition to the Premier of NSW:
    We are pleased with efforts to limit the financial impact on business owners and employees by easing limits on those allowed to gather in pubs and clubs, cafes and restaurants.
    However, we see no reason that the same treatment should not be extended to those who wish to gather in churches.
    Why are 50 people allowed to dine in a restaurant, but only 10 people are allowed to attend Mass, even though our churches are often much larger in size?

  24. JC

    Advice on a trader blog to other traders.

    STOP SHORTING STOCKS YOU FUCKING MORONS

  25. zyconoclast

    ‘A Year’s Worth of Suicide Attempts in Four Weeks’
    By Jon Miltimore

    The costs of the government responses to the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic have been severe. New evidence suggests they could be even worse than we imagined.

    An ABC affiliate in California reports that doctors at John Muir Medical Center tell them they have seen more deaths by suicide than COVID-19 during the quarantine.

    “The numbers are unprecedented,” said Dr. Michael deBoisblanc, referring to the spike in suicides.

    “We’ve never seen numbers like this, in such a short period of time,” deBoisblanc added. “I mean we’ve seen a year’s worth of suicide attempts in the last four weeks.”

  26. zyconoclast

    New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s order requiring nursing homes to take coronavirus patients has been quietly deleted from the state department website.

    The web page where the March 25 order was originally located now shows the message: ‘We’re sorry, the page you are looking for is now found.’ The page was deleted after May 5, according to Fox News.

    The order from March 25 stated: ‘During this global health emergency, all NHs [nursing homes] must comply with the expedited receipt of residents returning from hospitals to NHs. Residents are deemed appropriate for return to a NH upon a determination by the hospital physician or designee that the resident is medically stable for return.

  27. feelthebern

    ITK, why is your boyfriend flogging pizza’s?
    I can’t keep up with him.

  28. I then ordered a new one from Sydney … it arrived two days later. The one from Melbourne arrived yesterday, 23 days after it was posted. How does a small package get that lost in the mail system? It was posted in a letter.

    The 23 days sounds more like it.
    How did something come from Sydney in only Two days?

    Anything I order from Melbourne (even before the Wuhan Flu) would be budgeted for a month, & we wouldn’t even start to ask about it until a calendar month has passed.
    A lot of stuff I’d taken to ordering from Paris (France) as anything I ordered out of the suburbs of Paris would land on my desk 6 days later. Every time.

  29. OldOzzie

    Morning Market Wrap: Financials lead Wall Street higher
    28 May 2020

    In a relatively volatile session, stocks that are well positioned in the re-opening process outperformed overnight.

    Hopes for a swift economic recovery continued to support sentiment as large bank shares advanced on Wednesday. The Dow Jones Industrial climbed over 550 points at session end to finish 2.2% higher. Goldman Sachs rose close to 7% and gained over 15% in the last 2 trading sessions along with JPMorgan Chase shares which are also up approximately 14% in 2 days. The financials sector boosted the S&P500 which despite trading lower at certain periods throughout the session, finished 1.5% higher to 11 week highs and more significantly, above it’s 200 day moving average at 3036.13 points. Airlines such as Alaska Air and United also saw gains alongside other stocks expected to benefit from increased activity as investors seem to adopt the “reopening trade” which resulted in companies with positive exposure to lockdowns trading lower, including Zoom and Netflix. The Nasdaq closed 0.75% higher and is 4.38% positive year-to-date. Although investors are increasingly optimistic, there remains concern regarding the strained relationship between the US and China. President Trump announced he is working on a strong response to address the proposed security laws on Hong Kong by China.

    The ASX200 index fell roughly a percent in early trade yesterday however experienced an intra-day rally strongly led by the big 4 banks. In what seems to be a similar correlation to Wall Street, investors appear bullish on particular financial stocks that will possibly benefit from reduced restriction measures. With the exception of CBA (which gained 4.9%) the big 4 banks rose between 7.8-8.6% and are up over 15% in the last 2 sessions. Healthcare declined the most as industry giant CSL dropped 6.4%.

    The Australian dollar fell from its recent highs of US66.75c to trade at around US66.24c this morning. The Euro saw a small rise from US$1.1001 to around US$1.1014. Brent crude price fell by 4.6% or US$1.65 to US$34.52 a barrel. This came after reports that Russia and Saudi Arabia were sending mixed messages about their coordination in cutting oil production, as well as fear over Trump’s retaliation to China’s treatment of Hong Kong. Spot Gold finished the US trading day at $1712.84 per ounce. Iron Ore saw an increase of 0.5% to end the US trading day at US$95.10 a tonne. Further concern about Brazil’s worsening COVID-19 crisis and continued demand from China have kept prices climbing.

    Today the Reserve Bank Governor, Philip Lowe will address the Senate and Select Committee to give an update on the Australian economy and the impact of COVID-19. Private Capital Expenditure, which measures the total inflation-adjusted value of new capital expenditures made by private businesses, will be released. The previous quarter saw a reduction of -2.8%, and today’s data is forecasted to see a slight improvement of -2.6%.

  30. OldOzzie

    Snoopy
    #3466304, posted on May 28, 2020 at 10:04 am
    OldOzzie
    #3466268, posted on May 28, 2020 at 9:13 am
    Andrews has put China above his party and his nation

    Not so fast Old Ozzie

    Victoria follows in the footsteps of the ‘Turnbull govt’s Belt and Road betrayal‘

    Turnbull pure A’Hole

    Like

    “I am no apologist for Daniel Andrews, but the same Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade that has its nose out of joint over Andrews signing a Belt and Road Framework Agreement said, in 2018, that the Turnbull Government deal with China is ‘confidential between the parties unless otherwise agreed’,” Mr Jones said.

    When the Federal government signed the deal, the then Trade Minister, Steve Ciobo told the media at the time, both parties were required to agree to release the text of the MOU and China has not agreed to do so.

    “No wonder Canberra are silent about the Daniel Andrews deal with China”.

    “No wonder Trade Minister Birmingham has had nothing to say”.

    Mr Jones said “China must be laughing” as “Premier Andrews is criticised for precisely what the Turnbull Government signed up for in September 2017”.

    The Chinese Communist party “have governments across Australia by the throat”.

  31. stackja

    One package from one Sydney suburb to another Sydney suburb took a week. Another package again Sydney suburb to Sydney suburb one day.

  32. Zatara

    Tuberville is an open borders, pro-China shill.

    No, he isn’t.

    It’s Simple — A Secure Border Means a More Secure Nation

    We must first secure our border as we attempt real immigration reforms that will impact our nation for decades to come. I fully support President Trump’s plan to build a wall and make our nation more secure. And I will make sure our border patrol, detention centers, and law enforcement officers along and near the border have the resources they need to fight the scourge of illegal immigration that brings drugs, terrorists, and criminals into our country on a daily basis.

    I will be a leader in Washington fighting for smaller government, less taxes, and our national sovereignty. I am running to defend the Constitution, and I understand that the freedoms we enjoy must be protected and preserved for future generations.

    I’m a Donald Trump guy, but there are things that he hasn’t done yet that we’ve got to get done.

    As to China…

    “Well, we can’t worry about investigating China right now. We’ve gotta worry about Alabama and this country” “It’s all about investigations from our leaders…they investigate and nothing ever comes of it, so right now we’ve gotta worry about this country”

    So someone else is tired of the investigation after investigation BS leading absolutely nowhere in DC politics. That’s a pretty popular view in the US right now.

  33. Infidel Tiger King

    Tuberville wants mass cheap immigration and the US to lay off China and let them take over.

    Very weak and dishonest man. Terrible candidate.

  34. stackja

    OO – AJ spoke on this subject this morning on 2GB.

  35. Zatara

    Tuberville wants mass cheap immigration and the US to lay off China and let them take over.

    Ah, I see. It’s horseshit hour and Sinc forgot to turn on the sign over the bar.

  36. Infidel Tiger King

    Every public utterance of Tuberville’s has been in support of mass immigration and issuing more work visas.

    Trump only likes him because of his grudge with Sessions.

    Not to worry, he has no hope of beating Jones and Trump is on track to lose to Biden if he keeps up his madness.

  37. feelthebern

    Stop scaring the horses IT.
    What’s up with pizza boy?

  38. Mother Lode

    Can you imagine the same “reasoning” being allowed if the perp was male?

    For all their clamouring that women are as strong as men, they still believe women in untenable relationships are trapped – no friends, no government hotlines, no shelters, no government programs, no legal services, and no constant reminders in the media that men are to blame.

    Mind you, with regards the last point, there are endless variations on the same cycle in things like Hallmark productions where the man is physically abusive and the woman submissive for the sake of the children but where the woman finally summons up the courage to flee only to be told that the law and society are still blind and there is still not enough help. The husband invariably stalks the woman and near kills her. She either kills him or she gets her day in court where she stares him down, humiliates him, and wins a magnificent victory.

    I wonder how many women who really are in dangerous relationships, cowed and isolated, look at those movies and see the strength and endurance of the protagonist, and think it would be impossible for them and are more hopeless than before.

  39. Infidel Tiger King

    Pizza reviews is his thing.

    Since China Flu he had to switch to frozen pizza.

  40. stackja

    Zippy – X1 taking on USA assumes the “war” won’t have USA ready.

  41. OldOzzie

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #3466320, posted on May 28, 2020 at 10:19 am
    interesting read
    Is The U.S. Prepared For War With China?

    Thanks Zippy, Thorough and Detailed Read, and I liked Summary

    Like Japan in 1941, the CPC must buy time if it is to survive and consolidate control over markets and sources of supply. But, like Japan in 1941, would a precipitate action cause not just the US, but a variety of its allies to rebuild in the longer-term?

    The wager is now in the air.

    PS (ȊꞪꞨV) are you a HSV Owner?

  42. Zatara

    Every public utterance of Tuberville’s has been in support of mass immigration and issuing more work visas.

    … and yet you choose not to provide a quote or a link.

  43. OldOzzie

    Supply Disruptions Are Challenging the Return to Auto Production

    Carmakers are bringing their plants online, but the process hasn’t been as easy for many companies that supply essential parts for those cars.

  44. Infidel Tiger King

    Tuberville also said the Chinese military was better than the US military.

    Very dangerous and strange guy.

  45. Mother Lode

    That’s FBI 101, taught Day 1 at the FBI Academy at Quantico, Va.

    What are the chances that some fact check unit declares this sentence FALSE.

    Having contacted the FBI Academy they can confirm that day one is about room assignments and facility orientation. They do not learn about the need to list suspicious factors prior to opening a document until Day 2, after the morning coffee break.

  46. OldOzzie

    Border paranoia risks jobs revival and national unity

    The Australian EDITORIAL

    It’s often said Perth is the most isolated city in the world. But last year Western Australia’s tourism minister declared the perception was “outdated” and asked residents to brag about the state’s appeal. Yet, amid the coronavirus pandemic, Premier Mark McGowan keeps talking down WA’s prospects. “Isolation is Western Australia’s greatest strength. Isolation from the rest of the country, isolation from the rest of the world,” he said, vowing to defend the ramparts from Canberra or the NSW government. This is a fearful man’s perspective; it undersells WA’s virtues and puts citizens and employers in a defensive mindset. Such thinking will keep its economy in suspended animation, relegating WA to slower growth and tens of thousands of people to longer stints of unemployment.

    As Australia winds back restrictions in a three-stage process, there will be differences of approach, guided by medical and other advice, balancing competing needs. But the aim is to have a COVID-safe operating environment in place by July, with state borders reopened and possibly a trans-Tasman travel zone. Scott Morrison has been first among equals in national cabinet, conveying consensus decisions and the relative harmony between jurisdictions. Shutting down the economy to flatten the curve of infections was relatively easy compared with the current phase of bespoke reanimation. WA and Queensland, and to a lesser extent South Australia and Tasmania, have become strident on border closures. The Prime Minister correctly called them out on Wednesday, warning that they were hurting the economy and tourism businesses, especially with the looming school holiday season.

    As leaders know, closing internal borders was not the advice of the Australian Health Protection Principal Committee, the key medical adviser to national cabinet. That point has been made often by Chief Medical Officer Brendan Murphy and his deputies. But there are acute sensitivities to new outbreaks of COVID-19. A sheep ship carrying ill crew members was allowed to dock in Fremantle, leading to finger-pointing at Canberra from a riled Mr McGowan. The death of a Queensland man will again raise the political heat over borders — but it shouldn’t. As restrictions are lifted, and people return to school, work, sport and social life, it’s inevitable there will be spikes in case numbers. We are not going to eradicate the virus for some time, if ever.

    Our strategy has been to suppress the spread of COVID-19, while building capability to deal with any outbreaks. We’ve succeeded in boosting intensive-care capacity, are broadening testing and have put in place a tracing regime that will help officials track the contacts of infected people. NSW, with Sydney as the gateway for visitors, has been the caseload epicentre. But progress in reducing community transmission is giving officials confidence, as long as there is not complacency on strict social distancing and good hygiene practices. Chief Health Officer Kerry Chant told NSW MPs the state was unlikely to face another major wave of COVID-19 infections this year, with the virus effectively contained and transmission rates reduced to nearly zero. This will underpin the easing of restrictions, allowing NSW to emerge faster from the economic calamity of shutdown.

    There is a risk the nation could become a two-speed, even three-speed, economy in recovery. It may even be a matter of choice, due to border closures. WA is exposed to the resources cycle, but still attracts out-of-state tourists. Queensland relies heavily on tourism, especially in winter. As we report on Thursday, states could lose $45bn in revenue and see a 40 per cent spike in debt over the next two years, putting pressure on credit ratings. Queensland could lose $2bn in tourism spending from now to September; it is the most reliant on interstate visitors, accounting for almost half of its market. Tourism Minister Simon Birmingham demands states with closed borders must release their scientific advice and explain why.

    Senator Birmingham argues it is now clear the lifting of restrictions had not caused a spike in COVID-19 cases. Instead of engaging on the substance of his argument, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk reflexively took a cheap shot at the South Australian. Ms Palaszczuk runs a state with one of the highest rates of people employed in tourism, while South Australia has one of the lowest. “Queensland clearly has the most to lose from any delays to the reopening of domestic tourism,” the Tourism Minister said. We have a national economy, where movement of goods and people should be seamless. As we look for ways to revive and retool our economy out of hibernation, there’s nothing at all splendid about isolation.

  47. mh

    Dow rises another 2 % to close at 25,548.27

    A lot of confidence from investors.

  48. stackja

    Ƶĩppʯ (ȊꞪꞨV)
    #3466320, posted on May 28, 2020 at 10:19 am
    interesting read
    Is The U.S. Prepared For War With China?

    GREGORY R. COPLEY
    Historian, author, and strategic analyst — and onetime industrialist — Gregory R. Copley, who was born in 1946, has for almost five decades worked at the highest levels with various governments around the world, advising on national security, intelligence, and national management issues. He has authored or co-authored more than 35 books, including “The Art of Victory” (2006), “UnCivilization: Urban Geopolitics in a Time of Chaos” (2012), and “Sovereignty in the 21st Century and the Crisis for Identity, Cultures, Nation-States, and Civilizations” (2018). An Australian, he is President of the International Strategic Studies Association, based in Washington, DC, and Editor-in-Chief of the “Defense & Foreign Affairs” group of publications, including the government-only intelligence service, the Global Information System. Among his international recognitions, he was, in 2007, made a Member of the Order of Australia in the Queen’s Birthday Honours. http://www.StrategicStudies.org.

    Gregory Copley, AM, GCHT*, FRCGS, FSS, FRSN

  49. OldOzzie

    News Corp Australia

    On Wednesday, 1st of April we wrote to notify you of the decision to suspend the print editions of the News Local, Leader, Quest and Messenger community networks whilst a review was undertaken to determine the future viability of these newspapers

    Today, I am writing to advise you that we will cease the printed version and transition the bulk of these community titles to digital-only editions. Three News Local newspapers Wentworth Courier, Mosman Daily and North Shore Times, are the exception and will resume in print in the coming months. We concluded that it’s time to move our business to the places and platforms our audiences are turning to every day, so that we better meet the needs of our consumer and advertisers.

    In addition to these community newspaper changes, News Corp’s regional newspapers will transition from printed newspapers to online only from June 29. The Cairns Post, Townsville Bulletin, Gold Coast Bulletin, Geelong Advertiser, NT News, Hobart Mercury and Toowoomba Chronicle will continue to publish in both print and online.

    Although the print editions of these regional publications will cease, our commitment to local business, local news and community journalism is unchanged. 375 journalists will remain on the ground in regional areas to allow us to continue to serve our communities with local news digitally. This transition will allow us to continue to meet the growing demands of our audiences who expect to find their local news online.

    This strategy will provide you, our valued client, with highly targeted and measurable advertising solutions and a gateway to reach and convert MORE local customers, faster.

    In response to the changes shared with you today, News Corp’s state-based newspapers will carry more regional content both in print and online.

    I would like to thank you for supporting your local classifieds. Over the past month, we’ve heard from many of you about your own challenges and it’s been humbling to hear the value you place on News Corp and the role we play in generating awareness and leads for you. I want to assure you that my team and I are here for you. We will continue to advocate for your needs and support you with world class, cost effective advertising and marketing solutions.

    To view the detailed changes to our publications, please click here.

    Over the coming month, we will be in touch to see how we can help. In the interim, should you have questions regarding these changes or impacts to your advertising, please click here for a call back.

    Yours sincerely,

    Jodi Graham
    General Manager
    Direct Sales, a division of News Corp Australia

  50. Infidel Tiger King

    Dow rises another 2 % to close at 25,548.27

    A lot of confidence from investors

    All the funny money has to find a home somewhere.

    Real America is dying, jobless and desperate. The elite keep on truckin’

  51. cohenite

    Infidel Tiger King
    #3466233, posted on May 28, 2020 at 8:11 am
    I’m starting to question Don’s sanity.

    How about starting with your own stalker.

  52. custard

    Fuck wit Gargoolery is trolling me now with my golf swing.

    He doesnt possess the feeling of greatness!

  53. Tel

    A lot of confidence from investors.

    Confident that inflation is coming and the cash will lose value.

  54. OldOzzie

    This Karen is a Bit Thick!

    Amy Cooper once claimed her ex-lover bilked her out of $65K

    The white dog-walker who sparked widespread outrage by calling the cops on a black man in Central Park was once embroiled in a soap opera-like drama involving a married boyfriend and claims that he cheated her out of $65,000.

    Amy Cooper had a “romantic relationship” with Wall Street trader Martin Priest from 2008 to 2012, “while unaware that [he] was still residing with his wife,” according to a fraud suit she filed against him in 2015.

  55. stackja

    Bulk of News Corporation’s regional newspapers disappear. Tragedy.
    Thursday, 28 May 2020 – michaelsmithnews
    News Corp Australia announces portfolio changes

    News Corp Australia announces portfolio changes

    The Executive Chairman of News Corp Australasia, Mr Michael Miller, today announced significant changes to News Corp Australia’s publishing portfolio.

    Mr Miller said that over recent months News Corp had undertaken a comprehensive review of its regional and community newspapers. This review considered the ongoing consumer shift to reading and subscribing to news online, and the acceleration of businesses using digital advertising.

  56. stackja

    Riots in Michigan – shops looted – police in retreat
    Thursday, 28 May 2020

    michaelsmithnews

    Karen Scullin FOX9
    @kscullinfox9
    This is awful out here. No police. Looting continues

  57. Dr Faustus

    interesting read
    Is The U.S. Prepared For War With China?

    As the article points out, China is advancing aggressively on all fronts:

    ‘All-out combat’ feared as India, China engage in border standoff

    And the US is responding:

    House sends China sanctions bill to Trump’s desk as tensions escalate

  58. OldOzzie

    BREAKING: President Trump Vows to Veto FISA Reauthorization if Passed…

    Moments ago President Trump tweeted he will veto the House FISA re-authorization if it is passed without first investigating and exposing prior FISA abuses committed against his prior election campaign and administration:

    The House of Representatives is scheduled to vote by proxy on the FISA re-authorization previously passed by the Senate. No-one has any idea if the FISA vote will actually pass the House and it appears most republicans are positioned to vote against it.

  59. Tom

    ScoMo is the best Labor PM eva — because too much free stuff will never be enough!:

    RBA Governor Lowe says it’s “too early” to say if the economy will need more support in four months when the JobKeeper program is due to expire. But if it hasn’t come out of the current trough, there “should be a discussion” about how the JobKeeper wage subsidy “transitions into something else or is tapered”, Dr Lowe tells the Senate Select Committee into the economic response to the coronavirus pandemic.

    The Australian public service just abolished the private economy because someone might die and now the cost of unabolishing it is too high so let’s just whack it on the credit card. FMD.

  60. OldOzzie

    Marco Rubio Moves to Protect Senate From Exposure in Their Role Against President Trump….

    Senator Marco Rubio was moved into the position of Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI) for the specific purpose of defending the interests of the senate. The SSCI under republican leadership was weaponized against Donald Trump and was a participating unit in the soft-coup against a sitting U.S. president.

    The corrupt intent crosses over party designations; this is a unified self-interest.

    Rubio previously shielded SSCI Vice Chair Mark Warner for his covert contacts with Christopher Steele after a series of “would rather not have a paper trail” text messages were discovered during the investigation of SSCI Security Director James Wolfe’s leaks.

    The Florida Senator was moved into position recently as surfacing documents started to put more sunlight on the Senate Intel Committee. Rubio’s role is to cover their tracks.

  61. mh

    China has the arrogance of the Third Reich, and appears to believe it is so powerful that it can now do whatever it wants anywhere in the world.

    I’m thinking the Communist Party is heading for a big fall, most likely in the next 10 to 15 years.

  62. Maj

    Mitt Romney (RINO), Liz Cheney (Neo-Con), and the Wall St Journal (Globalist Capitalism) criticize President Trump’s tweets.

    By his enemies, you shall know him.

  63. Infidel Tiger King

    Trump’s tweets have been crazy lately. It’s why he is tanking in the polls too.

  64. Maj

    GOP Senators Beg Trump to Import More Foreign Workers, 36M Americans Jobless

    Nine Republican Senators are lobbying President Trump to import more foreign workers, claiming there are not enough qualified Americans to take jobs, even with more than 36 million out of work.

    While economists predict there may soon be 41 million unemployed Americans due to the Chinese coronavirus crisis, Senators Lindsey Graham (R-SC), John Cornyn (R-TX), Mike Crapo (R-ID), James Risch (R-ID), Mike Rounds (R-SD), Todd Young (R-IN), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Dan Sullivan (R-AK), and James Lankford (R-OK) are asking Trump to continue an inflow of foreign workers to take agricultural and nonagricultural jobs.

    Specifically, the GOP Senators say Trump must continue fast-tracking H-2A foreign agricultural workers and H-2B foreign nonagricultural workers into the U.S. and should allow businesses to exempt themselves from foreign worker restrictions so long as they claim they cannot find Americans to hire.

    The GOP Senators write:

    The marked impact that the coronavirus has had on the job market is undeniable. Nearly 33 million Americans are unemployed, and close to eight million American small businesses are at risk of shuttering forever. Some of these struggling small businesses rely on labor that many Americans may not be qualified or able to perform, even in the aftermath of the pandemic, and some of these businesses operate in industry sectors that are not experiencing high unemployment … or in particular geographical locations where qualified labor is scarce. American businesses that rely on help from these visa programs should not be forced to close without serious consideration. Guest workers are needed to boost American business, not take American jobs. [Emphasis added]

    Due to the temporary and seasonal nature of the work, it is exeedingly difficult to find American workers, even now, who wish to work only on a temporary basis. Many of the jobs lost since March are not temporary or seasonal. Much of the furloughed or laid off workforce are likely looking to return to the jobs they were forced to leave … we are afraid the unemployment insurance compensation included in the CARES Act has created a disincentive for many American furloughed or laid off workers from finding new jobs, especially those seasonal or temporary in nature. [Emphasis added]

    As the GOP Senators lobby Trump to import more foreign workers during mass unemployment, grassroots organizations representing American workers and college students are asking the president to halt foreign worker visa programs to ensure scarce jobs go to unemployed Americans.

    Between the H-2A visa program for foreign agricultural workers, and the H-2B visa program for foreign nonagricultural workers, more than 350,000 additional blue-collar foreign workers are imported to the U.S. labor market annually. Despite this year’s record unemployment, hundreds of thousands of H-2A and H-2B foreign workers are expected to take American jobs.

    For some time, the H-2B visa program has been used by businesses to bring in cheaper foreign workers and has contributed to blue-collar Americans having their wages undercut.

  65. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    China has the arrogance of the Third Reich, and appears to believe it is so powerful that it can now do whatever it wants anywhere in the world.

    Stay out of Russia.

  66. mh

    蔡英文 Tsai Ing-wen
    @iingwen
    Today I asked the Executive Yuan to draw up a humanitarian assistance action plan for #HongKong citizens that lays out clear, complete plans for their residence, placement, employment, & life in #Taiwan as soon as possible.

    https://twitter.com/iingwen/status/1265600680804270088?s=20

  67. thefrollickingmole

    The Morning Briefing: Trump’s Twitter Trolling Is the Greatest Entertainment in America

    What Trump has managed to do with Twitter is counter the narrative advantage that the mainstream media always had and used against Republican presidents. He doesn’t have to rely on press releases or press conferences to get his side of any story out to the public, he just wakes up and starts tweeting.

    For those of us who were sick of watching the MSM run roughshod over Republican presidents, Trump’s Twitter rants were a thing of absolute beauty.

    The thoroughly leftist Twitter has a love/hate relationship the president, of course. He brings them the kind of publicity that they couldn’t possibly buy. If he weren’t the president and just a regular conservative, he’d be shadow-banned or suspended immediately. They have to keep the president of the United States around, much to their chagrin, no doubt.

    In the last few weeks, the liberal anxiety about Trump on Twitter has been ratcheting up, and it’s been delightful.

    https://twitter.com/morningmika/status/1263096515632881664?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1263096515632881664%7Ctwgr%5E&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fpjmedia.com%2Fcolumns%2Fstephen-kruiser%2F2020%2F05%2F27%2Fthe-morning-briefing-trumps-twitter-trolling-is-the-greatest-entertainment-in-america-n431637
    ..

  68. mh

    Secretary Pompeo
    @SecPompeo
    Today, I reported to Congress that Hong Kong is no longer autonomous from China, given facts on the ground. The United States stands with the people of Hong Kong.
    1:38 AM · May 28, 2020

  69. candy

    Trump’s tweets have been crazy lately. It’s why he is tanking in the polls too.

    Trump is under enormous pressure. The corona deaths are blamed on him.

    I wonder if he needs Twitter now? They want to ban him. If that happens then Twitter will die. Twitter company whoever it is,may need him more than he needs it?
    He has the rallies and the election is not far off anyway.

  70. Cassie of Sydney

    ” Three News Local newspapers Wentworth Courier, Mosman Daily and North Shore Times, are the exception”

    Pity the Wentworth Courier is still going to be published…..it’s a rag…..a far-left one at that.

  71. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Andrew ‘Twiggy’ Forrest wants JobKeeper ‘savings’ used to pay for free child care ‘indefinitely’
    Headshot of Lanai Scarr
    Lanai Scarr
    The West Australian
    Wednesday, 27 May 2020 7:14PM
    Lanai Scarr

    An education initiative launched by Andrew “Twiggy” Forrest has called on the Federal Government to use the overestimated $60 billion in the JobKeeper package to permanently fund free child care for all Australian children.

    The West Australian can reveal that former South Australian premier Jay Weatherill, who heads up Thrive By Five — an initiative by Mr Forrest’s Minderoo Foundation to promote the benefits of early childhood education — has written to Education Minister Dan Tehan calling on him to think about the long-term benefits of properly funding child care.

    It can also be revealed that a poll of 1500 parents and prospective parents found a staggering 79 per cent believed child care should be brought into thepublic education system and made free.

    The survey by Essential Media was held between April 22 and April 28. In a strongly-worded letter to Mr Tehan, Mr Weatherill warned that if free childcare was ended early “it would deliver negative impacts on three fronts”.

    It included forcing more women out of the workforce “because they cannot afford childcare fees”, reducing children’s learning outcomes and forcing centres to close and resulting job losses.

    He said the package should be extended “indefinitely”.

    “Given the importance of early childhood development to the education and health trajectory of Australians, as well as to national productivity and economic growth, we ask that you extend indefinitely … to allow time for a necessary redesign of the ECEC system,” Mr Weatherill writes in the letter.

    He said that using the $60 billion that was incorrectly allocated to JobKeeper in an accounting bungle by Treasury would be a logical place to look for the cash. “It should be used for that,” Mr Weatherill said.

    The Federal Government is tipped to this week make public its decision on whether the free childcare tap will be turned off next month or if it will be extended.

    The West Australian.

  72. candy

    The guy was threatening to bait her dog. I wonder if it’s something he has been doing since he could not stand any unleashed dogs in the bird park and was obsessed about it.

  73. Arnost

    Trump’s tweets have been crazy lately.

    There would inevitably come a time when he – anyone! – would crack. He has like zero support from any of the administration staff [they are more likely to give him wrong data or withhold crucial info to make him look bad]. Most of the Senate and Reps are RINOs … yes MOST. And all of the media can’t be trusted.

    However – not sure if he has.

    The only way that he can communicate with the population is by direct messaging. And that is what he’s the master at. Throws out a controversial tweet – the media melts down and spreads the underlying message for him.

    Even the new fact check will backfire on twitter. For example lot of interest has been raised on voter mail in fraud by the fact that twitter “fact checked it” as false. People take notice and we now have lots of examples of it trending. But even more interestingly, people will note that some of his tweats won’t be labeled (and so by implication true…) Isn’t interesting then that the Morning Joe tweats have not fact check…?

  74. Maj

    Pity the Wentworth Courier is still going to be published…..it’s a rag…..a far-left one at that.

    Just like the local MP?

  75. *Just get married*

    LOL

    Judges in western nations are giving women a pass for murder.

    *If only he maintained frame*

    It’s like Fuentes says. Yep, we’re afraid of you babe, but not for the reasons you think. Going around torching institutions doesn’t mean you’re strong, it is a tell of psychopathy.

    Go on strike lads, have a comari. Kids etc are great but these rules we’re expected to live under are unacceptable.

  76. cohenite

    Small steps, but steps non the less:

    The coal, hard fact is we must put jobs first in this economic climate
    Matt Canavan The Australian May 27, 2020

    As the biblical saying goes, you can’t serve two masters. For a decade we have been trying to con ourselves we could. We thought you could serve the master of ­climate change and keep a strong manufacturing sector. The data doesn’t lie. You can’t. While we have reduced our emissions by 5 per cent (largely by making it illegal for farmers to clear their own land), our manufacturing industry has gone backwards for the first time. During the past decade Australian manufacturing has declined in real, absolute terms. The 1990s and 2000s were not boom times for manu­facturing but the sector still managed to grow by 10 per cent each decade. Since 2010, it has shrunk by 5 per cent.
    During that time, our pursuit of climate change and renewable ­energy policies helped double the cost of energy, despite our abundant reserves. The COVID-19 pandemic shows what a mistake this has been.
    Now everyone wants to secure our supply chains and start making things again. None of this talk will lead to renewed manufacturing strength, however, if we do not get serious about reducing energy costs. And to do that we need to make tough choices about what is important in a post-COVID, economically depressed world.
    Talk of the immediate importance of reducing our small carbon footprint now sounds like a dis­cordant echo from a bygone era. With millions are out of work, and our major trade partner threatens our economic security, why would we continue to self-flagellate by imposing the additional costs of reducing carbon emissions for no environmental benefit?
    China’s recent actions demonstrate beyond a doubt that there is no hope a global agreement to reduce carbon emissions will lead to any meaningful global action. If we can’t trust China to keep faith with a trade agreement signed just a few years ago, and can’t trust it to be upfront on the pandemic, how can we trust China to honour a global agreement to reduce carbon dioxide emissions?
    I do not make these points to critique others. I made the mistakes too. I have been a supporter of the Paris Agreement because Australia has benefited from international agreements. But things have changed. With the need to secure our manufacturing industry and the clear breakdown of international co-operation, we must face the fact that era is over.
    We should end our participation in the Paris Agreement, given the more immediate need to secure our manufacturing jobs. And we should rule out any moves to net-zero emissions or a future global agreement on carbon until other countries, much larger than us, demonstrate real reductions in their carbon emissions.
    Our future targets continue to restrain our ability to make the tough choices to rebuild Australian manufacturing. Because of those targets, many are rushing to promote gas over coal. Gas in eastern Australia is not a pathway to globally competitive energy prices any time soon. The geology of our gas is not the lucrative shale seams from which the US has benefited.
    At best we might hope to get the wellhead energy cost of Australian onshore gas down to $6 a gigajoule. That is still double the mining costs of most Australian black coal (and more than 10 times the cost of brown coalmining). It is also more than double the cost of US shale gas.
    If we are not going to pursue and fight for the cheapest energy costs, then we are not serious about rebuilding an Australian manufacturing industry.
    Some say the politics of building a coal-fired power station is too tough. I am a big supporter of gas developments but I drove to Canberra last week and I saw about 20 “no coal-seam gas” signs in western NSW. But I didn’t see a single “no coal” sign. Sure, lots of inner-city greenies oppose coal, but all politics is local. As last year’s federal election showed, if you have the locals supporting a project (such as Adani), that is a political fight you can win.
    The political battle we should engage in is the one to return manufacturing jobs to Australia. To pursue naive policies that reduce our carbon emissions, regardless of what other countries are doing, hurts our ability to win that battle. To recover from this pandemic we must recognise that the era of rampant globalism is over and put Australian jobs first.

  77. Zyconoclast

    Trump’s tweets have been crazy lately. It’s why he is tanking in the polls too.

    Another yawnfest

    Big Tech is doing everything in their very considerable power to CENSOR in advance of the 2020 Election. If that happens, we no longer have our freedom. I will never let it happen! They tried hard in 2016, and lost. Now they are going absolutely CRAZY. Stay Tuned!!!

    Twitter has now shown that everything we have been saying about them (and their other compatriots) is correct. Big action to follow!

    And

    Republicans feel that Social Media Platforms totally silence conservatives voices. We will strongly regulate, or close them down, before we can ever allow this to happen. We saw what they attempted to do, and failed, in 2016. We can’t let a more sophisticated version of that….

  78. cohenite

    Arnost
    #3466391, posted on May 28, 2020 at 12:06 pm
    Trump’s tweets have been crazy lately.
    There would inevitably come a time when he – anyone! – would crack.

    Trump is the Honey badger of politics;

  79. Top Ender

    I’m thinking the Communist Party is heading for a big fall, most likely in the next 10 to 15 years.

    Interesting to muse on China having some sort of internal rebellion.

    I guess if the middle class keep getting steadily better off, and the working class remain hopeful, nothing much will happen.

  80. custard

    The panel for #theirABC Insiders on Sunday

    La Trioli
    Karen Middleton
    Gareth Parker

    Two karens and a Gareth.

  81. Cassie of Sydney

    “Maj
    #3466392, posted on May 28, 2020 at 12:06 pm
    Pity the Wentworth Courier is still going to be published…..it’s a rag…..a far-left one at that.

    Just like the local MP?”

    No. I wouldn’t call Dave Sharma a far-left rag……he’s a pussy, he’s a wimp and he’s a wuss. But now that he is being sued by the far-left Jooo hating, former Labor member for Fremantle…Melissa Parke (she is probably someone who the Toowoomba Turd admires)….I’ll stand with Dave although I’m unsure if I’ll vote for him in two years time. However…considering what Wentworth vomited up in 2004, 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016 and then double vomited in that by-election of 2018…I’ll take Dave any day.

  82. Mother Lode

    I then ordered a new one from Sydney … it arrived two days later. The one from Melbourne arrived yesterday, 23 days after it was posted. How does a small package get that lost in the mail system? It was posted in a letter.

    I ordered some stuff from the US (Minnesota) and they were with Aussie Post in Sydney six days later.

    They were delivered to me in Sydney the next day. (Maybe two days – much faster than I expected.) I suspect similar handling times – while the US is far away by far most of that distance is traversed in a jet in about a day.

    Maybe you should ask for things to be delivered overseas and then forwarded to your address in Sydney.

    Quicker than interstate.

  83. Zyconoclast

    … Dave Sharma … is being sued by … former Labor member for Fremantle…Melissa Parke …

    Why?

  84. Arnost

    V interesting read on that Karen v Karen take in the National Review “The Central Park Dog Case Is Covington 2.0” posted above…

    What is she supposed to do with her life now? If I were Ms. Cooper, I would be focused on one potential source of income only: Suing my former employer for its libel and demanding a hefty sum.

    Indeed…

    And it may be a much needed lesson for corporations. I know that on first glance, an employees life is immensely sacrificeable for a couple of cents of brand value on the stock exchange for a day or two while the tweetstorm passes… But honour is important too. They really need to stand their ground and not succumb to leftie activist pressure BEFORE the facts are in. If they sacrifice the employee for naught – then that brand damage may be MUCH longer lasting.

    On face value – Karen Amy’s complaint / call to the police was [even by Karen Christian’s account] 100% factual. “There is an African-American man, I am in Central Park, he is recording me and threatened myself and my dog,”.

    I’d guess that Amy may be in for a big [non-disclosure governed] settlement.

  85. Infidel Tiger King

    The only way that he can communicate with the population is by direct messaging.

    I’m talking about the Joe Scarborough stuff.

    That is freaking stupid and everyone hates it including his base.

  86. Arnost

    LOL… Not sure if this has been posed here – but Sam Neil and his phone:

    https://twitter.com/TwoPaddocks/status/1264105443724390400

  87. Bruce in WA

    I ordered some stuff from the US (Minnesota) and they were with Aussie Post in Sydney six days later.

    They were delivered to me in Sydney the next day.

    A carton of red wine from Melbourne — 10 days to the Perth warehouse — and then sat there for 11 days until delivered, with damaged packaging and heat-affected, to suburban Perth.

  88. Infidel Tiger King

    The best way to fund “Child Care” would be an increase on iron ore royalties.

    In fact that is how we should pay off all debts.

  89. Mitch M.

    Targeting early brain inflammation may slow down Alzheimer’s

    It will help but it is very difficult to do because the brain’s immune cells are the principal drivers. I can think of possibilities but I can’t think of definite solutions.

  90. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The best way to fund “Child Care” would be an increase on iron ore royalties.

    What’s wrong with “User pays?”

  91. Mitch M.

    I’m talking about the Joe Scarborough stuff.

    That is freaking stupid and everyone hates it including his base.

    He needs to immediately stop that.

  92. Infidel Tiger King

    What’s wrong with “User pays?”

    I’d rather that ChiCom ball licking fuckwit Twiggy paid.

  93. Maj

    I’m talking about the Joe Scarborough stuff.

    President Trump is playing 4D chess here.

    Psycho Joe Scarborough is an ex-Republican Congressman, and the President is using Twitter to make Psycho Joe’s fellow RINOs expose themselves so Trump can get them removed before November.

    That is freaking stupid and everyone hates it including his base.

    Are you kidding? The base loves this!

    What the base loves about Donald Trump is that he’s a fighter. What the Left calls “a tirade” his base calls “Punching back, hard!” And every time he does this he reminds the base why they elected him in the first place.

  94. Top Ender

    Defence Chief warns against Sheean VC
    CLAIRE BICKERS
    Hobart Mercury 28 May 2020

    AUSTRALIA’S standing with Queen Elizabeth could be damaged if the government pushes ahead to award a Tasmanian war hero the Victoria Cross, the nation’s most senior military leader has warned.
    In an exceptional move, Chief of the Defence Force Angus Campbell has written to both Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Minister for Defence Personnel Darren Chester to “strongly advise” them not to seek the honour for Teddy Sheean.
    General Campbell acknowledged the young sailor’s bravery, but warned the request to grant him a VC could open the floodgates to a “swath of additional claims for retrospective military honours” from “all past conflicts”.
    He also warned it could damage Australia’s standing among other Commonwealth countries and “potentially with the Queen herself”.
    The Defence chief’s warning comes amid a growing push in government ranks to recognise Sheean’s bravery with the highest honour for valour, for strapping himself to a gun on a sinking ship in World War II to shoot down enemy planes.
    Tasmania’s federal Liberal MPs have written to Mr Morrison to advise him of their “unanimous” support for the tribunal’s recommendation to award Sheean a VC.
    In the letter, they voiced their disappointment at the government’s decision not to push ahead with the tribunal’s recommendation.
    But in a frank letter to Mr Chester, seen by the Mercury, General Campbell cautions the Minister to give “careful consideration” to going ahead with the request, which he said would put the Queen in a position where she would have to make an “unprecedented” call.
    The general wrote the request would ultimately have to go before the monarch, who was “personally interested” in the VC as the top award for valour in the Commonwealth.
    It also had “direct ties to an award instigated by her greatgreat-grandmother”.
    “Defence Honours and Awards staff have advised me that a decision in favour of Ordinary Seaman Sheean would be unprecedented for both Australia and the broader Commonwealth,” General Campbell wrote.
    “As such, I ask that you give careful consideration as to the reasonableness of a Minister of the Crown placing Her Majesty in such a position.
    “Doing so may well damage Australia’s standing among other Commonwealth countries, and potentially with the Queen herself.”
    The general also noted Sheean’s case was “comprehensively reviewed” by the 2013 Valour Inquiry, which did not recommend a VC.
    He said as no new evidence in Sheean’s case had emerged since the 2013 inquiry, the tribunal’s latest recommendation “can only be based on a different interpretation of the evidence”.
    “I do not see the circumstances surrounding the appeal for Ordinary Seaman Sheean as being sufficient to overturn the original decision,” he said.
    General Campbell wrote an initial letter to Mr Chester on October 4, 2019, after the Minister requested his comments on the tribunal’s recommendation.
    He wrote a second letter to the Prime Minister this week, after the growing push within Coalition ranks to award Sheean a VC emerged, saying he felt “compelled” to offer his view as the Chief of the Defence Force.
    Mr Morrison has previously stood by the government’s decision not to proceed with the recommendation, saying it was “not taken lightly” and was made with advice from military chiefs “past and present”.
    “No doubt there are many cases deserving of recognition from times long since past, or even more recently, but these are matters, in the absence of compelling new evidence, that should be left to the decisionmakers of the time, and not second guessed by the decision of politicians many years later in a different context,” he said.
    Buckingham Palace previously rejected a request in 2006 from New Zealand’s Defence Minister to retrospectively award one of its citizens the VC, after the Queen followed King George’s 1949 decision not to consider any further awards from World War II.
    The Mercury contacted the Defence Department about General Campbell’s letter.
    A spokeswoman said: “The Chief of the Defence Force has no further comment.”

  95. Top Ender

    Editorial in today’s Mercury newspaper; Hobart, 28 May 2020:
    Wrong call by the top brass

    THE extraordinary intervention by Australia’s Defence Force chief Angus Campbell in the bid to grant a posthumous Victoria Cross to Ordinary Seaman Edward “Teddy” Sheean is a slap in the face for all those fighting to have the Tasmanian war hero’s amazing act of bravery finally recognised.

    Once again, the 18-year-old has been dudded by the top brass.
    As revealed in today’s Mercury, General Campbell wrote to Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Defence Personnel Minister Darren Chester to “strongly advise” against pushing for Sheean to receive the top military honour for valour.
    General Campbell argues the move would set a precedent which would open the floodgates for other families to push for their relatives to receive higher military honours and put the Queen in a difficult position.
    “Doing so may well damage Australia’s standing among other Commonwealth countries, and potentially with the Queen herself,” he wrote.
    Really? Does he actually believe Australia’s push to honour a war hero would undermine our strong relationships with Commonwealth countries such as New Zealand and Canada? Does he truly think that Her Majesty would think less of us for recommending a young soldier, who sacrificed himself for his mates, receive the top military award for bravery? What a lot of mumbo jumbo.
    It would be surprising if our 94-year-old monarch spent much time at all in giving her royal approval on honours granted in her name, or the name of her great-great-grandmother.
    This is the same Queen who has rubber stamped many honours across the Commonwealth, including knighthoods for cricketers and rock stars. Even if she did “take a personal interest”, as General Campbell suggests, so what? Australia should be proud to argue its case in such a worthy fight.
    Perhaps the only reasonable argument is the fear that a successful bid might encourage other families to fight for similar awards for other veterans.
    Well, good luck to them. Relatives and supporters have been fighting for more than a decade to have Teddy Sheean’s courage recognised. They have carefully gathered evidence and jumped through countless hoops to get as far as they have. And the case for Sheean to receive a VC is undeniably strong.
    His heroic act, where he strapped himself to a gun on the deck of the HMAS Armidale as it sunk in the Timor Sea, firing at Japanese planes, saved the lives of dozens of his crewmates.
    It has been corroborated by survivors. An independent panel which reviewed the case found new evidence to support the push. What’s the point of that panel’s findings if they can be simply vetoed?
    Some could argue that Mr Morrison has been caught in the crossfire and is simply following the advice of his highest military commander in rejecting Sheean’s VC recommendation.
    But this is where good leaders step up. The Prime Minister should do what is right, no matter how uncomfortable it might get. Teddy Sheean put a lot more on the line when he died saving his mates.

  96. DrBeauGan

    Complained to the boss moderator and they both have been accepted. Yay!

    And the truth shall set you free!

    Cassie showed the way, bless her.

  97. rickw

    I then ordered a new one from Sydney … it arrived two days later. The one from Melbourne arrived yesterday, 23 days after it was posted. How does a small package get that lost in the mail system? It was posted in a letter.

    Jihadi Post. We had one of their jihadi’s turn up with a package for a business that is next door but shares the same physical address. “They’re next door” was met with a tirade of abuse, threats to dump the package in the lobby and more insanity. He left without delivering the package after having spent 10 minutes on a tirade over a 2 minute walk.

    Welcome to the Third World! Nothing works! Most are mentally unstable!

  98. Entropy

    Infidel Tiger King
    #3466416, posted on May 28, 2020 at 12:50 pm
    The best way to fund “Child Care” would be an increase on iron ore royalties.

    In fact that is how we should pay off all debts.

    Hate to quibble, but childcare, which the feds stupidly decided to start subsidising, is a federal expenditure, whereas royalties for iron ore belong to WA.

  99. rickw

    Interesting to muse on China having some sort of internal rebellion.

    I guess if the middle class keep getting steadily better off, and the working class remain hopeful, nothing much will happen.

    Why it’s important to smash they’re economy and choke off immigration. Give them no choice but to fight.

  100. rickw

    I then ordered a new one from Sydney … it arrived two days later. The one from Melbourne arrived yesterday, 23 days after it was posted. How does a small package get that lost in the mail system? It was posted in a letter.

    M Post. We had one of their M’s turn up with a package for a business that is next door but shares the same physical address. “They’re next door” was met with a tirade of abuse, threats to dump the package in the lobby and more insanity. He left without delivering the package after having spent 10 minutes on a tirade over a 2 minute walk.

    Welcome to the Third World! Nothing works! Most are mentally unstable!

  101. Infidel Tiger King

    Hate to quibble, but childcare, which the feds stupidly decided to start subsidising, is a federal expenditure, whereas royalties for iron ore belong to WA.

    A federal company tax that only targets Andrew Forrest and his entities should suffice.

    What an awful human being he is. Just the worst.

    He has Jay Weatherall on the payroll pushing this child care madness.

  102. rickw

    China has the arrogance of the Third Reich, and appears to believe it is so powerful that it can now do whatever it wants anywhere in the world.

    Stay out of Russia.

    Do they have a hate on with Russia? They’ve pissed off every other neighbour except the Norks?

  103. cohenite

    Maj
    #3466425, posted on May 28, 2020 at 12:56 pm

    Correct. WTF do Trump’s cuck critics want him to be: more decorous like the magic negro: he’s decorous and as corrupt as shit. Trump is what he is: honest, calls a spade a spade and a piece of shit a piece of shit; joe scarborough is a piece of shit and laughed about killing his assistant; wtf is that.

  104. thefrollickingmole

    Hate to quibble, but childcare, which the feds stupidly decided to start subsidising, is a federal expenditure, whereas royalties for iron ore belong to WA.

    Sort of, up until recently the income from that was effectively used to punish WA during the GST carveups.
    This is obviously a mining mob doing a bit of “lower the royalties” pleading but the bare facts are right.

    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/wa-would-be-better-off-without-royalties-minerals-council/news-story/393335e19340add1bdd12b9b73e4d822

    A Minerals Council of Aust­ra­lia assessment concludes that WA would have been better off financially if it had no iron-ore royalties, although every other state would be much worse off.

    WA will have $4.52 billion of its per-capita share of goods and services tax revenue­ redistributed to other states this year because of its iron-ore royalties, although they have been assessed at an average of only $4.36bn a year.

    The Productivity Commission is investigating whether the GST distribution formula ­cre­ates disincentives to reform.

    The MCA’s submission says ­the system rewards states that lock up their mineral resources while punishing those that exploi­t them.

    It argues that the grants commission starts with the false assumptio­n that all states will develop­ their mineral resources with equal vigour. “The problem for the pro-active states is that, as soon as the royalty revenues start to flow, their GST receipts start to fall,’’ it says.

    “Meanwhile, in the obstructionist states, their share of GST distributions starts to rise.

    “The policy signal heard in state capitals is unmistakeable. State governments can impose moratoria on new gas development, ban uranium mining, close brown-coal generation and be better off, not worse.”

  105. Neil

    The best way to fund “Child Care” would be an increase on iron ore royalties.

    In fact that is how we should pay off all debts.

    Best way to pay off govt debt is to cut govt spending

  106. rickw

    Riots in Michigan – shops looted – police in retreat
    Thursday, 28 May 2020

    I bet not in the Korean area. Those ex military, 2A rooftop Koreans can stop anything!

  107. cohenite

    Top Ender
    #3466427, posted on May 28, 2020 at 12:58 pm
    Editorial in today’s Mercury newspaper; Hobart, 28 May 2020:
    Wrong call by the top brass
    THE extraordinary intervention by Australia’s Defence Force chief Angus Campbell in the bid to grant a posthumous Victoria Cross to Ordinary Seaman Edward “Teddy” Sheean is a slap in the face for all those fighting to have the Tasmanian war hero’s amazing act of bravery finally recognised.

    Campbell is a serious dickhead. He is overseeing the Ben RS debacle; diversity training for his troops and has banned death insignia on uniforms. He is a real arsehole.

  108. Infidel Tiger King

    President Trump is playing 4D chess here.

    Psycho Joe Scarborough is an ex-Republican Congressman, and the President is using Twitter to make Psycho Joe’s fellow RINOs expose themselves so Trump can get them removed before November.

    Shut up. No one believes this.

  109. rickw

    “We’ve never seen numbers like this, in such a short period of time,” deBoisblanc added. “I mean we’ve seen a year’s worth of suicide attempts in the last four weeks.”

    Profoundly dumb people are in Government the world over.

  110. Infidel Tiger King

    About 3 people watch Scarborough’s show.

    Without Trump tweeting all the time, no one would have heard of him.

  111. cohenite

    Without Trump tweeting all the time, no one would have heard of him.

    Stop being such a pantywaist. Trump is the Conan of politics: he is going to crush his enemies, drive them before him and hear the lamentations of their women.

  112. A decent government would throw Campbell in the brig and least discharge him for being completely nuts.

    The RAAF can’t bomb bridges and the grunts are getting taught about racism.

    If only we did this fighting Japan.

    Amazing isn’t it?

    You can sabotage the military, but you cannot sow disaffection towards the government.

  113. Free Radical

    Riots in Michigan Minneapolis – shops looted – police in retreat
    Thursday, 28 May 2020

    I bet not in the Korean area. Those ex military, 2A rooftop Koreans can stop anything!

    I bet no Koreans were murdered by policemen. In Michigan or Minnesota.

  114. Makka

    News.com;

    A young Chinese businesswoman has emerged as a key figure behind Victoria’s controversial Belt and Road trade deal.
    Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews has been criticised for joining the initiative – the only Australian state leader to do so – which will provide loans and investment in infrastructure projects from the Chinese government.
    Jean Dong, 33, is the chief executive of the Australia-China Belt and Road Initiative company, and had a big part to play in securing the deal.
    She boasted about her political influence in a YouTube video called “Journey of Influence”, which documented her life from her days as a student journalist in Beijing, to working with Australian politicians including former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull and former Labor NSW premier Bob Carr.

  115. Maj

    Trump is the Conan of politics: he is going to crush his enemies, drive them before him and hear the lamentations of their women.

    You just know all of this is going in the “Book of Trump”.

  116. Frank

    From the ABC we have, words we are no longer allowed to use.

    If you knew the origin of these common slang words, you might think twice about using them


    Woke and Karen are of course bigoted and must be banished forthwith, as must those despicable oiks that utter them.

  117. Frank

    In addition, the pussyfooting around the portmanteau word munter at that link is a bit precious.

  118. thefrollickingmole

    Holy snapping duckshit, the Lancet might have just been dudded by a fake study on coronavirus medication.

    Questions raised over hydroxychloroquine study which caused WHO to halt trials for Covid-19

    Questions have been raised by Australian infectious disease researchers about a study published in the Lancet which prompted the World Health Organization to halt global trials of the drug hydroxychloroquine to treat Covid-19.

    The study published on Friday found Covid-19 patients who received the malaria drug were dying at higher rates and experiencing more heart-related complications than other virus patients. The large observational study analysed data from nearly 15,000 patients with Covid-19 who received the drug alone or in combination with antibiotics, comparing this data with 81,000 controls who did not receive the drug.
    ….
    The Lancet told Guardian Australia: “We have asked the authors for clarifications, we know that they are investigating urgently, and we await their reply.” The lead author of the study, Dr Mehra Mandeep, said he had contacted Surgisphere, the company that provided the data, to reconcile the discrepancies with “the utmost urgency”. Surgisphere is described as a healthcare data analytics and medical education company.

    “If they got this wrong, what else could be wrong?” Cheng said. It was also a “red flag” to him that the paper listed only four authors.

    “Usually with studies that report on findings from thousands of patients, you would see a large list of authors on the paper,” he said. “Multiple sources are needed to collect and analyse the data for large studies and you usually see that acknowledged in the list of authors.”

  119. Maj

    Why is this allowed?

    Central banks have distorted market signals and played havoc with the concept of equity value.

    The post-COVID blitz by the US Federal Reserve – which has increased its balance sheet from $US4 trillion ($6 trillion) to $US7 trillion in just two months – has flooded the system with liquidity, in concert with emergency spending by the US Treasury. This may have masked a lot of sins and played havoc with normal price-to-earnings ratios.

    The Fed has torn up the rule book and is buying the debt of “fallen angels”, BBB companies reduced to junk status. It could at any time go further and start to buy equity index funds and ETFs as well. The Bank of Japan is already doing so.

    Isn’t this Communism?

    Don’t know if this is the official definition but a mate told me a long time ago: “Socialism is the government managing the means of production. Communism is the government owning the means of production.”

  120. calli

    Interesting to get another viewpoint.

    After the video went viral and she became the world’s designated hate target of the day, her only option was to grovel, which rarely works and didn’t this time. “I’m not a racist. I did not mean to harm that man in any way,” she told the media. Harm that man? She did Mr. Cooper no harm. He encouraged her to call the police as he was filming her. He, on the other hand, threatened to harm her dog, then his sister posted the video on Twitter in order to upend Ms. Cooper’s life. She even lost her dog after social-media users Karened on her for “choking” it in the video.

    From vr’s NationalReview link.

    I did wonder about those “treats”.

    He appears, from comments here, to have grown from 6’6” to 6’10”. Which is remarkable in itself. Perhaps the whole story has been fertilised with a good side dressing of 🐂💩.

  121. OldOzzie

    Ok Stew is now slow cooking after 1 and half hours of prep – now to relax and listen to some music in the sun (not supposed to do) and get some vitamin D – checking simmer and stirring stew every 30 min.

  122. Arnost

    i

    That is freaking stupid and everyone hates it including his base.

    Not sure … All he’s doing is highlighting the one rule for them and one rule for you [the punters] – and letting the media do it for him. One of the tweet’s that started this was re the “injustice” for Roger Stone.

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1263081823812366338

    So I’m guessing that it’s a start of a play to free Stone.

    [And – like with Flynn – he needs to do something about the obvious double standards in justice: As otherwise if he let’s his supporters hang for simply supporting him … he won’t have any supporters!]

  123. Knuckle Dragger

    LTGEN Angus Campbell.

    ‘Employing violence with humility’ Campbell.

    ‘Don’t give this bloke a thoroughly deserved VC now as they lost the paperwork 80 years ago, because then everyone will want one’ Campbell.

    Flog.

  124. Arky

    Good news:
    ..

    TSMC prepares for US-China chips decoupling
    On May 15, the world’s largest contract chipmaker announced plans to open a production plant, or “fab,” in Arizona, US. If you know the industry, it doesn’t seem to make business sense: the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) will build a 5nm fab in Phoenix, Arizona and start churning out chips by 2024, with a target of processing 20,000 wafers per month. The chipmaker plans to invest $12 billion through 2029.

    TSMC share price:
    https://www.google.com/search?q=tsmc+share+price&oq=TSMC+&aqs=chrome.3.69i57j0l7.12583j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

  125. Fisky

    mh
    #3466364, posted on May 28, 2020 at 11:22 am
    China has the arrogance of the Third Reich, and appears to believe it is so powerful that it can now do whatever it wants anywhere in the world.
    I’m thinking the Communist Party is heading for a big fall, most likely in the next 10 to 15 years.

    There is no alternative centre of power to the CCP, except for the PLA, so any collapse in that country would just lead to direct military rule. There won’t be a successful foreign invasion to replace the regime either (even Japan at its strongest could only take around one third of China).

    Once Beijing is cut off from earning foreign exchange through HK, most likely scenario is the gradual North Koreanisation of the PRC – it’s transformation into a hungry, nasty, race-obsessed bunker regime in permanent hostility with its neighbours (already happening – see India, Taiwan, S.C. Sea….)

  126. feelthebern

    Jean Dong, 33, is the chief executive of the Australia-China Belt and Road Initiative company, and had a big part to play in securing the deal.
    She boasted about her political influence in a YouTube video called “Journey of Influence”, which documented her life from her days as a student journalist in Beijing, to working with Australian politicians including former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull and former Labor NSW premier Bob Carr.

    Bob Carr never saw a Dong he didn’t like.

  127. Fisky

    Do they have a hate on with Russia? They’ve pissed off every other neighbour except the Norks?

    Nope, and not gonna happen either. Putin is the only leader XJP won’t pick a fight with.

  128. feelthebern

    From the WSJ.

    TECHNOLOGY ALERT
    In Draft Executive Order, Trump Would Seek to Limit Protections for Social-Media Companies

    A draft of an executive order President Trump is expected to sign on Thursday would seek to limit the broad legal protection that federal law currently provides social-media and other online platforms, according to people familiar with the draft.

  129. Rex Anger

    @MH and fisky:

    This is China’s historical pattern- Out of squabbling local warlords and satraps comes a songle unifying dynasty. Its rise is meteoric, its rule brutal, and its collapse just as abrupt and vicious. Then back to squabbling warlords and satrapy. And the occasional dose of doreign interference to build a mythology of grievance on (Mongols! Yeah!). They’ve got 2500+ years’ worth of it, and are very proud to tell you so.

    It will simply be that the CCP dynasty is one of the shortest in China’s recorded and mythologised history.

  130. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Paul Garvey 1.25pm: WA Treasurer pushes for JobKeeper extension

    WA Treasurer Ben Wyatt has urged his federal counterpart to extend the JobKeeper program beyond its current September deadline, warning that the assistance was propping up around 5 per cent of the state’s workforce.

    Speaking as he confirmed WA would enter recession this year, Mr Wyatt said he hoped to see the program taper off after September.

    “I don’t think a hard end is actually in the Commonwealth’s interest, the state’s interest or Australia’s interest and hopefully they will end up with an alternate transition plan rather than a hard end,” Mr Wyatt said.

    “I agree that JobKeeper is not here forever and we can’t afford to keep it forever, but I don’t think a hard end is practical or in the interests of the nation.”

    Treasury modelling tabled in WA’s parliament on Thursday morning showed that the state expects its economy to contract by 5 per cent in the June quarter alone and a further 3 per cent in the 2021 financial year. The combined hit will suck around $12 billion out of the state’s economy.

    WA’s unemployment rate sits at around 10-11 per cent and Mr Wyatt said JobKeeper was helping to keep that figure lower than would otherwise be the case.

    “JobKeeper is working, I understand a lot of people have frustrations with it but it is working in keeping people connected to their employer. That’s why I think the Commonwealth will invariably come to a point where you can’t hard-end it.

    “I get they want to come out of it so it’ll probably be more of a transition. Whether it’s industry-based or the figure starts to reduce over time, ultimately they will come to a point on that which hopefully will cushion as we come out of this.”

    Mr Wyatt said the government was focused on bringing forward investment in infrastructure such as roads and rail that will create jobs quickly, as well as reforming regulations that will expedite investment in the private sector.

    He said the state’s economic figures were unprecedented but would have been much worse if the government and the mining sector hadn’t agreed to keep the industry operating through the crisis.

    “We are seeing some of the worst figures that anyone has seen in their lifetime, I never thought I’d see these kinds of figures as a treasurer, but where we were two months ago compared to where we were two months ago, I’m more optimistic and i fully expect ultimately if the success of the health response to COVID continues, and I expect that will, then the return to normal behaviour around our internal economy will certainly support that,” he said.

    Breaking, from the Oz.

  131. feelthebern

    In the US, there have already been rulings in favour of business owners regarding insurance companies paying out on business continuity policies.
    How long before we see similar challenges here in Oz?

  132. feelthebern

    No doubt the insurance companies in the US are appealing the decisions.
    Uncle Warren would be impacted.

  133. Arnost

    Interesting to get another viewpoint.

    It is actually more interesting that we haven’t actually had an Amy viewpoint. Even the “threat” [you won’t like what I do and the doggie treats] are from the Karen Christian’s Facebook.

    It may be that another video may turn up where – prior to his video starting – there was more than just a threat to the dog (but a physicial threat to her as well). And show it as less a spontaneous and more an intentional exercise to provoke or trigger a reaction. With an intent to get dog-walkers out of the brambles and not disturb the playground for birders (and cocksters).

  134. Fisky

    @MH and fisky:
    This is China’s historical pattern- Out of squabbling local warlords and satraps comes a songle unifying dynasty. Its rise is meteoric, its rule brutal, and its collapse just as abrupt and vicious. Then back to squabbling warlords and satrapy. And the occasional dose of doreign interference to build a mythology of grievance on (Mongols! Yeah!). They’ve got 2500+ years’ worth of it, and are very proud to tell you so.
    It will simply be that the CCP dynasty is one of the shortest in China’s recorded and mythologised history.

    I doubt the country will break apart. It’s a bit different now because there is far more unity and national consciousness in that place than previously. There was no “China” really before Western contact and the republican period, just an emperor lording it over a patchwork of localities that didn’t even speak a common language. Most likely the PLA will form the next government, with or without a formal name change.

  135. EvilElvis

    Mail update!

    Goalposts for delivery estimate have been changed to the next five days, after going 2 days over the last delivery estimate. Been in Perth apparently for 8 days and I’m 2 hours away. Fucking joke of an organisation.

  136. Fisky

    You look at Eastern Europe under the Soviets, and there was always some kind of opposition party or movement, with moral authority dating back to the pre-war period, usually with a charismatic leader ready to take over. In China there is nothing. Literally no one with any administrative or leadership experience who would challenge the regime and assume government. There isn’t even any channel or means of organizing an opposition. Type the wrong phrase into Wechat and you get deleted/banned. If your social credit points go too low, you can’t travel anywhere (it’s automatic). The government could just cancel your Alipay anytime and you can’t even buy basic provisions.

  137. EvilElvis

    I tried not to get on the mail bashing today. I really tried.

  138. Rex Anger

    Yeah. However you swing it, the death throes of the PRC will not be pretty.

  139. Fisky

    All the very, very stupid people who were proclaiming Angela Merkel the “leader of the free world” when Trump took over, should just hand in their credentials. Just ignorant garbage.

    Cartogropher Balding 大老板
    @BaldingsWorld
    ·
    5m

    I was at a conference within the past two years. Senior EU diplomat from Germany was asked basically “are there any red lines?” Response: “No, there is nothing that would prevent us from continuing our engagement strategy.” Do not expect anything from Europe: It ain’t happening
    Quote Tweet

    Andreas Fulda

    @AMFChina
    · 17m
    Chancellor Merkel’s position is highly problematic. She is effectively saying that no matter how much the Chinese Communist Party undermines the international liberal order, we should still seek ‘dialogue and cooperation’. Are there no red lines for her in the relationship? twitter.com/dw_politics/st…

  140. Arnost

    A draft of an executive order President Trump is expected to sign on Thursday would seek to limit the broad legal protection that federal law currently provides social-media and other online platforms, according to people familiar with the draft.

    Game & Set [Maybe not match] For even if @Jack did not ban him … Trump has what he needs in the Mika / Joe / Intern meltdown to publicise the fact that media and the social-media platforms think it’s fine to throw their weight around and block and de-platform voices that they don’t approve off.

  141. Rex Anger

    Must be just where you are Elvis. Down Canning Vale way, you can’t toss a beer can withput knocking a Postie off his bike. They’re swarming all over the place at all times of the day like Hi-Vis, Honda-riding little bees…

  142. Mark A

    OldOzzie
    #3466474, posted on May 28, 2020 at 1:48 pm

    Ok Stew is now slow cooking after 1 and half hours of prep – now to relax and listen to some music in the sun (not supposed to do) and get some vitamin D – checking simmer and stirring stew every 30 min.

    Wow, must some stew OO if it took you an hour an half just to prepare for cooking.😎👌

  143. feelthebern

    Why did the Melb plod shoot that guy this morning?
    Couldn’t they have tased the fuck out of the guy instead?

  144. Infidel Tiger King

    Why did the Melb plod shoot that guy this morning?
    Couldn’t they have tased the fuck out of the guy instead?

    Was it a social distancing or traffic infringement issue?

  145. feelthebern

    Chap wasn’t wearing a face mask.

  146. feelthebern

    Good to see the Shooters, Fishers & Farmers ensuring NSW public servants get their well deserved pay rise this year.
    That’s what their supporters voted for.

  147. Infidel Tiger King

    All the very, very stupid people who were proclaiming Angela Merkel the “leader of the free world” when Trump took over, should just hand in their credentials. Just ignorant garbage.

    While the Germans were busy examining their stool, China has stolen all their IP.

    Their manufacturing industry is rooted forever.

    Add to that they are now completely reliant on Russia for energy.

    Couldn’t happen to nicer people. Burn in hell, you sausage breathed morons.

  148. jupes

    Hey Top Ender:

    Buckingham Palace previously rejected a request in 2006 from New Zealand’s Defence Minister to retrospectively award one of its citizens the VC, after the Queen followed King George’s 1949 decision not to consider any further awards from World War II.

    You might be better off waiting until King Charles.

  149. feelthebern

    Burn in hell, you sausage breathed morons.

    Is that what you say to your missus?

  150. feelthebern

    The great thing about the US is you can choose to live in a state that has gun laws you agree with.

  151. Good to see the Shooters, Fishers & Farmers ensuring NSW public servants get their well deserved pay rise this year.
    That’s what their supporters voted for.

    That was my first thought.
    Until the reason for their objection was revealed.

  152. EvilElvis

    Must be just where you are Elvis. Down Canning Vale way, you can’t toss a beer can withput knocking a Postie off his bike.

    I think it’s just like my relationship with Telstra, Rex. It’s love hate.

    As I said the other day, the end delivery people are fine but wtf happens upstream from them? Another wonder of the public service.

  153. Infidel Tiger King

    Burn in hell, you sausage breathed morons.

    Is that what you say to your missus?

    Sometimes under my breath when I haven’t had my coffee.

  154. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From feelthebern at 2:22 pm:

    “Why did the Melb plod shoot that guy this morning?
    Couldn’t they have tased the fuck out of the guy instead?”

    Perhaps he was a horrid person?

  155. Infidel Tiger King

    Capital city mayors are calling for new foreign students to be ­urgently allowed into the country, saying that international education arrivals are needed to kickstart CBD economies.

    NSW, Victoria and South Australia are preparing to present Scott Morrison with plans to take small batches of foreign students to get the education industry back on its feet.

    There is growing anxiety over the lack of details from Western Australia and Queensland, which could cost both Labor states thousands of students and billions of dollars in ­investment.

    Brisbane lord mayor Adrian Schrinner told The Australian the return of foreign students would be key to getting the city’s economy back to health. “International education is one of Brisbane’s top 10 export markets, contributing $3.6bn to the local economy in 2019 … it has been devastating to see Brisbane’s thriving inter­national education sector virtually grind to a halt,” he said.

    “Supporting our international students requires an effort that ­expands across all three levels of government and I welcome any changes by the federal government to implement a more flexible process for assessing and renewing student visas.”

    Queensland State Development Minister Kate Jones said this week she had started talks with the education sector about how foreign students could safely come into the Sunshine State.

    More than 83,000 students with offshore visas are currently not in the country — 20 per cent of all offshore visa holders — and the sector expects 90,000 students who were due to come later this year will now be blocked by the closure of Australia’s borders.

    Melbourne lord mayor Sally Capp said she hoped the hotel quarantine system could be used to allow intakes and revive inter­national education — her city’s No 1 export. “There are good tools there — quarantining, the tracing app — which if applied means we can welcome international students safely … we’re also looking at how higher education sectors around the world are dealing with tracing and quarantining,” she said.

    Sydney lord mayor Clover Moore called on the national cabinet to make foreign students first priority when slowly opening up Australia. “International students will play a major role in the economic and social future of our city, and I encourage state and federal governments to support the return of these students to our capital cities as a priority,” she said.

    Perth, which has not had a lord mayor since 2018 when the city council was suspended, could lose out on a $2bn market after WA Premier Mark McGowan said he would move on foreign students only when the national cabinet did.

    WA Opposition Leader Liza Harvey said she would back foreign students starting to come to WA safely and lashed Mr McGowan’s lack of a plan. “It defies belief that the WA Labor government would not be taking this opportunity in a relatively safe part of the world to capture international market share with early and detailed planning,” she said.

    “There is an opportunity for international students to land in Perth, spend two weeks holidaying at the spectacular Rottnest Island quarantine zone and then commence their studies … this conceptually could be a substantial part of WA’s economic recovery.”

    Adelaide lord mayor Sandy Verschoor said her city was dependent on boosting the influx of students, who make up nearly 25 per cent of the South Australian capital’s population. “We only have a population of 26,000, so the growth of the student population is necessary if we are to grow economically again … these students are jobmakers — it’s four jobs for every student,” she said.

    Hobart lord mayor Anna Reynolds pressed the state gov­ern­ment to outline plans to bring students in as the Apple Isle’s capital sought to revive its student-led culture and property boom.

    We are so rooted. What sort of crazy arse country is this?

  156. Hay Stockard

    Cohenite,
    Never trust a Campbell. Old Scotch saying.

  157. H B Bear

    Melbournibad’s No1 export would be mediocre Green voting non value-adding academics.

  158. “Why did the Melb plod shoot that guy this morning?
    Couldn’t they have tased the fuck out of the guy instead?”

    Get used to this type of policing in Victoria once the Batlandians have foreclosed on the mortgage.

  159. Ian

    Re the mail posting, I can happily report that after a crazy 2 mths we have finally caught up with the backlog and things are returning to normal. This Sat will be my first one off for 9 weeks. People often complain about late delivery and blame Aus Post, some of that is warranted but my experience (as a Star Track subbie) is that the retailer is bullshitting the customer about delivery time because they don’t have the item in stock and have to order it from their supplier and then forward it to AP. If you order something very small ask the supplier to put it in a shoebox size box and it will not be allocated to the normal posties. Evil, calm down.

  160. thefrollickingmole

    “Why did the Melb plod shoot that guy this morning?
    Couldn’t they have tased the fuck out of the guy instead?”

    Known associate of Dick Pussy

  161. Arnost

    The protests in the US are getting a dash out of control …

  162. Infidel Tiger King

    Hospital administrators plan to turn off the life support of a young mother carrying a potentially-viable unborn child, against her partner’s wishes, leaving him feeling like “condemned man proceeding to an execution”.

    Khayla Reno, 29, then 19 weeks pregnant, was behind the wheel of her car near Tumut nearly two weeks ago when it reportedly veered into an oncoming truck.

    Ms Reno was left with such devastating brain injuries she has been on life support since shortly after arriving at Canberra Hospital.

    Her daughter, Erica, 10, died in the crash and her other daughter, Violet, 4, is still fighting for life in Westmead Children’s hospital.

    The father of the unborn baby, Jamie Millard – who has been in a relationship with Ms Reno for around 18 months – rushed to the helipad at the Canberra hospital after the crash.

    Two days after Ms Reno’s crash, Mr Millard was told by hospital staff that they would be pulling the plug on her life support, dooming the couple’s unborn baby.

    Doctors, he said in court documents, were “rude” and “disrespectful”.

    “I want to do everything I can to keep both Khayla and our baby alive,” he said.

    Urgent, but doomed, legal action to have the ACT Supreme Court stop the move failed on Thursday.

    A distraught Mr Millard blasted an offer by hospital lawyers to give him one final visit with his partner in exchange for agreeing to organ donation.

    “That was awful and caused me even more hurt and distress as I knew this wasn’t what Khayla wanted,” he said.

    His criticisms were echoed in a judgment by Chief Justice Helen Murrell, who said the hospital’s “attitude to (Mr Millard) … fueled this unfortunate litigation, which has been traumatic to all concerned”.

    Mr Millard said Ms Reno would have wanted to try to save her unborn child, although the hospital continues to side with Ms Reno’s other family members, who say she would have wanted her organs donated.

    “Last night the hospital rang me to tell me they will turn off life support this afternoon,” Mr Millard said on the steps of the court, before a final visit at the hospital.

    “My unborn baby is now on death row. I cannot do anything to stop the hospital committing this crime against this poor defenceless baby.”

    “I now go to my final one-hour visit feeling like a condemned man proceeding to an execution.”

    Court records show social workers restricting Mr Millard’s access to visits, placing security guards on the ward when he was there.

    Hospital lawyers also banned him from visiting and court records detail the hospital taking sides – against Mr Millard – among “a background of family tension”.

    Mr Millard said the now-late Erica and seriously injured Violet were both hoping for a baby brother.

    They had nicknamed him “baby Jimmy”.

    https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/canberra-star/khayla-reno-tumut-canberra-hospital-turns-off-life-support-for-baby-jimmy/news-story/08d79859d147604ecc7319021b0e91c0

    Didn’t we just spend 2 months locked down destroying everything because “life was sacred”?

    WTF?

  163. Infidel Tiger King

    Mr Millard said Ms Reno would have wanted to try to save her unborn child, although the hospital continues to side with Ms Reno’s other family members, who say she would have wanted her organs donated.

    “Last night the hospital rang me to tell me they will turn off life support this afternoon,” Mr Millard said on the steps of the court, before a final visit at the hospital.

    “My unborn baby is now on death row. I cannot do anything to stop the hospital committing this crime against this poor defenceless baby.”

    “I now go to my final one-hour visit feeling like a condemned man proceeding to an execution.”

    Court records show social workers restricting Mr Millard’s access to visits, placing security guards on the ward when he was there.

    Hospital lawyers also banned him from visiting and court records detail the hospital taking sides – against Mr Millard – among “a background of family tension”.

    What a sick, demented and immoral society we are.

  164. thefrollickingmole

    Infidel Tiger King

    Thats bloody awful story.

    Its not as though there arent any ICU beds unused at the moment.

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/icu-beds-doubled-to-more-than-1000-to-cope-with-covid-19-20200407-p54hz5.html
    The number of intensive care beds in NSW has almost doubled to more than 1000 in two months, with plans for bed numbers to quadruple as the state braces for severe coronavirus cases.

    The Berejiklian government has been working to significantly boost capacity in ICU since the COVID-19 crisis hit and the bed numbers have risen from 537 to 1020 in eight weeks.

  165. Infidel Tiger King

    The protests in the US are getting a dash out of control …

    The police have only themselves to blame.

    The Minneapolis PD should be forced to clean up the mess too.

  166. Free Radical

    thefrollickingmole #3466469, posted on May 28, 2020 at 1:42 pm

    You left out the most important bit:

    He stressed that even if the paper proved to be problematic, it did not mean hydroxychloroquine was safe or effective in treating Covid-19. No strong studies to date have shown the drug is effective. Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine have potentially severe and even deadly side effects if used inappropriately, including heart failure and toxicity. Other studies have found the drug is associated with higher mortality when given to severely unwell Covid-19 patients.

  167. EvilElvis

    Evil, calm down.

    I hate when people tell me to calm down. 😁

    Good to see you about, Ian.

    Now, none of the things mentioned apply in this case on several packages from two different states. Both manageable sizes, not easily lost and I’m purely working on the dates and info that Auspost themselves provide not the retailer. Something magical is happening between the point of postage and the good folk like yourself, Ian.

  168. OldOzzie

    Jetstar: Fuel additive led to near double engine malfunction on a Jetstar 787

    ROBYN IRONSIDE
    AVIATION WRITER

    A chemical added to fuel to kill microbiological growth is thought to have led to a near disastrous dual engine malfunction on a Jetstar 787, during a critical part of a flight from Cairns to Osaka last year.

    The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has issued an airworthiness bulletin about Kathon biocide which Boeing had recommended be added to fuel in its aircraft.

    The biocide has also been linked to other in-flight incidents involving dual engine surge, including one involving a UK-registered Airbus A321 in February this year.

    CASA’s notice “strongly recommended” all aircraft operators and maintainers suspend the use of the biocide and seek engine and aircraft manufacturer advice on an appropriate alternative.

    In the Jetstar incident, which remains under investigation by the Japan Transport Safety Board, the B787 was descending into Kansai International Airport, with up to 335 people on board.

    At about 15,000 feet, the flight crew began to receive a number of engine warnings, including a thrust warning and engine fail indication.

    As the aircraft continued to descend, an engine fail warning was received for engine number two, which was automatically relit but continued to surge on landing.

    Boeing has described aeroplane landings as the most dangerous phase of flights, with almost half of all fatal accidents occurring in the last fraction of a journey.

    The Japan Transport Safety Board investigation, with assistance from the Australian Transport Safety Bureau was continuing, but a Jetstar spokeswoman said they had already acted to address the fuel issue.

    “We were using Kathon biocide treatment on our B787 aircraft until May 2019, in accordance with Boeing’s recommendations,” said the spokeswoman.

    “When we became aware of the potential impact it could have on engines, we immediately stopped using the product.”

    She said Jetstar was continuing to work with the relevant investigators, regulators and manufacturers to determine the exact cause of the 787 event.

    The CASA bulletin said the incident could have been the result of an “overdosing maintenance error during a fuel system biocide treatment procedure”.

    The other possibility was the GE engine’s fuel system was sensitive to the biocide which may have significantly compromised normal operation of both engines.

    In response GE recommended airlines stop using Kathon biocide for treatment of fuel tanks until further notice.

  169. cohenite

    dover_beach
    #3466525, posted on May 28, 2020 at 3:07 pm

    That is very funny.

    This on the other hand is just horrible, and would appear to contravene Zoe’s Law, or it would have done if the LINO kunts in the lnp hadn’t allowed it to lapse:

    Infidel Tiger King
    #3466537, posted on May 28, 2020 at 3:31 pm
    Hospital administrators plan to turn off the life support of a young mother carrying a potentially-viable unborn child, against her partner’s wishes, leaving him feeling like “condemned man proceeding to an execution”.
    Khayla Reno, 29, then 19 weeks pregnant, was behind the wheel of her car near Tumut nearly two weeks ago when it reportedly veered into an oncoming truck.
    Ms Reno was left with such devastating brain injuries she has been on life support since shortly after arriving at Canberra Hospital.
    Her daughter, Erica, 10, died in the crash and her other daughter, Violet, 4, is still fighting for life in Westmead Children’s hospital.
    The father of the unborn baby, Jamie Millard – who has been in a relationship with Ms Reno for around 18 months – rushed to the helipad at the Canberra hospital after the crash.
    Two days after Ms Reno’s crash, Mr Millard was told by hospital staff that they would be pulling the plug on her life support, dooming the couple’s unborn baby.
    Doctors, he said in court documents, were “rude” and “disrespectful”.

  170. Something magical is happening between the point of postage and the good folk like yourself, Ian.

    The Post Office has serious form when it comes to keeping parcels on the shelf instead of handing them over the counter.
    Also for marking a registered package as “signed for & collected” but never delivering or notifying.

  171. jupes

    Why do “protesters” always take it out on shopkeepers?

  172. cohenite

    Hay Stockard
    #3466526, posted on May 28, 2020 at 3:11 pm
    Cohenite,
    Never trust a Campbell. Old Scotch saying.

    When I first read that I thought it said never trust a Campbell’s Scotch.

  173. Infidel Tiger King

    Why do “protesters” always take it out on shopkeepers?

    Yes, they should be burning down government buildings. But they don’t stock TVs.

  174. OldOzzie

    Debt-hit states told to rein in spending

    ADAM CREIGHTON
    ECONOMICS EDITOR

    States face a $45bn debt blowout over the next few months that will push combined state and federal government debts above $1.2 trillion — or 60 per cent of GDP — by 2022, according to new analysis that warns states to rein in expenses or lose their AAA credit ratings.

    More than 40 per cent of states’ revenue sources — including GST receipts, and property and gambling taxes — were vulnerable to a “severe decline” that would contribute to a $15bn slump in their combined revenue this quarter, and a further $30bn before the year’s end, the Centre for Independent Studies finds in a new report.

    “That’s on an optimistic basis,” said Robert Carling, the report’s author, who said total debts across both tiers of government could climb to $1.35 trillion once non-­financial corporations such as the NBN and state-owned electricity and water utilities were included.

    The states’ revenue shortfall is the biggest contributor to a deterioration that would include about $10bn in extra stimulus and about $4.5bn in extra money to boost health systems, the report says. “The impact of the pandemic will both add to expenses and, more severely, sap various major sources of revenue, at least for a time,” Mr Carling added, pointing out that GST revenues of about $65bn last year, highly vulnerable to a sharp drop in household consumption, made up almost a quarter of state revenues.

    “Much will have to go right over the next several years if individual states are not to see their credit ratings downgraded, their policy options become much more constrained by their debt burdens, and their exposure to future shocks and the challenges of population ageing elevate,” he said.

    Among the eight jurisdictions, Tasmania and the Northern Territory were the most vulnerable, having 50 per cent or more of their revenues in the “vulnerable” category, while Western Australia was the least vulnerable, with just 27 per cent

    “WA receives relatively little GST revenue, allows very little gambling, already had depressed levels of real estate activity before the crisis, and relies more than other states on mining royalties, which have been little affected by shutdown,” the report says.

    While federal government fin­ances had been steadily improving since the pandemic, most states’ net operating balances — which strip out capital investment — had already been deteriorating and total state debt was poised to roughly triple to $150bn over the three years to 2022.

    “Frequent calls for more spending on infrastructure to stimulate the economy seem to have missed the point that an infrastructure boom is already happening,” Mr Carling said, pointing to “pressure on available construction resources and major cost overruns”.

    Mr Carling, a former senior NSW Treasury official, found total government net debt — state and federal — would rise from 22 per cent to 40 per cent by 2022, and in gross terms from 43 per cent to 60 per cent, equivalent to about $1.2 trillion.

    “From zero 10 years ago, general [state] government net debt is heading for a level more than 60 per cent of revenue, and broader non-financial public sector net debt is rising from 35 per cent to ­almost 90 per cent of revenue,” the report says.

    The analysis singles out Victoria and Queensland for increasing their public sector headcounts by 10 per cent, adjusted for population, over three years.

    “Given the recent history of rapid expenditure growth in Victoria, it should not be difficult to achieve a slowdown, but that same history warrants scepticism about the assumed degree of future restraint,” Mr Carling said.

    NSW and Victoria, with the two biggest housing markets, were the most vulnerable to declines in stamp duty. “Property stamp duty — a notoriously volatile source of state revenue — is certain to fall steeply, mainly in response to a fall in the volume of turnover but also as prices weaken,” the analysis said, noting it made up $19bn or 6.6 per cent of state revenue.

    Rating agencies S&P and Fitch have already warned the federal government it could lose its AAA credit rating. The report came as the NSW government moved to freeze the pay of its 410,000 public sector workers, and the federal government berated states for keeping borders closed without sufficient medical reason.

  175. Arnost

    Why do “protesters” always take it out on shopkeepers?

    And start carbeques?

  176. Snoopy

    thefrollickingmole
    #3466469, posted on May 28, 2020 at 1:42 pm
    Holy snapping duckshit, the Lancet might have just been dudded by a fake study on coronavirus medication.

    The easiest con is when the mark just wants to believe.

  177. JC

    Wow! Person of the year already.

    NEW YORK, NY—Time’s Person of the Year issue has highlighted some of the world’s most influential, important, and controversial figures for almost 100 years. After weeks of intense internal deliberation, Time Magazine has officially announced its Person of the Year: Karen.

    “Karen could be any of us. She could be all of us,” said Edward Felsenthal, Editor in Chief of Time. “For years, we have been under the watchful protection of everyday heroes who are dedicated to righting all wrongs, no matter how tiny or insignificant. Today, that watchful protector has a name, and her name is Karen.”

    It’s the Bee 🙂

    https://babylonbee.com/news/time-names-karen-person-of-the-year

  178. JC

    Driller, you’ve been whining about the post office for 2 days. Move to the city if you want parcels delivered on time.

  179. incoherent rambler

    “Why did the Melb plod shoot that guy this morning?
    Couldn’t they have tased the fuck out of the guy instead?”

    I presume he was having sex in a night club. A known shooting offence in Dannograd.

  180. Why do “protesters” always take it out on shopkeepers?

    There’s a reason the protesters don’t take their anti-police violence to the … police station…

    Wonder what that reason could be?

  181. Roger

    Once Beijing is cut off from earning foreign exchange through HK, most likely scenario is the gradual North Koreanisation of the PRC – it’s transformation into a hungry, nasty, race-obsessed bunker regime in permanent hostility with its neighbours

    I think we’re already there.

  182. Ian

    Evil, I have heard some disturbing stories about the main clearing depot at Chullorah, staffed in the main by people who may or may not like curries, such as building up backlogs so as to get weekend o.t. etc. We subbies can only deliver what is in front of us and in general we value our customers and do our best, but as in every service environment there are some dickheads who do the wrong thing and bring the rest down.

  183. Spurgeon Monkfish III

    Interesting to muse on China having some sort of internal rebellion.

    Well, they could always have a big democracy cakewalk right through the middle of Tiananmen Square.

    Oh, wait.

  184. OldOzzie

    RACKSBRAX LAUNCHES NEW ACCESSORY PLATE

    Quality design and manufacture for safety and function are the hallmark of the RacksBrax product range.

    The range has been developed by Australian designers and engineers, using state of the art technology and tested in the field to make sure they meet rigorous standards.

    And, yes, all RacksBrax products are manufactured in Australia.

    The RacksBrax HD Hitch lets you swap from commuter to camper or tradie to tourer in less than 10 seconds.

  185. Mother Lode

    Yeah. However you swing it, the death throes of the PRC will not be pretty.

    I would expect it merely to be people deserting Xi and flocking to someone else who promises a way out – a palace coup.

    Any blame can be kept on Xi, the Chinese government saves what face it can and makes minor concessions, and eventually all is forgotten.

    The Chinese population are not starving peasants with nothing to lose. They see themselves as affluent (certainly more than their ancestors) and want the solution that keeps that in place.

    There will likely be a backlash and lasting grudge against over-reliance on China kept alive by domestic politics in other countries and I expect the Chinese economy will take a hit – or the West will eventually lose its nerve and the united front they currently present will melt away, which is likely what Xi is counting on.

  186. thefrollickingmole

    Grigglebot trying its little heart out and failing.
    “Ill show mummie this time” it whimpers, hammering at the keyboard
    but inside it knows Mummie will be so disappointed in it, it was always such a sickly, mewling babe, never showed any promise.

  187. Roger

    The Chinese population are not starving peasants with nothing to lose. They see themselves as affluent (certainly more than their ancestors) and want the solution that keeps that in place.

    That would apply in the big urban centres, but regional areas have been left behind. The resulting income inequality makes China an unstable country according to the Gini coefficient.

    Otoh, the social control the government can exert via technology is unprecedented in modern times.

    The Chinese future doesn’t look pretty either way and we’d be foolish not to uncouple as much as possible. We can still trade with China, but our future and theirs cannot be interlocked as our politicla class so foolishly imagined.

  188. Zatara

    Why do “protesters” always take it out on shopkeepers?

    “In the midst of chaos, there is also opportunity” ― Sun-Tzu

  189. thefrollickingmole

    Because she’s the hero Gotham deserves, but not the one it needs right now. So we’ll hunt her. Because she can take it. Because she’s not our hero. She’s a whining guardian. A watchful bellyacher. A Dark Karen.

  190. incoherent rambler

    Otoh, the social control the government can exert via technology is unprecedented in modern times.

    Enough about Viktoristan, what about China?

  191. incoherent rambler

    Rumour has it that the Viktoristani rural peasants are getting restless.

  192. OldOzzie

    Terry McCrann: How many jobs from China partnership are worth a life, Dan?

    So, tell me, Premier – and indeed all Victorians – how many jobs are worth a life?

    If no game of golf is worth someone’s life, what’s the measure in jobs? One job per life? Ten jobs per life?

    I ask this in the context of your statement on Wednesday that any cooling of Victoria’s partnership with China would cost jobs.

    But what if the cooling saved lives? Will you trade them off for the jobs?

    You do know, I presume, that the virus quite literally flew out of China and into Australia and that included Victoria.

    You do – or should – know that the single most effective decision to stop the spread of the virus and to limit the number of deaths was that by the federal government to ban flights from China on February 1, followed if too-belatedly by flights from everywhere else, and especially Italy.

    Even though that China ban threatened to and indeed actually did “cool” relations with China.

    The Chinese embassy in Canberra made that cooling official with a very angry statement. “We express our deep regret and dissatisfaction over the Australian government’s announcement,” it said.

    “The World Health Organisation has repeatedly stressed that it does not recommend putting travel and trade restrictions on China. Only Australia and a small number of countries have taken such extreme measures,” the statement back in February went on.

    I can’t find any reference to you endorsing the flight ban at the time – nor even more pointedly, unlike your Labor colleague, Queensland premier Annastacia Palaszczuk, actually calling on the Federal Government to halt flights from China before it did.

    Palaszczuk apparently was prepared to “cool” relations with China and to cost jobs in the state’s tourism industry as the price to be paid to save the lives of Queenslanders and indeed Australians generally.

    I’m all ears to hear that you said the same thing back at the end of January when it actually counted.

    I’m also interested to hear your guarantee that we can now absolutely trust China to never unleash another global pandemic like this one.

    Your right hand man – sorry, person – treasurer Tim Pallas obviously believes that China’s word is its bond. He attacked the Federal Government for calling for an independent inquiry into how the virus started in and escaped from Wuhan, a city I believe is in China.

    Pallas said he didn’t believe in “vilifying any particular nation”. That rather suggests he also did not want to “cool” relations with one particular nation by holding it to proper account for the 352,200 deaths, and counting.

    It is of course purely coincidental that the virus erupted so, well, virulently in Europe in the one major country that had signed up for your same Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) with China and in the exact region which had developed the greatest ‘China partnership’ with some half-a-million resident Chinese expatriates: Lombardy in Italy.

    You said repeatedly that you had to crush the Victorian economy, destroying businesses and jobs, so that we didn’t end up like Italy.

    Maybe a better place to have started would have been to dump the BRI or indeed never to have signed it.

    Indeed even and especially Italy might not have “ended up like Italy” if it had never signed the BRI.

    The Italian disaster does rather pose the question: did the federal flight ban actually save Victoria from the folly of its BRI “partnership”?

    But of course we can now trust China; that there’ll never be another pandemic escaping from one of its wet markets or labs or whatever.

    And if it does; well, we can always ban golf.

  193. OldOzzie

    MONEY NOT LOGIC PUMPS BANKS

    The surge in bank stocks – with rises between 5 per cent and a quite astonishing 8.6 per cent on Wednesday among the big four – is less about some rational evaluation of their future profit prospects and more just the weight of money.

    That and good old FOMO – Fear Of Missing Out.

    Wall St is on a tear, up over one-third from its virus-bottom and seemingly headed inexorably higher.

    That has dragged our market up around 25 per cent from our bottom.

    But not so much for the banks – for the obvious reason they are (or is that now ‘were’?) the focus of all the negatives from the virus-lockdown and the policy responses: likely massive loan losses and having to live with zero interest rates, along with the slashing of dividends (in two of the four cases, to zero).

    But if you want to pour money back into the market, in Australia you just have to end up also buying into the four big banks.

    They are just too big a part of the market.

    We just don’t have the Amazons and Googles that have been such a big part of the Wall St surge; and with good reason in the new world of locking yourself in your home and building an online virtual reality.

    Maybe we face a sobering wake-up call when the bank profits start surfacing – first with CBA after its June balance date and then the other three after September.

    The banks have made big provisions in anticipation of the losses from our worst recession in nearly 100 years. If they prove enough, the banks will be clear to ride the recovery.

    When we find out we will also be finding out whether the Wall St surge is real.

    MORE TERRY MCCRANN

  194. jupes

    Terry McCrann: How many jobs from China partnership are worth a life, Dan?

    Absolute Gold from McCrann.

  195. Farmer Gez

    Ten out of eleven COVID cases in Australia from Victoria today.
    The media ladies seem to not bother to ask, why? Wasn’t Dan’s extra tough measures meant to put Victoria in the best position, not the worst.

  196. OldOzzie

    Patrick Carlyon: Preparations for second wave seem excessive when we barely had a first

    Go to any major beach and you are greeted with signs explaining what you cannot do. No jumping. No diving. No dogs.

    Australia likes rules. They have flourished in the wake of the COVID-19 threat, and no matter that they are generally unenforceable and unnecessary. Much like the beach signs, which by their prominence imply that people generally should not be trusted.

    Victoria leads the nation for sticking to the rules. We have had triple the fines for breaching virus restrictions than any other state, in part because the culprits have been reported by fellow citizens.

    Why have local laws or police officers when ordinary citizens do the job for them? Is it time for a new licence plate logo? Victoria: The Dibber Dobber State.

    The dimming of the virus has accelerated the rise of such petty tyrannies.

    In the suburbs, jumped-up parade ground corporals go disguised as well-meaning, helpful people who like to pretend that the rules they enforce are just as silly as everyone thinks they are.

    Junior sport has long been an unchecked nursery for their kind. Australians have fought wars with fewer rules of engagement than the under 9s Canterbury Cobras v Park Orchards Sharks clash.

    About half of parents at each game, or so it seems, must wear a bright bib that designates their duties. Ground managers unite with water carriers and umpire escorts to ensure that the game is, well, fun.

    There are also Chief Hand-holders, Deputy Chief Hand-holders and Morale Incentivisers. They may not have official titles yet. Give it time. They will.

    This virus threat has complicated an already tangled pursuit. An eastern suburbs local netball association edict earlier this week began: “Approved return to netball protocols – if these are not followed, Council will close down the entire Association, including our Power and VNL teams!!!!!”.

    It then sets out an involved set of guidelines. No spectators and no toilet breaks – although you can visit the exe-loo outside.

    The netball association has taken its cues from the Australian Sports Commission COVID-19 checklist. This runs to 17 pages of pseudo military jargon, as if aimed at choking the spirit of the most devoted parent.

    It seems that every club and association must have a dedicated “COVID-19 Safety Co-ordinator” to monitor wayward players and their dodgy entourages. The sinister kicker lies in the onus of responsibility:

    “(W) here an action in this checklist is not undertaken, the organisation should be able to justify that decision to relevant sport stakeholder groups, including government and public health authorities, on an ‘if not, why not?’ basis.”

    The checklist includes advice on possible sanctions against those who does not abide by social distancing. But should you call the cops if a curious three-year-old strays too close when he tries to pat a dog?

    Players should “shower with soap” before turning up. Will COVID-19 co-ordinators smell the armpits of players before writing down their name and number on a Body Odour compliance form?

    Witches hats and footballs should be disinfected after changes of play. Presumably, a new bib emblazoned with “Spray n’ Wipe Chief Operating Officer” is being mass produced as we speak, although it remains unclear if the newfangled officials get a hard hat with their name on it.

    “Isolation areas” are to be set aside for sudden outbreaks of illness. Sick people must be taken to this zone, where personal protective equipment should be stationed. Precisely who dons the gear, and what they are expected to do once they have done a Darth Vader impersonation, is not spelled out.

    I know one football COVID-19 co-ordinator who has figured out that a pool noodle is about 1.5 metres long. She plans to use the noodle to allocate space, and merrily belt the non-compliant around the legs.

    Sport is an obvious hotspot. Other misplaced restrictions are also doomed to endure.

    State border controls make no difference, according to the best health advice. But Queensland is determined to keep them, anyway. Just ‘cos.

    There has been no evidence of virus spread through a supermarket or the sharing of a Sherrin. It seems unlikely there will be, especially among kids who generally don’t suffer the contagion.

    Yet it doesn’t matter. A cottage industry in petty power has been born. It will thrive, even though it serves no purpose.

    Has anyone stopped to wonder how you seek to suppress a second wave when, statistically, you have barely suffered a first? Isn’t the enemy “invisible” because the enemy is mostly elsewhere?

    We’ve been here before. The Y2K bug, ultimately, had to be treated as real, not because haywire computers were likely to black out entire countries, but to justify so much effort against the perceived threat.

    Still, many questions about COVID-19 protocols remain unanswered. Such as the tricky role of football umpire escorts. How do the escorts protect an umpire if they must maintain 1.5 metres from both the umpire and a wannabe assailant?

    If, in doing their duty, an escort breaches virus guidelines, who will be the first to dob them in?

  197. Farmer Gez

    The Chinese population are not starving peasants with nothing to lose. They see themselves as affluent (certainly more than their ancestors) and want the solution that keeps that in place.

    Nope.
    Had a mate go to China last year and he went to the back blocks to look at fertiliser businesses.
    ‘Hungry’ is how he described the locals.

  198. Perfidious Albino

    I wonder if the fuel additive problem in the Jetstar 787 took out the engines in that Pakistani airliner a few days ago?

  199. Tim Neilson

    A distraught Mr Millard blasted an offer by hospital lawyers to give him one final visit with his partner in exchange for agreeing to organ donation.

    This is why we need concealed carry.

  200. Delta A

    OldOzzie
    #3466583, posted on May 28, 2020 at 4:43 pm
    Terry McCrann: How many jobs from China partnership are worth a life, Dan?

    What an excellent article by Terry McCrann. Thanks for posting it, OldOzzie.

  201. OldOzzie

    This Election Is Republicans v. China – Oops, I Mean Democrats

    It’s pretty clear who the commie bastards known for their shoddy lab practices and their weird fetish for gnawing on pangolins badly want to win in November, and is not Trump and the Republicans. The Chinese communists want their money’s worth, and they will go all-in for the Democrats who find the chance to hurt Trump at the same time they hurt America too delicious to pass up. Plus, the Dems heartily approve of what Mao’s Pals are doing to freedom-loving Hong Kongers, seeing it as a template for what they would love to do to freedom-loving us.

    We need to understand and accept that a vote for anyone with a “D” is a vote for Xi.

    Now, some people who are stupid and/or liars will whine that this is mean and unfair and totally unlike the last four years of accusations about Trump and his folks being the pet of Vladimir Putin whose treason has perpetually had the walls closing in whilst the Grand Marshal of the Supreme Court was poised to frog-march them all to a C-130, next stop Gitmo. And it is totally unlike the Obamagate/Russiagate thing, in that with the Obamagate/Russiagate thing was a manifest lie and the accusation that the CCP is holding the pink slip of the Donkey Party in its bat soup-moistened hands is true.

    Let’s look at Joe Biden for a moment, though it will have to be on video since the Geppettos holding his strings are not letting him out of his Delaware dungeon unless a miracle happens and he becomes a real boy.

    This is the guy that went publicly incontinent when the Great Wall Gang was shipping Typhoid Mulans over here and Trump cut off that insanity. Travel bans were racist, you know, until they weren’t. And this guy wants to be president, when he remembers he is running for president, though his priority was not saving American lives but not vexing Beijing. This guy is so far in the Red Menace’s pocket that he’s risking lint poisoning.

    They channel the digital Dem, asking, “Come on man, is it too much to want a president who takes America’s side?

    Well, to the Democrats, the answer is a responding, “Yes, and don’t assume my gender.”

    Now, Biden always sides with the PRC because, like the elite whose Guccis he slurps, he’s totally comfortable with the Chinese supplanting the USA as the world’s preeminent nation – that’ll show those flag-waving flyover rubes who’s not boss! The totally-not-senile politician opposed Trump’s tariffs and his attempts to level the playing field, and Hi-Bidder Biden would sign agreements to lock in the former Deliverance trade model. His response to the People’s Liberation Army arms build-up that threatens our Pacific Fleet would be, “Hey man, I believe in building-up arms! I work out and I am strong and I can do more push-ups than you, fat!”

  202. OldOzzie

    The “Obstruction of Justice Trap” – Former AAG Matt Whitaker Confirms Mueller Probe Was Used As Weapon to Cover Coup Effort….

    Posted on May 27, 2020 by sundance

    Within an interesting interview conducted by Jan Jekielek of Epoch Times, former AAG Matt Whitaker confirms what CTH long suspected. The Mueller investigation was used by corrupt interests within the special counsel’s office to threaten any/all executive branch and congressional officials with “obstruction of justice” charges if they revealed any exculpatory or counter-narrative information during the Mueller probe.

    Whitaker describes this as the “obstruction of justice trap.”

    Essentially, this approach confirms the second-prong purpose of the Mueller investigation itself. First, use the special counsel in 2017, 2018 and into the beginning of 2019, as a shield (hide information); and secondly a weapon (threats) against any entity who would reveal the background intelligence that undercut the Trump-Russia collusion narrative.

    We know President Trump was threatened by Rod Rosenstein not to declassify any information in September of 2018 or the Mueller investigation would use that act as evidence of obstruction. Whitaker confirms that same approach was applied toward any executive branch officer who would reveal or release information to congress during the tenure of the special counsel; even within the DOJ and including the attorney general.

    This is how the Mueller probe was weaponized to mislead the American people.

  203. Delta A

    Longish, but The Mocker gives Clem Ford a well-deserved smack-down. From The Oz:

    Why this brouhaha over writer Clementine Ford and her tweeting “Honestly the coronavirus isn’t killing men fast enough” last week?

    It was meant as a joke and I thought it was hilarious. If you think otherwise, chances are you should lighten up.

    Just imagine all those men across the world inflicted with the disease: struggling to breathe, their lungs inflamed, their kidneys so badly damaged they cannot cleanse the blood, their vital organs gradually shutting down. Many are dying alone, their loved ones denied the chance to be at their side during their final moments. Yes Clementine, it makes you want to slap your thigh with delight, chortle loudly and sing a feminist empowerment song.

    It should have been obvious to everyone that Ford does want not all men to die, particularly those who subsidise her lifestyle.

    For example, if not for her Melbourne City Council artistic grant worth thousands of dollars which is partly funded by men, she would not be able to write her ironically titled book “How We Love”.

    And only a philistine would deny she is a worthy recipient of this public largesse. As the ever-so-modest Ford herself pointed out to her detractors this week, the council was obviously inspired by the fact her books have collectively sold over 100,000 copies.

    🔥 stickytape
    @waldowns
    · May 4, 2020
    Replying to @clementine_ford @cityofmelbourne
    Fark me – the caliber of the other applicants must have been low or non existent.


    @clementine_ford
    The city of Melbourne might have been swayed by the fact my other books have collectively sold more than 100,000 copies but you’re probably right eh. How many books have you written?

    It does raise the question, though, of why a supposedly successful author has her hand out for public dosh. I hasten to add in asking this I am not casting aspersions on Ford, and that her applying for this should not be examined in the context of an entitlement mentality but rather her ongoing and noble struggle against patriarchy. Also, as the council’s art portfolio chair and Greens councillor Rohan Leppert confirmed, Ford’s application “met the criteria strongly”.

    @RohanLeppert
    I have been chair of the Arts portfolio at City of Melbourne for 7 years. In all of that time I have insisted on independence in arts funding assessment from politicians. The recent COVID-response arts grants program was no exception.

    In response to Ford’s tweet, Lord Mayor Sally Capp requested a review into the funding program on Monday, saying she found her comments “deliberately divisive and incredibly unhelpful”.

    Whatever the outcome, Leppert has already said this review will not overturn the original decision. “We have never sought to regulate the speech of grants recipients unrelated to the grant in question,” he stated, assuring artists the council was “not engaging in censorship”.

    Translation: the council will not engage in censorship except when deciding which arts grants will be approved.

    Despite his stressing the council must avoid “becoming the arbiter [of] taste and offence,”

    he as chair does exactly that. The funding guidelines for the grants expressly provide that “artists or arts organisations or applications that seek to exclude or offend parts of the community” are ineligible. Incidentally, just over two years ago Leppert was demanding that Melbourne venues not host right-wing activist Milo Yiannopoulos during his speaking tour. Spare us his tosh about not wanting to constrain expression.

    @RohanLeppert
    White supremacists are marching the streets in Kensington/Flemington, the centre of my incredibly diverse and rich multicultural community. Disgusted. Hey venue operators (and Parliament!) – DON’T GIFT MILO A PLATFORM!

    In fairness to Ford, she was hardly acting out of character. She has an extensive history of hurling vile abuse at conservative figures on social media, regardless of whether they are men or women. In 2017 the ABC was forced to apologise after Ford declared on live television that Daily Telegraph columnist Miranda Devine was a “c**t”.

    In 2015, she tweeted regarding Herald Sun columnist Rita Panahi, who is of Iranian descent, “No matter how hard she tries, she’ll never be a white man.”

    Tony Abbott is among those who have copped abuse by Clementine Ford. Picture; Nick Klein.
    Tony Abbott is among those who have copped abuse by Clementine Ford. Picture; Nick Klein.
    In 2013, when the Coalition assumed government, she sold “F. k Tony Abbott” T-shirts. Others she has called a “c**t” on Twitter include former senator Cory Bernardi, and former Speaker Bronwyn Bishop. In 2018 she tweeted “Eat shit Dutton,” referring to the Home Affairs Minister.

    For most of that period she was employed as a columnist by the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, yet seemingly she was still allowed to go the full Linda Blair on social media. In 2015, Ford applauded the sacking of a Sydney hotel supervisor who had called her a “slut” on Facebook after she alerted his employer to his comment. She also searched his Facebook page and took snapshots of racist and other offensive jokes.

    “There are basically no consequences for men who behave like this, so we have to start making consequences for them,” she wrote.

    If you need a wry laugh, just consider that Ford appeared on ABC that year to talk about “sexist double standards”.

    It was only in September 2018 she was finally forced to curb her abuse of others following her suspension with pay after tweeting that Prime Minister Scott Morrison was a “f**king disgrace”. She terminated her arrangements with those newspapers in a Twitter huff in 2019, claiming the impetus was Nine’s takeover of the former Fairfax.

    She remains unrepentant for all these vituperative tweets, yet uncharacteristically she apologised for her latest outburst, saying it was a case of misjudgment.

    @clementine_ford
    THREAD: I’m a big enough person to admit when I’ve misjudged something. I still stand 100% behind my fury at men exploiting women’s unpaid labour (exacerbated by the global pandemic), but I’ve reconsidered my flippancy in discussing it. I’ve always maintained that the difference

    Given this immediately preceded mayoral intervention concerning her grant, it is not difficult to infer why she suddenly relented.


    @SallyCapp_
    Clementine Ford’s recent comments on social media were deliberately divisive and incredibly unhelpful when we are trying to keep our community together during COVID-19. (1/
    Now compare this with what she wrote for 10 Daily about 2GB presenter Alan Jones in 2019 and his comments about New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, specifically, his calls to “shove a sock down her throat.

    “Management at 2GB has a lot to answer for, prioritising profits at the expense of human dignity and protecting men who don’t deserve to be protected. In doing so, they’ve made it clear exactly where they stand – on the wrong side of history,” she wrote. “[Jones] has offered an apology to Ardern, but it seems to me that it was likely offered unwillingly and in a nod to damage control.”

    But no doubt she would maintain her apology was both sincere and the act of a righteous woman.

    As for Ford’s little solecisms, she need not worry too much about the media holding her to account.

    Conduct a search of ABC’s online screen tool using her name and it will retrieve hundreds of entries relating to Ford, including shows promoting her books “Fight Like a Girl” and “Boys Will Be Boys”. Yet none of them mention this latest outburst. There is a reason for that and it has everything do with ABC’s championing of Ford and its contempt for conservatives.

    For example, consider this excerpt from an interview Sunday Extra presenter Jonathan Green did with Ford in 2017. “You cop a lot of hate, especially online,” said a sympathetic Green. “I reckon this is the trademark of modern conservative argument: this is the logical inversion – the people who hate accuse you of doing the hating.”

    Not only is that an inane generalisation; it falsely portrays Ford as an innocent victim of harassment and bullying.

    As 3AW Drive host Tom Elliott said this week: “She put out this vitriol, this bile, to get a

    reaction”. He also labelled her a “man-hater”, saying: “Most women I know would have nothing to do with Clementine Ford”.

    When interviewed on ABC’s One Plus One in 2018, Ford claimed she did not conflate the phrase “toxic masculinity” with masculinity.

    “Some people make the mistake when they hear the phrase ‘toxic masculinity’ of thinking that what it means is that all masculinity is toxic,” she said. “Which is not the case. Toxic masculinity refers to the aspects and elements of masculinity that are weaponised by the patriarchy to cause harm to other people, sometimes to cause harm to men themselves.”

    One might similarly observe that some people make the mistake when they hear the phrase “toxic feminism” of thinking what it means is that all feminism is toxic. That is not the case. Toxic feminism refers to the aspects and elements of feminism that are weaponised by misandrists to cause harm to other people, sometimes to cause harm to women themselves – especially those who publicly reject its parasitic and spiteful mantra of entitlement, victimhood and hatred of men.

    Now there is a project worthy of a generous grant by a council – a course in detoxifying feminism.

    Consider the composition. Day 1: “Misogyny is not the default position for every setback you

    experience”. Day 2: “Victimhood and self-respect, two mutually exclusive concepts”. Day 3: “How to debate without resorting to expletives or platitudes”. Day 4: “Should I write for Daily Life or get a life?” Day 5: “What do male and female chauvinists want in common? Answer: a meek and subservient spouse”.

    It is an amusing thought, but the chances of Ford and her ilk even considering such notions are zilch.

    After all, bores will be bores.

    THE MOCKER

  204. Nick

    Why did the Melb plod shoot that guy this morning?

    I’m betting he had a library book overdue.

  205. Natural Instinct

    Can’t wait to watch tonight how they play the rugby league tonight – and conform to social distancing laws/regulations/rules/guidelines/suggestions.
    Does this mean it will be like touch footy but with imaginary touches?
    .
    Defender: You’re tackled. I got within 1.5m of you and hit you with my pool noodle.
    Attacker: Yes you did. But you hit me around the chest, and as anyone knows it takes 2 pool noodle hits to stop a forward if contact is made above the knees. (but only one for backs).
    .
    But “that’s stupid” I hear you say. Oh then, it must be one rule for them and one rule for us plebs.
    .
    My “COVID 19 Safe Operating Plan” is 43 pages long and no where does it say that tackling a customer is a safe work practice.

  206. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Trump looks set to win by hook or by crook, but mainly by crook.

  207. cohenite

    Longish, but The Mocker gives Clem Ford a well-deserved smack-down. From The Oz:

    The only smack down our clem should get is a real one: not that I’m advocating violence.

  208. OldOzzie

    Turns out ‘Central Park Karen’ was an Obama and Buttigieg donor

    A white woman who got into an incredibly stupid altercation with a black man in the wilds of Central Park over her inexplicable refusal to put her dog on a leash as he politely asked and the park rules required, and then threatened to call the cops on him, pretty well did herself in. After getting herself on film in the throes of her episode, and seeing it go viral, Amy Cooper lost her $170,000-a-year job at Franklin Templeton, any prospect of employment afterward, her reputation, and even her dog. And sure enough, her lowly dog-walker was the one who turned her in.

    It was rough justice for sure, given what she did, but she knew the rules of living in New York. Tom Wolfe’s Sherman McCoy pretty well mansplained it. For being a “Karen,” or entitled white woman, as the annoying term now means, she’s now a Sherman. As for the black man, Christian Cooper (no relation), he was unjustly treated, too, given that the woman was trying to call the cops on him and counting on the cops to believe her over him, and she was lying about being “threatened.” The only creature who got a real scare from that encounter was the poor yelping dog.

    Actually, she was a liberal. Just like everyone else in that picture. She’d voted for Barack Obama twice. She was a big fan of Hillary Clinton. She donated money to the John Kerry and Pete Buttigieg campaigns. She went to the now-left-wing University of Chicago. She was as proper as they come in the eyes of the left establishment swamp. And still she attempted to pull that call-the-cops stunt on the black man after he asked her to put the dog on a leash (he was an avid bird-watcher, and dogs disturb ground bird nests) and then offered dog biscuits to her dog to get her to put the leash on.

    Yet lefties have yet to delete their tweets claiming this was MAGA in action, and the product of the “climate” President Trump had created.

    But that’s not the story. The story is that leftists are so filled with their own sense of self-virtue that they can’t possibly conceive of racism sitting in their own ranks. Any time anything bad happens, Trump’s supporters did it. Nobody’s apologizing for that nonsense. The people who got smeared in this instance, for sure, were the Trumpsters. Call it left-skin privilege. Where’s the lefty apology on that?

  209. cohenite

    Trump looks set to win by hook or by crook, but mainly by crook.

    Complete and utter bullshit; but par for the course.

  210. EvilElvis

    as in every service environment there are some dickheads who do the wrong thing and bring the rest down.

    That’s a 10-4 there big buddy.

    Now, enough about mail. Let’s chat about other stuff. 😁

  211. Bruce of Newcastle

    Trump looks set to win by hook or by crook, but mainly by crook.

    It says they dropped the charges, which must mean they were complete and total crap.
    The Left never gives up unless keeping going is worse for them than not keeping going.

  212. Tel

    Trump looks set to win by hook or by crook, but mainly by crook.

    If you are arrested, and then the charges are dropped … that means you are not guilty.

    It also means the police understood they did not have a case.

  213. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Lindt gunman Man Monis’ girlfriend Amirah Droudis to appeal 44-year murder sentence

    Janet Fife-Yeomans, The Daily Telegraph
    Subscriber only
    |
    May 28, 2020 4:09pm
    Current Time 0:1

    The girlfriend of Lindt Siege gunman Man Monis has lodged a publicly-funded appeal against her 44-year jail sentence for stabbing his ex-wife 18 times and then setting her on fire.

    Amirah Droudis, who went from a miniskirt-wearing King’s Cross hairdresser to a niqab-wearing self-declared terrorist, was controversially on bail along with Monis when he took hostages at the Martin Place cafe in December 2014.

    Hostages cafe manager Tori Johnson and mother and lawyer Katrina Dawson would still be alive if Monis had not been freed on bail at the time over his wife’s murder and a string of sex offences.

    Droudis, 40, was convicted in 2016 after a judge-alone trial of the murder of Monis’ wife, who has been given the pseudonym Helen Lee to protect the identity of her family members.

    Droudis was jailed for 44 years with a non-parole period of 33 years due to expire in December 2047.

    She did not give evidence at her trial nor at her sentencing.

    Likewise, she did not provide evidence at the long-running inquest into the siege or help police trace Monis’ final movements before he went into the Lindt Cafe.

    She was living with Monis at the time of the siege.

    There is no suggestion she had any involvement in it.

    Droudis’ appeal, which will argue the sentence was manifestly excessive, is being funded by Legal Aid NSW and is due to be heard by the Court of Criminal Appeal next month.

    In finding her guilty in 2016, Justice Peter Johnson said he was satisfied that Monis planned the murder and Droudis carried it out.

    He described Monis as an evil man and said Droudis uncritically adopted and espoused his “vile beliefs”.

  214. woolfe

    The Pakistani airliner was not established on approach and to fast. They put the gear down but as it was going to fast the gear did not go down, there are audible warnings going off every where. They landed with the gear up scrapping the engines and when they realised it they took off again. The engines were damaged in the landing and stopped running when the plane was on downwind. They turned towards the airport but could not make it.

    So fuel problems, no, total pilot error.

    Youtube if your friend if you want to see more.

  215. Delta A

    The only smack down our clem should get is a real one: not that I’m advocating violence.

    She is an abomination, cohenite.

    I’m just grateful to The Mocker for using a public forum to document her vicious attacks against decent, conservative men and women. My one fear is that she ignites in me sizzling fury – almost hatred – that challenges the Christian beliefs of grace and forgiveness, which I hold dear.

    So okay, I forgive her, but I’d still like to smack her in her horse-like chops. Not that I’m advocating violence tm.

  216. OldOzzie

    EvilElvis
    #3466619, posted on May 28, 2020 at 5:35 pm
    as in every service environment there are some dickheads who do the wrong thing and bring the rest down.

    That’s a 10-4 there big buddy.

    Now, enough about mail. Let’s chat about other stuff. 😁

    Enjoy the very best in the comfort of your own home

    Already ordered – Barbecue Deluxe + Sangiovese

    Thinking about

    Salmon Lovers + Riesling or Seafood + Semillon

  217. OldOzzie

    Delta A
    #3466627, posted on May 28, 2020 at 5:42 pm
    The only smack down our clem should get is a real one: not that I’m advocating violence.

    She is an abomination, cohenite.

    Delta A,

    I cannot believe she has a son – kid will grow up a total wreck – again summed up by – West Side Story – Gee Officer Krupke! (1961) HD

  218. cohenite

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
    #3466623, posted on May 28, 2020 at 5:38 pm
    Lindt gunman Man Monis’ girlfriend Amirah Droudis to appeal 44-year murder sentence
    Janet Fife-Yeomans, The Daily Telegraph
    Subscriber only
    |
    May 28, 2020 4:09pm
    Current Time 0:1
    The girlfriend of Lindt Siege gunman Man Monis has lodged a publicly-funded appeal against her 44-year jail sentence for stabbing his ex-wife 18 times and then setting her on fire.
    Amirah Droudis, who went from a miniskirt-wearing King’s Cross hairdresser to a niqab-wearing self-declared terrorist, was controversially on bail along with Monis when he took hostages at the Martin Place cafe in December 2014.

    Let’s hope her sentence is increased.

  219. OldOzzie

    A viral video may keep Biden’s nasty little habit in the public eye

    Even if leftists successfully obliterate Tara Reade’s story, there’s one creepy Joe Biden narrative that’s not going to go away, and that’s the endless footage of him getting too close to and too touchy with little girls. On Tuesday, a new video emerged with the usual footage showing Biden relentlessly pawing manifestly uncomfortable little girls. What makes this one different is the way it’s paired with statements from Professor Anthony Zenkus (ironically enough, a die-hard leftist and anti-capitalist) who speaks in an old video about how p*dophiles groom children:

  220. Snoopy

    Julia Baird on The Dumb is about to ask experts what we have learnt from the coronavirus pandemic. Not very much I hope or else what does expert mean?

  221. Meanwhile Dettol Donny plays golf.

  222. Gab

    That’s PRESIDENT Dettol Danny to you, TwoBob Nam.

  223. Gab

    I did want to say “That’s PRESIDENT Dettol Danny to you, scumbag” but decided against it.

  224. Colonel Crispin Berka

    Bruce of Newcastle

    It says they dropped the charges, which must mean they were complete and total crap.

    D’oh. I didn’t even see that part.
    Must be the afternoon coffee wore off.
    Carry on as you were.

  225. Perth Trader

    Meanwhile here in West Aust the big question being asked is ..’ WTF are we going to do with 56000 sheep stranded in holding yards , caused by corona beer…ooops virus on board the Al Kuwait.”?

  226. OldOzzie

    1735099
    #3466637, posted on May 28, 2020 at 6:02 pm
    Meanwhile Dettol Donny plays golf.

    CRETIN Vietnam LOSER

    Cuomo gave immunity to nursing home executives after big campaign donations

    As Governor Andrew Cuomo faced a spirited challenge in his bid to win New York’s 2018 Democratic primary, his political apparatus got a last-minute boost: a powerful healthcare industry group suddenly poured more than $1m into a Democratic committee backing his campaign.

    Less than two years after that flood of cash from the Greater New York Hospital Association (GNYHA),
    Cuomo signed legislation last month quietly shielding hospital and nursing home executives from the threat of lawsuits stemming from the coronavirus outbreak. The provision, inserted into an annual budget bill by Cuomo’s aides, created one of the nation’s most explicit immunity protections for healthcare industry officials, according to legal experts.

    Critics say Cuomo removed a key deterrent against nursing home and hospital corporations cutting corners in ways that jeopardize lives.
    As those critics now try to repeal the provision during this final week of Albany’s legislative session, they assert that data prove such immunity is correlating to higher nursing home death rates during the pandemic – both in New York and in other states enacting similar immunity policies.

    New York has become one of the globe’s major pandemic hotspots – and the center of the state’s outbreak has been nursing homes, where more than 5,000 New Yorkers have died, according to Associated Press data.

    Those deaths have occurred as Cuomo’s critics say he has taken a hands-off approach to regulating the healthcare industry interests that helped bankroll his election campaign. In March, Cuomo’s administration issued an order that allowed nursing homes to readmit sick patients without testing them for Covid-19. Amid allegations of undercounted casualties, the governor also pushed back against pressure to have state regulators more stringently record and report death rates in nursing homes.

    And then came Cuomo’s annual budget – which included a little-noticed passage shielding corporate officials who run New York hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities from liability for Covid-related deaths and injuries.

    GNYHA – a lobbying group for hospital systems, including some that own nursing homes – said it “drafted and aggressively advocated for” the immunity provision. The new law declares that top officials at hospital and nursing home companies “shall have immunity from any liability, civil or criminal, for any harm or damages alleged to have been sustained as a result of an act or omission in the course of arranging for or providing healthcare services” to address the Covid-19 outbreak.

    Prior to the budget language, Cuomo had already temporarily granted limited legal immunity to doctors and nurses serving on the medical frontlines. But the carefully sculpted passage buried in the state’s annual spending bill expanded that by offering extensive immunity to any “healthcare facility administrator, executive, supervisor, board member, trustee or other person responsible for directing, supervising or managing a healthcare facility and its personnel or other individual in a comparable role”.

    New York is now one of just two states to shield those corporate officials from both civil lawsuits and some forms of criminal prosecution by the government, according to an analysis by Syracuse University law professor Nina Kohn and the University of Houston’s Jessica L Roberts.

    “New York is an outlier and has the most explicit and sweeping immunity language,” Kohn said.

    Cuomo’s administration said the new immunity provision – which is a narrow version of a broader proposal championed by the Senate Republican leader, Mitch McConnell – is necessary.

    “This pandemic remains an unprecedented public health crisis and we had to realign New York’s entire healthcare system, using every type of facility to prepare for the surge, and recruiting more than 96,000 volunteers – 25,000 from out of state, to help fight this virus,” said Cuomo’s senior adviser Rich Azzopardi in an emailed statement. “These volunteers are good samaritans and what was passed by 111 members of the legislature was an expansion of the existing Good Samaritan Law to apply to the emergency that coronavirus created. If we had not done this, these volunteers wouldn’t have been accepted and we never would have had enough frontline healthcare workers.”

    Immunity followed $2.3m in campaign cash

    The immunity provision in Cuomo’s budget came 18 months after the GNYHA delivered $1.25m to the Cuomo-controlled New York State Democratic committee that was supporting the governor’s re-election bid. The money went to the committee’s so-called housekeeping account. The account, which can accept unlimited donations, is meant to support general party activities but has also been used to promote Cuomo and his agenda in television ads, including in his 2018 re-election campaign.

    The GNYHA donations – which were a huge increase from prior years – made the group one of the New York Democratic party’s largest contributors during Cuomo’s campaign. Three of the hospital association’s top officials separately gave more than $150,000 to Cuomo’s campaign between 2015 and 2018.

    In all, during the governor’s second term, Cuomo’s campaign and his state party committee raked in more than $2.3m from hospital and nursing home industry donors and their lobbying firms, according to data compiled by the National Institute on Money in Politics.

    Azzopardi said the Cuomo administration’s decision to insert the language into the budget was not a reflection of lobbyists’ influence.

    “This law was intended to increase capacity and provide quality care, and any suggestion otherwise is simply outrageous,” he said.

  227. EvilElvis

    You’re out of control, OldOzzie! All this gourmet food and 4WD stuff makes me think you’re hatching some big plan. What you got going on?

  228. Delta A

    I did want to say “That’s PRESIDENT Dettol Danny to you, scumbag” but decided against it.

    You showed great restraint*, Gab. Well done.

    *wasted on a scumbag.

  229. thefrollickingmole

    Here you go Wang

    Knock yourself out.
    An anally retentive failure set this site up just for you.

    https://trumpgolfcount.com/#page-top

  230. Gab

    Thanks, Delta A. I try my best to be courteous.

  231. Filbert

    Numbers loves Commos which means…

  232. OldOzzie

    EvilElvis
    #3466644, posted on May 28, 2020 at 6:10 pm
    You’re out of control, OldOzzie! All this gourmet food and 4WD stuff makes me think you’re hatching some big plan. What you got going on?

    I agree with Filbert – Numbers means…

  233. OldOzzie

    Eurozone on brink: EU currency faces devastating COLLAPSE – panicked ECB issues warning

    THE Eurozone’s most debt-ridden countries risk bringing the single currency bloc to its knees as the impact of the coronavirus pandemic is laid bare, the European Central Bank has warned.

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